Fall 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 121-01 Environmental Science for Non-Majors
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
This introductory environmental science course will explore the integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human interactions with them. Students will use scientific principles to explore the consequences of human activity. Students will be exposed to basic techniques for investigating environmental topics in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. This is an introductory course for non-majors. Students intending to major in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science should enroll in ENST 161.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course does not count towards the B.A. in Environmental Studies or B.S. in Environmental Science.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
KAUF 109
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 115
ENST 121-02 Environmental Science for Non-Majors
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
This introductory environmental science course will explore the integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human interactions with them. Students will use scientific principles to explore the consequences of human activity. Students will be exposed to basic techniques for investigating environmental topics in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. This is an introductory course for non-majors. Students intending to major in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science should enroll in ENST 161.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course does not count towards the B.A. in Environmental Studies or B.S. in Environmental Science.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 109
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 115
ENST 161-01 Environmental Connections
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
This introductory environmental studies course draws from the influences of the humanities and natural sciences on the social sciences in relation to the environment. The course will examine the ideas, concepts, and debates central to the field. Students will examine the relationship between humans and the environment and become familiar with a range of environmental challenges, with an emphasis on how these challenges have emerged over time and space. The course will investigate and evaluate a variety of strategies that are currently being pursued to address these environmental challenges. The course stresses the importance of seeing connections, thinking carefully and critically about environmental issues, and appreciating that complex questions rarely have a single solution. This is an introductory course for those majoring in environmental studies and environmental science. Non-majors should enroll in ENST 121 Introduction to Environmental Science. This course has no laboratory section.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALISON GREAT HALL
ENST 161-02 Environmental Connections
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
This introductory environmental studies course draws from the influences of the humanities and natural sciences on the social sciences in relation to the environment. The course will examine the ideas, concepts, and debates central to the field. Students will examine the relationship between humans and the environment and become familiar with a range of environmental challenges, with an emphasis on how these challenges have emerged over time and space. The course will investigate and evaluate a variety of strategies that are currently being pursued to address these environmental challenges. The course stresses the importance of seeing connections, thinking carefully and critically about environmental issues, and appreciating that complex questions rarely have a single solution. This is an introductory course for those majoring in environmental studies and environmental science. Non-majors should enroll in ENST 121 Introduction to Environmental Science. This course has no laboratory section.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALISON GREAT HALL
ENST 161-03 Environmental Connections
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
This introductory environmental studies course draws from the influences of the humanities and natural sciences on the social sciences in relation to the environment. The course will examine the ideas, concepts, and debates central to the field. Students will examine the relationship between humans and the environment and become familiar with a range of environmental challenges, with an emphasis on how these challenges have emerged over time and space. The course will investigate and evaluate a variety of strategies that are currently being pursued to address these environmental challenges. The course stresses the importance of seeing connections, thinking carefully and critically about environmental issues, and appreciating that complex questions rarely have a single solution. This is an introductory course for those majoring in environmental studies and environmental science. Non-majors should enroll in ENST 121 Introduction to Environmental Science. This course has no laboratory section.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, WF
ALISON GREAT HALL
ENST 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01 and ERSC 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
KAUF 109
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 185
ENST 303-01 The Politics of Climate Change
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Climate change is the most significant challenge in the 21st century. It will alter weather patterns, increase sea levels, make storms more unpredictable and change agricultural output worldwide, mostly for the worse. Mitigating climate change will require massive economic transformations, affecting energy, transportation, and industrial sectors. This class examines the politics of that transformation and the political forces obstructing it. It will explore how can social movements, institutions, and economic interests can interact to shape the national and global response to climate change. This class will also amplify diverse voices to show how the environment affects different people in different ways, complicating the need for a collective response. Finally, the class centers on solutions. Students will be asked to analyze what works for meeting the challenge of a changing climate.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 311
ENST 305-01 Green Infrastructure
Instructor: Allyssa Decker
Course Description:
Green infrastructure reduces and treats stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social, and economic benefits. This interdisciplinary course will examine different types of green infrastructure systems and how the components of each system work together to provide intended benefits. Topics may include rainwater harvesting, permeable pavements, bioswales/bioretention, green streets and parking, and green roofs. There will be an added focus on components of the water cycle within these systems including precipitation, infiltration, runoff, and evapotranspiration. Students will learn how to acquire, organize and analyze green infrastructure information and data using qualitative and quantitative methods. Three hours of laboratory per week.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 113
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 178
ENST 306-01 Environmental Leadership and Organizing for Sustainable Social Change
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
The goal of this class is to think about ourselves as agents of change and focus on forging solutions to environmental and social problems. Students will form a deep understanding of the theories, approaches and practices of social change and become familiar with issue campaigns, community organizing, new and traditional media, diversity and alliance building, facilitation and group process and power analysis. Students will enhance their understanding of what leadership is, and explore the passions, values and skills they bring to this work. Students will learn from leaders and organizers and get hands-on experience putting their ideas for social change into practice. The course is applicable to those that want to understand how non-profit organizations work for sustained change as well as those interested in being entrepreneurs or policy makers that want to initiate change.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 178
