Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 162-01 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Margaret Douglas
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161 This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
1330:T   KAUF 109
0900:TR   KAUF 186
ENST 162-02 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Margaret Douglas
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161 This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
1330:W   KAUF 109
0900:TR   KAUF 186
ENST 162-03 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Maiko Arashiro
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161 This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
1330:R   KAUF 109
1030:TR   KAUF 187
ENST 303-01 Urban Planning and Environmental Systems
Instructor: Scott Kalafatis
Course Description:
With an increasing majority of the worlds population living in urban areas, cities have emerged as key sites for addressing the environmental challenges that society faces. Students in this course will explore the roles that urban areas play in society, their connections with the natural world, and their emerging efforts to lead the transition to a more sustainable future. To shed light on dynamics driving their actions and impact, we will use systems thinking to analyze urbanization from several different angles. Through doing so, we will reveal how cities represent physical, social, governmental, and environmental systems that fundamentally shape humanities relationship with the natural world.
1330:MR   TOME 117
ENST 305-01 Mammalogy
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
This lecture and lab course will provide students with a solid foundation in the study of mammals. Students will be introduced to the different taxonomic groups of mammals through various topics including evolutionary history, adaptations, physiology, diversity, biogeography, behavioral ecology, community ecology, and conservation. Familiarity of mammalian groups to the family level and identification of Pennsylvania fauna to species level will be expected of each participant. Labs will incorporate the use of existing mammal skins and skulls as well as the providing students the opportunity to learn how to prepare museum specimens (optional), along with a museum field trip and visits to one or more active research sites.
1330:W   KAUF 113
0830:MWF   KAUF 187
ENST 305-02 Conservation Biology
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
We appear to be entering the sixth major extinction of biodiversity in the history of life on earth. Unlike the previous five mass extinctions, this one is largely a result of human activity. The field of conservation biology has developed to face the challenge of protecting the worlds biological diversity and to better understand human impacts on species, communities, and ecosystems. In this course, we will examine the biological diversity of life on Earth: what is it, where is it, and how do we measure it? As a class, we will explore the history of diversity change through geologic time and discuss the implications of human activities on biodiversity. Through a series of readings, case studies, and hands-on activities, this course will cover the principles of conservation biology, as well as the ways in which we value biodiversity, including ecological, economic, and ethical perspectives. This course may count as a theme course in both the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies major or as an Applications of Environmental Science course.
1330:T   KAUF 116
0900:TR   KAUF 178
ENST 305-03 Wildlife Monitoring Methods and Technology
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
This field course will provide students with a solid foundation and hands on experiences regarding the practical use of specific tools and the application of field methods and techniques used in both environmental consulting and wildlife sciences today. Coursework will focus on numerous topics including research and experimental design; collection, management and analysis of data; identification of animals and marking techniques; measuring animal abundance; assessment of wildlife habitat, the role of radio and satellite telemetry; and the practical application of spatial technology (GIS). Students will gain hands on experience in reading and using topographic maps, interpreting aerial photos, using a compass and hand held GPS, orienteering, and creating maps in GIS. Students will also learn about employing and in many cases practicing various monitoring techniques such as spot mapping, area searches, conducting point counts, nest searches, transect surveys, live trapping and marking, use of remote cameras; telemetry; and the use of mist nets for capturing birds and mammals. At least one field trip will include a day long (weekend) visit to an active research site.
1330:F   KAUF 113
ENST 306-01 Citizen Science: Possibilities and Pitfalls
Instructor: Scott Kalafatis
Course Description:
Every year, the impact of science and technology on our lives increases, but skepticism about the conclusions of scientific research abounds and social problems that require scientific attention go unaddressed. Many have argued that involving the general public in collaborative scientific research can empower communities, increase public understanding of the scientific process, reduce social inequalities, and enhance the relevance and rigor of science. This course introduces students to the issues surrounding this citizen science why people advocate for it, the positive impacts it can have for both science and society, and the potential pitfalls that it might present. By the end of the course, students should have a better sense of when and how citizen science should and shouldnt be pursued. They will have the opportunity to learn from those who have practiced citizen science as well as design their own strategy for using citizen science to address a social problem of their choosing.
1500:MR   TOME 117
ENST 330-01 Environmental Policy
Instructor: Scott Kalafatis
Course Description:
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 161 and 162, or permission of instructor. This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 161 and 162, or permission of instructor.
0900:TR   KAUF 179
ENST 361-01 The Role of Natural Science in Environmental Studies
Instructor: Brian Pedersen
Course Description:
What can natural science contribute to our understanding of the interactions between humans and our environment? What makes it possible for natural science to provide this understanding? What are the limits on natural sciences capacity to contribute to environmental studies? Answers to these questions come from the humanities, social science, and natural science. From these perspectives, this course will examine natural science as a way of knowing, and explore the application of natural science to environmental challenges. Laboratory activities will provide opportunities for students to work with ideas and processes that are fundamental to natural science, and experience how natural science is applied in environmental studies. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 162 or any three natural science courses or junior class standing. What can natural science contribute to our understanding of the interactions between humans and our environment? What makes it possible for natural science to provide this understanding? What are the limits on natural sciences capacity to contribute to environmental studies? Answers to these questions come from the humanities, social science, and natural science. From these perspectives, this course will examine natural science as a way of knowing, and explore the application of natural science to environmental challenges. Laboratory activities will provide opportunities for students to work with ideas and processes that are fundamental to natural science, and experience how natural science is applied in environmental studies. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 162 or any three natural science courses or junior class standing.
1030:MWF   KAUF 113
1330:M   KAUF 113
ENST 372-01 Environment, Conflict and Peace
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03. The goal of this class is to examine the complex relationships between the environment, conflict and peace. We will discuss the emergence of the environment as a topic of conflict and peace studies, and ask if the environment should be a security concern. We will scrutinize the extent to which environmental degradation, resource scarcity, natural resource wealth, and even climate change, increases the likelihood of violent conflict, and discuss the environmental consequences of war itself. We will explore whether environmental cooperation reduces the risk of violent conflicts, and whether responses to environmental problems can serve as catalyst for peace. We will strive to understand how international institutionsgovernmental, intergovernmental and non-governmentalact to address security and peacebuilding challenges linked to the environment. The course approaches the topic from different levels of analysis (local, national, transnational and supranational), diverse theoretical frameworks and analytical methods and range of environmental issue areas. Finally, we will use a broad range of materials, employ lectures and seminar-like discussions and incorporate field trips and guest speakers.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 08
ENST 406-01 Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
1330:W   KAUF 187
ENST 550-01 Climate Change and Small Town Preparation: A Case Study in Pennsylvania Local Government
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-02 The Effects of Dissolved Organic Carbon on Methane Cycling in Lakes
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-03 Analysis of Local Air Pollution
Instructor: Maiko Arashiro
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-04 Extreme Rain Events Alter Water Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in PA Reservoirs
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-05 Climate Change Effects on Phenology in Lake Powell
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-06 The Role of Methanotrophs in Aquatic Food Webs
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
 
ENST 560-01 Relating Diatom Community Shifts to Environmental Change in Icelandic Freshwater Lakes-Part 2
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
 
ENST 560-02 Student/Faculty Collaborative Research
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 121.
