Fall 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 121-01 Environmental Science for Non-Majors
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
Class lecture & labs will occur live via Zoom on the regularly scheduled days and times. Attendance will be taken. Lectures will be recorded as will portions of labs including lab introduction, instructions, and wrap up. Lectures: The lecture part of the course will include a combination of PowerPoint presentations, assigned readings, periodic class discussions, open Q & A throughout the class period and one or more documentary videos. Labs: A variety of materials, methods and technology will be employed depending on lab topic/activity. There will be a brief introduction, instructions, and possibly a video demonstration provided at the beginning of each lab. There will be a brief wrap-up at the end of labs. In addition, your instructor will be available throughout the lab to answer any questions. Students will often be paired up with one or two other classmates to work on and complete each lab assignment during the scheduled time. All work will be submitted by the end of each lab. Two labs will involve recorded video tours of local facilities. Each video tour will be played during those scheduled lab times and will be followed by a live Q&A with the person who provided the tour. Moodle will be used to distribute and receive most course materials including the following: course syllabus, assigned readings, lecture and lab exams & quizzes, lab materials, and submission of student assignments. Ensemble will be utilized for access to particular videos. This introductory environmental science course will explore the integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human interactions with them. Students will use scientific principles to explore the consequences of human activity. Students will be exposed to basic techniques for investigating environmental topics in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. This is an introductory course for non-majors. Students intending to major in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science should enroll in ENST 161.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course does not count towards the B.A. in Environmental Studies or B.S. in Environmental Science.
0930:MWF   DIST
1330:M   DIST
ENST 121-02 Environmental Science for Non-Majors
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
Class lecture & labs will occur live via Zoom on the regularly scheduled days and times. Attendance will be taken. Lectures will be recorded as will portions of labs including lab introduction, instructions, and wrap up. Lectures: The lecture part of the course will include a combination of PowerPoint presentations, assigned readings, periodic class discussions, open Q & A throughout the class period and one or more documentary videos. Labs: A variety of materials, methods and technology will be employed depending on lab topic/activity. There will be a brief introduction, instructions, and possibly a video demonstration provided at the beginning of each lab. There will be a brief wrap-up at the end of labs. In addition, your instructor will be available throughout the lab to answer any questions. Students will often be paired up with one or two other classmates to work on and complete each lab assignment during the scheduled time. All work will be submitted by the end of each lab. Two labs will involve recorded video tours of local facilities. Each video tour will be played during those scheduled lab times and will be followed by a live Q&A with the person who provided the tour. Moodle will be used to distribute and receive most course materials including the following: course syllabus, assigned readings, lecture and lab exams & quizzes, lab materials, and submission of student assignments. Ensemble will be utilized for access to particular videos. This introductory environmental science course will explore the integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human interactions with them. Students will use scientific principles to explore the consequences of human activity. Students will be exposed to basic techniques for investigating environmental topics in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. This is an introductory course for non-majors. Students intending to major in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science should enroll in ENST 161.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course does not count towards the B.A. in Environmental Studies or B.S. in Environmental Science.
1330:W   DIST
0930:MWF   DIST
ENST 161-01 Environmental Connections
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
This course will be a synchronous course. Students need to be active participants online during the assigned class time. There will be additional small group tutorial sessions at various times throughout the semester, which students will sign-up for out of a selection of time options. This introductory environmental studies course draws from the influences of the humanities and natural sciences on the social sciences in relation to the environment. The course will examine the ideas, concepts, and debates central to the field. Students will examine the relationship between humans and the environment and become familiar with a range of environmental challenges, with an emphasis on how these challenges have emerged over time and space. The course will investigate and evaluate a variety of strategies that are currently being pursued to address these environmental challenges. The course stresses the importance of seeing connections, thinking carefully and critically about environmental issues, and appreciating that complex questions rarely have a single solution. This is an introductory course for those majoring in environmental studies and environmental science. Non-majors should enroll in ENST 121 Introduction to Environmental Science. This course has no laboratory section.
0900:TR   DIST
ENST 161-02 Environmental Connections
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
This course will be a synchronous course. Students need to be active participants online during the assigned class time. There will be additional small group tutorial sessions at various times throughout the semester, which students will sign-up for out of a selection of time options. This introductory environmental studies course draws from the influences of the humanities and natural sciences on the social sciences in relation to the environment. The course will examine the ideas, concepts, and debates central to the field. Students will examine the relationship between humans and the environment and become familiar with a range of environmental challenges, with an emphasis on how these challenges have emerged over time and space. The course will investigate and evaluate a variety of strategies that are currently being pursued to address these environmental challenges. The course stresses the importance of seeing connections, thinking carefully and critically about environmental issues, and appreciating that complex questions rarely have a single solution. This is an introductory course for those majoring in environmental studies and environmental science. Non-majors should enroll in ENST 121 Introduction to Environmental Science. This course has no laboratory section.
1030:TR   DIST
ENST 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01 and ERSC 218-01.The course will include attending online lectures, participating in virtual discussions and presentations, and completing GIS exercises using a computer and/or smartphone. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
1330:F   DIST
0930:MWF   DIST
ENST 218-02 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca, Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-02 and ERSC 218-02.The course will include attending online lectures, participating in virtual discussions and presentations, and completing GIS exercises using a computer and/or smartphone. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
0930:MWF   DIST
1330:T   DIST
ENST 305-02 Green Infrastructure
Instructor: Michael Beevers, Allyssa Decker
Course Description:
This course will consist of mostly asynchronous learning with one synchronous component per week. Green infrastructure reduces and treats stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social, and economic benefits. This interdisciplinary course will examine different types of green infrastructure systems and how the components of each system work together to provide intended benefits. Topics may include rainwater harvesting, permeable pavements, bioswales/bioretention, green streets and parking, and green roofs. There will be an added focus on components of the water cycle within these systems including precipitation, infiltration, runoff, and evapotranspiration. Students will learn how to acquire, organize and analyze green infrastructure information and data using qualitative and quantitative methods. Three hours of laboratory per week.
1330:R   DIST
1030:MWF   DIST
ENST 335-01 Analysis and Management of the Aquatic Environment
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
An interdisciplinary study of the aquatic environment, with a focus on the groundwater and surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin. This course provides a scientific introduction to the dynamics of rivers, lakes, wetlands, and estuarine systems as well as an appreciation of the complexity of the political and social issues involved in the sustainable use of these aquatic resources. Students conduct an original, cooperative, field-based research project on a local aquatic system that will involve extensive use of analytical laboratory and field equipment. Extended field trips to sample freshwater and estuarine systems and to observe existing resource management practices are conducted. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 162.
1230:W   DIST
1030:TR   DIST
ENST 345-01 Agroecology
Instructor: Maggie Douglas
Course Description:
The lecture portion of this course will use a combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning. The class will meet virtually during our scheduled lecture time, for discussion, working through case studies and journal articles, and group work. Students should plan to attend those class meetings and notify the instructor (douglasm@dickinson.edu) if time zone or other challenges will make it consistently difficult to do so. The lab for this course will be based on investigations students can do from home, using a combination of online resources and materials that will be mailed. Students will likely have flexibility concerning when they complete lab activities, but should still budget 3 hours/week for lab. How can agricultural systems be designed to nourish a growing human population while sustaining the natural resources upon which agriculture ultimately depends? In this course, students will learn to use ecological principles as a lens to understand and improve the food system. Topics may include crop genetic resources, soil and pest management, the role of animals in agriculture, and agriculture as a producer and user of energy. Class meetings will incorporate significant student participation including presentation and discussion of primary scientific literature and other readings. Laboratory meetings will orient students to agroecosystems in the region and provide opportunities for hands-on learning and scientific investigation. Three hours of laboratory per week.Prerequisites: ENST 162 or BIOL 131.
0900:TR   DIST
1330:T   DIST
ENST 371-01 Global Environmental Politics
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03.The class will combine synchronous discussions and activities during scheduled class time along with asynchronous readings, lectures and assignments. Global environmental politics seeks to understand how the global environment is being changed by humanity and how states, organizations, individuals, communities, societies, movements and corporations are responding to planetary environmental issues. In this course, we discuss the causes of global environmental problems and how solutions have been conceptualized and put into practice over the last several decades. We examine trends in global environmental governance, and focus on the role of the sovereign state and global organizations in designing, implementing and enforcing effective international environmental agreements and regimes. We study the growing role in global environmental politics of global civil society and multinational corporations. Finally, we consider the major tensions and controversies that characterize global environmental politics such as the impact of economics and trade, sustainable development, and the role of knowledge, power and science. This course engages with a broad range of materials from the global environmental politics literature and endeavors to represent different methodological and conceptual approaches. The course is not organized around environmental issue areas but rather focuses on the underlying dynamics of power, authority, interests, legitimacy and ideas that ultimately shape environmental debates. We focus on how theory informs policy making and learn to recognize the constraints and opportunities available for addressing environmental challenges in a changing world. The course will incorporate lectures and seminar discussions as well as possible field trip and guest speakers. Prerequisite: ENST 161 or INST/POSC 170.
1330:MR   DIST
ENST 406-01 Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
The class will combine synchronous discussions and activities during scheduled class time along with asynchronous readings, lectures and assignments. This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
1330:T   DIST
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 201-01 Introduction to American Studies
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
This course will be taught mostly remote with 10% face to face. Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of United States and hemispheric cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.