ENST 335-01 Analysis and Management of the Aquatic Environment
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
An interdisciplinary study of the aquatic environment, with a focus on the groundwater and surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin. This course provides a scientific introduction to the dynamics of rivers, lakes, wetlands, and estuarine systems as well as an appreciation of the complexity of the political and social issues involved in the sustainable use of these aquatic resources. Students conduct an original, cooperative, field-based research project on a local aquatic system that will involve extensive use of analytical laboratory and field equipment. Extended field trips to sample freshwater and estuarine systems and to observe existing resource management practices are conducted. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 162.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 178
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 116
ENST 345-01 Agroecology
Instructor: Maggie Douglas
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. How can agricultural systems be designed to nourish a growing human population while sustaining the natural resources upon which agriculture ultimately depends? In this course, students will learn to use ecological principles as a lens to understand and improve the food system. Topics may include crop genetic resources, soil and pest management, the role of animals in agriculture, and agriculture as a producer and user of energy. Class meetings will incorporate significant student participation including presentation and discussion of primary scientific literature and other readings. Laboratory meetings will orient students to agroecosystems in the region and provide opportunities for hands-on learning and scientific investigation. Three hours of laboratory per week.Prerequisites: ENST 162 or BIOL 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
KAUF 113
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 178
ENST 406-01 What Does the Earth Ask of Us
Instructor: Maggie Douglas
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.The question motivating this senior seminar is drawn from the work of Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer, an ecologist and member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. Dr. Kimmerer invites us to consider not only what benefits humans derive from the Earth, but also what gifts we have to offer in return. In this senior seminar, we will explore this question individually and collectively, taking an interdisciplinary approach that draws on both scholarly/creative work and the work of practitioners in the environmental field. We will critically examine paradigms that have been put forward to help repair the human relationship to the Earth (e.g. restoration, reconciliation, regeneration) and case studies in which such paradigms have been put into practice, with varying degrees of success. Students will help lead class discussions and develop a capstone project focused on a particular environmental challenge. Throughout, students will be encouraged to reflect on their education and experiences to identify the gifts they have to offer the Earth in their post-graduation pursuits.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
KAUF 178
ENST 550-01 Heat and Shade Ineqaulities in Carlisle
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:

ENST 550-02 Cover Crops in a Changing Climate: Can Mixtures Reduce Water Stress
Instructor: Maggie Douglas
Course Description:

Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 201-01 Introduction to American Studies
Instructor: Jed Kuhn
Course Description:
Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of United States and hemispheric cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency. Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of United States and hemispheric cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 313
ANTH 101-02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Mariel Gruszko
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
ANTH 216-01 Medical Anthropology
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
Comparative analysis of health, illness, and nutrition within environmental and socio-cultural contexts. Evolution and geographical distribution of disease, how different societies have learned to cope with illness, and the ways traditional and modern medical systems interact. Offered every other year.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 212
ANTH 331-01 Human Evolution
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 115
Courses Offered in ARCH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
ARCH 206-01 Museum Studies
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 206-01. Introduces students to the history, role, nature, and administration of museums. It examines the emergence and development of museums and the political, social, and ethical issues that they face. Case studies include: government funding of the arts, the lure and trap of the blockbuster, T-Rex "Sue", the Nazi Entartete Kunst exhibition, the Enola Gay exhibition, war memorials, the Holocaust Museum, public sculpture, conservation, museum architecture, auction houses, and the repatriation of cultural property. This course is open to all students and is especially relevant to those studying the fine arts, anthropology, archaeology, history, American studies, and public policy. This course is cross-listed as ARTH 206. Offered every two years.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
TOME 115
ARCH 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-01 and ERSC 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 185
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
KAUF 109
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 101-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
This course is a critical survey of western art beginning with the Ancient Near East (approximately 4000 B.C.) through the Gothic period in Europe (early 1300s). Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of style, subject-matter, and function within an historical context, and especially on the student's ability to develop skills in visual analysis. Developing appropriate vocabularies with which to discuss and analyze works of art and imagery will also be stressed, along with learning to evaluate scholarly interpretations of them. This course is a critical survey of western art beginning with the Ancient Near East (approximately 4000 B.C.) through the Gothic period in Europe (early 1300s). Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of style, subject-matter, and function within an historical context, and especially on the student's ability to develop skills in visual analysis. Developing appropriate vocabularies with which to discuss and analyze works of art and imagery will also be stressed, along with learning to evaluate scholarly interpretations of them.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
WEISS 235
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
WEISS 235
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Eleanor Conover
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.
01:30 PM-03:29 PM, MW
WEISS 343
ARTH 130-01 Art and Sustainability
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
This course promotes themes of sustainability and social engagement as the catalyst for artmaking. Primarily investigated through the design and construction of sculptures, installation art or other creative acts, students will explore creative practices exemplified by land art, social practice art, collaborative art, and social sculpture, among others.
