Spring 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 162-01 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Maggie Douglas
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
1330:T   KAUF 113
0900:TR   KAUF 178
ENST 162-02 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Irene Hawkins
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 204
1330:W   KAUF 113
ENST 162-03 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Irene Hawkins
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 204
1330:F   KAUF 113
ENST 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ERSC 218-01 and ARCH 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
0930:MWF   KAUF 185
1330:F   KAUF 186
ENST 280-01 Environmental and Social Justice
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-04. This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices. This course is cross-listed with SOCI 230.
1330:TF   KAUF 187
ENST 305-01 Ornithology
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
The class room component of this course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and conservation biology of birds. Students will have numerous opportunities both in and outside of the classroom to examine conservation issues and actions as they relate to the functioning of natural ecosystems, the consequences of anthropocentric impacts to those environments and learn how sustainability practices influence many bird species, populations and communities. The lab portion of this course will focus on hands-on learning through a variety of tools, mechanisms and field experiences including but not limited to use of study skins and skeletons, field guides, optics and field-monitoring techniques. Students will be regularly immersed in living labs during field trips both local and regional including visits to a bird banding station, state wildlife management areas and research study sites. In addition students will learn how to identify birds through specific behaviors, visual field marks, songs and calls. There will be a least one day-long field trip during a weekend, one extended lab field trip to a waterfowl stopover habitat during spring migration and an optional 4-5 day field trip over spring break to visit other sites utilized by birds in and outside of Pennsylvania. Each student will also complete a research paper on selected ornithological topics.
1030:MWF   KAUF 109
1330:R   KAUF 109
ENST 305-02 Wildlife Monitoring Methods and Technology
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
This field course will provide students with a solid foundation and hands on experiences regarding the practical use of specific tools and the application of field methods and techniques used in both environmental consulting and wildlife sciences today. Coursework will focus on numerous topics including research and experimental design; collection, management and analysis of data; identification of animals and marking techniques; measuring animal abundance; assessment of wildlife habitat, the role of radio and satellite telemetry; and the practical application of spatial technology (GIS). Students will gain hands on experience in reading and using topographic maps, interpreting aerial photos, using a compass and hand held GPS, orienteering, and creating maps in GIS. Students will also learn about employing and in many cases practicing various monitoring techniques such as spot mapping, area searches, conducting point counts, nest searches, transect surveys, live trapping and marking, use of remote cameras; telemetry; and the use of mist nets for capturing birds and mammals. At least one field trip will include a day long (weekend) visit to an active research site.
1330:F   KAUF 109
ENST 306-01 Environmental Leadership and Organizing for Sustainable Social Change
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
The goal of this class is to think about ourselves as agents of change and focus on forging solutions to environmental and social problems. Students will form a deep understanding of the theories, approaches and practices of social change and become familiar with issue campaigns, community organizing, new and traditional media, diversity and alliance building, facilitation and group process and power analysis. Students will enhance their understanding of what leadership is, and explore the passions, values and skills they bring to this work. Students will learn from leaders and organizers and get hands-on experience putting their ideas for social change into practice. The course is applicable to those that want to understand how non-profit organizations work for sustained change as well as those interested in being entrepreneurs or policy makers that want to initiate change.
1330:R   KAUF 178
ENST 406-01 Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
1330:T   KAUF 178
ENST 406-02 Environmental Innovations and Activism Capstone
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Innovative approaches are needed to address urgent environmental and social concerns, including the climate crisis. As a capstone in Environmental Studies and Science, this course will examine environmental challenges, innovations, and activism from natural science, social science, and humanities perspectives. Following a review of key course concepts, the group will explore how diverse actors, groups, and governments approach environmental action and activism. Students will each select an environmental challenge and examine related innovations and activism for their capstone project. These student topics will frame the focal areas for course case studies and will allow the class to examine how a range of stakeholders attempt to contest and address pressing environmental issues.
1330:W   KAUF 178
ENST 500-01 Human Security and Nepal
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-01 Biogeochemical Cycling In Icelandic Glacial Runoff
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-02 Using Big Data to Inform Lake Management
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Nadia Alahmed
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 121.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 08
AFST 220-04 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 256-01. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
1030:TR   DENNY 110
AFST 220-05 African American Foodways and the Civil Rights
Instructor: Lynn Johnson, Say Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-04.Part of the African American Foodways and the Civil Rights Movement Mini-Mosaic.In recent years, the Civil Rights Movement has been memorialized and remembered in an ever-expanding heritage sector, particularly in the US South. In so doing, the course revisits civil rights movement history through the prism of foodways the food cultures, establishments and politics that shaped how that movement was fought throughout the country. Three major themes will guide the work of this course: pleasure, contestation, and nourishment. Students and professors will explore these themes in relation to resistance initiatives planned in African American restaurants in Washington, DC; sit-in protests of segregated lunch counters in the rural south; and Black-owned and -operated grocery stores, eateries, farmers cooperatives and freedom farms as they produced powerful critiques of food poverty and malnourishment within African American communities.
1330:T   ALTHSE 201
AFST 220-06 Religions of Africa
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Karegeye
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 210-01 and SOCI 230-05.The course examines the variety of religious experiences, traditions, and representations of religion in African cultures. These include indigenous religions, Islam, Christianity and syncretistic traditions. We will examine the various roles that religion plays in responding to current crises facing African cultures, including HIV/AIDS pandemic, political conflicts, and issues related to gender (e.g., girls' education, shifting perspectives on masculinity and femininity) that have been shaped by religious attitudes. Students will use novels, memoir and film to supplement scholarly readings.
1500:MR   DENNY 104
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 201-01 Introduction to American Studies
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency. Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.
0900:TR   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   DENNY 104
ANTH 101-02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
0930:MWF   DENNY 104
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 222-01 Anthropology of Latin America
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 222-01. This course is an ethnographic exploration of contemporary life in Latin America. It is designed to introduce students to the major themes and debates in the anthropology of Latin America. It is aimed at understanding the cultural and historical development of Latin America, and it seeks to make sense of the cultural similarities and differences that have both captured the interest of anthropologists and helped to make Latin America an important site of anthropological study and theorizing. In the process of examining the histories and cultures of Latin America, we will also look at how power and structural inequalities have shaped the region. The course will study Latin American cultures and societies in relation to neighboring nations - the United States, Canada and the Caribbean - given their shared history and experiences of colonialism and slavery as well as their economic interdependence.This course is cross-listed as LALC 222. Offered every other year.
1330:TF   DENNY 112
ANTH 256-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
1030:TR   DENNY 110
ANTH 261-01 Archaeology of North America
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 261-01. This course reviews Pre-Columbian landscapes north of Mesoamerica. We consider topics including the timing and process of the initial peopling of the continent, food production, regional systems of exchange, development of social hierarchies, environmental adaption and the nature of initial colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans. These questions are addressed primarily by culture area and region. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 261. Offered every two years.
