Spring 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 162-01 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Allyssa Decker
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 115
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 113
ENST 162-02 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Allyssa Decker
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 113
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 115
ENST 162-03 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 186
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
KAUF 113
ENST 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Peter Sak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01, ERSC 218-01, and GISP 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ERSC 218 and GISP 218.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 186
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
LIBRY ICCR
ENST 218-02 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-02, ERSC 218-02, and GISP 218-02. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ERSC 218 and GISP 218.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
DENNY 112
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 185
ENST 305-01 Ornithology
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
The class room component of this course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and conservation biology of birds. Students will have numerous opportunities both in and outside of the classroom to examine conservation issues and actions as they relate to the functioning of natural ecosystems, the consequences of anthropocentric impacts to those environments and learn how sustainability practices influence many bird species, populations and communities. The lab portion of this course will focus on hands-on learning through a variety of tools, mechanisms and field experiences including but not limited to use of study skins and skeletons, field guides, optics and field-monitoring techniques. Students will be regularly immersed in living labs during field trips both local and regional including visits to a bird banding station, state wildlife management areas and research study sites. In addition students will learn how to identify birds through specific behaviors, visual field marks, songs and calls. There will be a least one day-long field trip during a weekend, one extended lab field trip to a waterfowl stopover habitat during spring migration and an optional 4-5 day field trip over spring break to visit other sites utilized by birds in and outside of Pennsylvania. Each student will also complete a research paper on selected ornithological topics.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 109
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 109
ENST 305-02 Environmental Data Analysis
Instructor: Maggie Douglas
Course Description:
Realms of environmental study as different as climate change, natural resource management, environmental justice, and many others share something in common: they often depend on collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data. This course will introduce students to data analysis as it applies to environmental studies and science. Lecture will include activities to understand statistical concepts, as well as critique of environmental data as it is presented in scholarly sources and popular media. During lab, students will learn to write code in the R statistical language to import, wrangle, analyze, and visualize data. The course culminates in a project to use a particular dataset to answer an environmental question. No previous coding experience is expected or required. Pre-req: ENST 162
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
KAUF 116
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 178
ENST 305-03 Wildlife Monitoring Methods and Technology
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
This field course will provide students with a solid foundation and hands on experiences regarding the practical use of specific tools and the application of field methods and techniques used in both environmental consulting and wildlife sciences today. Coursework will focus on numerous topics including research and experimental design; collection, management and analysis of data; identification of animals and marking techniques; measuring animal abundance; assessment of wildlife habitat, the role of radio and satellite telemetry; and the practical application of spatial technology (GIS). Students will gain hands on experience in reading and using topographic maps, interpreting aerial photos, using a compass and hand held GPS, orienteering, and creating maps in GIS. Students will also learn about employing and in many cases practicing various monitoring techniques such as spot mapping, area searches, conducting point counts, nest searches, transect surveys, live trapping and marking, use of remote cameras; telemetry; and the use of mist nets for capturing birds and mammals. At least one field trip will include a day long (weekend) visit to an active research site.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
KAUF 109
ENST 318-01 Advanced Applications in GIS
Instructor: Gordon Cromley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 318-01, ERSC 318-01 and GISP 318-01. The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or GISP 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 318, ARCH 318 and GISP 318. Offered every two years.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
KAUF 116
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
LIBRY ICCR
ENST 330-01 Environmental Policy
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 161 and 162, or permission of instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
KAUF 187
ENST 406-01 Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 187
ENST 550-01 Mapping Thermal Inequity and Racial Segregation in Carlisle
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:

Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 121.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-02 Indigenous Futurism in Contemporary Culture
Instructor: Darren Lone Fight
Course Description:
In the field of what scholar Grace Dillon calls Indigenous Futurism, Native artists from the visual to the literary have found a profoundly ripe stage for the exploration of Indigenous representation and artistic exploration. Following historically on other alternative-futurist projects such as Afrofuturism and Queer Futurism, Indigenous Futurism shares certain sensibilities with these related aesthetic forms, perhaps most strikingly as a strategy of decolonial clapback against the white-washing tendencies of the majority of popular speculative art throughout the 20th and into the 21st century. Nevertheless, Indigenous Futurism marshals the field of SF/Futurism in critically different ways unique to the history and relationship of Native America to popular culture. Indeed, this emerging field has a particular strategic advantage due to its temporal and pop-cultural orientation, allowing such art to function as a laboratory of resistance to the colonial project. This course examines Native authors, filmmakers, and visual/multimedia artists in order to evolve an understanding of the character of the field of Indigenous Futurism and why it operates as a critical strategic negotiation site for the representation of Native people in contemporary American culture.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 304
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 115
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Mariel Gruszko
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 311
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
ANTH 212-01 Development Anthropology
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
Sociocultural change, development, and modernization in both Western society and the Third World are examined in terms of theory and practice. Emphasis is on the planning, administration, and evaluation of development projects in agriculture, energy, education, health, and nutrition. The increasingly important role of professional anthropologists and anthropological data is examined in the context of government policies and international business. Offered every other year.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 112
ANTH 222-01 Anthropology of Latin America