09:30 AM-11:29 AM, MW
GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 206-01 Museum Studies
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 206-01. Introduces students to the history, role, nature, and administration of museums. It examines the emergence and development of museums and the political, social, and ethical issues that they face. Case studies include: government funding of the arts, the lure and trap of the blockbuster, T-Rex "Sue", the Nazi Entartete Kunst exhibition, the Enola Gay exhibition, war memorials, the Holocaust Museum, public sculpture, conservation, museum architecture, auction houses, and the repatriation of cultural property. This course is open to all students and is especially relevant to those studying the fine arts, anthropology, archaeology, history, American studies, and public policy. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 206. Offered every two years.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
TOME 115
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-01. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
09:30 AM-11:30 AM, TR
GDYRST 101
ARTH 221-02 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-02. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
01:30 PM-03:29 PM, TR
GDYRST 101
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: The Physiology of Life
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2218
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: The Physiology of Life
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2218
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Mike Potthoff
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2228
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
JAMESR 2228
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
JAMESR 2206
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 201
BIOL 221-01 Animal Diversity w/Lab
Instructor: Tony Pires
Course Description:
An exploration of the enormous diversity of animal life. We will study developmental processes and evolutionary patterns as a coherent approach to comprehending the organizational principles of disparate animal body plans. Students will be introduced to the morphological and physiological adaptations of the major phyla that fit them to their ecological roles in marine, aquatic and terrestrial environments. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; For Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125. An exploration of the enormous diversity of animal life. We will study developmental processes and evolutionary patterns as a coherent approach to comprehending the organizational principles of disparate animal body plans. Students will be introduced to the morphological and physiological adaptations of the major phyla that fit them to their ecological roles in marine, aquatic and terrestrial environments. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; For Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
JAMESR 1228
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 1228
BIOL 301-01 Eurasian Invasion, The Columbian Exchange: Biology That Changed the World
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
All lecture synchronous and most labs the same.Beginning in 1492 there has been an exchange of all levels of fauna and flora across the globe. This exchange is known as the Columbian Exchange. The biological consequences of this exchange have been dramatic and all ecosystems on this globe have been altered. Today there exists two Europes, two Africas and two Asias as a result of this exchange of species. One of each exists in the original geographic location and the other in the United States. This course will explore the impact of invasive species on the ecosystems in Central Pennsylvania and to a lesser extent the rest of the United States and the World. This is a field based course. Students will visit local examples of invasive damage, local labs and meet scientists that manage invasive species. Students will also discover the controversies surrounding the purposeful introduction of many species that have become important parts of our local ecosystems.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 2319
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
JAMESR 1206
BIOL 313-01 Cell Biology w/Lab
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
An introduction to the structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. The course will involve discussion-oriented lectures and readings from the current literature. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying state of the art techniques to cell biological experiments. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 186
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
JAMESR 1218
BIOL 314-01 Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
Study of the interactions of organisms with each other, and with their environment, at the level of the individual, the population, the community, and the ecosystem. Lectures and readings consider both the theory of ecology and data from empirical research in the classic and current literature. Laboratory and field studies explore how ecologists perform quantitative tests of hypotheses about complex systems in nature. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequiste is NRSC 200. Study of the interactions of organisms with each other, and with their environment, at the level of the individual, the population, the community, and the ecosystem. Lectures and readings consider both the theory of ecology and data from empirical research in the classic and current literature. Laboratory and field studies explore how ecologists perform quantitative tests of hypotheses about complex systems in nature. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequiste is NRSC 200.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
RNORTH 1317
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 179
BIOL 326-01 Microbiology w/Lab
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
Molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry (structure and function) of bacteria, archaea, and viruses. Includes an introduction to the immune system and mechanisms of medical control of microbes. Molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis are addressed via readings from the recent primary literature. Laboratory exercises include the isolation and characterization of unknown bacteria using traditional and molecular methods, and modern genomic approaches to characterizing host response to infection. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200. Molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry (structure and function) of bacteria, archaea, and viruses. Includes an introduction to the immune system and mechanisms of medical control of microbes. Molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis are addressed via readings from the recent primary literature. Laboratory exercises include the isolation and characterization of unknown bacteria using traditional and molecular methods, and modern genomic approaches to characterizing host response to infection. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 117
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
RNORTH 1316
BIOL 333-01 Physiology w/Lab
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required. A study of physiological mechanisms in the animal kingdom, stressing the structural and functional bases of biological activities. Emphasis is on vertebrate organs and organ systems. Laboratory includes experimental physiological studies of selected organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2206
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1113
BIOL 343-01 Metabolism
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 343-01. A survey of the metabolic processes in animals and plants, including signal transduction, aerobic and anaerobic respiration, and photosynthesis, as well as the biosynthesis of the major types of biomolecules. For each metabolic pathway, we will examine the regulation of enzymes and related genes, their energetic requirements, and the function of pathway end products. Both the normal functioning of metabolic pathways and common metabolic malfunctions, e.g., human inborn errors of metabolism, will be considered. Selected readings from the primary literature and the popular press are required. Students will complete detailed case studies focusing on human metabolism and metabolic disorders. Three hours classroom a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 343.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 411