0900:TR   DENNY 313
ANTH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:R   ARCH LAB
ANTH 331-01 Human Evolution
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
1030:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 345-02 Life and the Anthropocene
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Increased attention human influences on Earths climates and geology has given rise to a much-discussed Anthropocene epoch. Whether we locate the start of the epoch thousands of years ago with the origins of agriculture, with the industrial revolution, or even more recently with nuclear bomb technologies, we find reasons for the label in rapid successions of record high temperatures and severe weather events, polar ice melts and rising sea levels, and astonishing numbers of extinctions, all of which play out in disparate ways across the globe. These changes call for new ways to understand how humans live in the world. In this course we will examine what it means to be human in these times, and how people interact with technologies, environments, and other species in ways that shape these processes and that are shaped by them. Our organizing frame will be ethnography, with examples drawn from throughout the world. Students will develop projects that explore these interactions, and sustainability will be a persistent question during the semester.
1330:MR   DENNY 315
Courses Offered in ARCH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ARCH 206-01 Museum Studies
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 206-01. Introduces students to the history, role, nature, and administration of museums. It examines the emergence and development of museums and the political, social, and ethical issues that they face. Case studies include: government funding of the arts, the lure and trap of the blockbuster, T-Rex "Sue", the Nazi Entartete Kunst exhibition, the Enola Gay exhibition, war memorials, the Holocaust Museum, public sculpture, conservation, museum architecture, auction houses, and the repatriation of cultural property. This course is open to all students and is especially relevant to those studying the fine arts, anthropology, archaeology, history, American studies, and public policy. This course is cross-listed as ARTH 206. Offered every two years.
1500:TF   ALTHSE 106
ARCH 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ERSC 218-01 and ENST 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
0930:MWF   KAUF 185
1330:F   KAUF 186
ARCH 261-01 Archaeology of North America
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 261-01. This course reviews Pre-Columbian landscapes north of Mesoamerica. We consider topics including the timing and process of the initial peopling of the continent, food production, regional systems of exchange, development of social hierarchies, environmental adaption and the nature of initial colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans. These questions are addressed primarily by culture area and region. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 261. Offered every two years.
0900:TR   DENNY 313
ARCH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:R   ARCH LAB
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
1030:TR   WEISS 235
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Emily Lehman
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.
0930:TR   WEISS 343
ARTH 206-01 Museum Studies
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 206-01. Introduces students to the history, role, nature, and administration of museums. It examines the emergence and development of museums and the political, social, and ethical issues that they face. Case studies include: government funding of the arts, the lure and trap of the blockbuster, T-Rex "Sue", the Nazi Entartete Kunst exhibition, the Enola Gay exhibition, war memorials, the Holocaust Museum, public sculpture, conservation, museum architecture, auction houses, and the repatriation of cultural property. This course is open to all students and is especially relevant to those studying the fine arts, anthropology, archaeology, history, American studies, and public policy. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 206. Offered every two years.
1500:TF   ALTHSE 106
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-03. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
1530:MW   WEISS 327
ARTH 221-02 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-05. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
0930:MW   WEISS 327
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ecology of Animals, Plants & Fungi
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 201
1330:M   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ecology of Animals, Plants & Fungi
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 201
1330:T   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Mike Potthoff
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0900:TR   JAMESR 2228
1330:W   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 132-01 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Topics in the Molecular Basis of Disease
Instructor: Dana Somers, Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:M   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 132-02 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Topics in the Molecular Basis of Disease
Instructor: Dana Somers, Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:T   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
1330:F   JAMESR 2218
0930:MWF   STERN 103
BIOL 301-01 Wildlife Ecology
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
Wildlife Ecology is designed for majors in both Environmental Science and Biology. This course approaches ecology from the aspect of focusing on individual organisms and the role they play in their environment. Students will visit various habitats in Pennsylvania and view wildlife first hand. The texts are both place based focusing on Northeastern forests and Northeastern vernal ponds. These two ecosystems are intimately linked and the health of one influences the other. Students will have hands on labs with living organisms and investigate the roles each of these organisms play in the forest and vernal pool environment. A focus of the course will be how we must manage these ecosystems if they are to be enjoyed by our grandchildren. Both of these ecosystems are being changed by human ignorance and global climate change. We are at a squeak point in our ability to sustain these ecosystems. Only a complete understanding of their ecology and rapid action will sustain them for future generations.
0830:MWF   KAUF 109
1330:M   KAUF 109
BIOL 313-01 Cell Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Missy Niblock
Course Description:
An introduction to the structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. The course will involve discussion-oriented lectures and readings from the current literature. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying state of the art techniques to cell biological experiments. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
1330:W   JAMESR 1218
1030:MWF   KAUF 187
BIOL 332-01 Natural History of Vertebrates w/Lab
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
An exploration into the lifestyles of vertebrates heavily focused on field biology. Natural history is strongly dependent on descriptive anatomy and systematics and therefore this course will cover the evolutionary relationships among vertebrates highlighting unique features that facilitated the success of the major groups. In field labs, students will develop observational skills such as how to identify a bird by its song, a frog by its call, a mammal by the color of its pelage, and a snake by its shed skin. Indoor labs will focus on identifying species from preserved specimens as well as providing students with the skills necessary to preserve vertebrates for future study. Preservation methods could include preparing museum-quality mammal and bird skins, formalin fixation of fish, and skeletal preparations. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: one 200-level biology course or ERSC 307. Offered every two years. An exploration into the lifestyles of vertebrates heavily focused on field biology. Natural history is strongly dependent on descriptive anatomy and systematics and therefore this course will cover the evolutionary relationships among vertebrates highlighting unique features that facilitated the success of the major groups. In field labs, students will develop observational skills such as how to identify a bird by its song, a frog by its call, a mammal by the color of its pelage, and a snake by its shed skin. Indoor labs will focus on identifying species from preserved specimens as well as providing students with the skills necessary to preserve vertebrates for future study. Preservation methods could include preparing museum-quality mammal and bird skins, formalin fixation of fish, and skeletal preparations. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: one 200-level biology course or ERSC 307. Offered every two years.
0930:MWF   RNORTH 1317
1330:W   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 334-01 Vertebrate Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory study of the anatomy, embryology, physiology, and evolution of vertebrates. Representative live and dissection specimens are studied from the perspective of structure and function. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
0900:TR   RNORTH 1317
1030:TR   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan, Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
1030:TR   STUART 1113
1315:R   STUART 2112
BIOL 380-01 Immunology
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
An in-depth study of the field of immunobiology with an emphasis on the mammalian immune system. Topics include the innate and adaptive immune responses, immunochemistry, immunogenetics, and immunopathology. Emphasis in the class and the laboratory will be on the process and analysis of experimental investigation. Prerequisites: BIOL 213 or 216.