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 222-01. This course is an ethnographic exploration of contemporary life in Latin America. It is designed to introduce students to the major themes and debates in the anthropology of Latin America. It is aimed at understanding the cultural and historical development of Latin America, and it seeks to make sense of the cultural similarities and differences that have both captured the interest of anthropologists and helped to make Latin America an important site of anthropological study and theorizing. In the process of examining the histories and cultures of Latin America, we will also look at how power and structural inequalities have shaped the region. The course will study Latin American cultures and societies in relation to neighboring nations - the United States, Canada and the Caribbean - given their shared history and experiences of colonialism and slavery as well as their economic interdependence.This course is cross-listed as LALC 222. Offered every other year.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 313
ANTH 260-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 260-01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 260. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 211
ANTH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Nikki Cummings
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
ARCH LAB
Courses Offered in ARCH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
ARCH 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Peter Sak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-01, ERSC 218-01, and GISP 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 , ERSC 218 and GISP 218.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 186
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
LIBRY ICCR
ARCH 218-02 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-02, ERSC 218-02, and GISP 218-02. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 , ERSC 218 and GISP 218.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 185
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
DENNY 112
ARCH 260-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 260-01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 260. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
ARCH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 211
ARCH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Nikki Cummings
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
ARCH LAB
ARCH 318-01 Advanced Applications in GIS
Instructor: Gordon Cromley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 318-01, ERSC 318-01, and GISP 318-01. The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or GISP 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318, ERSC 318 & GISP 318. Offered every two years.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
LIBRY ICCR
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
KAUF 116
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Lisa Dorrill
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
WEISS 235
ARTH 108-01 Arts of East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 108-01. This course introduces students to a selection of objects and sites that elicit new modes of cultural perception and insight into the artistic cultures of China, Korea, and Japan. Loosely arranged in a chronological order, each week is devoted to in-depth examination of a different type of object, medium, and format. The diverse mediums (sculpture, ceramics, metalwork, lacquer, prints, painting, calligraphy, photography, performance, and architecture) and the long historical span covered in class will chart how culture traveled within East Asia, and later, globally, as well as each cultures distinctive methods of adaptation over time. Major themes include the relationship between artistic production and sociopolitical and socioeconomic development, cultural exchange, aesthetics, impact of religion, power and authority, gender, and issues of modernity. Lectures are supplemented by viewing sessions in the Trout Gallery.This course is cross-listed as EASN 108.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
WEISS 235
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Eleanor Conover
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.
01:30 PM-03:29 PM, MW
WEISS 343
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-03. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
09:30 AM-11:30 AM, TR
GDYRST 101
ARTH 252-01 Philosophy of Art
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 252-01. The discipline of aesthetics is primarily concerned with philosophical questions about art and beauty. This course will examine classic and contemporary Western discussions of such questions as, What is art? How can we determine what a work of art means? Are beauty and other aesthetic qualities subjective or objective? How should the quality of a work of art be assessed? Is there a general way to describe the creative process? What are the driving forces in the unfolding of art history? We will encounter such giants of the Western intellectual tradition as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Hegel, and also such contemporary figures as Arthur Danto, Richard Wollheim, and Kendall Walton. Prerequisites: one previous course in art history or philosophy, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 252.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 411
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 2319
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
RNORTH 2319
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Evolution and Ecology
Instructor: Tony Pires
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2218
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Evolution and Ecology
Instructor: Tony Pires
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2218
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 131-04 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Mike Potthoff
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2228
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
JAMESR 2228
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 179
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 1316
BIOL 216-02 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2206
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 187
BIOL 332-01 Natural History of Vertebrates w/Lab
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
An exploration into the lifestyles of vertebrates heavily focused on field biology. Natural history is strongly dependent on descriptive anatomy and systematics and therefore this course will cover the evolutionary relationships among vertebrates highlighting unique features that facilitated the success of the major groups. In field labs, students will develop observational skills such as how to identify a bird by its song, a frog by its call, a mammal by the color of its pelage, and a snake by its shed skin. Indoor labs will focus on identifying species from preserved specimens as well as providing students with the skills necessary to preserve vertebrates for future study. Preservation methods could include preparing museum-quality mammal and bird skins, formalin fixation of fish, and skeletal preparations. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: one 200-level biology course or ERSC 307. Offered every two years. An exploration into the lifestyles of vertebrates heavily focused on field biology. Natural history is strongly dependent on descriptive anatomy and systematics and therefore this course will cover the evolutionary relationships among vertebrates highlighting unique features that facilitated the success of the major groups. In field labs, students will develop observational skills such as how to identify a bird by its song, a frog by its call, a mammal by the color of its pelage, and a snake by its shed skin. Indoor labs will focus on identifying species from preserved specimens as well as providing students with the skills necessary to preserve vertebrates for future study. Preservation methods could include preparing museum-quality mammal and bird skins, formalin fixation of fish, and skeletal preparations. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: one 200-level biology course or ERSC 307. Offered every two years.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 1317
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
RNORTH 1317
BIOL 334-01 Vertebrate Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory study of the anatomy, embryology, physiology, and evolution of vertebrates. Representative live and dissection specimens are studied from the perspective of structure and function. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
RNORTH 1317
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
RNORTH 1317
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, R
STUART 2112
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 08
BIOL 342-02 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 342-02. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 2112
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 08