1030:TR   DIST
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
Synchronous meetings over Zoom for lecture (MWF 8:30-920) and also for lab sections (W 1:30-4:30). This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
0830:MWF   DIST
1330:W   DIST
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
1500:MR   DIST
ANTH 101-02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
he full class will meet remotely on Mondays, almost always synchronously. For much of the semester, half of the students will meet remotely with the professor on Wednesdays, and the other half will meet remotely with the professor on Fridays. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
1030:MWF   DIST
ANTH 216-01 Medical Anthropology
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
We will meet as a full group on Tuesdays from 1:30-2:45 with mostly synchronous activities and on Fridays, the class will have two meeting times: Group A from 1:30 -2:10 p.m. and Group B from 2:15 2:55 p.m. Fridays will be devoted to discussions that combines asynchronous and synchronous activities. Comparative analysis of health, illness, and nutrition within environmental and socio-cultural contexts. Evolution and geographical distribution of disease, how different societies have learned to cope with illness, and the ways traditional and modern medical systems interact. Offered every other year.
1330:TF   DIST
ANTH 245-01 The Archaeology of Farming
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 200-01.Weekly lectures, readings, videos, and other materials will be posted to Moodle each week to be completed asynchronously. Class will meet via Zoom up to two days a week (TBD) to review, discuss, and ask questions about posted materials. There will also be student presentations using Zoom to individual assignments. Students will also be using ArcGIS Online for projects. In this course, students will explore the long-term histories of food production systems that developed across the globe through examination of archaeological, anthropological, biological, historical, and agroecological sources. We will learn about the processes and trajectories of domestication of plants and animals, modification of landscapes for farming, and intensification strategies. We will consider how the environment and climate played a role in shaping how these systems developed in distinct regions. We will also consider the social and political dimensions of farming including division of labor, generation of surplus and redistribution, and ritual. This long-term perspective will allow students to better understand our current food production systems and consider how ancient/traditional practices might contribute to sustainable farming practices for the future.
1030:MWF   DIST
Courses Offered in ARCH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 200-01 The Archaeology of Farming
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 245-01.Weekly lectures, readings, videos, and other materials will be posted to Moodle each week to be completed asynchronously. Class will meet via Zoom up to two days a week (TBD) to review, discuss, and ask questions about posted materials. There will also be student presentations using Zoom to individual assignments. Students will also be using ArcGIS Online for projects. In this course, students will explore the long-term histories of food production systems that developed across the globe through examination of archaeological, anthropological, biological, historical, and agroecological sources. We will learn about the processes and trajectories of domestication of plants and animals, modification of landscapes for farming, and intensification strategies. We will consider how the environment and climate played a role in shaping how these systems developed in distinct regions. We will also consider the social and political dimensions of farming including division of labor, generation of surplus and redistribution, and ritual. This long-term perspective will allow students to better understand our current food production systems and consider how ancient/traditional practices might contribute to sustainable farming practices for the future.
1030:MWF   DIST
ARCH 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-01 and ERSC 218-01.The course will include attending online lectures, participating in virtual discussions and presentations, and completing GIS exercises using a computer and/or smartphone. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
1330:F   DIST
0930:MWF   DIST
ARCH 218-02 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca, Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-02 and ERSC 218-02.The course will include attending online lectures, participating in virtual discussions and presentations, and completing GIS exercises using a computer and/or smartphone. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
0930:MWF   DIST
1330:T   DIST
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 101-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
This class meets MWF at 9:30. Students must be able to take the class at the specified time - a completely asynchronous option will not be available. Mon: All students meet with Prof. Schlitt on ZOOM for class; Wed. 1/2 of the class meets with Prof. Schlitt on ZOOM for discussion and continuation of topic; Fri: other of class meets with Prof. Schlitt on ZOOM for discussion and continuation of topic. Third class session: all students will engage in short looking assignments relevant to the particular topic for that week and will watch a 10-20 minute video on a focused issue, made by Prof. Schlitt. This course is a critical survey of western art beginning with the Ancient Near East (approximately 4000 B.C.) through the Gothic period in Europe (early 1300s). Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of style, subject-matter, and function within an historical context, and especially on the student's ability to develop skills in visual analysis. Developing appropriate vocabularies with which to discuss and analyze works of art and imagery will also be stressed, along with learning to evaluate scholarly interpretations of them.
0930:MWF   DIST
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Synchronous classes on Zoom This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
1030:TR   DIST
ARTH 108-01 Arts of East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 108-01.Each class meeting typically consists of 60 minutes of interactive lecture and 15 minutes of discussion of readings. This course introduces students to a selection of objects and sites that elicit new modes of cultural perception and insight into the artistic cultures of China, Korea, and Japan. Loosely arranged in a chronological order, each week is devoted to in-depth examination of a different type of object, medium, and format. The diverse mediums (sculpture, ceramics, metalwork, lacquer, prints, painting, calligraphy, photography, performance, and architecture) and the long historical span covered in class will chart how culture traveled within East Asia, and later, globally, as well as each cultures distinctive methods of adaptation over time. Major themes include the relationship between artistic production and sociopolitical and socioeconomic development, cultural exchange, aesthetics, impact of religion, power and authority, gender, and issues of modernity. Lectures are supplemented by viewing sessions in the Trout Gallery.This course is cross-listed as EASN 108.
0900:TR   DIST
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.
0930:MW   DIST
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-05.An entry-level course in Fine Art photography emphasizing theory, history and practice. Students will learn how to create images using a digital camera and further enhance those images using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom. Through small group critiques, students will also learn how to read and respond to images. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
1330:TR   DIST
ARTH 221-02 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-06.An entry-level course in Fine Art photography emphasizing theory, history and practice. Students will learn how to create images using a digital camera and further enhance those images using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom. Through small group critiques, students will also learn how to read and respond to images. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
1530:TR   DIST
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Mike Potthoff
Course Description:
The overall goal of this course is to give students an understanding of the biology of marine communities. This includes principles of marine science, organisms of the ocean, structure/function of marine ecosystems, and the interactions between humans and the ocean.
0900:TR   DIST
1330:W   DIST
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
Class will be delivered online both asynchronously (recorded lectures/activities) and synchronously (Zoom meetings). Students should reserve lecture times for synchronous Zoom meetings as well as small group work. Labs will also be delivered both asynchronously and synchronously, but students should reserve the entire lab time block to allow for scheduling based on the lab activity. A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
1330:W   DIST
0900:TR   DIST
BIOL 216-02 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
Lecture and lab material will be delivered both asynchronously (recorded lectures/activities) and synchronously (Zoom meetings). Students should reserve lecture and lab times for synchronous Zoom meetings. A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
1030:TR   DIST
1330:R   DIST
BIOL 221-01 Animal Diversity w/Lab
Instructor: Tony Pires
Course Description:
Lectures and labs will take place remotely and synchronously via Zoom. An exploration of the enormous diversity of animal life. We will study developmental processes and evolutionary patterns as a coherent approach to comprehending the organizational principles of disparate animal body plans. Students will be introduced to the morphological and physiological adaptations of the major phyla that fit them to their ecological roles in marine, aquatic and terrestrial environments. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; For Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125.
1030:TR   DIST
1330:T   DIST
BIOL 301-01 Eurasian Invasion, The Columbian Exchange: Biology That Changed the World
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
All lecture synchronous and most labs the same.Beginning in 1492 there has been an exchange of all levels of fauna and flora across the globe. This exchange is known as the Columbian Exchange. The biological consequences of this exchange have been dramatic and all ecosystems on this globe have been altered. Today there exists two Europes, two Africas and two Asias as a result of this exchange of species. One of each exists in the original geographic location and the other in the United States. This course will explore the impact of invasive species on the ecosystems in Central Pennsylvania and to a lesser extent the rest of the United States and the World. This is a field based course. Students will visit local examples of invasive damage, local labs and meet scientists that manage invasive species. Students will also discover the controversies surrounding the purposeful introduction of many species that have become important parts of our local ecosystems.
0830:MWF   DIST
1330:M   DIST
BIOL 313-01 Cell Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Missy Niblock
Course Description:
Asynchronous lecture period M, Synchronous lecture period discussions WF, Synchronous lab Th An introduction to the structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. The course will involve discussion-oriented lectures and readings from the current literature. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying state of the art techniques to cell biological experiments. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
1330:R   DIST
1030:MWF   DIST
BIOL 314-01 Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
Study of the interactions of organisms with each other, and with their environment, at the level of the individual, the population, the community, and the ecosystem. Lectures and readings consider both the theory of ecology and data from empirical research in the classic and current literature. Laboratory and field studies explore how ecologists perform quantitative tests of hypotheses about complex systems in nature. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequiste is NRSC 200. Study of the interactions of organisms with each other, and with their environment, at the level of the individual, the population, the community, and the ecosystem. Lectures and readings consider both the theory of ecology and data from empirical research in the classic and current literature. Laboratory and field studies explore how ecologists perform quantitative tests of hypotheses about complex systems in nature. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequiste is NRSC 200.