BIOL 416-01 Population Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
This is a course on advanced genetics in the genomics age. Whole genome sequences are accumulating at an increasingly rapid pace. Our current challenge is to uncover meaning in the hundreds of billions of base pairs that are now available. The fields of study that strive to make sense of all this variation are population and quantitative genetics. In this course, we will survey topics in population genetics, the study of frequencies of alleles in populations, and quantitative genetics, the study of continuously varying traits, with the goal of developing a deeper understanding of the connection between genotypes and phenotypes. This course will integrate lectures, in-class discussions, and wet and dry (computational) labs to provide a comprehensive perspective on population and quantitative genetics. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 215 or 216. This is a course on advanced genetics in the genomics age. Whole genome sequences are accumulating at an increasingly rapid pace. Our current challenge is to uncover meaning in the hundreds of billions of base pairs that are now available. The fields of study that strive to make sense of all this variation are population and quantitative genetics. In this course, we will survey topics in population genetics, the study of frequencies of alleles in populations, and quantitative genetics, the study of continuously varying traits, with the goal of developing a deeper understanding of the connection between genotypes and phenotypes. This course will integrate lectures, in-class discussions, and wet and dry (computational) labs to provide a comprehensive perspective on population and quantitative genetics. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 215 or 216.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
JAMESR 2206
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
JAMESR 2206
Courses Offered in CHEM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CHEM 131-01 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 131-02 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Cindy Samet
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 131-03 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
STUART 1104
CHEM 131-04 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Donald Carr
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
STUART 1104
CHEM 131-L1 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 1121
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 1113
CHEM 131-L2 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
06:00 PM-09:00 PM, M
STUART 1121
06:00 PM-09:00 PM, M
STUART 1113
CHEM 131-L3 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
01:15 PM-04:15 PM, T
STUART 1113
01:15 PM-04:15 PM, T
STUART 1121
CHEM 131-L4 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 1113
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 1121
CHEM 131-L5 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
01:15 PM-04:15 PM, R
STUART 1121
01:15 PM-04:15 PM, R
STUART 1113
CHEM 131-L6 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 1121
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 1113
CHEM 141-01 Accelerated General Chemistry with Lab
Instructor: Amy Witter
Course Description:
A one-semester introductory course for students who are especially well-prepared for general chemistry, replacing CHEM 131, 132 as a prerequisite for more advanced courses in the major. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, acid/base chemistry, solubility, and transition metal chemistry. The laboratory experiments will relate directly to topics covered in lecture, and will include statistical analysis of data, molecular modeling, instrumental methods of analysis, and quantitative analytical and inorganic chemistry. Admittance into this course is based on a placement exam. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. A one-semester introductory course for students who are especially well-prepared for general chemistry, replacing CHEM 131, 132 as a prerequisite for more advanced courses in the major. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, acid/base chemistry, solubility, and transition metal chemistry. The laboratory experiments will relate directly to topics covered in lecture, and will include statistical analysis of data, molecular modeling, instrumental methods of analysis, and quantitative analytical and inorganic chemistry. Admittance into this course is based on a placement exam. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 2112
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
STUART 1113
CHEM 241-01 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 131/132 or 141. . Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 241-02 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun
Course Description:
The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 131/132 or 141. . Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 241-L1 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Jason Gavenonis
Course Description:
The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 131/132 or 141. . Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 1118
CHEM 241-L2 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 131/132 or 141. . Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, T
STUART 1118
CHEM 241-L3 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun
Course Description:
The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 131/132 or 141. . Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 1118
CHEM 241-L4 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun
Course Description:
The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 131/132 or 141. . Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, R
STUART 1118
CHEM 343-01 Metabolism
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 343-01. A survey of the metabolic processes in animals and plants, including signal transduction, aerobic and anaerobic respiration, and photosynthesis, as well as the biosynthesis of the major types of biomolecules. For each metabolic pathway, we will examine the regulation of enzymes and related genes, their energetic requirements, and the function of pathway end products. Both the normal functioning of metabolic pathways and common metabolic malfunctions, e.g., human inborn errors of metabolism, will be considered. Selected readings from the primary literature and the popular press are required. Students will complete detailed case studies focusing on human metabolism and metabolic disorders. Three hours classroom per week. Prerequisite: 242. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 343.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 411
CHEM 347-01 Concepts of Inorganic Chemistry with Lab
Instructor: Sarah St. Angelo
Course Description:
This course will cover fundamental concepts in inorganic chemistry to include: periodic trends, atomic and molecular structure, ionic bonding and crystal structures, solubility of ionic solids, acid-base chemistry, structure and bonding in coordination compounds, and reactions of transition metal complexes. Throughout the course the unifying theme will be the application of principles of structure and bonding to predict and explain reactions involving inorganic compounds. Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 244, 341 or concurrent enrollment. This course will cover fundamental concepts in inorganic chemistry to include: periodic trends, atomic and molecular structure, ionic bonding and crystal structures, solubility of ionic solids, acid-base chemistry, structure and bonding in coordination compounds, and reactions of transition metal complexes. Throughout the course the unifying theme will be the application of principles of structure and bonding to predict and explain reactions involving inorganic compounds. Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 244, 341 or concurrent enrollment.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 2117
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 122
CHEM 490-01 Environmental Chemistry & Toxicology
Instructor: Amy Witter
Course Description:
This course will examine the occurrence and fate of naturally-occurring and anthropogenic chemicals in the environment, especially those with bioactive properties. Topics will include how chemicals enter the environment, how they react once they are in the environment, and impacts on human and non-human organisms. This course is suitable for students having completed organic chemistry II.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
STUART 1113