BIOL 423-01 Plant Physiological Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
A study of how plants function and respond to their environment. Topics include mineral nutrition, cellular and whole plant water relations, photosynthesis and sugar metabolism, hormonal regulation, sensing, induced defense responses, and reproduction. The course focuses the interactions between plants and a rapidly changing environment, including climate warming, accelerating CO2 rise, drought, flooding, and pollution. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162. A study of how plants function and respond to their environment. Topics include mineral nutrition, cellular and whole plant water relations, photosynthesis and sugar metabolism, hormonal regulation, sensing, induced defense responses, and reproduction. The course focuses the interactions between plants and a rapidly changing environment, including climate warming, accelerating CO2 rise, drought, flooding, and pollution. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 178
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 178
Courses Offered in CHEM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CHEM 132-01 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Cindy Samet
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 132-02 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 132-03 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
STUART 1104
CHEM 132-L1 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 1121
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 1113
CHEM 132-L2 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
06:00 PM-09:00 PM, M
STUART 1121
06:00 PM-09:00 PM, M
STUART 1113
CHEM 132-L3 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
01:15 PM-04:15 PM, T
STUART 1121
01:15 PM-04:15 PM, T
STUART 1113
CHEM 132-L4 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 1113
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 1121
CHEM 132-L5 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
01:15 PM-04:15 PM, R
STUART 1113
01:15 PM-04:15 PM, R
STUART 1121
CHEM 242-01 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 242-02 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Jason Gavenonis
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 242-L1 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Jason Gavenonis
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L2 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Jason Gavenonis
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, T
STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L3 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L4 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, R
STUART 1118
CHEM 243-01 Modern Chemical Analysis w/Lab
Instructor: Amy Witter
Course Description:
The theory of chemical equilibrium as it pertains to acid-base, metal-ligand, redox, and EDTA titrations. Topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, and the optimization and validation of experimental results will be covered. Statistical analysis of data will also be included. This class is meant to aid students in developing both a sound knowledge of experimental protocols (i.e. How many samples do we need to collect? How do we extract our analyte from the matrix? How much sample must be extracted in order to obtain a measurable result? How do we measure what's present? and in the critical evaluation of experimental results (How much confidence do we have that our results are representative of the system under study?). Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141. The theory of chemical equilibrium as it pertains to acid-base, metal-ligand, redox, and EDTA titrations. Topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, and the optimization and validation of experimental results will be covered. Statistical analysis of data will also be included. This class is meant to aid students in developing both a sound knowledge of experimental protocols (i.e. How many samples do we need to collect? How do we extract our analyte from the matrix? How much sample must be extracted in order to obtain a measurable result? How do we measure what's present? and in the critical evaluation of experimental results (How much confidence do we have that our results are representative of the system under study?). Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
STUART 1113
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 2112
CHEM 244-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Instructor: Sarah St. Angelo
Course Description:
The fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics will be presented with a view towards providing an understanding of the concept of chemical equilibrium. Introductory concepts in chemical kinetics will also be discussed. Laboratory will focus on experiments illustrating the principles of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 132 or 141, MATH 171 or concurrent enrollment.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 2117
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 122
CHEM 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 08
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, R
STUART 2112
CHEM 342-02 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 342-02. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 2112
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 08
Courses Offered in COMP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
COMP 130-01 Introduction to Computing
Instructor: Lev Fruchter
Course Description:
An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course, other than COMP 180. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester. An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course, other than COMP 180. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 118
03:00 PM-05:00 PM, W
TOME 118
COMP 130-02 Introduction to Computing
Instructor: Michael Skalak
Course Description:
An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course, other than COMP 180. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester. An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Dickinson Computer Science course, other than COMP 180. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 118
03:00 PM-05:00 PM, R
TOME 118
COMP 132-01 Principles of Object-Oriented Design
Instructor: Farhan Siddiqui
Course Description:
An introduction to object-oriented software design using Java. Topics include objects, classes, code modularity and reusability, abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Additional topics include unit testing, recursion, empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: Equivalent of one course of prior programming experience. See Advising Guide for placement advice for 130 and 132. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester. An introduction to object-oriented software design using Java. Topics include objects, classes, code modularity and reusability, abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Additional topics include unit testing, recursion, empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: Equivalent of one course of prior programming experience. See Advising Guide for placement advice for 130 and 132. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
01:00 PM-02:59 PM, M
TOME 118
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 118
COMP 180-01 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Xiexin Liu
Course Description:
Cross-listed with DATA 180-01 and MATH 180-01. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as DATA 180 and MATH 180.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 121
COMP 180-02 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Xiexin Liu
Course Description:
Cross-listed with DATA 180-02 and MATH 180-02. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as DATA 180 and MATH 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 121
COMP 241-02 Computational Mathematics
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MATH 241-02. An introduction to a broad range of numerical methods for solving mathematical problems that arise in science and engineering. Focus is given to developing a basic understanding of numerical algorithms, their applicability, and their limitations. Topics typically include floating-point number representation, sources of error, conditioning and numerical stability, root finding, solutions of both linear and nonlinear systems, least squares, splines and polynomial interpolation, optimization, and numerical differentiation and integration. The implementation and validation of algorithms through computer programming is also emphasized. No prior programming experience is required. Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following courses: MATH 170,171, 211 and 270. This course is cross-listed as MATH 241. Offered in even numbered spring semesters.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 121