0900:TR   DIST
1330:R   DIST
BIOL 323-01 Algae, Fungi & Lichens W/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Lectures and labs will be synchronous but recorded. Labs will have a mix of meetings and guided activities (all safe) that students can do where they are. Students will be given information on what specific times they need to sign in for lab and when they will be doing activities on their own. Activities will be tailored to what students are able to do in their locations; as able, students will be doing outdoor collections and observations and will have lab time to do that. Office hours and individual/small group zoom sessions will also be held and will generally not be recorded if everyone who is supposed to attend is there, but they could be recorded at student request and with agreement of those present. Students will also have the option of doing office hour-type consultations on phone. Study of the systematics, morphology, ecology, evolution, physiology and development of algae, fungi, and lichens. Lecture and discussion include examples and readings from classic and recent research. Laboratories include field surveys and collections, follow-up laboratory identifications, and experimental investigations including directed individual or small-group research projects. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. Offered every other year.
1030:MW   DIST
1230:M   DIST
BIOL 323-02 Algae, Fungi & Lichens W/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Lectures and labs will be synchronous but recorded. Labs will have a mix of meetings and guided activities (all safe) that students can do where they are. Students will be given information on what specific times they need to sign in for lab and when they will be doing activities on their own. Activities will be tailored to what students are able to do in their locations; as able, students will be doing outdoor collections and observations and will have lab time to do that. Office hours and individual/small group zoom sessions will also be held and will generally not be recorded if everyone who is supposed to attend is there, but they could be recorded at student request and with agreement of those present. Students will also have the option of doing office hour-type consultations on phone. Study of the systematics, morphology, ecology, evolution, physiology and development of algae, fungi, and lichens. Lecture and discussion include examples and readings from classic and recent research. Laboratories include field surveys and collections, follow-up laboratory identifications, and experimental investigations including directed individual or small-group research projects. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. Offered every other year.
1030:MW   DIST
1230:W   DIST
BIOL 326-01 Microbiology w/Lab
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required. Molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry (structure and function) of bacteria, archaea, and viruses. Includes an introduction to the immune system and mechanisms of medical control of microbes. Molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis are addressed via readings from the recent primary literature. Laboratory exercises include the isolation and characterization of unknown bacteria using traditional and molecular methods, and modern genomic approaches to characterizing host response to infection. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
1330:W   DIST
1130:MWF   DIST
BIOL 333-01 Physiology w/Lab
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
A study of physiological mechanisms in the animal kingdom, stressing the structural and functional bases of biological activities. Emphasis is on vertebrate organs and organ systems. Laboratory includes experimental physiological studies of selected organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
1330:M   DIST
0930:MWF   DIST
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Jason Gavenonis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01.Course will meet synchronously via Zoom, with recordings made available through Moodle afterward. Lab meetings will be a live demonstration of computational methods in biochemistry (recording available), used to introduce the self-paced exercise for that week's lab. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
1030:TR   DIST
1315:T   DIST
BIOL 343-01 Metabolism
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 343-01. A survey of the metabolic processes in animals and plants, including signal transduction, aerobic and anaerobic respiration, and photosynthesis, as well as the biosynthesis of the major types of biomolecules. For each metabolic pathway, we will examine the regulation of enzymes and related genes, their energetic requirements, and the function of pathway end products. Both the normal functioning of metabolic pathways and common metabolic malfunctions, e.g., human inborn errors of metabolism, will be considered. Selected readings from the primary literature and the popular press are required. Students will complete detailed case studies focusing on human metabolism and metabolic disorders. Three hours classroom a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 343.
0830:MWF   DIST
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
The lecture and lab portions of this course will be delivered via Zoom as a live, synchronous, interactive discussion/demonstration during the scheduled time slot. These sessions will be recorded and posted to Moodle for students unable to attend the live class. Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
1330:M   DIST
0900:TR   DIST
Courses Offered in CHEM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CHEM 131-01 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Amy Witter
Course Description:
Flipped classroom; watch videos before class, synchronous Zoom class will be used to practice problem solving, answer questions. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
0930:MWF   DIST
CHEM 131-02 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Cindy Samet
Course Description:
This course will be delivered via ZOOM at the regularly scheduled class time. The class will be live from my "covid classroom" at home, complete with whiteboard and all of the normal tools. This class will include discussion and group work and will be interactive, just as if we were in a campus classroom. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1030:MWF   DIST
CHEM 131-03 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
The class will meet live using Zoom at the regularly scheduled class time. These sessions will include a mixture of lecture, discussion, problem-solving and small group work using Zoom breakout rooms. Students can use Moodle to access class recordings, the electronic textbook and materials needed for pre-class preparation, assignments and assessments. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1030:TR   DIST
CHEM 131-04 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
The majority of the course information will be presented on Moodle, that the students will work through. These activities will include videos, Moodle Lessons, Moodle quizzes, etc. Synchronous classes on Zoom will be held during class time. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving skills related to the topics for the class period. Small group work will occur using Breakout rooms and Chem 101. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
0900:TR   DIST
CHEM 131-L1 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
Chemistry 131 lab students will design experiments, practice methods of analyzing experimental data, develop lab notebook and scientific writing skills. Each experiment has a prelab lesson on Moodle which goes over the background concepts and calculations for that experiment. The experiment videos and simulations can be done any time during the week. The lab instructor will be available on Zoom to provide guidance on the experiments and answer student questions during the scheduled lab period as well as during other office hours. Students will submit their experiments on a weekly or biweekly basis according to the experiment schedule. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1330:M   DIST
CHEM 131-L2 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
Chemistry 131 lab students will design experiments, practice methods of analyzing experimental data, develop lab notebook and scientific writing skills. Each experiment has a prelab lesson on Moodle which goes over the background concepts and calculations for that experiment. The experiment videos and simulations can be done any time during the week. The lab instructor will be available on Zoom to provide guidance on the experiments and answer student questions during the scheduled lab period as well as during other office hours. Students will submit their experiments on a weekly or biweekly basis according to the experiment schedule. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1800:M   DIST
CHEM 131-L3 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Cindy Samet
Course Description:
Chemistry 131 lab students will design experiments, practice methods of analyzing experimental data, develop lab notebook and scientific writing skills. Each experiment has a prelab lesson on Moodle which goes over the background concepts and calculations for that experiment. The experiment videos and simulations can be done any time during the week. The lab instructor will be available on Zoom to provide guidance on the experiments and answer student questions during the scheduled lab period as well as during other office hours. Students will submit their experiments on a weekly or biweekly basis according to the experiment schedule. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1315:T   DIST
CHEM 131-L4 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
Chemistry 131 lab students will design experiments, practice methods of analyzing experimental data, develop lab notebook and scientific writing skills. Each experiment has a prelab lesson on Moodle which goes over the background concepts and calculations for that experiment. The experiment videos and simulations can be done any time during the week. The lab instructor will be available on Zoom to provide guidance on the experiments and answer student questions during the scheduled lab period as well as during other office hours. Students will submit their experiments on a weekly or biweekly basis according to the experiment schedule. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1330:W   DIST
CHEM 131-L5 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
Chemistry 131 lab students will design experiments, practice methods of analyzing experimental data, develop lab notebook and scientific writing skills. Each experiment has a prelab lesson on Moodle which goes over the background concepts and calculations for that experiment. The experiment videos and simulations can be done any time during the week. The lab instructor will be available on Zoom to provide guidance on the experiments and answer student questions during the scheduled lab period as well as during other office hours. Students will submit their experiments on a weekly or biweekly basis according to the experiment schedule. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1315:R   DIST
CHEM 131-L6 General Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
Chemistry 131 lab students will design experiments, practice methods of analyzing experimental data, develop lab notebook and scientific writing skills. Each experiment has a prelab lesson on Moodle which goes over the background concepts and calculations for that experiment. The experiment videos and simulations can be done any time during the week. The lab instructor will be available on Zoom to provide guidance on the experiments and answer student questions during the scheduled lab period as well as during other office hours. Students will submit their experiments on a weekly or biweekly basis according to the experiment schedule. The first semester of intro chemistry for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences, who have completed one year of HS chemistry but do not place into Chemistry 141. Core principles and applications of chemistry will be covered that will aid students in understanding "Why Chemistry Matters" regardless of discipline. Topics will include: atomic and molecular structure (Lewis, VSEPR), stoichiometry, gas laws, energy and chemical reactions, periodicity, and solubility and intermolecular forces. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1330:F   DIST
CHEM 141-01 Accelerated General Chemistry with Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
There will be pre-recorded online lectures provided and group work, problem solving and discussion will be held during the synchronous class times. Students will be encouraged strongly to attend all synchronous sessions. Lab will also be synchronous and performed in groups using Microsoft Teams. Some labs will be synchronous with edible experiments for students to try at home. A one-semester introductory course for students who are especially well-prepared for general chemistry, replacing CHEM 131, 132 as a prerequisite for more advanced courses in the major. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, acid/base chemistry, solubility, and transition metal chemistry. The laboratory experiments will relate directly to topics covered in lecture, and will include statistical analysis of data, molecular modeling, instrumental methods of analysis, and quantitative analytical and inorganic chemistry. Admittance into this course is based on a placement exam. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1030:TR   DIST
1330:W   DIST
CHEM 141-02 Accelerated General Chemistry with Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
There will be pre-recorded online lectures provided and group work, problem solving and discussion will be held during the synchronous class times. Students will be encouraged strongly to attend all synchronous sessions. Lab will also be synchronous and performed in groups using Microsoft Teams. Some labs will be synchronous with edible experiments for students to try at home. A one-semester introductory course for students who are especially well-prepared for general chemistry, replacing CHEM 131, 132 as a prerequisite for more advanced courses in the major. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, acid/base chemistry, solubility, and transition metal chemistry. The laboratory experiments will relate directly to topics covered in lecture, and will include statistical analysis of data, molecular modeling, instrumental methods of analysis, and quantitative analytical and inorganic chemistry. Admittance into this course is based on a placement exam. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week.