1030:MWF   EASTC 314
1330:T   JAMESR 2206
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor. Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
1330:M   RNORTH 1316
0900:TR   TOME 115
Courses Offered in CHEM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CHEM 132-01 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Cindy Samet
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
0930:MWF   STUART 1104
CHEM 132-02 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1030:MWF   STUART 1104
CHEM 132-03 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
0900:TR   STUART 1104
CHEM 132-L1 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1330:M   STUART 1113
1330:M   STUART 1121
CHEM 132-L3 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1315:T   STUART 1113
1315:T   STUART 1121
CHEM 132-L4 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Cindy Samet
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1330:W   STUART 1113
1330:W   STUART 1121
CHEM 132-L5 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1315:R   STUART 1113
1315:R   STUART 1121
CHEM 242-01 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: David Crouch
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
0830:MWF   STUART 1104
CHEM 242-02 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Jason Gavenonis
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1130:MWF   STUART 1104
CHEM 242-L1 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Jason Gavenonis
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1230:M   STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L2 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1315:T   STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L3 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: David Crouch
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1230:W   STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L4 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1315:R   STUART 1118
CHEM 243-01 Modern Chemical Analysis w/Lab
Instructor: Amy Witter
Course Description:
The theory of chemical equilibrium as it pertains to acid-base, metal-ligand, redox, and EDTA titrations. Topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, and the optimization and validation of experimental results will be covered. Statistical analysis of data will also be included. This class is meant to aid students in developing both a sound knowledge of experimental protocols (i.e. How many samples do we need to collect? How do we extract our analyte from the matrix? How much sample must be extracted in order to obtain a measurable result? How do we measure what's present? and in the critical evaluation of experimental results (How much confidence do we have that our results are representative of the system under study?). Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141. The theory of chemical equilibrium as it pertains to acid-base, metal-ligand, redox, and EDTA titrations. Topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, and the optimization and validation of experimental results will be covered. Statistical analysis of data will also be included. This class is meant to aid students in developing both a sound knowledge of experimental protocols (i.e. How many samples do we need to collect? How do we extract our analyte from the matrix? How much sample must be extracted in order to obtain a measurable result? How do we measure what's present? and in the critical evaluation of experimental results (How much confidence do we have that our results are representative of the system under study?). Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
0900:TR   STUART 1113
1230:W   STUART 2112
CHEM 244-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Instructor: Sarah St. Angelo
Course Description:
The fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics will be presented with a view towards providing an understanding of the concept of chemical equilibrium. Introductory concepts in chemical kinetics will also be discussed. Laboratory will focus on experiments illustrating the principles of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 132 or 141, MATH 171 or concurrent enrollment.
1230:M   STUART 2117
1030:TR   TOME 122
CHEM 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan, Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
1030:TR   STUART 1113
1315:R   STUART 2112
Courses Offered in COMP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
COMP 130-02 Introduction to Computing
Instructor: Lev Fruchter
Course Description:
An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester. An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
1130:MWF   TOME 118
1500:R   TOME 118
COMP 132-01 Principles of Object-Oriented Design
Instructor: Farhan Siddiqui
Course Description:
An introduction to object-oriented software design using Java. Topics include objects, classes, code modularity and reusability, abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Additional topics include unit testing, recursion, empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: None. See Advising Guide for placement advice for 130 and 132. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester. An introduction to object-oriented software design using Java. Topics include objects, classes, code modularity and reusability, abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Additional topics include unit testing, recursion, empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: None. See Advising Guide for placement advice for 130 and 132. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
0930:MWF   TOME 118
1300:W   TOME 118
COMP 241-01 Numerical Methods
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MATH 241-01. An introduction to numerical methods for solving mathematical problems. Topics chosen from interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, solutions to linear and nonlinear systems, numerical solutions to differential equations and related topics. Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following courses: MATH 170,171, 211 and 270. This course is cross-listed as MATH 241. Offered in even numbered spring semesters.
0930:MWF   TOME 121
COMP 241-02 Numerical Methods
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MATH 241-02. An introduction to numerical methods for solving mathematical problems. Topics chosen from interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, solutions to linear and nonlinear systems, numerical solutions to differential equations and related topics. Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following courses: MATH 170,171, 211 and 270. This course is cross-listed as MATH 241. Offered in even numbered spring semesters.
1030:MWF   TOME 121
Courses Offered in CRWR
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CRWR 219-01 Creative Nonfiction: Writing about Food
Instructor: Adrienne Su
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required.
1030:TR   EASTC 303
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 206-01 Asian Urban Ecology
Instructor: David Strand
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-03. Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with ecological modernization, the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jakarta, Delhi, H Ch Minh City, Taipei, Varanasi, Manila and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.
0900:TR   STERN 103
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 111-01 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Behzod Ahundjanov
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 111-02 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Behzod Ahundjanov
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 112-01 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1330:TF   DENNY 317
ECON 112-02 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1500:TF   DENNY 317
ECON 112-03 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 112-04 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 214-02 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-03 and WGSS 202-02. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 206
ECON 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Nicky Tynan
Course Description:
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 228-01 Economic Analysis of Policy
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.
1330:W   ALTHSE 109
ECON 228-02 Economic Analysis of Policy
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 288-01 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 207
Courses Offered in EDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EDST 120-01 Contemporary Issues in American Education
Instructor: Liz Lewis
Course Description:
An examination of current policies, practices, and problems in the landscape of American education with particular attention to the perspectives of various stakeholders (e.g. teachers, students, families, community leaders, employers, and elected officials). U.S. diversity with respect to race, class, gender, language, and exceptionality is considered within a variety of educational contexts. The course also examines the ways in which educational issues and reform efforts intersect with social, economic, political, and cultural forces. An examination of current policies, practices, and problems in the landscape of American education with particular attention to the perspectives of various stakeholders (e.g. teachers, students, families, community leaders, employers, and elected officials). U.S. diversity with respect to race, class, gender, language, and exceptionality is considered within a variety of educational contexts. The course also examines the ways in which educational issues and reform efforts intersect with social, economic, political, and cultural forces.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 207
EDST 140-01 Educational Psychology
Instructor: Sarah Bair
Course Description:
An examination of physical, cognitive, and psychological developmental theories and research as well as theories of learning. The course includes theoretical perspectives on: age-stage characteristics, exceptionality, achievement versus aptitude, as well as how developmental, sociocultural, and motivational factors influence student learning in classroom contexts.