Courses Offered in DATA
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
DATA 180-01 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Xiexin Liu
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-01 and MATH 180-01. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and MATH 180.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 121
DATA 180-02 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Xiexin Liu
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-02 and MATH 180-02. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and MATH 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 121
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 108-01 Arts of East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 108-01. This course introduces students to a selection of objects and sites that elicit new modes of cultural perception and insight into the artistic cultures of China, Korea, and Japan. Loosely arranged in a chronological order, each week is devoted to in-depth examination of a different type of object, medium, and format. The diverse mediums (sculpture, ceramics, metalwork, lacquer, prints, painting, calligraphy, photography, performance, and architecture) and the long historical span covered in class will chart how culture traveled within East Asia, and later, globally, as well as each cultures distinctive methods of adaptation over time. Major themes include the relationship between artistic production and sociopolitical and socioeconomic development, cultural exchange, aesthetics, impact of religion, power and authority, gender, and issues of modernity. Lectures are supplemented by viewing sessions in the Trout Gallery.This course is cross-listed as ARTH 108.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
WEISS 235
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 111-01 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 317
ECON 111-02 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Nicky Tynan
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 204
ECON 111-03 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 08
ECON 112-01 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Yaxiang Song
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 106
ECON 112-02 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Yaxiang Song
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 117
ECON 112-03 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Paul Ko
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 08
ECON 228-01 Economic Analysis of Policy
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 08
ECON 230-01 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCIO 227-01 and WGSS 202-02. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended) This course is cross-listed as SOCI 227 & WGSS 202.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 206
ECON 288-01 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
ALTHSE 207
ECON 351-01 Gender and Development
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 351-01 an WGSS 302-01.Permission of Instructor Required. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as INST 351& WGSS 302.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in EDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EDST 120-01 Contemporary Issues in American Education
Instructor: Jacquie Forbes
Course Description:
An examination of current policies, practices, and problems in the landscape of American education with particular attention to the perspectives of various stakeholders (e.g. teachers, students, families, community leaders, employers, and elected officials). U.S. diversity with respect to race, class, gender, language, and exceptionality is considered within a variety of educational contexts. The course also examines the ways in which educational issues and reform efforts intersect with social, economic, political, and cultural forces. An examination of current policies, practices, and problems in the landscape of American education with particular attention to the perspectives of various stakeholders (e.g. teachers, students, families, community leaders, employers, and elected officials). U.S. diversity with respect to race, class, gender, language, and exceptionality is considered within a variety of educational contexts. The course also examines the ways in which educational issues and reform efforts intersect with social, economic, political, and cultural forces.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
BOSLER 314
EDST 140-01 Educational Psychology
Instructor: Jacquie Forbes
Course Description:
An examination of physical, cognitive, and psychological developmental theories and research as well as theories of learning. The course includes theoretical perspectives on: age-stage characteristics, exceptionality, achievement versus aptitude, as well as how developmental, sociocultural, and motivational factors influence student learning in classroom contexts.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
BOSLER 314
EDST 260-01 Introduction to Educational Research
Instructor: Liz Lewis
Course Description:
An introduction to the purposes and methodologies of research in education including how various stakeholders in the educational community use and access research findings as well as how studies in education are designed, implemented, and disseminated. Quantitative, qualitative, and historical methodologies are addressed. Research processes are introduced around the topic of literacy. Students will develop a review of the research literature on a topic related to literacy using online catalogs, databases, and other open access resources to find and gather sources and digital publications formats to disseminate their reviews. Prerequisite: 140. An introduction to the purposes and methodologies of research in education including how various stakeholders in the educational community use and access research findings as well as how studies in education are designed, implemented, and disseminated. Quantitative, qualitative, and historical methodologies are addressed. Research processes are introduced around the topic of literacy. Students will develop a review of the research literature on a topic related to literacy using online catalogs, databases, and other open access resources to find and gather sources and digital publications formats to disseminate their reviews. Prerequisite: 140.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TR
DENNY 304
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 410
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 303
ENGL 220-03 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 410
ENGL 341-01 The Start of the Anthropocene? Environment and Sustainability in Enlightenment France
Instructor: Hanna Roman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-01.Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Toulouse. Scientists today often attribute the beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the Anthropocene, to changes in culture, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What were the intellectual and philosophical ideas behind these changes, and how did they contribute to modern-day conceptions of the natural environment and the human role within it? What did questions of sustainability and climate change look like in the eighteenth century? This seminar will address these sustainability-themed questions through the lens of the literature of Enlightenment France, which imagined new ways of perceiving and altering nature. It will engage with the Enlightenment movement as both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction of both natural and human environments. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful to our contemporary understandings of sustainability and which have become harmful to the future of our species and planet. Readings include works of fiction, philosophy, natural history, and science fiction by famous Enlightenment authors such as Diderot, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Voltaire, as well as by less well-known, but equally important, voices such as Bernadin de Saint-Pierre, Mme de Graffigny, and Quesnay. Field trips to the Dickinson Farm, to natural areas around Carlisle, to rare books collections, and an optional GIS portion of the class focusing on foodways in Toulouse, France, are also part of the course. Readings, assignments, and discussions for this class are in English. As a FLIC course, students with the ability to read advanced French as well as French majors can complete readings and assignments in French. If you are a FFS major, you must enroll in the FLIC/FR section of the class (not the English section).