1030:MWF   TOME 117
AFST 220-01 African American Foodways
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This course examines the multifarious ways in which food has influenced the expressions of African American identity and culture. We will begin with a discussion of food as a cultural connector that preserves the ties between African Americans and their African antecedents. Subsequently, we will consider specific African American culinary practices and the origins of soul food. Additionally, we will analyze the roles of food in African American social activism. In so doing, we will pay particular attention to the relationships that exist among food consumption, human rights, and African American communal health, as represented by the anti-soul food and black vegetarianism/veganism movements.
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 109
AFST 220-02 Global Eastern Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 255-01. This course examines global connections in the intersections of culture and power that underlie contemporary issues in eastern Africa. The globally marketed indigenous cultures and exotic landscapes of eastern Africa, like current dilemmas of disease and economic development, are products of complex local and transnational processes (gendered, cultural, social, economic, and political) that developed over time. To understand ethnicity, the success or failure of development projects, the social and economic contexts of tourism, responses to the AIDS crisis, the increasing presence of multinational corporations, and other contemporary issues, we will develop an ethnographic perspective that situates cultural knowledge and practice in colonial and postcolonial contexts. While our focus is on eastern Africa, the course will offer students ways to think about research and processes in other contexts.
1130:MWF   DENNY 303
AFST 320-01 African Technoscapes
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 345-01. Live-blogging the Zimbabwe coup. Commuting by high-speed rail in Kenya. Using a Vietnamese telecom for internet in Tanzanian schools. Voting, driving, and obtaining health care in Ghana with one biometric ID card. The technoscapes concept emerged almost 30 years ago to characterize how technologies, knowledge, and information move in global cultural flows. Today, lives in Africa are embedded with technologies, infrastructures, and circulations that were scarcely imaginable three decades ago. From road building to WhatsApp, and from genetic maize science to paying for electricity via smartphones, we are concerned with understanding technoscapes in Africa: what they are, how they work and interrelate, and their dynamic mutualities with peoples lives and relationships, experiences of belonging and exclusion. We will examine ethnographic studies of diverse technoscapes, and students will develop projects focused on specific technologies in African contexts.
1330:TF   DENNY 315
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 201-01 Introduction to American Studies
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.
1130:MWF   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:T   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ANTH 100-02 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:W   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
0930:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 101-02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 214-01 Ecological Anthropology
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
An examination of human adaption to changing environments with an emphasis on systems analysis. Special attention to development and current environmental problems. Offered every other year.
1030:TR   DENNY 204
ANTH 229-01 Principles of Human Variation and Adaptation
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course explores anthropological perspectives on modern human biological diversity. We examine genetic variation, biological and cultural responses to environmental stressors, including climate, altitude, nutrition, infectious and chronic diseases, and population growth and demography. We use our understanding of human biological diversity to examine the notion that race is a social phenomenon with no true biological meaning. Offered every other year.
0930:MWF   DENNY 211
ANTH 233-03 Anthropology of Religion
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
A cross-cultural survey of the functions of religion, magic, and myth in simple and complex societies. Religion and communication. Myth and social structure. A historical summary of the scientific study of religion. Offered every other year.
1030:MWF   DENNY 204
ANTH 255-01 Global Eastern Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. This course examines global connections in the intersections of culture and power that underlie contemporary issues in eastern Africa. The globally marketed indigenous cultures and exotic landscapes of eastern Africa, like current dilemmas of disease and economic development, are products of complex local and transnational processes (gendered, cultural, social, economic, and political) that developed over time. To understand ethnicity, the success or failure of development projects, the social and economic contexts of tourism, responses to the AIDS crisis, the increasing presence of multinational corporations, and other contemporary issues, we will develop an ethnographic perspective that situates cultural knowledge and practice in colonial and postcolonial contexts. While our focus is on eastern Africa, the course will offer students ways to think about research and processes in other contexts. Offered every two years.
1130:MWF   DENNY 303
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
0900:TR   DENNY 311
ANTH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:M   ARCH LAB
ANTH 331-01 Principles of Human Evolution
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
1030:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 345-01 African Technoscapes
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01. Live-blogging the Zimbabwe coup. Commuting by high-speed rail in Kenya. Using a Vietnamese telecom for internet in Tanzanian schools. Voting, driving, and obtaining health care in Ghana with one biometric ID card. The technoscapes concept emerged almost 30 years ago to characterize how technologies, knowledge, and information move in global cultural flows. Today, lives in Africa are embedded with technologies, infrastructures, and circulations that were scarcely imaginable three decades ago. From road building to WhatsApp, and from genetic maize science to paying for electricity via smartphones, we are concerned with understanding technoscapes in Africa: what they are, how they work and interrelate, and their dynamic mutualities with peoples lives and relationships, experiences of belonging and exclusion. We will examine ethnographic studies of diverse technoscapes, and students will develop projects focused on specific technologies in African contexts.
1330:TF   DENNY 315
Courses Offered in ARCH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ARCH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.
0900:TR   DENNY 311
ARCH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:M   ARCH LAB
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Lisa Dorrill
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
1030:TR   WEISS 235
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.
1330:TR   WEISS 343
ARTH 206-01 Museum Studies
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Introduces students to the history, role, nature, and administration of museums. It examines the emergence and development of museums and the political, social, and ethical issues that they face. Case studies include: government funding of the arts, the lure and trap of the blockbuster, T-Rex "Sue", the Nazi Entartete Kunst exhibition, the Enola Gay exhibition, war memorials, the Holocaust Museum, public sculpture, conservation, museum architecture, auction houses, and the repatriation of cultural property. This course is open to all students and is especially relevant to those studying the fine arts, anthropology, archaeology, history, American studies, and public policy. Offered every two years.