1030:TR   DIST
1330:R   DIST
CHEM 241-01 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
Lecture will be a combination of synchronous (MWF 8:30 local time) and asynchronous (pre-recorded for viewing at leisure) presentations. The class will follow a modified flipped approach: students will watch videos (a combination of videos made by the instructor and videos available on the internet) prior to class time and lectures will be used to build on that information and also to work problems. Synchronous lectures will be done via Zoom and will be recorded and stored; asynchronous lectures will be available online. Moodle will be the home base for the class. Student assessment for the lecture part of the course will be done by a combination of exams and quizzes or short projects. The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 141. Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
0830:MWF   DIST
CHEM 241-02 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun
Course Description:
Organic lecture will be offered with a synchronous component during the specified meeting time. Such sessions will also be recorded for asynchronous viewing. Meetings will consist of a combination of group problem solving and sort, interactive lessons. The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 141. Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
1130:MWF   DIST
CHEM 241-L1 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
Students will be introduced to the practice of organic chemistry using a variety of methods including virtual lab simulations. Laboratory materials will be delivered on Moodle and discussed during weekly live Zoom sessions that begin at the regularly scheduled lab time. Session recordings will be posted for those who can't attend or want to review them. Lab work can be completed asynchronously and submitted weekly. The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 141. Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
1230:M   DIST
CHEM 241-L2 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun
Course Description:
Students will be introduced to the practice of organic chemistry using a variety of methods including virtual lab simulations. Laboratory materials will be delivered on Moodle and discussed during weekly live Zoom sessions that begin at the regularly scheduled lab time. Session recordings will be posted for those who can't attend or want to review them. Lab work can be completed asynchronously and submitted weekly. The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 141. Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
1315:T   DIST
CHEM 241-L3 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun
Course Description:
Students will be introduced to the practice of organic chemistry using a variety of methods including virtual lab simulations. Laboratory materials will be delivered on Moodle and discussed during weekly live Zoom sessions that begin at the regularly scheduled lab time. Session recordings will be posted for those who can't attend or want to review them. Lab work can be completed asynchronously and submitted weekly. The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 141. Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
1230:W   DIST
CHEM 241-L4 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Instructor: Jason Gavenonis
Course Description:
Students will be introduced to the practice of organic chemistry using a variety of methods including virtual lab simulations. Laboratory materials will be delivered on Moodle and discussed during weekly live Zoom sessions that begin at the regularly scheduled lab time. Session recordings will be posted for those who can't attend or want to review them. Lab work can be completed asynchronously and submitted weekly. The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 141. Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
1315:R   DIST
CHEM 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Jason Gavenonis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 342-01.Course will meet synchronously via Zoom, with recordings made available through Moodle afterward. Lab meetings will be a live demonstration of computational methods in biochemistry (recording available), used to introduce the self-paced exercise for that week's lab. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
1315:T   DIST
1030:TR   DIST
CHEM 343-01 Metabolism
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 343-01. A survey of the metabolic processes in animals and plants, including signal transduction, aerobic and anaerobic respiration, and photosynthesis, as well as the biosynthesis of the major types of biomolecules. For each metabolic pathway, we will examine the regulation of enzymes and related genes, their energetic requirements, and the function of pathway end products. Both the normal functioning of metabolic pathways and common metabolic malfunctions, e.g., human inborn errors of metabolism, will be considered. Selected readings from the primary literature and the popular press are required. Students will complete detailed case studies focusing on human metabolism and metabolic disorders. Three hours classroom per week. Prerequisite: 242. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 343.
0830:MWF   DIST
CHEM 347-01 Concepts of Inorganic Chemistry with Lab
Instructor: Sarah St. Angelo
Course Description:
The classroom part of this course will be conducted as combined flipped course. This means that there will be asynchronous work that students should do before meeting for scheduled synchronous meetings. Synchronous work will focus on problem solvng, group activities and discussion of topics in further detail.The laboratory portion of this couse will allow students to explore reactions and properties of inorganic chemistry through professor made videos and videos produced by others. We will still discuss lab techniques, safety, and instrument use but will focus on analysis of data, chemical literature, and professional writing. This course will cover fundamental concepts in inorganic chemistry to include: periodic trends, atomic and molecular structure, ionic bonding and crystal structures, solubility of ionic solids, acid-base chemistry, structure and bonding in coordination compounds, and reactions of transition metal complexes. Throughout the course the unifying theme will be the application of principles of structure and bonding to predict and explain reactions involving inorganic compounds. Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 244, 341 or concurrent enrollment.
1230:W   DIST
0900:TR   DIST
CHEM 490-02 Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Instructor: Amy Witter
Course Description:
Seminar will be taught synchronously using Zoom.
1030:TR   DIST
Courses Offered in COMP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
COMP 130-01 Introduction to Computing
Instructor: Lev Fruchter
Course Description:
Classes will be held synchronously 3 days per week plus a 2 hour synchronous lab once per week. Much work will be done in teams of 3 students, so participants should be eager for online small group projects. Synchronous office hours will be available online at scheduled times and via appointment, but active particpation in online class forums is vital for this course. An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
1500:W   DIST
0830:MWF   DIST
COMP 130-02 Introduction to Computing
Instructor: Lev Fruchter
Course Description:
Classes will be held synchronously 3 days per week plus a 2 hour synchronous lab once per week. Much work will be done in teams of 3 students, so participants should be eager for online small group projects. Synchronous office hours will be available online at scheduled times and via appointment, but active particpation in online class forums is vital for this course An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
1500:R   DIST
1130:MWF   DIST
COMP 132-01 Principles of Object-Oriented Design
Instructor: John MacCormick
Course Description:
All students will meet via Zoom at the scheduled lecture and lab times. An introduction to object-oriented software design using Java. Topics include objects, classes, code modularity and reusability, abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Additional topics include unit testing, recursion, empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: Equivalent of one course of prior programming experience. See Advising Guide for placement advice for 130 and 132. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
1030:MWF   DIST
1500:T   DIST
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 108-01 Arts of East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 108-01.Each class meeting typically consists of 60 minutes of interactive lecture and 15 minutes of discussion of readings. This course introduces students to a selection of objects and sites that elicit new modes of cultural perception and insight into the artistic cultures of China, Korea, and Japan. Loosely arranged in a chronological order, each week is devoted to in-depth examination of a different type of object, medium, and format. The diverse mediums (sculpture, ceramics, metalwork, lacquer, prints, painting, calligraphy, photography, performance, and architecture) and the long historical span covered in class will chart how culture traveled within East Asia, and later, globally, as well as each cultures distinctive methods of adaptation over time. Major themes include the relationship between artistic production and sociopolitical and socioeconomic development, cultural exchange, aesthetics, impact of religion, power and authority, gender, and issues of modernity. Lectures are supplemented by viewing sessions in the Trout Gallery.This course is cross-listed as ARTH 108.
0900:TR   DIST
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 111-01 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
All class lectures will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied with synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop format The choice of times will be 1pm (Friday) and 2pm (Friday). A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
  DIST
ECON 111-02 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
All class lectures will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied with synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop format The choice of times will be 1pm (Friday) and 2pm (Friday). A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
  DIST
ECON 111-03 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Most lectures will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied with synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop format (in groups of up to 20 students) every Tuesday or Thursday at 10:30am ET (our originally scheduled class time). You must choose a meeting time during the first week of class and you will need instructor approval to change groups once the add/drop period ends A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
  DIST
ECON 111-04 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Nicky Tynan
Course Description:
All lectures and assignments will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied by synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop format (in groups of approximately 20 students) every Wednesday at 9:30am ET (our originally scheduled class time), 12:30pm ET, and one other time to be determined. You will be asked to choose a meeting time during the first week of class. A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
  DIST
ECON 111-05 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Nicky Tynan
Course Description:
All lectures and assignments will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied by synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop format (in groups of aproximately 20 students) every Wednesday at 10:30am ET (our originally scheduled class time), 12:30pm ET, or one other time to be determined. You will be asked to choose a meeting time during the first week of class. A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
  DIST
ECON 111-06 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
All lectures will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied with synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop format (in groups of up to 20 students) every Friday at 9:30am ET (our originally scheduled class time) or 2:30pm ET. You must choose a meeting time during the first week of class and you will need instructor approval to change groups once the add/drop period ends. A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
  DIST
ECON 112-01 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Sohani Fatehin
Course Description:
Online lectures in Moodle for both sections and one day meeting (Friday 9.30 am for section 01 and 10.30am for section 02) in zoom. Lectures (both power point and recordings will be uploaded). Problem sets, quiz, Homeworks too (which will be discussed on Friday in zoom). Three exams will be taken including the final exam. Office hour will be given through zoom. A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
0930:F   DIST
ECON 112-02 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Sohani Fatehin
Course Description:
Online lectures in Moodle for both sections and one day meeting (Friday 9.30 am for section 01 and 10.30am for section 02) in zoom. Lectures (both power point and recordings will be uploaded). Problem sets, quiz, Homeworks too (which will be discussed on Friday in zoom). Three exams will be taken including the final exam. Office hour will be given through zoom. A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1030:F   DIST
ECON 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
Most lectures will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied with synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop or discussion format every Friday during our scheduled class time. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
1030:F   DIST
ECON 222-02 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
Most lectures will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied with synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop or discussion format every Friday during scheduled class time. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
1130:F   DIST
ECON 228-01 Economic Analysis of Policy
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
The course will be offered by asynchronous lectures and synchronous math tutorials at the scheduled class times via Zoom. This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.