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 104
Courses Offered in ENSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENSC 550-02 Bioretention System Research
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:

Courses Offered in ERSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ERSC 142-01 Earth's Changing Climate
Instructor: Marcus Key
Course Description:
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 186
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
KAUF 152
ERSC 142-02 Earth's Changing Climate
Instructor: Marcus Key
Course Description:
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate players such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 186
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 152
ERSC 151-01 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Alyson Thibodeau
Course Description:
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
KAUF 134
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 179
ERSC 151-02 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Alyson Thibodeau
Course Description:
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
KAUF 134
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 179
ERSC 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Peter Sak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-01, ARCH 218-01, and GISP 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and GISP 218.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
LIBRY ICCR
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 186
ERSC 218-02 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-02, ARCH 218-02, and GISP 218-02. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and GISP 218.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 185
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
DENNY 112
ERSC 250-01 Introduction to Arctic Studies
Instructor: Ben Edwards
Course Description:
Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Iceland. This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the physical/social geography, geology and ecology of the Arctic region of earth particularly through the lens of global climate change. Students will use a variety of media (lectures, readings, videos, blogs) to build knowledge about this critical region of earth to serve as a basis for individual and group projects on a specific Arctic region (e.g., Siberia, Svalbard, Greenland, Iceland, Nunavut, Alaska) and topic (e.g., climate change, Arctic tourism, Arctic flora/fauna species, Arctic archeology, Arctic exploration). Learning goals include: i) exposure to spatial analysis and Geographic Information Systems, ii) foundational knowledge of the Arctic cryosphere and its response to climate change, geological history, human geography and ecological systems, and iii) mastery of Arctic geography. Course meetings will include student presentations, fieldtrips and basic GIS instruction.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 185
ERSC 305-01 Earth Materials
Instructor: Ben Edwards
Course Description:
Completion of both ERSC 305 and ERSC 309 fulfills the WID Requirement. This gives students a basic understanding of the tools and techniques used in modern science to identify and characterize solid earth materials at the macroscopic (hand samples), microscopic (polarized light), and sub-microscopic (X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy) levels. Emphasis in the first part of the course will be on minerals, while the second part of the course will introduce students to characterization techniques of other solid earth materials (soils and rocks) and their conditions of formation. This course is required for the Earth Sciences major, and will be useful to students interested in agricultural science, archeology, environmental science, forensic science, planetary science, and solid state chemistry and physics. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 151 or permission of instructor. Completion of both 305 and 309 fulfills the WID graduation requirement. Offered every other year.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 140
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 140
ERSC 318-01 Advanced Applications in GIS
Instructor: Gordon Cromley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 318-01, ENST 318-01, and GISP 318-01. The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ARCH 218 or GISP 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 318, ENST 318 and GISP 318. Offered every two years.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
LIBRY ICCR
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
KAUF 116
Courses Offered in FMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FMST 220-03 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 221-01. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
09:30 AM-11:30 AM, TR
GDYRST 101
FMST 220-06 Mass Media and American Politics
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 243-01. Examines the causes, content, and consequences of political news, primarily focusing on television. It will explore the ways in which audience characteristics, organizational routines, and professional socialization influence the style and substance of the news. The content of news will be analyzed for: the three branches of government, war, foreign governments, crises, and presidential campaigns. The impact of the media on political behavior will also be discussed. Content analysis will be used by students to systematically analyze television network news. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 203
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 364-01 The Start of the Anthropocene? Environment and Sustainability in Enlightenment France
Instructor: Hanna Roman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-01.Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Toulouse. Scientists today often attribute the beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the Anthropocene, to changes in culture, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What were the intellectual and philosophical ideas behind these changes, and how did they contribute to modern-day conceptions of the natural environment and the human role within it? What did questions of sustainability and climate change look like in the eighteenth century? This seminar will address these sustainability-themed questions through the lens of the literature of Enlightenment France, which imagined new ways of perceiving and altering nature. It will engage with the Enlightenment movement as both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction of both natural and human environments. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful to our contemporary understandings of sustainability and which have become harmful to the future of our species and planet. Readings include works of fiction, philosophy, natural history, and science fiction by famous Enlightenment authors such as Diderot, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Voltaire, as well as by less well-known, but equally important, voices such as Bernadin de Saint-Pierre, Mme de Graffigny, and Quesnay. Field trips to the Dickinson Farm, to natural areas around Carlisle, to rare books collections, and an optional GIS portion of the class focusing on foodways in Toulouse, France, are also part of the course. Readings, assignments, and discussions for this class are in English. As a FLIC course, students with the ability to read advanced French as well as French majors can complete readings and assignments in French. If you are a FFS major, you must enroll in the FLIC/FR section of the class (not the English section).