1030:MWF   DENNY 313
EDST 260-01 Introduction to Educational Research
Instructor: Kirk Anderson
Course Description:
An introduction to the purposes and methodologies of research in education including how various stakeholders in the educational community use and access research findings as well as how studies in education are designed, implemented, and disseminated. Quantitative, qualitative, and historical methodologies are addressed. Research processes are introduced around the topic of literacy. Students will develop a review of the research literature on a topic related to literacy using online catalogs, databases, and other open access resources to find and gather sources and digital publications formats to disseminate their reviews. Prerequisite: 140. An introduction to the purposes and methodologies of research in education including how various stakeholders in the educational community use and access research findings as well as how studies in education are designed, implemented, and disseminated. Quantitative, qualitative, and historical methodologies are addressed. Research processes are introduced around the topic of literacy. Students will develop a review of the research literature on a topic related to literacy using online catalogs, databases, and other open access resources to find and gather sources and digital publications formats to disseminate their reviews. Prerequisite: 140.
1330:WF   DENNY 104
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1030:TR   EASTC 410
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1500:TF   EASTC 410
Courses Offered in ERSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ERSC 151-01 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Marcus Key
Course Description:
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
1330:M   KAUF 152
0930:MWF   KAUF 186
ERSC 151-02 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Marcus Key
Course Description:
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
1330:W   KAUF 152
0930:MWF   KAUF 186
ERSC 201-01 Surface Processes
Instructor: Peter Sak
Course Description:
Description, origin, development, and classification of landforms. Relationships of soils, surficial materials, and landforms to rocks, structures, climate, processes, and time. Topics will include interpretation of maps and aerial photographs of landscapes produced in tectonic, volcanic, fluvial, glacial, periglacial, coastal, karst, and eolian environments. Exercises will include: photo-geologic interpretation, surficial mapping, and classification of soils. Lectures, discussions, laboratories, and field trip(s). Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 141, 142, or 151 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year. Description, origin, development, and classification of landforms. Relationships of soils, surficial materials, and landforms to rocks, structures, climate, processes, and time. Topics will include interpretation of maps and aerial photographs of landscapes produced in tectonic, volcanic, fluvial, glacial, periglacial, coastal, karst, and eolian environments. Exercises will include: photo-geologic interpretation, surficial mapping, and classification of soils. Lectures, discussions, laboratories, and field trip(s). Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 141, 142, or 151 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.
1030:MWF   KAUF 153
1330:M   KAUF 153
ERSC 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01 and ENST 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
0930:MWF   KAUF 185
1330:F   KAUF 186
ERSC 250-01 Introduction to Arctic Studies
Instructor: Benjamin Edwards
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the physical/social geography, geology and ecology of the Arctic region of earth particularly through the lens of global climate change. Students will use a variety of media (lectures, readings, videos, blogs) to build knowledge about this critical region of earth to serve as a basis for individual and group projects on a specific Arctic region (e.g., Siberia, Svalbard, Greenland, Iceland, Nunavut, Alaska) and topic (e.g., climate change, Arctic tourism, Arctic flora/fauna species, Arctic archeology, Arctic exploration). Learning goals include: i) exposure to spatial analysis and Geographic Information Systems, ii) foundational knowledge of the Arctic cryosphere and its response to climate change, geological history, human geography and ecological systems, and iii) mastery of Arctic geography. Course meetings will include student presentations, fieldtrips and basic GIS instruction.
1500:TF   KAUF 134
ERSC 305-01 Earth Materials
Instructor: Benjamin Edwards
Course Description:
Completion of both ERSC 305 and ERSC 309 fulfills the WID Requirement. This gives students a basic understanding of the tools and techniques used in modern science to identify and characterize solid earth materials at the macroscopic (hand samples), microscopic (polarized light), and sub-microscopic (X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy) levels. Emphasis in the first part of the course will be on minerals, while the second part of the course will introduce students to characterization techniques of other solid earth materials (soils and rocks) and their conditions of formation. This course is required for the Earth Science major, and will be useful to students interested in agricultural science, archeology, environmental science, forensic science, planetary science, and solid state chemistry and physics. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: Prerequisite: 151 or permission of instructor. Completion of both 305 and 309 fulfills the WID graduation requirement. Offered every other year.
1330:W   KAUF 140
0900:TR   KAUF 187
ERSC 333-01 Environmental Geophysics
Instructor: Jorden Hayes
Course Description:
Geophysics combines geological knowledge with fundamental principles from physics, mathematics, and computer science to indirectly image and elucidate Earths subsurface structure. This course focuses on understanding geophysical methods commonly applied to Earths shallow subsurface (less than 200 m) to solve environmental, geological, archaeological, and civil engineering problems. This course will include physical theory, field methodology (e.g., survey design and data collection), data analysis and interpretation. Course topics include refraction and reflection seismology, ground penetrating radar, electrical resistivity and conductivity, magnetism and magnetic surveying, nuclear magnetic resonance, and gravity. This course will involve collecting and integrating datasets from multiple geophysical surveys and culminate in a final project. Lectures, discussions, laboratories, and field trips. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 151. Geophysics combines geological knowledge with fundamental principles from physics, mathematics, and computer science to indirectly image and elucidate Earths subsurface structure. This course focuses on understanding geophysical methods commonly applied to Earths shallow subsurface (less than 200 m) to solve environmental, geological, archaeological, and civil engineering problems. This course will include physical theory, field methodology (e.g., survey design and data collection), data analysis and interpretation. Course topics include refraction and reflection seismology, ground penetrating radar, electrical resistivity and conductivity, magnetism and magnetic surveying, nuclear magnetic resonance, and gravity. This course will involve collecting and integrating datasets from multiple geophysical surveys and culminate in a final project. Lectures, discussions, laboratories, and field trips. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 151.
1030:TR   KAUF 146
1330:R   KAUF 146
Courses Offered in FMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FMST 220-03 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 221-01.
1530:MW   WEISS 327
FMST 220-04 Mass Media and American Politics
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 243-01.
1330:MR   DENNY 304
FMST 220-05 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 221-02.
0930:MW   WEISS 327
Courses Offered in GRMN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
GRMN 215-01 German Environments
Instructor: Antje Pfannkuchen
Course Description:
Known for their contemporary environmentalism, German-speaking cultures have a long cultural history that speaks to complex understandings and relationships with nature. At times ideological, political, religious, spiritual, and critical, it is a turbulent history. This course will focus on the environment in German-speaking cultures while posing questions about how cultures relationship to the environment is informed by and informs contemporary German-speaking cultures. Topics might include understanding the significant role of nature in Romanticism that continues to influence concepts today, the industrialization of Central Europe, 20th and 21st century environmentalism, or the ways in which media (i.e. literature, film, music) underscore or contradict certain assumptions about nature. This course may be taught in German or in English.Prerequisite: GRMN 202 if offered in German, or permission of the instructor. No prerequisite, if offered in English. Known for their contemporary environmentalism, German-speaking cultures have a long cultural history that speaks to complex understandings and relationships with nature. At times ideological, political, religious, spiritual, and critical, it is a turbulent history. This course will focus on the environment in German-speaking cultures while posing questions about how cultures relationship to the environment is informed by and informs contemporary German-speaking cultures. Topics might include understanding the significant role of nature in Romanticism that continues to influence concepts today, the industrialization of Central Europe, 20th and 21st century environmentalism, or the ways in which media (i.e. literature, film, music) underscore or contradict certain assumptions about nature. This course may be taught in German or in English.Prerequisite: GRMN 202 if offered in German, or permission of the instructor. No prerequisite, if offered in English.