1330:W   DIST
ECON 240-01 International Development
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 240-01 and INBM 300-08. This course examines the challenges and strategies of economic development, with a detailed focus on how households behave. The goal is to provide an understanding of what life for poor households in developing countries is like, what can be done about it, and an idea of how valuable insights can be gained using standard economic tools and thinking. In addition to learning about theoretical models and real-life examples, we will spend significant time understanding recent research on development problems. Issues examined include: poverty measures, health issues such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and undernutrition, economic growth, agriculture, land use, technology adoption, foreign aid, credits, child labor, child education, migration, and measures of inequality.This course is cross-listed as INST 240.
1330:TF   DIST
ECON 288-01 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
Online you will find homework, reading assignments, lecture notes, slides, and screencasts. Zoom discussion sessions and office hours will supplement asynchronous lectures. A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
1130:MWF   DIST
ECON 332-01 Economics of Natural Resource Sustainability
Instructor: Nicky Tynan
Course Description:
All lectures and assignments will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied by synchronous meetings (via Zoom). The first meeting will take place at 1:30pm ET on Monday 17th August. Subsequent meetings will take place every Thursday at 1:30pm ET (our originally scheduled class time) and at one other time to be determined based on student time zones. You will be asked to participate in at least one meeting each week. This course uses microeconomics to analyze the use and conservation of natural resources, including energy, minerals, fisheries, forests, and water resources, among others. Broad themes include the roles of property rights, intergenerational equity, and sustainable development in an economy based on resource exploitation. Prerequisite: 278. For ENST, ENSC and INST majors, prerequisite is ECON 222.
1330:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in EDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EDST 130-01 History of American Education
Instructor: Liz Lewis, Jamie Teeple
Course Description:
The majority of instruction will be remote, but, when safe and feasible, in-person instruction will take place inside the classroom. Class sessions will be streamed synchronously (including in-person meetings) and will also be recorded for students who can only access instruction asynchronously. An examination of the evolution in the purposes, structures, and methodologies of formal and informal education in the United States from the colonial period to the present with particular attention to how marginalized groups have been educated. The course situates educational history within the broader context of social, political, and economic developments in the U.S. and considers ways in which education has been used to meet societal goals.
1130:MWF   DIST
EDST 140-01 Educational Psychology
Instructor: Liz Lewis, Jamie Teeple
Course Description:
The majority of instruction will be remote, but, when safe and feasible, in-person instruction will take place inside the classroom. Class sessions will be streamed synchronously (including in-person meetings) and will also be recorded for students who can only access instruction asynchronously. An examination of physical, cognitive, and psychological developmental theories and research as well as theories of learning. The course includes theoretical perspectives on: age-stage characteristics, exceptionality, achievement versus aptitude, as well as how developmental, sociocultural, and motivational factors influence student learning in classroom contexts.
1030:MWF   DIST
EDST 260-01 Introduction to Educational Research
Instructor: Liz Lewis
Course Description:
The course will be taught both synchronously and asynchronously. Synchronous instruction will take place in the form of whole class and small group sessions, which will be recorded for students who only have asynchronous access. Students will complete activities and assignments individually as well as with peer partners. Students will participate in individual video conferences with Professor Lewis on a regular basis throughout the semester as a part of the course structure. An introduction to the purposes and methodologies of research in education including how various stakeholders in the educational community use and access research findings as well as how studies in education are designed, implemented, and disseminated. Quantitative, qualitative, and historical methodologies are addressed. Research processes are introduced around the topic of literacy. Students will develop a review of the research literature on a topic related to literacy using online catalogs, databases, and other open access resources to find and gather sources and digital publications formats to disseminate their reviews. Prerequisite: 140.
1030:TR   DIST
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Parts of this course will be taught in a classroom if conditions at the start of the semester and during the semester allow. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. Students who are working remotely will be at no disadvantage. If a student is working remotely in a time zone that does not allow them to participate at the assigned course meeting time, the professor will make arrangements for alternate participation. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1330:MR   DIST
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
This course will be taught remotely with synchronous components. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1330:TF   DIST
Courses Offered in ERSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ERSC 142-01 Earth's Changing Climate
Instructor: Marcus Key
Course Description:
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
0930:MWF   DIST
1330:M   DIST
ERSC 142-02 Earth's Changing Climate
Instructor: Marcus Key
Course Description:
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
0930:MWF   DIST
1330:R   DIST
ERSC 151-01 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Jorden Hayes
Course Description:
Students can expect regular class periods to have small group discussions in zoom break out sessions. Lab kits containing rock samples and other lab materials will be sent to students' homes. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
0900:TR   DIST
1330:T   DIST
ERSC 151-02 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Jorden Hayes
Course Description:
Students can expect regular class periods to have small group discussions in zoom break out sessions. Lab kits containing rock samples and other lab materials will be sent to students' homes. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
1330:W   DIST
0900:TR   DIST
ERSC 205-01 Introduction to Soil Science
Instructor: Benjamin Edwards
Course Description:
The main adaptation for this course will be spending more time than usual learning to use USDA Soils Web Portal GIS for making soils maps and showing soil usage/properties data via maps. We would normally do this anyway, but well do more since we wont have extensive in-person outdoor labs. Students will do some independent soils work at home depending on accessibility to the out-of-doors. This course focuses on giving students a basic understanding of soil formation processes and field/laboratory characterization of soils. Emphasis in the first part of the course will be on soil formation processes, while the second part of the course will focus on students conducting experiments relevant to soil formation. Weather permitting most labs will have an out-of-doors component. This course is an elective for the Earth Sciences major, and will be useful to students interested in the food studies certificate program, agricultural science, archeology, environmental science, forensic science, planetary science, and solid state chemistry and physics.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisie: one introductory lab science or permission of instructor.
1030:MWF   DIST
1330:W   DIST
ERSC 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01 and ENST 218-01.The course will include attending online lectures, participating in virtual discussions and presentations, and completing GIS exercises using a computer and/or smartphone. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
0930:MWF   DIST
1330:F   DIST
ERSC 218-02 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca, Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-02 and ENST 218-02.The course will include attending online lectures, participating in virtual discussions and presentations, and completing GIS exercises using a computer and/or smartphone. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
1330:T   DIST
0930:MWF   DIST
ERSC 301-01 Field Geology
Instructor: Peter Sak
Course Description:
A course in some of the basic geological field techniques, with the preparation of topographic and geologic maps and reports from data obtained by the student in the field. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 151 or permission of instructor.
1030:TR   DIST
1330:R   DIST
ERSC 331-01 Geochemistry
Instructor: Alyson Thibodeau
Course Description:
To the extent possible, there will be synchronous instruction during regularly scheduled lecture periods (MWF). Synchronous instruction will be supplemented with other resources (videos, links, readings, etc.) as appropriate. Lab assignments will be designed so that they can be completed mostly asynchronously. However, there may be some synchronous activities during regularly scheduled lab periods, such as (but not limited to): a live introduction to the material on the lab and class discussions related to lab material. Regularly schedule lab hours may also be used for students to get real-time answers to any questions they have about lab assignments. An introduction to the origin, distribution, and behavior of elements in the geochemical cycles and processes of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Topics include the chemistry of magma, hydrothermal fluids, weathering, fresh and ocean waters, sediment digenesis, hydrocarbons, and metamorphism. Includes radiometric dating and stable isotope applications. Lab will focus on sampling, instrumental analysis, and data interpretation of earth materials. Prerequisites: 151 and CHEM 131 or 141, or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.
1330:M   DIST
1130:MWF   DIST
Courses Offered in FMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FMST 220-05 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 221-01.An entry-level course in Fine Art photography emphasizing theory, history and practice. Students will learn how to create images using a digital camera and further enhance those images using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom. Through small group critiques, students will also learn how to read and respond to images.
1330:TR   DIST
FMST 220-06 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 221-02.An entry-level course in Fine Art photography emphasizing theory, history and practice. Students will learn how to create images using a digital camera and further enhance those images using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom. Through small group critiques, students will also learn how to read and respond to images.
1530:TR   DIST
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 240-01 Food, France, and Cultural Identity
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
This course aims to examine the past, present and future of French food culture and systems through a multitude of lenses, including gender, race, class, and environmental. This course will investigate France's epicurean traditions and agricultural systems to understand the complex relationships among gastronomic practices, food and farming industries, and French identity. An inquiry of this type must certainly consider numerous questions relating to sustainability: the sustainability and/or development of traditions, values, systems, and resources. Moreover, students will be asked to reflect on their own culinary customs as well as the agro-business systems of their native countries and the globalized world. Through intercultural analysis, students will learn more about how a region's food habits and ideologies relate to and affect environmental and health concerns of its inhabitants.