1500:TF   ALTHSE 106
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
1330:TR   GDYRST 101
ARTH 360-01 The Natural and Social Landscape
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic.This course introduces critical issues and practices in documentary and location photography/video. Explores the influence of social documentarians and landscape photographers. Examines the relationship of word and image, the role of photo editors and the development of the photo-essay through experiential learning, studio experience and discussions. Students will have a unique experience to learn about land and wildlife conservation both locally and abroad, as well as, community involvement in those efforts. As part of a mini mosaic participants in the course will have the option of traveling to Rwanda at the end of the semester.
1530:TR   GDYRST 101
ARTH 375-01 Beauty
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 275-01. Perhaps no term is as variously interpreted or as hard to define as "beauty." At one time, beauty was treated as among the ultimate values, along with goodness, truth, and justice. But in the last century or so it has been devalued, equated with prettiness or meaningless ornamentation. It has been quite out of fashion in art since the late nineteenth century. But one cannot understand much of the art of the Western tradition without understanding it as the attempt to make beautiful things, and without understanding what that goal meant in the cultures in which it had currency. And of course even now most people would not want to be without dimensions of beauty in their lives. We will look both at classic and contemporary attempts to answer such questions, and try to heighten our own appreciation for the beauty in the arts and in the world. Prerequisites: one previous course in art history or philosophy, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 275.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 106
1330:W   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 106
1330:R   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Michael Potthoff
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0900:TR   JAMESR 2218
1330:W   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 215-01 Evolution w/Lab
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
A study of the mechanics of evolutionary change and its role within populations. Topics typically covered include macroevolution vs microevolution, natural selection, adaptation, neutral theory, population genetics, speciation, extinction, and sex and sexuality. Interactive lectures, readings from the primary literature, laboratory and field investigations, and simulation exercises will be used to actively explore the principles of evolutionary change and its consequences. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; for Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 109
1330:R   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Irene Hawkins
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
1130:MF   ALTHSE 204
1330:F   RNORTH 1316
BIOL 322-01 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0830:MW   ALTHSE 201
1230:M   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 322-02 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0830:MW   ALTHSE 201
1300:T   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 322-03 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0830:MW   ALTHSE 201
1230:W   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 325-01 Plant Physiology w/Lab
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
A study of plant structure and function, with emphasis on the flowering plants. Includes plant cells and organelles, mineral nutrition, translocation processes, and hormonal regulation of growth, development, and reproduction. Biochemical and environmental aspects of photosynthesis are emphasized. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0930:MWF   KAUF 178
1330:W   KAUF 178
BIOL 333-01 Physiology w/Lab
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
A study of physiological mechanisms in the animal kingdom, stressing the structural and functional bases of biological activities. Emphasis is on vertebrate organs and organ systems. Laboratory includes experimental physiological studies of selected organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 08
1330:R   JAMESR 2206
BIOL 334-01 Vertebrate Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory study of the anatomy, embryology, physiology, and evolution of vertebrates. Representative live and dissection specimens are studied from the perspective of structure and function. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
0900:TR   RNORTH 1317
1030:TR   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
0830:MWF   STUART 1113
1315:T   STUART 2112
BIOL 412-01 Coastal Biology
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
Through detailed study of the primary biological literature, students acquire an understanding of the methodology and philosophy of scientific research. Includes study of the formulation of hypotheses, the design of experiments or observations to test these hypotheses, and the interpretation of results. This course will normally require a major research-based presentation and/or paper and may also involve the conduct of research by students. This course satisfies the requirement for a research experience for the biology major. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129, and one upper-level biology course.
1330:F   TOME 227
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
1330:M   RNORTH 1316
Courses Offered in CHEM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CHEM 132-01 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Cindy Samet
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
0930:MWF   STUART 1104
CHEM 132-02 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Cindy Samet
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1030:MWF   STUART 1104
CHEM 132-03 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Kathryn Barker
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
0900:TR   STUART 1104
CHEM 132-L1 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Mary Boylan
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1330:M   STUART 1113
CHEM 132-L2 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Mary Boylan
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1800:M   STUART 1113
CHEM 132-L3 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1315:T   STUART 1113
CHEM 132-L4 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Kathryn Barker
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1330:W   STUART 1113
CHEM 132-L5 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Mary Boylan
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
1315:R   STUART 1113
CHEM 242-01 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: R David Crouch
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
0830:MWF   STUART 1104
CHEM 242-02 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1130:MWF   STUART 1104
CHEM 242-L1 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: R David Crouch
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1230:M   STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L2 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1315:T   STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L3 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: R David Crouch
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1230:W   STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L4 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
1315:R   STUART 1118
CHEM 243-01 Modern Chemical Analysis w/Lab
Instructor: Amy Witter
Course Description:
The theory of chemical equilibrium as it pertains to acid-base, metal-ligand, redox, and EDTA titrations. Topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, and the optimization and validation of experimental results will be covered. Statistical analysis of data will also be included. This class is meant to aid students in developing both a sound knowledge of experimental protocols (i.e. How many samples do we need to collect? How do we extract our analyte from the matrix? How much sample must be extracted in order to obtain a measurable result? How do we measure what's present? and in the critical evaluation of experimental results (How much confidence do we have that our results are representative of the system under study?). Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
0900:TR   STUART 1113
1230:W   STUART 2112
CHEM 244-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Instructor: Sarah St. Angelo
Course Description:
The fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics will be presented with a view towards providing an understanding of the concept of chemical equilibrium. Introductory concepts in chemical kinetics will also be discussed. Laboratory will focus on experiments illustrating the principles of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 132 or 141, MATH 171 or concurrent enrollment.