Courses Offered in COMP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
COMP 130-01 Introduction to Computing
Instructor: Lev Fruchter
Course Description:
An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course, other than COMP 180. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester. An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course, other than COMP 180. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-05:00 PM, T
TOME 120
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 118
COMP 130-02 Introduction to Computing
Instructor: Michael Skalak
Course Description:
An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course, other than COMP 180. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester. An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course, other than COMP 180. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-05:00 PM, W
TOME 118
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 118
COMP 132-01 Principles of Object-Oriented Design
Instructor: Michael Skalak
Course Description:
An introduction to object-oriented software design using Java. Topics include objects, classes, code modularity and reusability, abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Additional topics include unit testing, recursion, empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: Equivalent of one course of prior programming experience. See Advising Guide for placement advice for 130 and 132. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester. An introduction to object-oriented software design using Java. Topics include objects, classes, code modularity and reusability, abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Additional topics include unit testing, recursion, empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: Equivalent of one course of prior programming experience. See Advising Guide for placement advice for 130 and 132. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 118
03:00 PM-05:00 PM, T
TOME 118
COMP 180-01 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with DATA 180-01 and MATH 180-01. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as DATA 180 and MATH 180.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 121
COMP 180-02 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Eren Bilen
Course Description:
Cross-listed with DATA 180-02 and MATH 180-02. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as DATA 180 and MATH 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 121
COMP 331-01 Operations Research
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MATH 331-01. An introduction to deterministic operations research, including linear programming, sensitivity analysis, and duality. Special topics may include transportation and assignment problems, network models, integer programming, and game theory. Prerequisite: 262. This course is cross-listed as MATH 331. Offered in odd numbered fall semesters.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 121
Courses Offered in DATA
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
DATA 180-01 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-01 and MATH 180-01. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and MATH 180.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 121
DATA 180-02 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Eren Bilen
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-02 and MATH 180-02. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and MATH 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 121
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 111-01 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Xiaozhou Ding
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 08
ECON 111-02 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 317
ECON 111-03 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 317
ECON 111-04 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 204
ECON 111-05 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 204
ECON 112-01 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
ECON 112-02 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
ECON 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Nicky Tynan
Course Description:
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 110
ECON 222-02 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Nicky Tynan
Course Description:
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 110
ECON 288-01 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 110
ECON 288-02 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 110
Courses Offered in EDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EDST 130-01 History of American Education
Instructor: Jacquie Forbes
Course Description:
An examination of the evolution in the purposes, structures, and methodologies of formal and informal education in the United States from the colonial period to the present with particular attention to how marginalized groups have been educated. The course situates educational history within the broader context of social, political, and economic developments in the U.S. and considers ways in which education has been used to meet societal goals.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
BOSLER 314
EDST 140-01 Educational Psychology
Instructor: Jacquie Forbes
Course Description:
An examination of physical, cognitive, and psychological developmental theories and research as well as theories of learning. The course includes theoretical perspectives on: age-stage characteristics, exceptionality, achievement versus aptitude, as well as how developmental, sociocultural, and motivational factors influence student learning in classroom contexts.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
BOSLER 314
EDST 260-01 Introduction to Educational Research
Instructor: Liz Lewis
Course Description:
An introduction to the purposes and methodologies of research in education including how various stakeholders in the educational community use and access research findings as well as how studies in education are designed, implemented, and disseminated. Quantitative, qualitative, and historical methodologies are addressed. Research processes are introduced around the topic of literacy. Students will develop a review of the research literature on a topic related to literacy using online catalogs, databases, and other open access resources to find and gather sources and digital publications formats to disseminate their reviews. Prerequisite: 140. An introduction to the purposes and methodologies of research in education including how various stakeholders in the educational community use and access research findings as well as how studies in education are designed, implemented, and disseminated. Quantitative, qualitative, and historical methodologies are addressed. Research processes are introduced around the topic of literacy. Students will develop a review of the research literature on a topic related to literacy using online catalogs, databases, and other open access resources to find and gather sources and digital publications formats to disseminate their reviews. Prerequisite: 140.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 313
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 410
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 303
ENGL 220-03 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
EASTC 303
Courses Offered in ERSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ERSC 151-01 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Alyson Thibodeau
Course Description:
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 179
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
KAUF 134
ERSC 151-02 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Alyson Thibodeau
Course Description:
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
KAUF 134
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 179
ERSC 201-01 Surface Processes
Instructor: Peter Sak
Course Description:
Description, origin, development, and classification of landforms. Relationships of soils, surficial materials, and landforms to rocks, structures, climate, processes, and time. Topics will include interpretation of maps and aerial photographs of landscapes produced in tectonic, volcanic, fluvial, glacial, periglacial, coastal, karst, and eolian environments. Exercises will include: photo-geologic interpretation, surficial mapping, and classification of soils. Lectures, discussions, laboratories, and field trip(s). Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 141, 142, or 151 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year. Description, origin, development, and classification of landforms. Relationships of soils, surficial materials, and landforms to rocks, structures, climate, processes, and time. Topics will include interpretation of maps and aerial photographs of landscapes produced in tectonic, volcanic, fluvial, glacial, periglacial, coastal, karst, and eolian environments. Exercises will include: photo-geologic interpretation, surficial mapping, and classification of soils. Lectures, discussions, laboratories, and field trip(s). Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 141, 142, or 151 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 153