1030:TR   DIST
FREN 240-02 Food, France, and Cultural Identity
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
This class will meet in the classroom on Thursdays.This course aims to examine the past, present and future of French food culture and systems through a multitude of lenses, including gender, race, class, and environmental. This course will investigate France's epicurean traditions and agricultural systems to understand the complex relationships among gastronomic practices, food and farming industries, and French identity. An inquiry of this type must certainly consider numerous questions relating to sustainability: the sustainability and/or development of traditions, values, systems, and resources. Moreover, students will be asked to reflect on their own culinary customs as well as the agro-business systems of their native countries and the globalized world. Through intercultural analysis, students will learn more about how a region's food habits and ideologies relate to and affect environmental and health concerns of its inhabitants.
1330:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-02 History of Climate Change
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
This remote class will require whole group and small group zoom meetings, as well as individual meetings with the professor and significant independent research. Students should keep the listed class time slot, TF 1:30-2:45, available on their weekly schedules for synchronous discussions/activities.While we may think of climate change mostly in terms of the futures it threatens, its a human-created disaster and so has a human history. So too do the solutions currently underway to respond to it. In this U.S.-focused class well examine and research the rise of fossil fuels, the building of unequal and vulnerable landscapes, the birth and development of climate science, the intentional construction of climate denial, and the consequent failures of climate politics. However, well also look at the histories of renewable energy, soil building, mass forest planting, ocean farming, organic farming, protest, movement-building, regulation, and political action. In doing so, well help create usable histories for a survivable and ethical future.
1330:TF   DIST
Courses Offered in INBM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INBM 100-01 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Steve Riccio
Course Description:
The course will be taught in a synchronous format. Students will be divided into groups of 20 and will participate in forty minute class discussions during the alloted time periods. Pre-work materials and assignments will be submitted to Moodle for completion prior to the class discussions. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 110
INBM 100-02 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Sherry Ritchey
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
0930:MWF   DIST
INBM 100-03 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Sherry Ritchey
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
1030:MWF   DIST
INBM 110-01 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
Both synchronous and asynchronous components This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
0900:TR   DIST
INBM 110-02 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
Both synchronous and asynchronous components This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
1030:TR   DIST
INBM 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
1500:TF   DIST
INBM 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-02.The Professor will use Zoom and meet with students for all 42 sessions. Each session will be recorded, with transcripts added, and will be posted in Moodle folder for the day. Depending on the material for the day, the pedagogy will range from lectures, to informal cooperative learning, to breakout rooms for student conversations. The Professor will NOT administer exams. Nor will he assign a class preparation and participation grade. Instead, each week, the professor will appoint students to a new team of 3 students. The professor will post a problem set: It will be due 10 days later. Each team of will submit one set of answers and each student on the team will receive the same grade. In total, each student will work with others on 12 problem sets. Since each will be worth 100 points, there will be 1200 possible points to earn during the semester. With respect to intangible outcomes, the course will stress the ability to collaborate with others, one of the most important skill in addressing the complex problems of the 21st Century. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
1030:MWF   DIST
INBM 230-01 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Dengjian Jin
Course Description:
The course will be offered synchronously. This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course may fulfill Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement, depending upon topic.
0930:MWF   DIST
INBM 230-02 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Steve Riccio
Course Description:
The course will be taught in a synchronous format. Pre-work materials and assignments will be submitted to Moodle for completion prior to the class discussions. This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course may fulfill Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement, depending upon topic.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 110
INBM 240-01 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Uwe Paff
Course Description:
I plan to teach the courses online at the same times, when I was supposed to teach in class. For those of the students, who have difficulties attending, I will record the parts of the Zoom lecture and put in online. The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
1330:MR   DIST
INBM 240-02 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Uwe Paff
Course Description:
I plan to teach the courses online at the same times, when I was supposed to teach in class. For those of the students, who have difficulties attending, I will record the parts of the Zoom lecture and put in online. The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
1500:MR   DIST
INBM 300-07 Business & Climate Change
Instructor: Helen Takacs
Course Description:
This course will be taught remotely using on-line pre-recorded mini-lectures, assignment worksheets, discussion forums, and synchronous Zoom sessions.Climate change, spurred by greenhouse gas emissions that have climbed since the industrial revolution, is being described as the most important challenge of our time. The business community, once hesitant to act on and even skeptical about climate change, is now stepping up. For example, the worlds largest investment company, Blackrock, Inc., announced at the start of this year that it will begin incorporating climate change into its portfolio decisions. In this course, we will explore the wide array of risks and opportunities that climate change presents for businesses; the many ways that businesses are responding to climate change; and, perhaps most importantly, how businesses can lead the effort to mitigate climate change and even contribute to the reversal or drawdown of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere.
0900:TR   DIST
INBM 300-08 International Development
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 240-01 and ECON 240-01.
1330:TF   DIST
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01Course content will be delivered via weekly asynchronous, recorded PowerPoint videos to which I will add my narration. We will have one live, synchronous Zoom class session each week during the scheduled class time to discuss readings and to help clarify points from the PowerPoint videos. The second scheduled weekly class time will be for one-on-one Zoom consultations. You should complete each weeks assigned readings (~50 pages per week) and view the weeks PowerPoint videos (~1 hour per week) prior to each live meeting. Other details about course requirements will be provided during the first week of the semester. Note: I will record the live sessions for those who occasionally miss them and for others to review. However, if time zone issues or other considerations mean you will generally not be able to participate live, you should consider another course that works better in your schedule. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
0900:TR   DIST
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02.Lectures will be posted asynchronously, as well as some other online activities; we will meet on zoom as a large group during the regular course time An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1330:MR   DIST
INST 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-03.Asynchronous presentations of content, chunked for digestibility, will be delivered via Moodle. Discussion sessions will meet twice weekly in smaller groups. I will divide the scheduled class time (TF 130P - 245P) among three groups. Students and I will meet via Zoom (video optional for students), for around 20 minutes, then the next group will switch in. Sessions will be recorded so students can review their own group discussion as well as others, ensuring equity. Students abroad or who are for any other reason unable to participate in synchronous sessions can review the recordings of those group discussions and then schedule one-on-one conversations with me. Assessment will be a combination of weekly low-stakes quizzes, participation points for contributions to synchronous and asynchronous (forum) discussions, and essay-based exams. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1330:TF   DIST
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1500:TF   DIST
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-02.The Professor will use Zoom and meet with students for all 42 sessions. Each session will be recorded, with transcripts added, and will be posted in Moodle folder for the day. Depending on the material for the day, the pedagogy will range from lectures, to informal cooperative learning, to breakout rooms for student conversations. The Professor will NOT administer exams. Nor will he assign a class preparation and participation grade. Instead, each week, the professor will appoint students to a new team of 3 students. The professor will post a problem set: It will be due 10 days later. Each team of will submit one set of answers and each student on the team will receive the same grade. In total, each student will work with others on 12 problem sets. Since each will be worth 100 points, there will be 1200 possible points to earn during the semester. With respect to intangible outcomes, the course will stress the ability to collaborate with others, one of the most important skill in addressing the complex problems of the 21st Century. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1030:MWF   DIST
INST 240-01 International Development
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 240-01 and INBM 300-08. This course examines the challenges and strategies of economic development, with a detailed focus on how households behave. The goal is to provide an understanding of what life for poor households in developing countries is like, what can be done about it, and an idea of how valuable insights can be gained using standard economic tools and thinking. In addition to learning about theoretical models and real-life examples, we will spend significant time understanding recent research on development problems. Issues examined include: poverty measures, health issues such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and undernutrition, economic growth, agriculture, land use, technology adoption, foreign aid, credits, child labor, child education, migration, and measures of inequality.This course is cross-listed as ECON 240.
1330:TF   DIST
INST 273-01 International Political Economy
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 273-01.Course content will be delivered via weekly asynchronous, recorded PowerPoint videos to which I will add my narration. We will have one live, synchronous Zoom class session each week during the scheduled class time to discuss readings and to help clarify points from the PowerPoint videos. The second scheduled weekly class time will be for one-on-one Zoom consultations. You should complete each weeks assigned readings (~75 pages per week) and view the weeks PowerPoint videos (~1 hour per week) prior to each live meeting. Other details about course requirements will be provided during the first week of the semester. Note: I will record the live sessions for those who occasionally miss them and for others to review. However, if time zone issues or other considerations mean you will generally not be able to participate live, you should consider another course that works better in your schedule. This course examines the politics of global economic relations. Specific topics discussed include: trade and protectionism, international monetary relations, foreign direct investment, global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and World Trade Organization (WTO), regional economic integration (e.g. the European Union [EU] and North American Free Trade Agreement [NAFTA], economic development, and the economic emergence of China and India. The larger issue serving as the backdrop to all of this is economic globalization -- its significance, sources, and consequences. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 273.
1330:MR   DIST
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01.Zoom instruction with class materials and reading online. Special sessions provided for students who cannot tune in at scheduled class times (in other countries, time zones, special circumstances, etc.) Thorough description of procedures will be sent directly to students with syllabus. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
1330:TF   DIST
INST 290-03 Global Environmental Politics
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03.The class will combine synchronous discussions and activities during scheduled class time along with asynchronous readings, lectures and assignments. Global environmental politics seeks to understand how the global environment is being changed by humanity and how states, organizations, individuals, communities, societies, movements and corporations are responding to planetary environmental issues. In this course, we discuss the causes of global environmental problems and how solutions have been conceptualized and put into practice over the last several decades. We examine trends in global environmental governance, and focus on the role of the sovereign state and global organizations in designing, implementing and enforcing effective international environmental agreements and regimes. We study the growing role in global environmental politics of global civil society and multinational corporations. Finally, we consider the major tensions and controversies that characterize global environmental politics such as the impact of economics and trade, sustainable development, and the role of knowledge, power and science. This course engages with a broad range of materials from the global environmental politics literature and endeavors to represent different methodological and conceptual approaches. The course is not organized around environmental issue areas but rather focuses on the underlying dynamics of power, authority, interests, legitimacy and ideas that ultimately shape environmental debates. We focus on how theory informs policy making and learn to recognize the constraints and opportunities available for addressing environmental challenges in a changing world. The course will incorporate lectures and seminar discussions as well as possible field trip and guest speakers.