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 104
Courses Offered in GISP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
GISP 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Peter Sak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-01, ERSC 218-01, and ARCH 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing.Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
LIBRY ICCR
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 186
GISP 218-02 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-02, ERSC 218-02, and ARCH 218-02. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing.Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 185
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
DENNY 112
GISP 318-01 Advanced Applications in GIS
Instructor: Gordon Cromley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 318-01, ERSC 318-01, and ARCH 318-01. The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 318, ENST 318 and ERSC 318. Offered every two years.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
LIBRY ICCR
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
KAUF 116
Courses Offered in HEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HEST 201-01 Introduction to Health Studies
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
Course Description:
Introduction to Health Studies is a multi-disciplinary course that explores various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of health. In addition to providing the overall framework for the materials covered, the faculty-convener of the course will draw on speakers from Dickinson faculty who will present health studies materials relevant to their respective areas of special expertise. Faculty speakers will be drawn from a range of disciplines at the college, including American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, History, International Business and Management, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Psychology, and Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies.Normally offered spring semester. Introduction to Health Studies is a multi-disciplinary course that explores various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of health. In addition to providing the overall framework for the materials covered, the faculty-convener of the course will draw on speakers from Dickinson faculty who will present health studies materials relevant to their respective areas of special expertise. Faculty speakers will be drawn from a range of disciplines at the college, including American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, History, International Business and Management, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Psychology, and Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies.Normally offered spring semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 109
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 151-01 History of Environment
Instructor: Mars Plater
Course Description:
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature. Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 203
HIST 211-01 EnvironmentalismS
Instructor: Mars Plater
Course Description:
Many people have advocated for the environment over the course of U.S. history -- for different reasons and in different ways -- and this course will explore their stories. We will consider the modern environmental movement that launched with Earth Day celebrations in 1970 and environmentalist ancestors who created national parks in the late nineteenth and earlier twentieth centuries. The love of wilderness that has often driven this vein of environmental advocacy, we will find, could also lead towards eugenicist and nativist thinking. We will also meet people who are not remembered as environmentalists, but who defended the environment and their communities' relationships with the environment. This course aims to broaden the history of environmentalism to include immigrants who petitioned and protested against the neglect of urban green space, women reformers who condemned industrial smoke, enslaved gardeners, and Native peoples displaced by the creation of national parks who broke rules to steward the land in their own way. An inclusive history of environmentalism will help us understand and analyze tensions among environmentalists of the present.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 103
HIST 211-02 Parks in U.S. History
Instructor: Mars Plater
Course Description:
This course will explore how shifting ideas about and functions of green space have shaped United States landscapes since the eighteenth-century emergence of the first urban parks. Looking to the past, we will ask: why are city, county, state, and national parks located where they are? What did parks replace and who did they displace? What values have shaped the rules in parks, and how have visitors violated authorities' visions in order to make these lands their own? Parks belong to the full public in theory, but how have systems of exclusion and inclusion determined who feels welcome in these common grounds? Why have parks been centers of urban protest and what role has public space played in movements for social and environmental change? We will see that the struggles over belonging, order, democracy, and justice that have defined the history of parks continue to rage in the present.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 112
Courses Offered in INBM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INBM 100-01 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: David Sarcone
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 201
INBM 100-02 Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Uwe Paff
Course Description:
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 201
INBM 110-01 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals. This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 204
INBM 110-02 Fundamentals of Accounting
Instructor: Joy Middaugh
Course Description:
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals. This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 204
INBM 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
INBM 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-02. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
INBM 230-01 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Dengjian Jin
Course Description:
This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 110
INBM 230-02 International Organizational Behavior
Instructor: Steve Riccio
Course Description:
This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 109
INBM 240-01 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Xiaolu Wang
Course Description:
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required. The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 110
INBM 240-02 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Xiaolu Wang
Course Description:
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required. The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 106
INBM 240-03 Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Sherry Ritchey
Course Description:
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required. The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
ALTHSE 204
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 104
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ECON 226.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-02. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ECON 226.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
INST 273-01 International Political Economy
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 273-01. This course examines the politics of global economic relations. Specific topics discussed include: trade and protectionism, international monetary relations, foreign direct investment, global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and World Trade Organization (WTO), regional economic integration (e.g. the European Union [EU] and North American Free Trade Agreement [NAFTA], economic development, and the economic emergence of China and India. The larger issue serving as the backdrop to all of this is economic globalization -- its significance, sources, and consequences. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 273.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 103
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 204
INST 290-03 Human Rights
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 258-01. The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights embodies a global consensus on the fundamental importance of human rights as a political value. But the idea and its practical applications have provoked intense controversy around the world on issues such as freedom of expression, capital punishment and torture, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, social and economic justice, and cultural and minority rights. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of the instructor.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 109
INST 351-01 Gender and Development
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 351-01 and WGSS 302-01.Permission of Instructor Required. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as ECON 351 & WGSS 302.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in JRNL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JRNL 200-01 Introduction to Journalism in the 21st Century