1230:M   STUART 2117
1030:TR   TOME 122
CHEM 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
0830:MWF   STUART 1113
1315:T   STUART 2112
Courses Offered in COMP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
COMP 131-01 Introduction to Computer Science I
Instructor: Spring Davidson
Course Description:
An introduction to Computer Science as a major scientific discipline. Special emphasis is placed on problem solving and experimentation via programming in Java. Topics covered include the design of objects and the use of flow-of-control constructs, along with techniques for testing software. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
0900:TR   TOME 118
1500:T   TOME 118
COMP 131-02 Introduction to Computer Science I
Instructor: Spring Davidson
Course Description:
An introduction to Computer Science as a major scientific discipline. Special emphasis is placed on problem solving and experimentation via programming in Java. Topics covered include the design of objects and the use of flow-of-control constructs, along with techniques for testing software. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
1030:TR   TOME 118
1500:W   TOME 118
COMP 132-01 Introduction to Computer Science II
Instructor: Farhan Siddiqui
Course Description:
A problem-solving course that utilizes object-based software design using Java. Topics include code modularity and reusability, recursion, data storage, and the empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: 131 or one year of object oriented programming in Java and instructor's permission. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
0930:MWF   TOME 118
1300:W   TOME 118
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 205-01 Japanese Architecture
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 205-02. This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
1030:TR   DENNY 304
EASN 206-01 Asian Urban Ecology
Instructor: David Strand
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-05. Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with ecological modernization, the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jakarta, Manila, Kolkata, Mumbai and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.
0900:TR   STERN 103
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 111-02 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Sohani Fatehin
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 204
ECON 111-03 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Sohani Fatehin
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 204
ECON 112-01 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 112-02 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 112-03 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 112-04 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 112-05 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1500:TF   DENNY 317
ECON 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Nicola Tynan
Course Description:
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 228-01 Economic Analysis of Policy
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.
1330:W   ALTHSE 109
ECON 288-01 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Mesude Kongar
Course Description:
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 207
ECON 496-04 Economic Demography and Sustainable Development
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Demography is the study of the determinants and consequences of population change. It is concerned with effectively everything that influences or can be influenced by population size, population growth or decline, population processes, population spatial distribution, population structure, and population characteristics. As we go from the historical pattern of high birth and death rates to the increasingly common pattern of low birth and death rates, we pass through the demographic transition. This is actually a whole set of transitions relating to changes in health and mortality, fertility, migration, age structure, urbanization, and family and household structure. Each of these separate, but interrelated, changes have serious consequences for the way societies and economies work and the natural environment they are built upon. Thus, the objectives of this course are threefold: (1) to develop knowledge of the underlying demographic theories explaining these transitions; (2) to use this knowledge to understand the interrelationships between these transitions; and (3) to determine the implications of these transitions for sustainable development, that is, for social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Some questions we will consider include (but are not limited to): Why are so many adults living alone? Why are women having fewer babies? What impact do sub-replacement birth rates have on economies and societies? What role do the rights of women have in demographic transitions? Why are adults waiting so long to get married or not getting married at all? What happens when the population ages? Why are more and more people choosing to live in cities? Is this expected growth of cities sustainable? Often for familiarity and simplicity we will use data and readings focused on the United States, but since these transitions have evolved in ways that vary from one part of the world to another, this course will often have a necessarily international focus. Naturally, given the expansive subject matter, this course will require much from you it is reading and writing intensive.
1330:T   STERN 103
Courses Offered in EDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EDST 120-01 Contemporary Issues in American Education
Instructor: Sarah Bair
Course Description:
An examination of current policies, practices, and problems in the landscape of American education with particular attention to the perspectives of various stakeholders (e.g. teachers, students, families, community leaders, employers, and elected officials). U.S. diversity with respect to race, class, gender, language, and exceptionality is considered within a variety of educational contexts. The course also examines the ways in which educational issues and reform efforts intersect with social, economic, political, and cultural forces.
1030:MWF   BOSLER 314
EDST 140-01 Educational Psychology
Instructor: Raymond Anderson
Course Description:
An examination of physical, cognitive, and psychological developmental theories and research as well as theories of learning. The course includes theoretical perspectives on: age-stage characteristics, exceptionality, achievement versus aptitude, as well as how developmental, sociocultural, and motivational factors influence student learning in classroom contexts.
1330:TR   STUART 1104
EDST 260-01 Introduction to Educational Research
Instructor: Elizabeth Lewis
Course Description:
An introduction to the purposes and methodologies of research in education including how various stakeholders in the educational community use and access research findings as well as how studies in education are designed, implemented, and disseminated. Quantitative, qualitative, and historical methodologies are addressed. Research processes are introduced around the topic of literacy. Students will develop a review of the research literature on a topic related to literacy using online catalogs, databases, and other open access resources to find and gather sources and digital publications formats to disseminate their reviews. Prerequisite: 140.
1500:TR   ALTHSE 109
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1500:MR   HPH LARGE SEM
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1030:TR   LIBRY ALDEN
ENGL 220-03 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1330:MR   HPH LARGE SEM
Courses Offered in ERSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ERSC 141-01 Earth's Hazards
Instructor: Jorden Hayes
Course Description:
This course examines natural processes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mass wasting events, and floods that have the potential to produce disastrous consequences for humans. All of these processes result from interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere directly or indirectly, which is the realm of earth sciences. Increasing global populations and increasingly interdependent national economies mean that few disasters are now only local. This course will use examples such as case studies of recent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions to examine how natural processes can be hazardous, and whether or not humans can anticipate and mitigate these kinds of hazards to prevent future disasters. Laboratory work will include analog experiments, field trips, and video analysis of historic disasters. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1330:M   KAUF 146
1030:MWF   KAUF 186
ERSC 141-02 Earth's Hazards
Instructor: Jorden Hayes
Course Description:
This course examines natural processes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mass wasting events, and floods that have the potential to produce disastrous consequences for humans. All of these processes result from interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere directly or indirectly, which is the realm of earth sciences. Increasing global populations and increasingly interdependent national economies mean that few disasters are now only local. This course will use examples such as case studies of recent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions to examine how natural processes can be hazardous, and whether or not humans can anticipate and mitigate these kinds of hazards to prevent future disasters. Laboratory work will include analog experiments, field trips, and video analysis of historic disasters. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1330:T   KAUF 146
1030:MWF   KAUF 186
ERSC 142-01 Earth's Changing Climate
Instructor: Alyson Thibodeau
Course Description:
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1330:W   KAUF 134
1130:MWF   KAUF 179
ERSC 142-02 Earth's Changing Climate
Instructor: Alyson Thibodeau
Course Description:
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1330:R   KAUF 134
1130:MWF   KAUF 179
ERSC 151-01 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Benjamin Edwards
Course Description:
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
1330:T   KAUF 140
0900:TR   KAUF 152
ERSC 250-01 Introduction to Arctic Studies
Instructor: Benjamin Edwards
Course Description:
This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the physical/social geography, geology and ecology of the Arctic region of earth particularly through the lens of global climate change. Students will use a variety of media (lectures, readings, videos, blogs) to build knowledge about this critical region of earth to serve as a basis for individual and group projects on a specific Arctic region (e.g., Siberia, Svalbard, Greenland, Iceland, Nunavut, Alaska) and topic (e.g., climate change, Arctic tourism, Arctic flora/fauna species, Arctic archeology, Arctic exploration). Learning goals include: i) exposure to spatial analysis and Geographic Information Systems, ii) foundational knowledge of the Arctic cryosphere and its response to climate change, geological history, human geography and ecological systems, and iii) mastery of Arctic geography. Course meetings will include student presentations, fieldtrips and basic GIS instruction.
