Introduction

 

 

 

Courses appropriate for prospective majors

Environmental Studies / Environmental Science

A new student with a strong interest in the Environmental Studies or Environmental Science major should take:

  1. FY Seminar (already assigned)
  2. Language
  3. ENST 161 
  4. One additional course required for the Environmental Studies or Environmental Science degrees, selected from one of the following categories: Humanities/Arts & Environment, Society & Environment, Foundations of Environmental Science, Applications of Environmental Science, Environmental Studies Specialization, or Disciplinary Specializations.  Students who are especially interested in environmental science are urged to select a course designated Foundations of Environmental Science.

NOTE: non-majors should not enroll in ENST 161; they should enroll in ENST 121.

Category lists of courses satisfying these requirements are available on the Banner system, and on the department website.

For course descriptions and requirements for the major, refer to the Academic Bulletin: Environmental Studies and Environmental Science or the department web site.

Courses that fulfill distribution requirements

The Environmental Studies program offers two majors – B.A. Environmental Studies (13 courses) and B.S. Environmental Science (16 courses) – that provide students the opportunity to develop their own academic programs within a structure that provides breadth and depth. Students are expected to engage with their academic advisor as they define their interests and goals (an ongoing process), and then select relevant courses that will meet the major requirements.

Both majors share a core of 3 required courses: ENST 161, 162, and 406 

B.A. Environmental Studies majors must complete an additional 10 courses from the categories below. At least three courses must be ENST courses and at least three must be at the 300-level or above.

Humanities/Arts & Environment – at least 1
Society & Environment – at least 2
Foundations of Environmental Science – at least 1
Applications of Environmental Science – at least 1

NOTE:  No more than two may be numbered 550 or 560

B.S. Environmental Science majors must complete an additional 13 courses from the categories below.  At least three must be ENST courses and at least five of which must be at the 300-level or above.

Humanities/Arts & Environment – at least 1
Society & Environment – at least 1
Foundations of Environmental Science – at least 3
Applications of Environmental Science – at least 5

NOTE:  No more than two may be numbered 550 or 560

Other courses may be taken from the Humanities/Arts & Environment, Society & Environment, Foundations of Environmental Science, Applications of Environmental Science, Environmental Studies Specialization, or Disciplinary Specialization lists.  No more than two Disciplinary Specialization courses can be applied to the degree.

For both majors, note that a single course may satisfy more than one requirement. However, this does not reduce the total number of courses required for the majors.

Course Categories

Humanities, Arts, & Environment courses.  Humanities, Arts, & Environment courses explore humanity’s relation to the earth from perspectives offered by the arts, literature, philosophy, and religion. Such classes may include aesthetic, spiritual, and ethical principles employed to assess natural and social scientific ideas.

Courses that fullfill this requirement can be found at this link.

Society and Environment Courses.  These courses address the ways human societies are affected by the environment and also the ways that human actions alter that same environment. Courses focus on the roles of social, political, economic, and scientific processes in shaping various environmental challenges. No global education courses meet the "Society and Environment" ES requirement.

Courses that fullfill this requirement can be found at this link.

Foundations of Environmental Science.  These courses present students with disciplinary knowledge from the natural sciences foundational to environmental science.  They may or may not consider how this knowledge relates to environmental science and include courses at introductory through advanced levels.

Courses that fullfill this requirement can be found at this link.

Applications of Environmental Science.  These courses apply scientific tools and methods to address environmental challenges.  A substantial component of the course must consider interactions between humans and the environment.

Courses that fullfill this requirement can be found at this link.

Environmental Studies Specializations.  Interdisciplinary courses that study an aspect of human-environment interactions. Normally, courses would include one of the following: four weeks of environmental content or the application of a foundational concept or idea (e.g. inequality, sculpture, development, ethics, etc.) to an environmental issues for at least two weeks.

Courses that fullfill this requirement can be found at this link.

Disciplinary Specialization courses.  Disciplinary specialization courses provide students the opportunity to place their understanding of environmental studies within the broader context of traditional and emerging academic disciplines. Environmental studies is built upon and connects to most disciplines. In many cases, progress within environmental studies requires drawing on these disciplines and communicating with practitioners in these disciplines. Disciplinary specialization courses are entirely optional. Offering these courses and inviting students to consider including them in their major program is consistent with the liberal arts.

Courses that fullfill this requirement can be found at this link.

Advising Worksheets

 

 

Honors

The distinction of Honors in Environmental Science and Environmental Studies is awarded by the Department to graduating seniors who have met the requisite academic standards. These include completion of a two-credit independent research project under faculty guidance and maintenance of a minimum GPA of 3.4 in all courses required or applied toward the major. The student's final GPA must be certified at the end of the Senior year just prior to graduation.

The honors project must have both oral and written components. The oral components consist of presentations at department seminars, a professional conference and before a faculty review committee consisting of selected Environmental Studies department faculty and the Faculty Research Advisor. The written component may be done with acknowledged assistance from the Faculty Research Advisor and must demonstrate deep understanding of the context and implications of the research.

Detailed guidelines for department honors are available on the department website and through the department chair.

Internships

Many majors are interested in an internship or research experience. There are many opportunities for such both on campus and in the Carlisle/Harrisburg community.  Students often complete an internship or research experience during the summer break.  

Co-curricular activities/programs

The Environmental Studies department has numerous employment, internship, and research opportunities in our two major community outreach co-curricular programs: The Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring (ALLARM) and the College Farm. Detailed information on these programs can be found on the department web site.

Students majoring in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science also often find employment, internship, and research opportunities with the Center for Sustainability Education.

Opportunities for off-campus study

Environmental Studies students are encouraged to participate in the following programs abroad: School for Field Studies, where students can participate in a field-based integrated environmental studies curriculum in one of five locations around the world; the Dickinson Science Program in Norwich, England, where environmental studies and science majors can take courses at an internationally-known environmental science center at the University of East Anglia; the Semester in Environmental Science at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, where students can participate in a rigorous field-based program in aquatic sciences; and the Dickinson Program in Queensland, Australia, which offers a wide variety of excellent Environmental Studies and Science courses. Information on many other opportunities for Environmental Studies students is available at the Center for Global Study and Engagement.