Instructor: Amy Worden
Course Description:
This course offers a broad overview of the practice of journalism combined with rigorous training in news writing. Students will be required to write a number of short articles and several longer pieces of journalistic writing. Readings and discussion topics will include the history of journalism in the United States and the ethics and techniques of reporting across media platforms. Students will be conducting interviews as part of the course. The course will focus special attention on current events, news literacy and the role of a free press in a challenging time. This course offers a broad overview of the practice of journalism combined with rigorous training in news writing. Students will be required to write a number of short articles and several longer pieces of journalistic writing. Readings and discussion topics will include the history of journalism in the United States and the ethics and techniques of reporting across media platforms. Students will be conducting interviews as part of the course. The course will focus special attention on current events, news literacy and the role of a free press in a challenging time.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, F
Online
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, T
STERN 103
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 121-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 100-01. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies.This course is cross-listed as AFST 100.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 201
LALC 222-01 Anthropology of Latin America
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 222-01. This course is an ethnographic exploration of contemporary life in Latin America. It is designed to introduce students to the major themes and debates in the anthropology of Latin America. It is aimed at understanding the cultural and historical development of Latin America, and it seeks to make sense of the cultural similarities and differences that have both captured the interest of anthropologists and helped to make Latin America an important site of anthropological study and theorizing. In the process of examining the histories and cultures of Latin America, we will also look at how power and structural inequalities have shaped the region. The course will study Latin American cultures and societies in relation to neighboring nations - the United States, Canada and the Caribbean - given their shared history and experiences of colonialism and slavery as well as their economic interdependence.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 222. Offered every other year.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 313
LALC 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and ANTH 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1) What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and ANTH 262.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 211
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 230-01 Negotiation and Advocacy
Instructor: Edward Guido
Course Description:
This course will focus on the role of the advocate in the law and policy-making process. It will consider various types of advocacy (public debate, litigation, public relations, etc.) and various methods of negotiation as well as compare and contrast the advocate's role in different forums (legislatures, courts, administrative agencies, the press, etc.). Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 110
Courses Offered in MATH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MATH 121-01 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Jackie Campbell
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
TOME 121
MATH 121-02 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Eren Bilen
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
TOME 121
MATH 151-01 Introduction to Calculus
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
An introduction to limits and derivatives together with a review of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: departmental placement. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, T
TOME 120
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 120
MATH 170-01 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Barry Tesman
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, R
TOME 120
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 117
MATH 170-02 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Tony Mixell
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 118
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, M
TOME 118
MATH 170-03 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Chris Fowler
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
04:30 PM-05:50 PM, W
TOME 120
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
TOME 117
MATH 170-04 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Barry Tesman
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 117
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, R
TOME 120
MATH 171-01 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 231
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, F
TOME 118
MATH 171-02 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, R
TOME 118
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 231
MATH 171-03 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, T
TOME 118
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
TOME 118
MATH 180-01 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Xiexin Liu
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-01 and DATA 180-01. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and DATA 180.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 121
MATH 180-02 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Xiexin Liu
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-02 and DATA 180-02. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and DATA 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 121
MATH 211-01 Foundations of Higher Mathematics
Instructor: Eddie Tu
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics and computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic, sets, functions, and methods of proof. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 130 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 232
MATH 211-02 Foundations of Higher Mathematics
Instructor: Eddie Tu
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics and computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic, sets, functions, and methods of proof. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 130 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 232
MATH 241-02 Computational Mathematics
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 241-02. An introduction to a broad range of numerical methods for solving mathematical problems that arise in science and engineering. Focus is given to developing a basic understanding of numerical algorithms, their applicability, and their limitations. Topics typically include floating-point number representation, sources of error, conditioning and numerical stability, root finding, solutions of both linear and nonlinear systems, least squares, splines and polynomial interpolation, optimization, and numerical differentiation and integration. The implementation and validation of algorithms through computer programming is also emphasized. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following courses: 170, 171, 211 and 270. This course is cross-listed as COMP 241. Offered in even numbered spring semesters.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 121
MATH 262-01 Linear Algebra
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
An introduction to matrix algebra and abstract vector spaces with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. Topics include linear systems and matrices, vector spaces, linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.Prerequisite: 211 or permission of the instructor. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
TOME 121
MATH 270-01 Integration and Infinite Series
Instructor: Lorelei Koss
Course Description:
The study of methods of integration, applications of the integral, elementary differential equations, and infinite sequences and series.Prerequisite: 171 or departmental placement. Offered every spring.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 120
MATH 270-02 Integration and Infinite Series
Instructor: Lorelei Koss
Course Description:
The study of methods of integration, applications of the integral, elementary differential equations, and infinite sequences and series.Prerequisite: 171 or departmental placement. Offered every spring.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 120
MATH 325-01 Probability and Statistics II
Instructor: Jeffrey Forrester
Course Description:
A continuation of Introduction to Probability and Statistics I. Topics include additional discrete and continuous distributions, conditional distributions, additional hypothesis tests, simple linear regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and goodness of fit tests. Special topics may include nonparametric tests, nonlinear regression, and time series analysis.Prerequisites: 171 and 225. Offered every spring.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 121