1330:R   KAUF 140
ERSC 321-01 Isotope Geochemistry
Instructor: Alyson Thibodeau
Course Description:
Major analytical advancements in the past two decades have revolutionized the field of isotope geochemistry and made isotopic measurements more widely available than ever before. This course will introduce students to both stable and radiogenic isotope systems and help them develop a quantitative understanding of both radioactive decay and isotopic fractionation. With the knowledge of how isotopic variations arise in nature, we will survey the use of isotopic tracers and chronometers in a variety of disciplines including: the earth and environmental sciences, archaeology, and biology. We will also examine some emerging applications of isotopic tools such as their role in tracing the trade of illegal drugs, identifying the origins of deceased migrants in border regions, revealing food sources and adulteration, and biomedicine. Prerequisite: One CHEM course or permission of instructor.
1030:MWF   KAUF 134
ERSC 335-01 Global Geophysics and Tectonics
Instructor: Jorden Hayes
Course Description:
How and why do earthquakes happen? Why does Earths magnetic field flip? How do we know there are magma reservoirs under mid ocean ridges? How have Earths tectonic plates moved in the past? Do mantle plumes really exist? Some of the answers to these questions can be found in the diverse field of geophysics. This course will address these and many other questions about our dynamic Earth. This course aims to teach fundamental physics underpinning the behavior of planet Earth. The application of physics to study plate tectonics is especially emphasized and includes observations from seismology, gravity, magnetism, isostasy, and heat flow. The course will also include units on Earths deep interior covering mantle convection, mantle plumes, and the geodynamo. Topics will be investigated from a mathematical perspective as well as more descriptive methods. Students will gain and/or enhance skills in manipulating and solving equations, interpreting geophysical data, presenting data, and scientific reasoning. The course will culminate in a semester project integrating and applying new geophysical knowledge to a case study plate boundary. Prerequisite: 151.
1030:TR   KAUF 146
Courses Offered in HEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HEST 201-01 Introduction to Health Studies
Instructor: Margaret Winchester
Course Description:
Introduction to Health Studies is a multi-disciplinary course that explores various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of health. In addition to providing the overall framework for the materials covered, the faculty-convener of the course will draw on speakers from Dickinson faculty who will present health studies materials relevant to their respective areas of special expertise. Faculty speakers will be drawn from a range of disciplines at the college, including American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, History, International Business and Management, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Psychology, and Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies.Normally offered spring semester.
1330:T   ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 151-01 History of Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
1030:MWF   DENNY 313
HIST 206-01 American Environmental History
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in the history of North America. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of the North America environment form the pre-colonial period to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: American Indian uses of the environment, colonial frontiers, agricultural change, industrialization, urbanization, westward expansion, the Progressive-Era conservation movement, changes in lifestyle and consumption including their increasingly global impact, shifts in environmental policy, and the rise of the post-World War II environmental movement.
1230:MWF   DENNY 313
Courses Offered in INBM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INBM 100-01 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Steven Riccio
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 201
INBM 100-02 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Sherry Ritchey
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 201
INBM 100-03 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: C Helen Takacs
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 201
INBM 110-01 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 204
INBM 110-02 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 204
INBM 110-03 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: David Sarcone
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
1500:TF   ALTHSE 204
INBM 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 08
INBM 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-02.Permission of instructor required. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 08
INBM 200-03 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-03.Permission of instructor required. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
1500:TF   ALTHSE 08
INBM 230-01 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Dengjian Jin
Course Description:
This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course may fulfill Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement, depending upon topic.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 110
INBM 230-02 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Dengjian Jin
Course Description:
This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course may fulfill Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement, depending upon topic.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 110
INBM 240-01 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Xiaolu Wang
Course Description:
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 110
INBM 240-02 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Xiaolu Wang
Course Description:
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 110
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Nina Barzachka
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1230:MWF   DENNY 311
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1330:MR   DENNY 304
INST 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1500:TF   DENNY 203
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 08
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-02.Permission of instructor required. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 08
INST 200-03 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-03.Permission of instructor required. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1500:TF   ALTHSE 08
INST 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 271.
1030:TR   DENNY 104
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Douglas Stuart
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 207
INST 280-02 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Robert Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-02. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
INST 290-03 Environment, Conflict and Peace
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 372-01.The goal of this class is to examine the complex relationships between the environment, conflict and peace. We will discuss the emergence of the environment as a topic of conflict and peace studies, and ask if the environment should be a security concern. We will scrutinize the extent to which environmental degradation, resource scarcity, natural resource wealth, and even climate change, increases the likelihood of violent conflict, and discuss the environmental consequences of war itself. We will explore whether environmental cooperation reduces the risk of violent conflicts, and whether responses to environmental problems can serve as catalyst for peace. We will strive to understand how international institutionsgovernmental, intergovernmental and non-governmentalact to address security and peacebuilding challenges linked to the environment. The course approaches the topic from different levels of analysis (local, national, transnational and supranational), diverse theoretical frameworks and analytical methods and range of environmental issue areas. Finally, we will use a broad range of materials, employ lectures and seminar-like discussions and incorporate field trips and guest speakers.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 08
Courses Offered in JDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JDST 215-01 Jewish Environmental Ethics
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 215-01. Since the 1960's many writers on environmental issues have blamed our contemporary environmental crises in part on a so-called "Judeo-Christian" worldview, rooted in the Hebrew Bible. Such writers assert that the biblical heritage shared by these two religious traditions, advocates an unhealthy relationship between humanity and nature, one in which human beings are destined to conquer the earth and master it. In this course we will explore Jewish perspectives on nature and the natural world through close readings of biblical and other classical Jewish theology, history and ritual practice, we will also examine the ways in which this motif is re-conceptualized in modern secular contexts (ie, Zionism, and the kibbutz movement). We will conclude by studying contemporary varieties of Jewish environmental advocacy. In addition to texts focused specifically on Judeo-Christian traditions, the syllabus will include other classic works of Environmental ethics foundational to the field of Environmental studies. Offered every three years in rotation with the offering of ENST 111. This course is cross-listed as RELG 215.