1330:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 248-01.This course will be taught in a mostly synchronous manner during its scheduled times (Tuesdays/Thursdays, 10:30-11:45 am). Enrolled students can expect to have a discussion-based course, supplemented by short asynchronous lectures, discussion boards, and writings. During our synchronous class meetings, students can also expect to work at crucial times in small groups and contribute to peer-to-peer activities. Please note that I would be happy to work with students who have concerns about attending class during the appointed meeting times. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 248.
1030:TR   DIST
Courses Offered in MATH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MATH 121-01 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Tony Mixell
Course Description:
Flipped Classroom format. Class will meet on Tuesdays and Fridays, 1:30-2:45 pm (Eastern Standard Time) via Zoom for practice problem and homework discussion. Students are to prepare for each meeting by watching/taking notes from posted videos. Textbook and class workbook required (purchase via bookstore website). Weekly homework assigned with periodical assessments. Minitab software will be utilized by students for exploration of topics and assignment completion. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
1330:TF   DIST
MATH 121-02 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Jackie Campbell
Course Description:
The course will be taught primarily in a remote format (mostly synchronous), with some in-person components. The primary in-person component will be small group sessions to work through material. In addition, exams may take place in person in an appropriately sized classroom, where possible. Alternatives to these in-person components will be provided to students who cannot attend on-campus course meetings. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
1500:TF   DIST
MATH 151-01 Introduction to Calculus
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
Links to short lecture videos will be posted along with other assignments for this class on Moodle. Students may be expected to attend class meetings synchronously online during scheduled class meeting times. Ideally, students in this class should plan to be able to upload PDFs of assignments, download PDF assignments, video conference, and/or use apps from the Microsoft 365 Office Suite in Gateway (no purchase necessary!). The capability to write on a tablet or phone screen with a stylus is a plus, though not required. Students with concerns about synchronous meetings or technology requirements are welcome to contact the instructor for more information. An introduction to limits and derivatives together with a review of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1330:W   DIST
0930:MWF   DIST
MATH 151-02 Introduction to Calculus
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
Links to short lecture videos will be posted along with other assignments for this class on Moodle. Students may be expected to attend class meetings synchronously online during scheduled class meeting times. Ideally, students in this class should plan to be able to upload PDFs of assignments, download PDF assignments, video conference, and/or use apps from the Microsoft 365 Office Suite in Gateway (no purchase necessary!). The capability to write on a tablet or phone screen with a stylus is a plus, though not required. Students with concerns about synchronous meetings or technology requirements are welcome to contact the instructor for more information. An introduction to limits and derivatives together with a review of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1500:W   DIST
1030:MWF   DIST
MATH 170-01 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Barry Tesman
Course Description:
The course will be synchronous and recorded for those who can't "attend" the lecture. I will incorporate a mandatory synchronous component for those who can't attend my lecture. The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
0930:MWF   DIST
1500:R   DIST
MATH 170-02 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Eddie Tu
Course Description:
Lecture videos will be posted regularly as a part of the asynchronous component of the course. Labs will be done synchronously, and students will be required to attend one additional synchronous session each week. Students unable to attend the synchronous session at the regularly scheduled times will be provided with alternative sessions. The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1330:R   DIST
1030:MWF   DIST
MATH 170-03 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Holley Friedlander
Course Description:
Twosynchronoussessions(onelecture,onelab)perweekandadditionalasynchronouscollaborativeworkwillberequired.Recordingsoralternativestosynchronoussessionswillbeprovidedforthoseunabletoattendsynchronously.Studentsshouldhaveaccesstoacomputerwithinternetandideallyasmartphoneortabletonwhichtheycandownloadapps. The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1130:MWF   DIST
1330:T   DIST
MATH 171-01 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
Course Description:
This course will be a combination of asynchronous lecture that can be viewed online and synchronous discussion and problem solving held during the scheduled class time. Alternatives to synchronous sessions will be provided for those unable to attend synchronously. Students should have access to a computer with internet and ideally a smartphone or tablet on which they can download apps. Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1330:R   DIST
0930:MWF   DIST
MATH 171-02 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Eddie Tu
Course Description:
Lecture videos will be posted regularly as a part of the asynchronous component of the course. Labs will be done synchronously, and students will be required to attend one additional synchronous session each week. Students unable to attend the synchronous session at the regularly scheduled times will be provided with alternative sessions. Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
0830:MWF   DIST
1330:M   DIST
MATH 211-01 Foundations of Higher Mathematics
Instructor: David Richeson
Course Description:
This class will have some asynchronous online material, but most of the class will be held synchronously at the scheduled time of the course. This is a course in which class participation and discussion are essential, so to the extent possible, students should work in an environment in which they can use their microphone. An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics and computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic, sets, functions, and methods of proof. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 130 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
0900:TR   DIST
MATH 211-02 Foundations of Higher Mathematics
Instructor: David Richeson
Course Description:
The course will be taught as a hybrid course. Students will watch prerecorded videos outside of class. The class will meet in person at the scheduled class times, although the duration of the class meetings will be shorter than the scheduled class times. The professor will work with students who are unable to return to campus to find a suitable workaround for not being able to be present in class. An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics and computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic, sets, functions, and methods of proof. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 130 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1030:TR   DIST
MATH 225-01 Probability and Statistics I
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
This course will have asynchronous lectures and Zoom-style group meetings for discussion. Zoom Office Hours will also be held. An introduction to the core topics of probability and statistics. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions, expectation, variance, random sampling from populations, hypothesis tests, and confidence intervals.Prerequisite: 171. Offered every fall.
0930:MWF   DIST
MATH 262-01 Linear Algebra
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Video lectures will be provided that students will watch and take notes from asynchronously, but we will meet during our regular class time through Zoom. Students will be required to attend the synchronous weekly Zoom meetings that will take place during the regularly scheduled times (I will make exceptions for certain circumstances, such as large time-zone differences). An introduction to matrix algebra and abstract vector spaces with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. Topics include linear systems and matrices, vector spaces, linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.Prerequisite: 211 or permission of the instructor. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
1030:TR   DIST
PHIL 102-01 Introduction to Ethics
Instructor: Jim Sias
Course Description:
Reading assignments and video lectures will be posted to the course website at the beginning of each week. Then well meet (synchronously, on Zoom) at our originally scheduled time on Friday mornings to discuss the weeks material.Since the end of the Cold War there has been a turn toward conflicts within states and violence perpetrated by non-state actors. This course is intended to explore the theories about the emergence of civil wars and violence by non-state actors, the nature of these conflicts, and the rebuilding of peace. The class will focus around three central questions: what is political violence? Why and how does one participate in violence? How do conflicts end? In answering each of these questions, the class will examine theoretical arguments for violence and non-violence in conflict, as well as critically engage with local and international responses. We will discuss civil war, revolution, terrorism, and other strategies of political violence, as well as how internal conflicts end. An introduction to the philosophical study of morality, focusing on concepts of right and wrong, virtue and vice, and wellbeing. This course provides students the opportunity to hone their ethical reasoning skills by critically examining how some of historys most influential philosophers thought about issues in morality. Students will also develop more general skills, such as evaluating philosophical arguments, and expressing and defending their own ideas in writing.
1030:WF   DIST
PHIL 104-01 Practical Ethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
We will have synchronous meetings for this course. The instructor will provide opportunities for 1-1 meetings during office hours on Zoom. This course introduces students to contemporary debates in practical ethics. Course materials investigate how theoretical approaches to ethics apply to practical issues, including discussions of animal ethics, environmental ethics, reproductive ethics, civil disobedience, and the ethics of mass incarceration and the death penalty. This course is best suited for students interested in thinking about the relationship between ethical theory and practice, with an emphasis on how power, privilege, and responsibility intersect in our everyday lives.
0930:MWF   DIST
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01.Class will be taught synchronously via zoom and will feature a combination of lecture, discussion, and team exercises. Student online attendance is required, although absences for legitimate reasons will be excused. Participation in discussions and team exercises is factored into the final grade. If, for any reason, students are generally unable to join remotely during the scheduled time period, they should consider taking a different class, one that fits their schedule and time zone. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
0900:TR   DIST
PHIL 180-02 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-02.Asynchronous presentations of content will be delivered via Moodle. Discussion sessions will meet synchronously in smaller groups during regular class time. Sessions will be recorded so students can review their own group discussion as well as others, ensuring equity. Students abroad or who are for any other reason unable to participate in synchronous sessions can review the recordings of those group discussions and also schedule one-on-one conversations with me. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
1130:MWF   DIST
PHIL 256-01 Philosophy of Mind
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
This course investigates the nature of the mind and its relation to the brain, body, and the surrounding world. Analyses of these topics will draw on information from fields such as psychology, neuroscience, cognitive science, or computer science. Prerequisite: one previous course in philosophy, or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in PHYS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHYS 131-01 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
This course will meet at the scheduled times using Zoom. Students unable to attend due to time-zone issues should contact the professor so that alternate arrangements can be made. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Kinematics, Newton's Laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, and oscillations are studied during the first semester. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, MATH 151 or 170.