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 153
ERSC 202-01 Energy Resources
Instructor: Marcus Key
Course Description:
The study of the origin, geologic occurrence, and distribution of petroleum, natural gas, coal, and uranium. Discussions include the evaluation and exploitation, economics, law, and the environmental impact of these resources and their alternatives, including geothermal, wind, solar, tidal, and ocean thermal power. Prerequisites: One introductory lab science or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 186
ERSC 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01 and ENST 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 185
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
KAUF 109
ERSC 309-01 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Instructor: Marcus Key
Course Description:
Completion of both ERSC 305 and ERSC 309 fulfills the WID Requirement. A study of the processes and patterns of sedimentation as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of rock strata. This includes the origin, transportation, deposition, lithification, and diagenesis of sediments. Lithology, geochemistry, paleontology, geochronology, and seismology will be used to understand the history of rock strata. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 151 or permission of instructor. Completion of both 305 and 309 fulfills the WID graduation requirement. Offered every other year.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 152
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
KAUF 152
Courses Offered in FDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FDST 250-01 Food Systems Exploration: A Bioregional Perspective
Instructor: Jenn Halpin
Course Description:
Oftentimes, we are unaware of existing food systems that surround us and the historical, cultural, and environmental influences that shape contemporary agricultural and culinary practices. In this class, we will explore the bioregion of the Cumberland Valley and the many ways in which the land, people, and natural resources have shaped place-based foodways over time. Students will learn about bioregional theory and practice, in addition to active investigations of food production and procurement systems, distribution models, and consumption practices specific to the Cumberland Valley region.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 187
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, T
KAUF 187
Courses Offered in FMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FMST 220-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 221-01. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
09:30 AM-11:30 AM, TR
GDYRST 101
FMST 220-02 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 221-02.An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
01:30 PM-03:29 PM, TR
GDYRST 101
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 240-01 Food, France, and Cultural Identity
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
This course aims to examine the past, present and future of French food culture while attending to a multitude of intersections, including gender, race, class, and sustainability. This course will investigate France's epicurean traditions and agricultural systems to understand the complex relationships among gastronomic practices, food and farming industries, and French identity. An inquiry of this type must certainly consider numerous questions relating to the sustainability and/or development of traditions, values, systems, and resources. Moreover, students will be asked to reflect on their own culinary customs as well as the agro-business systems of their native countries and the globalized world. Through intercultural analysis, students will learn more about how a region's food habits and ideologies relate to and affect the environmental, socio-economic, and health concerns of its inhabitants.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
BOSLER 306
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 151-01 History of Environment
Instructor: Marika Plater
Course Description:
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature. Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 203
HIST 311-01 Race and the Environment
Instructor: Marika Plater
Course Description:
This writing intensive course will explore environmental aspects and impacts of white supremacy. We will consider how colonizers ideas about race and the environment intersected, contributing to exploitation of people and natural resources during the age of global empire. Focusing in on the history of the United States, we will read scholarship on the role that the environment played in enslavement, migration, the whitening of European immigrants, segregation, the internment of Japanese Americans, and the so-called urban crisis of the late twentieth century. While exploring environmental dimensions of oppression, we will ask how people of color have drawn meaning from and connected with their environments.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 311
Courses Offered in INBM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INBM 100-01 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Steve Riccio
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 201
INBM 100-02 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: David Sarcone
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
ALTHSE 201
INBM 100-03 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Uwe Paff
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 201
INBM 110-01 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals. This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 207
INBM 110-02 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals. This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 207
INBM 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
Online
INBM 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-02. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
Online
INBM 200-03 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-03. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 201
INBM 230-01 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Dengjian Jin
Course Description:
This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 109
INBM 230-02 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Steve Riccio
Course Description:
This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 207
INBM 240-01 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Xiaolu Wang
Course Description:
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required. The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 109
INBM 240-02 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Sherry Ritchey
Course Description:
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required. The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
ALTHSE 110
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 104
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 08
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
Online
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-02. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
Online
INST 200-03 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-03. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 201
INST 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 271.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 103
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
STERN 103
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 248-01. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 248.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 311
Courses Offered in MATH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MATH 121-01 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Jackie Campbell
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
TOME 121
MATH 121-02 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Eren Bilen
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
TOME 121