1330:M   STERN 103
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 121-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 100-01. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies.This course is cross-listed as AFST 100.
1030:MWF   TOME 117
LALC 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and ARCH 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1) What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and ANTH 262.
0900:TR   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 200-01 Foundations in Policy Studies
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PMGT 200-01.Permission of Instructor Required. This course will provide a foundational experience for majors in both Law and Policy and Policy Management. It will introduce key policy studies principles, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes. Prerequisites: POSC 120 and ECON 111. This course is cross-listed as PMGT 200.
1330:MR   DENNY 212
LAWP 200-02 Foundations in Policy Studies
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PMGT 200-02.Permission of Instructor Required. This course will provide a foundational experience for majors in both Law and Policy and Policy Management. It will introduce key policy studies principles, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes. Prerequisites: POSC 120 and ECON 111. This course is cross-listed as PMGT 200.
1500:MR   DENNY 21
LAWP 230-01 Negotiation and Advocacy
Instructor: Edward Guido
Course Description:
This course will focus on the role of the advocate in the law and policy-making process. It will consider various types of advocacy (public debate, litigation, public relations, etc.) and various methods of negotiation as well as compare and contrast the advocate's role in different forums (legislatures, courts, administrative agencies, the press, etc.). Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   DENNY 212
LAWP 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 248-01. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 248.
1030:TR   DENNY 212
Courses Offered in MATH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MATH 121-01 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
1330:TF   TOME 121
MATH 121-02 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: David Luo, Grant Braught
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
1500:MR   TOME 121
MATH 121-03 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Grant Braught, Robert Mixell
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   TOME 121
MATH 151-01 Introduction to Calculus
Instructor: Sarah Bryant
Course Description:
An introduction to limits and derivatives together with a review of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1330:R   TOME 118
0830:MWF   TOME 120
MATH 170-01 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
0900:TR   TOME 120
1330:W   TOME 120
MATH 170-02 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1030:TR   TOME 120
1500:W   TOME 120
MATH 170-03 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Sarah Bryant
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1330:M   TOME 118
1130:MWF   TOME 120
MATH 170-04 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: David Richeson
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
0830:MWF   TOME 231
1500:W   TOME 231
MATH 171-01 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Eddie Tu
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1130:MWF   TOME 117
1500:R   TOME 120
MATH 171-02 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: David Sulon
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1230:MWF   TOME 120
1500:T   TOME 120
MATH 171-03 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: David Sulon
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1030:MWF   TOME 120
1330:T   TOME 120
MATH 211-01 Discrete Mathematics
Instructor: Richard Forrester
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics as well as computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic and methods of proof such as direct and indirect proofs and mathematical induction. Other topics include sets, functions, relations, matrix algebra, and techniques from elementary combinatorics and graph theory. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 131 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
0900:TR   TOME 121
MATH 211-02 Discrete Mathematics
Instructor: Richard Forrester
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics as well as computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic and methods of proof such as direct and indirect proofs and mathematical induction. Other topics include sets, functions, relations, matrix algebra, and techniques from elementary combinatorics and graph theory. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 131 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
1030:TR   TOME 121
MATH 262-01 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Instructor: Richard Forrester
Course Description:
An introduction to matrix algebra and abstract vector spaces with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. Topics include linear systems and matrices, vector spaces, linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.Prerequisite: 211 or permission of the instructor. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   TOME 120
MATH 270-01 Integration and Infinite Series
Instructor: Eddie Tu
Course Description:
The study of methods of integration, applications of the integral, elementary differential equations, and infinite sequences and series.Prerequisite: 171 or departmental placement. Offered every spring.
0930:MWF   TOME 117
MATH 270-02 Integration and Infinite Series
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
The study of methods of integration, applications of the integral, elementary differential equations, and infinite sequences and series.Prerequisite: 171 or departmental placement. Offered every spring.
0830:MWF   TOME 121
MATH 325-02 Probability and Statistics II
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
A continuation of Introduction to Probability and Statistics I. Topics include additional discrete and continuous distributions, conditional distributions, additional hypothesis tests, simple linear regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and goodness of fit tests. Special topics may include nonparametric tests, nonlinear regression, and time series analysis.Prerequisites: 171, 225 and completion of, or concurrent registration in 270. Offered in odd numbered spring semesters.
1030:MWF   TOME 121
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
1130:MWF   DENNY 104
PHIL 101-02 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
1030:TR   TOME 117
PHIL 102-01 Introduction to Ethics
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to the philosophical study of morality, focusing on concepts of right and wrong, virtue and vice, and wellbeing. This course provides students the opportunity to hone their ethical reasoning skills by critically examining how some of historys most influential philosophers thought about issues in morality. Students will also develop more general skills, such as evaluating philosophical arguments, and expressing and defending their own ideas in writing.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 201
PHIL 104-01 Practical Ethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
This course introduces students to contemporary debates in practical ethics. Course materials investigate how theoretical approaches to ethics apply to practical issues, including discussions of animal ethics, environmental ethics, reproductive ethics, civil disobedience, and the ethics of mass incarceration and the death penalty. This course is best suited for students interested in thinking about the relationship between ethical theory and practice, with an emphasis on how power, privilege, and responsibility intersect in our everyday lives.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 08
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
0930:MWF   DENNY 110
PHIL 275-01 Beauty
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 375-01. Perhaps no term is as variously interpreted or as hard to define as "beauty." At one time, beauty was treated as among the ultimate values, along with goodness, truth, and justice. But in the last century or so it has been devalued, equated with prettiness or meaningless ornamentation. It has been quite out of fashion in art since the late nineteenth century. But one cannot understand much of the art of the Western tradition without understanding it as the attempt to make beautiful things, and without understanding what the goal meant in the cultures in which it had currency. And of course even now most people would not want to be without dimensions of beauty in their lives. We will look both at classic and contemporary attempts to answer such questions, and try to heighten our own appreciation for the beauty in the arts and in the world. Prerequisite: one prior course in art history or philosophy or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ARTH 375.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110
PHIL 280-01 Recent Political Thought
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 202-01. This class aims to show the breadth and vitality of the field of political theory today. It does this by deepening and broadening the account of the discipline offered in POSC 180, discussing the most important recent accounts of justice, freedom, and equality, and adding consideration of democracy, rights, power, culture, community, and cosmopolitanism. We will also explore issues of exploitation and exclusion relating to gender, class, race, and human interaction with the natural environment, and consider how recent theorists have tried to challenge these practices. The class also explores the contours of political theory as an academic field of study, considering the disciplinary contributions of fields such as philosophy, political science, international relations, legal studies, and history, and major ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, anarchism, and feminism. This course is cross-listed as POSC 202. Prerequisite: 180 or POSC 180, or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in PHYS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHYS 132-01 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
0930:MWF   TOME 101
PHYS 132-02 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Windsor Morgan
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
1330:MWF   TOME 101
PHYS 142-01 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
1330:F   TOME 105
1030:MWF   TOME 115
PHYS 142-02 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
1330:R   TOME 105
1030:MWF   TOME 115
PHYS 314-01 Energy & Environmental Physics
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
A project-oriented approach to the study of the thermodynamics of fossil fuel engines and devices, the physics of solar and other alternative energy sources, energy conservation principles, the physics of nuclear fission reactors and nuclear fusion research, the physics of the atmosphere, air pollution, global climate change, and ozone depletion. Examples of projects include: energy conservation analysis, and the design, construction and testing of modern wind turbines or solar energy sources. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 141 and 142, and 211 or permission of instructor. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   TOME 103
Courses Offered in PMGT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PMGT 200-01 Foundations in Policy Studies
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 200-01.Permission of Instructor Required. This course will provide a foundational experience for majors in both Law and Policy and Policy Management. It will introduce key policy studies principles, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes. Prerequisites: POSC 120 and ECON 111. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 200.