0930:MWF   DIST
PHYS 131-02 Introductory Physics
Instructor: David Jackson
Course Description:
This course will meet at the scheduled times using zoom. Students who are not able to attend due to time-zone issues should contact the Professor so that alternate arrangements can be made. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Kinematics, Newton's Laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, and oscillations are studied during the first semester. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, MATH 151 or 170.
1330:MWF   DIST
PHYS 141-01 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Robert Boyle
Course Description:
Students will be expected to attend synchronous lecture and lab sections if at all possible. Classes and labs will be recorded and will be made available for those students who cannot attend synchronous sessions or who wish to review the material. Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141.
1330:M   DIST
1130:MWF   DIST
PHYS 141-02 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Windsor Morgan, Robert Boyle
Course Description:
Lab will be synchronous via Zoom Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141.
1330:W   DIST
1130:MWF   DIST
Courses Offered in PMGT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PMGT 301-01 Policy and Leadership
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
This course will focus both on traditional (top-down)and other less traditional models of leadership (bottom-up, e.g., grass roots advocacy, consensus building, and other less hierarchical models of shared leadership). Leadership in a variety of organizational contexts (e.g., public, private, and non-profit sectors) will be covered, and ethics will be an important theme woven throughout the course. Prerequisite: LAWP/PMGT 200.
1330:R   DIST
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
This class will be flexibly designed in order to accommodate students working in different places and times. Each week, students will be expected to stream a series of short video lectures, and to complete several course readings, at a time that is convenient for them. Then, all students will be expected to participate in one synchronous discussion section held via Zoom on Thursday afternoon 3-4pm OR Friday morning 9-10am. Students can choose which section best fits their schedule on a week-to-week basis. Alternative methods of completing the course can also be arranged for students unavailable at these specific times. Course assignments will include regular quizzes on course video lectures and readings, a series of short papers, and a lengthy final essay. A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
  DIST
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01.Course content will be delivered via weekly asynchronous, recorded PowerPoint videos to which I will add my narration. We will have one live, synchronous Zoom class session each week during the scheduled class time to discuss readings and to help clarify points from the PowerPoint videos. The second scheduled weekly class time will be for one-on-one Zoom consultations. You should complete each weeks assigned readings (~50 pages per week) and view the weeks PowerPoint videos (~1 hour per week) prior to each live meeting. Other details about course requirements will be provided during the first week of the semester. Note: I will record the live sessions for those who occasionally miss them and for others to review. However, if time zone issues or other considerations mean you will generally not be able to participate live, you should consider another course that works better in your schedule. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
0900:TR   DIST
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02.Lectures will be posted asynchronously, as well as some other online activities; we will meet on zoom as a large group during the regular course time An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:MR   DIST
POSC 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-03.Asynchronous presentations of content, chunked for digestibility, will be delivered via Moodle. Discussion sessions will meet twice weekly in smaller groups. I will divide the scheduled class time (TF 130P - 245P) among three groups. Students and I will meet via Zoom (video optional for students), for around 20 minutes, then the next group will switch in. Sessions will be recorded so students can review their own group discussion as well as others, ensuring equity. Students abroad or who are for any other reason unable to participate in synchronous sessions can review the recordings of those group discussions and then schedule one-on-one conversations with me. Assessment will be a combination of weekly low-stakes quizzes, participation points for contributions to synchronous and asynchronous (forum) discussions, and essay-based exams. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:TF   DIST
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01.Class will be taught synchronously via zoom and will feature a combination of lecture, discussion, and team exercises. Student online attendance is required, although absences for legitimate reasons will be excused. Participation in discussions and team exercises is factored into the final grade. If, for any reason, students are generally unable to join remotely during the scheduled time period, they should consider taking a different class, one that fits their schedule and time zone. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
0900:TR   DIST
POSC 180-02 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-02.Asynchronous presentations of content will be delivered via Moodle. Discussion sessions will meet synchronously in smaller groups during regular class time. Sessions will be recorded so students can review their own group discussion as well as others, ensuring equity. Students abroad or who are for any other reason unable to participate in synchronous sessions can review the recordings of those group discussions and also schedule one-on-one conversations with me. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
1130:MWF   DIST
POSC 204-01 Competing Political Ideologies
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
This class surveys the major ideologies that compete for political support in Western societies, such as liberalism, conservatism, and socialism, as well as radical alternatives (anarchism and fascism), and new perspectives such as feminism and ecologism/environmentalism. We will also examine the nature of ideology, and whether it is possible to develop a neutral, non-ideological perspective on politics. Prerequisite: 180, or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   DIST
POSC 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 248-01.This course will be taught in a mostly synchronous manner during its scheduled times (Tuesdays/Thursdays, 10:30-11:45 am). Enrolled students can expect to have a discussion-based course, supplemented by short asynchronous lectures, discussion boards, and writings. During our synchronous class meetings, students can also expect to work at crucial times in small groups and contribute to peer-to-peer activities. Please note that I would be happy to work with students who have concerns about attending class during the appointed meeting times. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 248.
1030:TR   DIST
POSC 258-01 Human Rights
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Lectures will be posted asynchronously, some group activities will take place online (e.g. quizzes,discussion boards, and short writing assignments), the class will meet all together on Thursday during the regular course meeting time The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights embodies a global consensus on the fundamental importance of human rights as a political value. But the idea and its practical applications have provoked intense controversy around the world on issues such as freedom of expression, capital punishment and torture, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, social and economic justice, and cultural and minority rights. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   DIST
POSC 273-01 International Political Economy
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 273-01.Course content will be delivered via weekly asynchronous, recorded PowerPoint videos to which I will add my narration. We will have one live, synchronous Zoom class session each week during the scheduled class time to discuss readings and to help clarify points from the PowerPoint videos. The second scheduled weekly class time will be for one-on-one Zoom consultations. You should complete each weeks assigned readings (~75 pages per week) and view the weeks PowerPoint videos (~1 hour per week) prior to each live meeting. Other details about course requirements will be provided during the first week of the semester. Note: I will record the live sessions for those who occasionally miss them and for others to review. However, if time zone issues or other considerations mean you will generally not be able to participate live, you should consider another course that works better in your schedule. This course examines the politics of global economic relations. Specific topics discussed include: trade and protectionism, international monetary relations, foreign direct investment, global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and World Trade Organization (WTO), regional economic integration (e.g. the European Union [EU] and North American Free Trade Agreement [NAFTA], economic development, and the economic emergence of China and India. The larger issue serving as the backdrop to all of this is economic globalization -- its significance, sources, and consequences. Prerequisite: 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 273.
1330:MR   DIST
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01.Zoom instruction with class materials and reading online. Special sessions provided for students who cannot tune in at scheduled class times (in other countries, time zones, special circumstances, etc.) Thorough description of procedures will be sent directly to students with syllabus. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
1330:TF   DIST
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 140-01 Social Psychology
Instructor: Grace Larson
Course Description:
One group of students will meet synchronously via Zoom during Tuesday's class session and one group will meet during Friday's class session, in additional to participating in asynchronous learning activities. In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior. In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior.
1330:TF   DIST
PSYC 140-02 Social Psychology
Instructor: Grace Larson
Course Description:
One group of students will meet synchronously via Zoom during Tuesday's class session and one group will meet during Friday's class session, in additional to participating in asynchronous learning activities. In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior. In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior.
1500:TF   DIST
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
0900:TR   DIST
SOCI 230-01 Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Instructor: Neil Leary
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SUST 200-01. What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States. We will meet synchronously using Zoom during scheduled class sessions for discussions, learning activities, and occasional lectures. Asynchronous course elements will include readings, videos, assignments to be completed outside of class meeting times, and some short pre-recorded lectures.
1030:TR   DIST
SOCI 236-01 Inequalities in the U.S.
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
Synchronous class meetings will occur during scheduled time, with additional study group meetings scheduled separately. The professor will post texts, lectures, films, podcasts, etc. for students to review during each week. This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year.
0900:TR   DIST
SOCI 237-01 Global Inequality
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year. Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year.
1500:TF   DIST
SOCI 244-01 Quantitative Research Methods
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Quantitative Research Methods introduces students to basic principles of sociological research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students learn to conceptualize a research question, operationalize key concepts, identify relevant literature, and form research hypotheses. Then, using elementary tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, they choose appropriate statistical methods, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions. Special emphasis is given to interpreting numbers with clear, persuasive language, in both oral and written formats. Students will become proficient in using quantitative software for data analysis. Two and a half hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 110. Quantitative Research Methods introduces students to basic principles of sociological research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students learn to conceptualize a research question, operationalize key concepts, identify relevant literature, and form research hypotheses. Then, using elementary tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, they choose appropriate statistical methods, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions. Special emphasis is given to interpreting numbers with clear, persuasive language, in both oral and written formats. Students will become proficient in using quantitative software for data analysis. Two and a half hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 110.
1330:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in SUST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SUST 200-01 Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Instructor: Neil Leary
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-01. What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States. We will meet synchronously using Zoom during scheduled class sessions for discussions, learning activities, and occasional lectures. Asynchronous course elements will include readings, videos, assignments to be completed outside of class meeting times, and some short pre-recorded lectures.
1030:TR   DIST