1330:MR   KADE SEM
Courses Offered in HEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HEST 201-01 Introduction to Health Studies
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
Introduction to Health Studies is a multi-disciplinary course that explores various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of health. In addition to providing the overall framework for the materials covered, the faculty-convener of the course will draw on speakers from Dickinson faculty who will present health studies materials relevant to their respective areas of special expertise. Faculty speakers will be drawn from a range of disciplines at the college, including American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, History, International Business and Management, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Psychology, and Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies.Normally offered spring semester. Introduction to Health Studies is a multi-disciplinary course that explores various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of health. In addition to providing the overall framework for the materials covered, the faculty-convener of the course will draw on speakers from Dickinson faculty who will present health studies materials relevant to their respective areas of special expertise. Faculty speakers will be drawn from a range of disciplines at the college, including American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, History, International Business and Management, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Psychology, and Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies.Normally offered spring semester.
1330:W   DENNY 212
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-02 Food and American Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
This class examines the ways that the culture and politics of food have reshaped North American landscapes and social relations from colonial to modern times. We will explore, for example, how the new taste for sweetness fueled the creation of plantations worked by enslaved, the ways that the distribution of frozen meat helped build cities and clear rangeland, and the ways that the eating of fresh fruit came to depend on both a new population of migrant laborers and a new regime of toxic chemicals. Other topics will include catastrophes such as the Dustbowl, the controversial transformations of the Green Revolution, and the modern debates about the obesity epidemic.
1500:TF   DENNY 311
HIST 211-04 African American Foodways and the Civil Rights
Instructor: Lynn Johnson, Say Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05.Part of the African American Foodways and the Civil Rights Movement Mini-Mosaic.
1330:T   ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in INBM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INBM 100-01 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Steve Riccio
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 201
INBM 100-02 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Uwe Paff
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 201
INBM 100-03 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Sherry Ritchey
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 201
INBM 110-01 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals. This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 204
INBM 110-02 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals. This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 204
INBM 110-03 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: David Sarcone
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals. This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 204
INBM 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 109
INBM 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-02.Permission of Instructor Required. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 207
INBM 230-01 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Dengjian Jin
Course Description:
This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course may fulfill Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement, depending upon topic. This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course may fulfill Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement, depending upon topic.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 110
INBM 230-02 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Dengjian Jin
Course Description:
This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course may fulfill Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement, depending upon topic. This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course may fulfill Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement, depending upon topic.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 110
INBM 240-01 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Xiaolu Wang
Course Description:
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required. The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 110
INBM 240-02 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Xiaolu Wang
Course Description:
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required. The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 110
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 201
INST 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 109
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-02.Permission of Instructor Required. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 207
INST 260-01 History of International Relations
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
This course is designed to give students an opportunity to apply theories of international relations to major events and issues in world history. Concepts such as balance of power, appeasement and imperialism will be studied against the backdrop of world historical events such as the Congress of Vienna, World War II, and the Algerian War. Prerequisite: INST 170 or POSC 170.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 201
INST 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 271.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
Courses Offered in JRNL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JRNL 200-01 Introduction to Journalism in the 21st Century
Instructor: Amy Worden
Course Description:
This course offers a broad overview of the practice of journalism combined with rigorous training in news writing. Students will be required to write a number of short articles and several longer pieces of journalistic writing. Readings and discussion topics will include the history of journalism in the United States and the ethics and techniques of reporting across media platforms. Students will be conducting interviews as part of the course. The course will focus special attention on current events, news literacy and the role of a free press in a challenging time. This course offers a broad overview of the practice of journalism combined with rigorous training in news writing. Students will be required to write a number of short articles and several longer pieces of journalistic writing. Readings and discussion topics will include the history of journalism in the United States and the ethics and techniques of reporting across media platforms. Students will be conducting interviews as part of the course. The course will focus special attention on current events, news literacy and the role of a free press in a challenging time.
1330:M   EASTC 108
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 121-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Nadia Alahmed
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 100-01. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies.This course is cross-listed as AFST 100.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 08
LALC 222-01 Anthropology of Latin America
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 222-01. This course is an ethnographic exploration of contemporary life in Latin America. It is designed to introduce students to the major themes and debates in the anthropology of Latin America. It is aimed at understanding the cultural and historical development of Latin America, and it seeks to make sense of the cultural similarities and differences that have both captured the interest of anthropologists and helped to make Latin America an important site of anthropological study and theorizing. In the process of examining the histories and cultures of Latin America, we will also look at how power and structural inequalities have shaped the region. The course will study Latin American cultures and societies in relation to neighboring nations - the United States, Canada and the Caribbean - given their shared history and experiences of colonialism and slavery as well as their economic interdependence.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 222. Offered every other year.
1330:TF   DENNY 112
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 230-01 Negotiation and Advocacy
Instructor: Edward Guido
Course Description:
This course will focus on the role of the advocate in the law and policy-making process. It will consider various types of advocacy (public debate, litigation, public relations, etc.) and various methods of negotiation as well as compare and contrast the advocate's role in different forums (legislatures, courts, administrative agencies, the press, etc.). Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   DENNY 110
LAWP 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 248-01. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 248.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
LAWP 255-01 Philosophy of Law
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 255-01. This course considers fundamental issues in the study of legal philosophy. These include the meanings and purposes of law, the limits of legal authority, and topics such as: theories of punishment; justifications for civil disobedience; the regulation of sex, gender, and sexuality; economic critiques of judicial process; and the construction of race and ethnicity within the law. Prerequisite: one prior course in Philosophy, or POSC 180, 202, 206, 208, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 255.
1330:MR   DENNY 212
Courses Offered in MATH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MATH 121-01 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   TOME 121
MATH 121-02 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
1330:TF   TOME 121
MATH 121-03 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
1500:TF   TOME 121
MATH 151-01 Introduction to Calculus
Instructor: Sarah Bryant
Course Description:
An introduction to limits and derivatives together with a review of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: departmental placement. Offered every semester.