1330:MR   DENNY 212
PMGT 200-02 Foundations in Policy Studies
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 200-02.Permission of Instructor Required. This course will provide a foundational experience for majors in both Law and Policy and Policy Management. It will introduce key policy studies principles, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes. Prerequisites: POSC 120 and ECON 111. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 200.
1500:MR   DENNY 21
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: Kathleen Marchetti
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
1330:TF   DENNY 304
POSC 150-01 Comparative Politics
Instructor: Santiago Anria
Course Description:
An introduction to comparative political analysis with applications to political systems, processes, and issues in countries of the Third World and in advanced industrial states alike. The purpose of the course is to learn to observe systematically, to analyze political phenomena, and to distinguish and evaluate the assumptions underlying alternative approaches to the study of politics.
1330:TF   DENNY 110
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Nina Barzachka
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1230:MWF   DENNY 311
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:MR   DENNY 304
POSC 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1500:TF   DENNY 203
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
0930:MWF   DENNY 110
POSC 202-01 Recent Political Thought
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 280-01. This class aims to show the breadth and vitality of the field of political theory today. It does this by deepening and broadening the account of the discipline offered in POSC 180, discussing the most important recent accounts of justice, freedom, and equality, and adding consideration of democracy, rights, power, culture, community, and cosmopolitanism. We will also explore issues of exploitation and exclusion relating to gender, class, race, and human interaction with the natural environment, and consider how recent theorists have tried to challenge these practices. The class also explores the contours of political theory as an academic field of study, considering the disciplinary contributions of fields such as philosophy, political science, international relations, legal studies, and history, and major ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, anarchism, and feminism. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 280. Prerequisite: 180 or PHIL 180, or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   DENNY 103
POSC 242-01 Political Behavior
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Cultural, social, and psychological factors which contribute to forms and directions of political behavior. Special attention is given to American voting behavior, ethnic political behavior, and personality influences on politics. Field surveys are undertaken to illustrate contemporary trends. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
POSC 246-01 The Legislative Process
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
An analysis of the legislative branch of government, especially Congress. Emphasis is placed upon the legislature as a social system, the decision-making process, the interrelationships with the political parties and interest groups, the executive and the judiciary. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
0930:MWF   DENNY 103
POSC 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 248-01. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 248.
1030:TR   DENNY 212
POSC 258-01 Human Rights
Instructor: David Strand
Course Description:
The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights embodies a global consensus on the fundamental importance of human rights as a political value. But the idea and its practical applications have provoked intense controversy around the world on issues such as freedom of expression, capital punishment and torture, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, social and economic justice, and cultural and minority rights. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of the instructor.
1030:MWF   STERN 103
POSC 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 271.
1030:TR   DENNY 104
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Douglas Stuart
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 207
POSC 280-02 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Robert Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-02. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
POSC 290-05 Asian Urban Ecology
Instructor: David Strand
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with ecological modernization, the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jakarta, Manila, Kolkata, Mumbai and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.
0900:TR   STERN 103
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 130-01 Perception, Memory & Thought
Instructor: Nina Tarner
Course Description:
This introduction to cognitive psychology will cover such topics as: How do you recognize your grandmother? Can you do more than one thing at a time? Why can't you remember the names of people you just met? More formally, we will examine the processes of perception, attention, representation, and retrieval in children, adults, and machines.
0900:TR   TOME 115
PSYC 130-02 Perception, Memory & Thought
Instructor: Nina Tarner
Course Description:
This introduction to cognitive psychology will cover such topics as: How do you recognize your grandmother? Can you do more than one thing at a time? Why can't you remember the names of people you just met? More formally, we will examine the processes of perception, attention, representation, and retrieval in children, adults, and machines.
1030:TR   TOME 115
PSYC 140-01 Social Psychology
Instructor: Marie Helweg-Larsen
Course Description:
In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior.
1030:TR   KAUF 179
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 208-01 Religion in the United States
Instructor: Jodie Vann
Course Description:
The course chronicles the relationship between religious ideas and cultural context from the founding of the first colonies through the rise of the Religious Right and New Age movements. Our journey will be guided by several key metaphors that have characterized the religious ethos of America: America as "The Promised Land"; America as the "land of opportunity", as the "melting pot." We will use primary sources, including fiction, poetry, and film.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
RELG 215-01 Jewish Environmental Ethics
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 215-01. Since the 1960's many writers on environmental issues have blamed our contemporary environmental crises in part on a so-called "Judeo-Christian" worldview, rooted in the Hebrew Bible. Such writers assert that the biblical heritage shared by these two religious traditions advocates an unhealthy relationship between humanity and nature, one in which human beings are destined to conquer the earth and master it. In this course we will explore Jewish perspectives on nature and the natural world through close readings of biblical and other classical Jewish theology, history and ritual practice, we will also examine the ways in which this motif is re-conceptualized in modern secular contexts (ie, Zionism, and the kibbutz movement). We will conclude by studying contemporary varieties of Jewish environmental advocacy. In addition to texts focused specifically on Judeo-Christian traditions, the syllabus will include other classic works of Environmental ethics foundational to the field of Environmental studies.Offered every three years in rotation with the offering of ENST 111. This course is cross-listed as JDST 215.