MATH 121-03 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Xiexin Liu
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
TOME 121
MATH 151-01 Introduction to Calculus
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
An introduction to limits and derivatives together with a review of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: departmental placement. Offered every semester.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 120
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, R
TOME 120
MATH 151-02 Introduction to Calculus
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
An introduction to limits and derivatives together with a review of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: departmental placement. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, R
TOME 120
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 120
MATH 151-03 Introduction to Calculus
Instructor: Tony Mixell
Course Description:
An introduction to limits and derivatives together with a review of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: departmental placement. Offered every semester.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 118
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, F
TOME 118
MATH 170-01 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Barry Tesman
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, R
TOME 118
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 201
MATH 170-02 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Barry Tesman
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, R
TOME 118
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 115
MATH 170-03 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Chris Fowler
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
04:30 PM-05:50 PM, W
TOME 120
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
TOME 117
MATH 170-04 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Eddie Tu
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 231
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, W
TOME 120
MATH 171-01 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: David Richeson
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 120
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, T
TOME 120
MATH 171-02 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: David Richeson
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, W
TOME 120
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 120
MATH 180-01 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-01 and DATA 180-01. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and DATA 180.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 121
MATH 180-02 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Eren Bilen
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-02 and DATA 180-02. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and DATA 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 121
MATH 211-01 Foundations of Higher Mathematics
Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics and computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic, sets, functions, and methods of proof. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 130 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 232
MATH 211-02 Foundations of Higher Mathematics
Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics and computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic, sets, functions, and methods of proof. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 130 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 232
MATH 225-01 Probability and Statistics I
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
An introduction to the core topics of probability and statistics. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions, expectation, variance, random sampling from populations, hypothesis tests, and confidence intervals.Prerequisite: 171. Offered every fall.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 121
MATH 225-02 Probability and Statistics I
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
An introduction to the core topics of probability and statistics. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions, expectation, variance, random sampling from populations, hypothesis tests, and confidence intervals.Prerequisite: 171. Offered every fall.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 121
MATH 262-01 Linear Algebra
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
An introduction to matrix algebra and abstract vector spaces with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. Topics include linear systems and matrices, vector spaces, linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.Prerequisite: 211 or permission of the instructor. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
TOME 121
MATH 271-01 Differential Equations
Instructor: Lorelei Koss
Course Description:
Elementary methods of solutions of selected types of differential equations; solutions of systems of linear differential equations with constant coefficients; and a brief introduction to numerical methods and nonlinear systems. Includes a strong emphasis on applications. Prerequisite: 171 and 270. Offered in odd numbered fall semesters.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
TOME 118
MATH 331-01 Operations Research
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 331-01. An introduction to deterministic operations research, including linear programming, sensitivity analysis, and duality. Special topics may include transportation and assignment problems, network models, integer programming, and game theory.Prerequisite: 262. This course is cross-listed as COMP 331. Offered in odd numbered fall semesters.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 121
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Emily Kelahan
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 104
PHIL 102-01 Introduction to Ethics
Instructor: Jim Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to the philosophical study of morality, focusing on concepts of right and wrong, virtue and vice, and wellbeing. This course provides students the opportunity to hone their ethical reasoning skills by critically examining how some of historys most influential philosophers thought about issues in morality. Students will also develop more general skills, such as evaluating philosophical arguments, and expressing and defending their own ideas in writing.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 411
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 313
PHIL 256-01 Philosophy of Mind
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
This course investigates the nature of the mind and its relation to the brain, body, and the surrounding world. Analyses of these topics will draw on information from fields such as psychology, neuroscience, cognitive science, or computer science. Prerequisite: one previous course in philosophy, or permission of the instructor.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 186
PHIL 302-01 Ethical Theory
Instructor: Jim Sias
Course Description:
This seminar will explore major issues or texts in classical or contemporary moral philosophy. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, at least two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor. Offered at least once every two years.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 112
Courses Offered in PHYS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHYS 131-01 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Kinematics, Newton's Laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, and oscillations are studied during the first semester. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, MATH 151 or 170. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Kinematics, Newton's Laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, and oscillations are studied during the first semester. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, MATH 151 or 170.
09:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 101
PHYS 131-02 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Krsna Dev
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Kinematics, Newton's Laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, and oscillations are studied during the first semester. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, MATH 151 or 170. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Kinematics, Newton's Laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, and oscillations are studied during the first semester. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, MATH 151 or 170.