0930:MWF   TOME 120
1330:W   TOME 120
MATH 170-02 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Eddie Tu
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1030:MWF   TOME 120
1330:T   TOME 120
MATH 170-03 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1130:MWF   TOME 117
1330:R   TOME 120
MATH 171-01 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Eddie Tu
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
0830:MWF   TOME 120
1500:T   TOME 120
MATH 171-02 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1330:R   TOME 118
1130:MWF   TOME 120
MATH 211-01 Discrete Mathematics
Instructor: Sarah Bryant
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics as well as computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic and methods of proof such as direct and indirect proofs and mathematical induction. Other topics include sets, functions, relations, matrix algebra, and techniques from elementary combinatorics and graph theory. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 131 or departmental placement. Offered every semester. An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics as well as computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic and methods of proof such as direct and indirect proofs and mathematical induction. Other topics include sets, functions, relations, matrix algebra, and techniques from elementary combinatorics and graph theory. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 131 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   TOME 231
MATH 211-02 Discrete Mathematics
Instructor: Lorelei Koss
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics as well as computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic and methods of proof such as direct and indirect proofs and mathematical induction. Other topics include sets, functions, relations, matrix algebra, and techniques from elementary combinatorics and graph theory. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 131 or departmental placement. Offered every semester. An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics as well as computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic and methods of proof such as direct and indirect proofs and mathematical induction. Other topics include sets, functions, relations, matrix algebra, and techniques from elementary combinatorics and graph theory. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 131 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1330:TF   TOME 232
MATH 241-01 Numerical Methods
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 241-01. An introduction to numerical methods for solving mathematical problems. Topics chosen from interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, solutions to linear and nonlinear systems, numerical solutions to differential equations and related topics.Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following courses: 170, 171, 211 and 270. This course is cross-listed as COMP 241. Offered in even numbered spring semesters.
0930:MWF   TOME 121
MATH 241-02 Numerical Methods
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 241-02. An introduction to numerical methods for solving mathematical problems. Topics chosen from interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, solutions to linear and nonlinear systems, numerical solutions to differential equations and related topics.Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following courses: 170, 171, 211 and 270. This course is cross-listed as COMP 241. Offered in even numbered spring semesters.
1030:MWF   TOME 121
MATH 262-01 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
Course Description:
An introduction to matrix algebra and abstract vector spaces with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. Topics include linear systems and matrices, vector spaces, linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.Prerequisite: 211 or permission of the instructor. Offered every semester.
0900:TR   TOME 117
MATH 270-01 Integration and Infinite Series
Instructor: Barry Tesman
Course Description:
The study of methods of integration, applications of the integral, elementary differential equations, and infinite sequences and series.Prerequisite: 171 or departmental placement. Offered every spring.
1130:MWF   TOME 231
MATH 270-02 Integration and Infinite Series
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
The study of methods of integration, applications of the integral, elementary differential equations, and infinite sequences and series.Prerequisite: 171 or departmental placement. Offered every spring.
1230:MWF   TOME 120
MATH 325-01 Probability and Statistics II
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
A continuation of Introduction to Probability and Statistics I. Topics include additional discrete and continuous distributions, conditional distributions, additional hypothesis tests, simple linear regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and goodness of fit tests. Special topics may include nonparametric tests, nonlinear regression, and time series analysis.Prerequisites: 171, 225 and completion of, or concurrent registration in 270. Offered in odd numbered spring semesters. A continuation of Introduction to Probability and Statistics I. Topics include additional discrete and continuous distributions, conditional distributions, additional hypothesis tests, simple linear regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and goodness of fit tests. Special topics may include nonparametric tests, nonlinear regression, and time series analysis.Prerequisites: 171, 225 and completion of, or concurrent registration in 270. Offered in odd numbered spring semesters.
0900:TR   TOME 121
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-03.An introduction to Western philosophy with a focus on issues surrounding sex and gender. What is rape culture, and how does it work? Do we have free will? What roles do sex, gender, and race play in making us who we are? Do we have a political obligation to be gender non-binary? Do our gender roles affect what we can know? An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
1030:TR   EASTC 411
PHIL 102-01 Introduction to Ethics
Instructor: Jim Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to the philosophical study of morality, focusing on concepts of right and wrong, virtue and vice, and wellbeing. This course provides students the opportunity to hone their ethical reasoning skills by critically examining how some of historys most influential philosophers thought about issues in morality. Students will also develop more general skills, such as evaluating philosophical arguments, and expressing and defending their own ideas in writing.
1030:MWF   STERN 103
PHIL 104-01 Practical Ethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
This course introduces students to contemporary debates in practical ethics. Course materials investigate how theoretical approaches to ethics apply to practical issues, including discussions of animal ethics, environmental ethics, reproductive ethics, civil disobedience, and the ethics of mass incarceration and the death penalty. This course is best suited for students interested in thinking about the relationship between ethical theory and practice, with an emphasis on how power, privilege, and responsibility intersect in our everyday lives. This course introduces students to contemporary debates in practical ethics. Course materials investigate how theoretical approaches to ethics apply to practical issues, including discussions of animal ethics, environmental ethics, reproductive ethics, civil disobedience, and the ethics of mass incarceration and the death penalty. This course is best suited for students interested in thinking about the relationship between ethical theory and practice, with an emphasis on how power, privilege, and responsibility intersect in our everyday lives.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 204
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
1500:TF   DENNY 103
PHIL 254-01 Philosophy of Science
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
This course considers such issues as the distinction between science and non-science; the relation of evidence to scientific theories; truth and rationality in science; competition among theories; the nature of scientific explanation; methods of scientific thinking; the impact of science on society. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1330:TF   EASTC 314
PHIL 255-01 Philosophy of Law
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 255-01. This course considers fundamental issues in the study of legal philosophy. These include the meanings and purposes of law, the limits of legal authority, and topics such as: theories of punishment; justifications for civil disobedience; the regulation of sex, gender, and sexuality; economic critiques of judicial process; and the construction of race and ethnicity within the law. Prerequisite: one prior course in Philosophy, or POSC 180, 202, 206, 208, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 255.
1330:MR   DENNY 212
PHIL 302-01 Ethical Theory
Instructor: Jim Sias
Course Description:
This seminar will explore major issues or texts in classical or contemporary moral philosophy. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, at least two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor. Offered at least once every two years.