1330:M   STERN 103
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
0900:TR   DENNY 313
SOCI 230-04 Sustainability: Social Justice and Human Rights
Instructor: Joyce Bylander
Course Description:
History "is a crab scuttling sideways, a drip of soft water wearing away stone, an earthquake breaking centuries of tension." (Solnit, Rebecca, Hope in the Dark, 2004). This course will examine the importance of the environmental movement and broader definitions of sustainability. We will explore examples of direct action, of serendipitous change, and of world-changing events that have moved us more clearly toward an understanding of "our" shared future on this planet. We will survey the issues connected to sustainable systems and will focus more specifically on issues related to food, water and energy. Through readings, film, and experiential activities the course will challenge us to analyze the impact of various actors and assess our own responsibility.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 201
SOCI 237-01 Global Inequality
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year.
1330:MR   DENNY 211
SOCI 240-01 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. This course introduces students to the theory and methods of social science research, beginning with an examination of the philosophies underlying various research methodologies. The course then focuses on ethnographic field methods, introducing students to the techniques of participant observation, structured and informal interviewing, oral histories, sociometrics, and content analysis. Students will design their own field projects. Prerequisite: 110 or ANTH 101.
0930:MWF   DENNY 112
SOCI 244-01 Quantitative Research Methods
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Quantitative Research Methods introduces students to basic principles of sociological research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students learn to conceptualize a research question, operationalize key concepts, identify relevant literature, and form research hypotheses. Then, using elementary tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, they choose appropriate statistical methods, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions. Special emphasis is given to interpreting numbers with clear, persuasive language, in both oral and written formats. Students will become proficient in using quantitative software for data analysis. Two and a half hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 110.
1330:MR   DENNY 112
SOCI 270-01 Social Movements, Protest and Conflict
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
The study of protest politics and social movements is the study of collective agency. Social movements arise when people act together to promote or resist social change. Movements represent not only grievances on a particular set of issues, but also frustration with more established political forms of making claims in societies. In this course, we will engage with some of the large theoretical debates in the study of social movements, reading both empirical treatments of particular movements and theoretical treatments of key issues. The featured case studies will include civil rights, feminism, ecology, the antinuclear movement, the New Right and the alternative globalization movement. We will be particularly concerned with the social and political context of protest, focusing on basic questions, such as: under what circumstances do social movements emerge? How do dissidents choose political tactics and strategies? And, how do movements affect social and political change?
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-02 Reading the Southern Cone: Lessons in Sustainability
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-05.In September 2015, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It was built from 17 Sustainable Development Goals aimed at attaining sustainable development for our world. These objectives are: No Poverty; Zero Hunger; Good Health and Well-Being; Quality Education; Gender Equality; Clean Water and Sanitation; Affordable and Clean Energy; Decent Work and Economic Growth; Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure; Reduced Inequalities; Sustainable Cities and Communities; Responsible Consumption and Production; Climate Action; Life Below Water; Life on Land; Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions; Partnerships for the Goals. Dickinsons working definition of sustainability captures many of the UNs articulated goals. It states that, sustainability is about more than recycling and the environment. Sustainability is about answering a fundamental question: How do we improve the human condition equitably in this and future generations, while conserving environmental systems necessary to support healthy and vibrant societies? [] Like most definitions, ours is born of a concern for the future of the planet, its people and its living systems, which are threatened by a growing human footprint that is consuming and degrading environmental resources at a rapid pace. It recognizes essential needs of vast numbers of people are not being met in the present, and that poverty and inequality are amplifiers of vulnerability to environmental and other hazards. It is motivated by values that seek balance among economic development, eradication of poverty and hunger, advancement of social justice, and protection of the natural world. Inspired by such approaches to sustainability and such definitions, this course examines a variety of environmental and sociopolitical issues affecting the Southern Cone, as they appear in a series of contemporary literary pieces. Widening the analytical frame, the course also discusses these issues as they may apply to private/personal, local, state, national, and global contexts. Please note that there will be several required field trips for this class (i.e. to Fur and Fowl Barn or Haldeman Island and to the Dickinson College Farm). This course is writing intensive.
1330:MR   BOSLER 213
SPAN 231-03 Reading the Southern Cone: Lessons in Sustainability
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-06.In September 2015, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It was built from 17 Sustainable Development Goals aimed at attaining sustainable development for our world. These objectives are: No Poverty; Zero Hunger; Good Health and Well-Being; Quality Education; Gender Equality; Clean Water and Sanitation; Affordable and Clean Energy; Decent Work and Economic Growth; Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure; Reduced Inequalities; Sustainable Cities and Communities; Responsible Consumption and Production; Climate Action; Life Below Water; Life on Land; Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions; Partnerships for the Goals. Dickinsons working definition of sustainability captures many of the UNs articulated goals. It states that, sustainability is about more than recycling and the environment. Sustainability is about answering a fundamental question: How do we improve the human condition equitably in this and future generations, while conserving environmental systems necessary to support healthy and vibrant societies? [] Like most definitions, ours is born of a concern for the future of the planet, its people and its living systems, which are threatened by a growing human footprint that is consuming and degrading environmental resources at a rapid pace. It recognizes essential needs of vast numbers of people are not being met in the present, and that poverty and inequality are amplifiers of vulnerability to environmental and other hazards. It is motivated by values that seek balance among economic development, eradication of poverty and hunger, advancement of social justice, and protection of the natural world. Inspired by such approaches to sustainability and such definitions, this course examines a variety of environmental and sociopolitical issues affecting the Southern Cone, as they appear in a series of contemporary literary pieces. Widening the analytical frame, the course also discusses these issues as they may apply to private/personal, local, state, national, and global contexts. Please note that there will be several required field trips for this class (i.e. to Fur and Fowl Barn or Haldeman Island and to the Dickinson College Farm). This course is writing intensive.
1500:MR   BOSLER 213