01:30 PM-03:20 PM, MWF
TOME 101
PHYS 141-01 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Krsna Dev, Robert Boyle
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
TOME 105
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 115
PHYS 141-02 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Robert Boyle, Krsna Dev
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
TOME 105
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 115
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 212
POSC 120-02 American Government
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 104
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 08
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 313
POSC 242-01 Political Behavior
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Cultural, social, and psychological factors which contribute to forms and directions of political behavior. Special attention is given to American voting behavior, ethnic political behavior, and personality influences on politics. Field surveys are undertaken to illustrate contemporary trends. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 204
POSC 246-01 The Legislative Process
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
An analysis of the legislative branch of government, especially Congress. Emphasis is placed upon the legislature as a social system, the decision-making process, the interrelationships with the political parties and interest groups, the executive and the judiciary. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
POSC 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 248-01. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 248.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 311
POSC 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 271.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 103
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
STERN 103
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 130-01 Perception, Memory & Thought
Instructor: Azriel Grysman
Course Description:
This introduction to cognitive psychology will cover such topics as: How do you recognize your grandmother? Can you do more than one thing at a time? Why can't you remember the names of people you just met? More formally, we will examine the processes of perception, attention, representation, and retrieval in children, adults, and machines.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 179
PSYC 150-01 Culture and Psychology
Instructor: Rui Zhang
Course Description:
The vast amount of what we know in psychology is based on observations from a thin sliver of the humanity pie, an unreliable foundation for generalizing knowledge across time and place. This course starts with the position that a psychological science of Homo sapiens requires examining the various cultural and historical contexts that shape human behavior. Throughout this survey course, we will consider human universals and cultural diversity across a wide array of content areas including self, cognition, motivation, emotion, interpersonal and social behaviors, and health, with emphasis on the implications of such a cultural perspective for understanding what unites and divides us in the contemporary world. The vast amount of what we know in psychology is based on observations from a thin sliver of the humanity pie, an unreliable foundation for generalizing knowledge across time and place. This course starts with the position that a psychological science of Homo sapiens requires examining the various cultural and historical contexts that shape human behavior. Throughout this survey course, we will consider human universals and cultural diversity across a wide array of content areas including self, cognition, motivation, emotion, interpersonal and social behaviors, and health, with emphasis on the implications of such a cultural perspective for understanding what unites and divides us in the contemporary world.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
KAUF 179
PSYC 150-02 Culture and Psychology
Instructor: Rui Zhang
Course Description:
The vast amount of what we know in psychology is based on observations from a thin sliver of the humanity pie, an unreliable foundation for generalizing knowledge across time and place. This course starts with the position that a psychological science of Homo sapiens requires examining the various cultural and historical contexts that shape human behavior. Throughout this survey course, we will consider human universals and cultural diversity across a wide array of content areas including self, cognition, motivation, emotion, interpersonal and social behaviors, and health, with emphasis on the implications of such a cultural perspective for understanding what unites and divides us in the contemporary world. The vast amount of what we know in psychology is based on observations from a thin sliver of the humanity pie, an unreliable foundation for generalizing knowledge across time and place. This course starts with the position that a psychological science of Homo sapiens requires examining the various cultural and historical contexts that shape human behavior. Throughout this survey course, we will consider human universals and cultural diversity across a wide array of content areas including self, cognition, motivation, emotion, interpersonal and social behaviors, and health, with emphasis on the implications of such a cultural perspective for understanding what unites and divides us in the contemporary world.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
KAUF 179
PSYC 175-01 Introduction to Community Psychology
Instructor: Howard Rosen
Course Description:
This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology--a field that focuses on persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals' mental health and wellbeing. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore the field's application to a range of clinical and social issues; and (d) emulate the field's commitment to the promotion of social change through research and action. This course is a Health Studies elective. This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology--a field that focuses on persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals' mental health and wellbeing. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore the field's application to a range of clinical and social issues; and (d) emulate the field's commitment to the promotion of social change through research and action. This course is a Health Studies elective.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
KAUF 179
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 216-01 Native American Religions
Instructor: Jodie Vann
Course Description:
A survey of some major religious phenomena in the relatively recent histories of selected Native American traditions with emphasis on the tribal religions of North America and the religions of the civilizations of Mexico and Central America.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
STERN 103
RELG 301-01 Buddhism in Tibet
Instructor: Kali Cape
Course Description:
Tibetan Buddhism is probably the world's most varied and complex religion, combining elements of everything found in late Indian Buddhism-huge monastic universities, esoteric rituals involving seemingly bizarre practices, an enormous pantheon of enlightened beings, demons, and others, devotional cults, sublime art-with wild and wooly indigenous Tibetan shamanism and some aspects of Chinese religions. The course examines the development of Buddhism in Tibet as well as its increasing interest and influence in the West. Tibetan Buddhism is probably the world's most varied and complex religion, combining elements of everything found in late Indian Buddhism-huge monastic universities, esoteric rituals involving seemingly bizarre practices, an enormous pantheon of enlightened beings, demons, and others, devotional cults, sublime art-with wild and wooly indigenous Tibetan shamanism and some aspects of Chinese religions. The course examines the development of Buddhism in Tibet as well as its increasing interest and influence in the West.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
Online
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Ya Su
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 103
SOCI 236-01 Inequalities in the U.S.
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year. This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 304
SOCI 237-01 Global Inequality
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year. Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 103
SOCI 240-01 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the theory and methods of social science research, beginning with an examination of the philosophies underlying various research methodologies. The course then focuses on ethnographic field methods, introducing students to the techniques of participant observation, structured and informal interviewing, oral histories, sociometrics, and content analysis. Students will design their own field projects. Prerequisite: 110.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 112