1330:MR   EASTC 301
PHIL 303-01 Epistemology
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
This seminar will probe key issues in epistemology, such as: the nature of knowledge and justification, the challenge of skepticism, the relation of sense perception to conceptual thought. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, at least two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   EASTC 410
Courses Offered in PHYS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHYS 114-01 Climate Change and Renewable Energies
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
An introduction to the physics of global climate change and a hands-on exposure to several types of renewable energy. The first third of this project-centered course introduces the basic physical principles of global climate change with a focus on radiative equilibrium, greenhouse effect, energy balance, and entropy. Since the energy sources of an energetically sustainable future will consist of renewable energies and possibly thermonuclear fusion energy, the remaining two thirds of the course is devoted to an exploration of wind turbines, solar concentrators, thermoelectric convertors, and photovoltaic systems. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics. Offered every two years. An introduction to the physics of global climate change and a hands-on exposure to several types of renewable energy. The first third of this project-centered course introduces the basic physical principles of global climate change with a focus on radiative equilibrium, greenhouse effect, energy balance, and entropy. Since the energy sources of an energetically sustainable future will consist of renewable energies and possibly thermonuclear fusion energy, the remaining two thirds of the course is devoted to an exploration of wind turbines, solar concentrators, thermoelectric convertors, and photovoltaic systems. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   TOME 103
PHYS 132-01 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
0930:MWF   TOME 101
PHYS 132-02 Introductory Physics
Instructor: David Jackson
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
1230:MWF   TOME 101
PHYS 142-01 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager, Windsor Morgan
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
1330:W   TOME 105
1030:MWF   TOME 115
PHYS 142-02 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Brett Pearson, Catrina Hamilton-Drager
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
1330:R   TOME 105
1030:MWF   TOME 115
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
1330:TF   DENNY 304
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 201
POSC 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
1500:TF   DENNY 103
POSC 233-01 Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-05. Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.This course is cross-listed as WGSS 202. Prerequisite: 120 or AP credit equivalent.
1500:TF   DENNY 304
POSC 243-01 Mass Media and American Politics
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-04. Examines the causes, content, and consequences of political news, primarily focusing on television. It will explore the ways in which audience characteristics, organizational routines, and professional socialization influence the style and substance of the news. The content of news will be analyzed for: the three branches of government, war, foreign governments, crises, and presidential campaigns. The impact of the media on political behavior will also be discussed. Content analysis will be used by students to systematically analyze television network news. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   DENNY 304
POSC 246-01 The Legislative Process
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
An analysis of the legislative branch of government, especially Congress. Emphasis is placed upon the legislature as a social system, the decision-making process, the interrelationships with the political parties and interest groups, the executive and the judiciary. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
0930:MWF   DENNY 211
POSC 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 248-01. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 248.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
POSC 258-01 Human Rights
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights embodies a global consensus on the fundamental importance of human rights as a political value. But the idea and its practical applications have provoked intense controversy around the world on issues such as freedom of expression, capital punishment and torture, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, social and economic justice, and cultural and minority rights. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of the instructor.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
POSC 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 271.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
POSC 290-03 Asian Urban Ecology
Instructor: David Strand
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with ecological modernization, the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jakarta, Delhi, H Ch Minh City, Taipei, Varanasi, Manila and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.
0900:TR   STERN 103
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 130-01 Perception, Memory & Thought
Instructor: Azriel Grysman
Course Description:
This introduction to cognitive psychology will cover such topics as: How do you recognize your grandmother? Can you do more than one thing at a time? Why can't you remember the names of people you just met? More formally, we will examine the processes of perception, attention, representation, and retrieval in children, adults, and machines.
1330:MR   KAUF 179
PSYC 130-02 Perception, Memory & Thought
Instructor: Azriel Grysman
Course Description:
This introduction to cognitive psychology will cover such topics as: How do you recognize your grandmother? Can you do more than one thing at a time? Why can't you remember the names of people you just met? More formally, we will examine the processes of perception, attention, representation, and retrieval in children, adults, and machines.
1500:MR   KAUF 179
PSYC 140-01 Social Psychology
Instructor: Grace Larson
Course Description:
In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior.
0930:MWF   DENNY 317
PSYC 140-02 Social Psychology
Instructor: Grace Larson
Course Description:
In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior.
1030:MWF   DENNY 317
PSYC 150-01 Introduction to Cross-Cultural Psychology
Instructor: Miranda Bobrowski
Course Description:
This course takes the position that human behavior can best be understood only in the cultural context in which it occurs. Discussions focus on the impact of culture on human behavior including the nature of culture; political and religious elements of culture; perceptions, stereotypes and the realities of cultural differences; how nationalism and animosity between cultures grow; and sources of prejudice and cultural conflict, and how they may be reduced. Suitable for all students, regardless of prior background in psychology. This course takes the position that human behavior can best be understood only in the cultural context in which it occurs. Discussions focus on the impact of culture on human behavior including the nature of culture; political and religious elements of culture; perceptions, stereotypes and the realities of cultural differences; how nationalism and animosity between cultures grow; and sources of prejudice and cultural conflict, and how they may be reduced. Suitable for all students, regardless of prior background in psychology.
0900:TR   KAUF 179
PSYC 150-02 Introduction to Cross-Cultural Psychology
Instructor: Miranda Bobrowski
Course Description:
This course takes the position that human behavior can best be understood only in the cultural context in which it occurs. Discussions focus on the impact of culture on human behavior including the nature of culture; political and religious elements of culture; perceptions, stereotypes and the realities of cultural differences; how nationalism and animosity between cultures grow; and sources of prejudice and cultural conflict, and how they may be reduced. Suitable for all students, regardless of prior background in psychology. This course takes the position that human behavior can best be understood only in the cultural context in which it occurs. Discussions focus on the impact of culture on human behavior including the nature of culture; political and religious elements of culture; perceptions, stereotypes and the realities of cultural differences; how nationalism and animosity between cultures grow; and sources of prejudice and cultural conflict, and how they may be reduced. Suitable for all students, regardless of prior background in psychology.
1030:TR   KAUF 179
PSYC 175-01 Introduction to Community Psychology
Instructor: Howard Rosen
Course Description:
This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology--a field that focuses on persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals' mental health and wellbeing. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore the field's application to a range of clinical and social issues; and (d) emulate the field's commitment to the promotion of social change through research and action. This course is a Health Studies elective. This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology--a field that focuses on persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals' mental health and wellbeing. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore the field's application to a range of clinical and social issues; and (d) emulate the field's commitment to the promotion of social change through research and action. This course is a Health Studies elective.
1500:TF   KAUF 179
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 110-01 Religion and Modern Culture
Instructor: Jodie Vann
Course Description:
Drawing upon popular examples from film, drama, and narrative, as well as critical essays, the course explores both the religious dimensions of modern culture myth, sacred space and time, nature spirituality and the cultural contexts of contemporary theologies gender, race, economics.
1030:TR   DENNY 104
RELG 201-01 Tibetan Buddhism
Instructor: Daniel Cozort
Course Description:
Tibetan Buddhism is probably the world's most varied and complex religion, combining elements of everything found in late Indian Buddhism-huge monastic universities, esoteric rituals involving seemingly bizarre practices, an enormous pantheon of enlightened beings, demons, and others, devotional cults, sublime art-with wild and wooly indigenous Tibetan shamanism and some aspects of Chinese religions. The course examines the development of Buddhism in Tibet as well as its increasing interest and influence in the West. Tibetan Buddhism is probably the world's most varied and complex religion, combining elements of everything found in late Indian Buddhism-huge monastic universities, esoteric rituals involving seemingly bizarre practices, an enormous pantheon of enlightened beings, demons, and others, devotional cults, sublime art-with wild and wooly indigenous Tibetan shamanism and some aspects of Chinese religions. The course examines the development of Buddhism in Tibet as well as its increasing interest and influence in the West.
1230:MWF   EASTC 411
RELG 210-01 Religions of Africa
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Karegeye
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06 and SOCI 230-05. The course examines the variety of religious experiences, traditions, and representations of religion in African cultures. These include indigenous religions, Islam, Christianity and syncretistic traditions. We will examine the various roles that religion plays in responding to current crises facing African cultures, including HIV/AIDS pandemic, political conflicts, and issues related to gender (e.g., girls' education, shifting perspectives on masculinity and femininity) that have been shaped by religious attitudes. Students will use novels, memoir and film to supplement scholarly readings.
1500:MR   DENNY 104
Courses Offered in RUSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RUSS 248-01 Russian Culture and the Environment
Instructor: Alyssa DeBlasio
Course Description:
NOTE: Taught in English. Russia is the largest country in the world. It contains some of our largest supplies of natural resources, including the most voluminous freshwater lake and the most square miles of forest. Russia and the Soviet Union have also been home to devastating environmental catastrophes, such as the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. It is thus fitting that the theme of the environmentboth natural and man-madehave played a pivotal role in the Russian cultural imagination of the past two centuries. This course will look at how Russian and Soviet culture from the nineteenth century to the present engage with the theme of the environment over a variety of genres, including literature, film, journalism, and art. No knowledge of Russian is required. Taught in English. Offered every three years.
1330:MR   BOSLER 214
Courses Offered in SCIE
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SCIE 259-01 Writing Science News
Instructor: Missy Niblock
Course Description:
Science hits the news more now than ever before. Is the news we read true to the research that it reports? Does it matter? Those are our concerns in this course. We analyze how scientists report their findings, how those findings become news, and what happens on the way. Taking knowledge into practice, you will conduct background research, interview scientists, and write your own science news. The portfolio you produce will include polished news releases based on science research at Dickinson. This course is primarily designed for future scientists who want to be able to communicate about their research, and for science majors considering a writing career. It is also appropriate for non-scientists who wish to be savvy consumers of science news. Science hits the news more now than ever before. Is the news we read true to the research that it reports? Does it matter? Those are our concerns in this course. We analyze how scientists report their findings, how those findings become news, and what happens on the way. Taking knowledge into practice, you will conduct background research, interview scientists, and write your own science news. The portfolio you produce will include polished news releases based on science research at Dickinson. This course is primarily designed for future scientists who want to be able to communicate about their research, and for science majors considering a writing career. It is also appropriate for non-scientists who wish to be savvy consumers of science news.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 07
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
0930:MWF   DENNY 304
SOCI 230-03 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 214-02 and WGSS 202-02. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 206
SOCI 230-04 Environmental and Social Justice
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 280-01.This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices.
1330:TF   KAUF 187
SOCI 230-05 Religions of Africa
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Karegeye
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 210-01 and AFST 220-06.The course examines the variety of religious experiences, traditions, and representations of religion in African cultures. These include indigenous religions, Islam, Christianity and syncretistic traditions. We will examine the various roles that religion plays in responding to current crises facing African cultures, including HIV/AIDS pandemic, political conflicts, and issues related to gender (e.g., girls' education, shifting perspectives on masculinity and femininity) that have been shaped by religious attitudes. Students will use novels, memoir and film to supplement scholarly readings.
1500:MR   DENNY 104
SOCI 236-01 Inequalities in the U.S.
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year. This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year.
0900:TR   DENNY 304
SOCI 244-01 Quantitative Research Methods
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Quantitative Research Methods introduces students to basic principles of sociological research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students learn to conceptualize a research question, operationalize key concepts, identify relevant literature, and form research hypotheses. Then, using elementary tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, they choose appropriate statistical methods, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions. Special emphasis is given to interpreting numbers with clear, persuasive language, in both oral and written formats. Students will become proficient in using quantitative software for data analysis. Two and a half hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 110. Quantitative Research Methods introduces students to basic principles of sociological research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students learn to conceptualize a research question, operationalize key concepts, identify relevant literature, and form research hypotheses. Then, using elementary tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, they choose appropriate statistical methods, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions. Special emphasis is given to interpreting numbers with clear, persuasive language, in both oral and written formats. Students will become proficient in using quantitative software for data analysis. Two and a half hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 110.
1330:MR   DENNY 112
SOCI 270-01 Social Movements, Protest and Conflict
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
The study of protest politics and social movements is the study of collective agency. Social movements arise when people act together to promote or resist social change. Movements represent not only grievances on a particular set of issues, but also frustration with more established political forms of making claims in societies. In this course, we will engage with some of the large theoretical debates in the study of social movements, reading both empirical treatments of particular movements and theoretical treatments of key issues. The featured case studies will include civil rights, feminism, ecology, the antinuclear movement, the New Right and the alternative globalization movement. We will be particularly concerned with the social and political context of protest, focusing on basic questions, such as: under what circumstances do social movements emerge? How do dissidents choose political tactics and strategies? And, how do movements affect social and political change? The study of protest politics and social movements is the study of collective agency. Social movements arise when people act together to promote or resist social change. Movements represent not only grievances on a particular set of issues, but also frustration with more established political forms of making claims in societies. In this course, we will engage with some of the large theoretical debates in the study of social movements, reading both empirical treatments of particular movements and theoretical treatments of key issues. The featured case studies will include civil rights, feminism, ecology, the antinuclear movement, the New Right and the alternative globalization movement. We will be particularly concerned with the social and political context of protest, focusing on basic questions, such as: under what circumstances do social movements emerge? How do dissidents choose political tactics and strategies? And, how do movements affect social and political change?
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-01 Ecocritical Literary Tours through South America
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
This course examines a selection of contemporary literary works primarily from Chile and Argentina through an ecocritical lens. Authors to be studied may include: Baldomero Lillo, Horacio Quiroga, Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Julio Cortzar, Braulio Arenas, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Francisco Coloane, Luis Seplveda, Pa Barros, Luisa Valenzuela, Pedro Lemebel, and Nicanor Parra.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305
Courses Offered in WGSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 101-03 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 101-01.An introduction to Western philosophy with a focus on issues surrounding sex and gender. What is rape culture, and how does it work? Do we have free will? What roles do sex, gender, and race play in making us who we are? Do we have a political obligation to be gender non-binary? Do our gender roles affect what we can know?
1030:TR   EASTC 411
WGSS 202-02 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 214-02 and SOCI 230-03. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 206
WGSS 202-05 Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 233-01.Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.
1500:TF   DENNY 304