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 207
PHIL 102-01 Introduction to Ethics
Instructor: Jim Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to the philosophical study of morality, focusing on concepts of right and wrong, virtue and vice, and wellbeing. This course provides students the opportunity to hone their ethical reasoning skills by critically examining how some of historys most influential philosophers thought about issues in morality. Students will also develop more general skills, such as evaluating philosophical arguments, and expressing and defending their own ideas in writing.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 08
PHIL 104-01 Practical Ethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
This course introduces students to contemporary debates in practical ethics. Course materials investigate how theoretical approaches to ethics apply to practical issues, including discussions of animal ethics, environmental ethics, reproductive ethics, civil disobedience, and the ethics of mass incarceration and the death penalty. This course is best suited for students interested in thinking about the relationship between ethical theory and practice, with an emphasis on how power, privilege, and responsibility intersect in our everyday lives. This course introduces students to contemporary debates in practical ethics. Course materials investigate how theoretical approaches to ethics apply to practical issues, including discussions of animal ethics, environmental ethics, reproductive ethics, civil disobedience, and the ethics of mass incarceration and the death penalty. This course is best suited for students interested in thinking about the relationship between ethical theory and practice, with an emphasis on how power, privilege, and responsibility intersect in our everyday lives.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 411
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 104
PHIL 252-01 Philosophy of Art
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 252-01. The discipline of aesthetics is primarily concerned with philosophical questions about art and beauty. This course will examine classic and contemporary Western discussions of such questions as, What is art? How can we determine what a work of art means? Are beauty and other aesthetic qualities subjective or objective? How should the quality of a work of art be assessed? Is there a general way to describe the creative process? What are the driving forces in the unfolding of art history? We will encounter such giants of the Western intellectual tradition as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Hegel, and also such contemporary figures as Arthur Danto, Richard Wollheim, and Kendall Walton. Prerequisite: one prior course in art history or philosophy or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ARTH 252.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 411
PHIL 303-01 Epistemology
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
This seminar will probe key issues in epistemology, such as: the nature of knowledge and justification, the challenge of skepticism, the relation of sense perception to conceptual thought. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, at least two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 105
Courses Offered in PHYS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHYS 132-01 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
09:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 101
PHYS 132-02 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Krsna Dev
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
01:30 PM-03:20 PM, MWF
TOME 101
PHYS 142-01 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Krsna Dev, Robert Boyle
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 115
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
TOME 105
PHYS 142-02 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Robert Boyle, Krsna Dev
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
TOME 105
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 115
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 104
POSC 120-02 American Government
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 304
POSC 150-01 Comparative Politics
Instructor: Craig Lang
Course Description:
An introduction to comparative political analysis with applications to political systems, processes, and issues worldwide. The purpose of the course is to learn to observe political life systematically, analyze a wide range of political phenomena, and distinguish and evaluate the assumptions underlying alternative approaches to the study of politics. The course may address topics such as democratization, authoritarian challenges to democratic systems, social inequality and underdevelopment, sustainability, political corruption, human rights, and political violence. An introduction to comparative political analysis with applications to political systems, processes, and issues worldwide. The purpose of the course is to learn to observe political life systematically, analyze a wide range of political phenomena, and distinguish and evaluate the assumptions underlying alternative approaches to the study of politics. The course may address topics such as democratization, authoritarian challenges to democratic systems, social inequality and underdevelopment, sustainability, political corruption, human rights, and political violence.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 313
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 104
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 104
POSC 204-01 Competing Political Ideologies
Instructor: John Harles
Course Description:
This class surveys the major ideologies that compete for political support in Western societies, such as liberalism, conservatism, and socialism, as well as radical alternatives (anarchism and fascism), and new perspectives such as feminism and ecologism/environmentalism. We will also examine the nature of ideology, and whether it is possible to develop a neutral, non-ideological perspective on politics. Prerequisite: 180, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 212
POSC 243-01 Mass Media and American Politics
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-06. Examines the causes, content, and consequences of political news, primarily focusing on television. It will explore the ways in which audience characteristics, organizational routines, and professional socialization influence the style and substance of the news. The content of news will be analyzed for: the three branches of government, war, foreign governments, crises, and presidential campaigns. The impact of the media on political behavior will also be discussed. Content analysis will be used by students to systematically analyze television network news. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 203
POSC 258-01 Human Rights
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03. The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights embodies a global consensus on the fundamental importance of human rights as a political value. But the idea and its practical applications have provoked intense controversy around the world on issues such as freedom of expression, capital punishment and torture, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, social and economic justice, and cultural and minority rights. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of the instructor.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 109
POSC 273-01 International Political Economy
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 273-01. This course examines the politics of global economic relations. Specific topics discussed include: trade and protectionism, international monetary relations, foreign direct investment, global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and World Trade Organization (WTO), regional economic integration (e.g. the European Union [EU] and North American Free Trade Agreement [NAFTA], economic development, and the economic emergence of China and India. The larger issue serving as the backdrop to all of this is economic globalization -- its significance, sources, and consequences. Prerequisite: 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 273.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 103
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 204
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 140-01 Social Psychology
Instructor: Grace Larson
Course Description:
In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
KAUF 179
PSYC 140-02 Social Psychology
Instructor: Grace Larson
Course Description:
In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
KAUF 179
PSYC 175-01 Introduction to Community Psychology
Instructor: Howard Rosen
Course Description:
This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology--a field that focuses on persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals' mental health and wellbeing. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore the field's application to a range of clinical and social issues; and (d) emulate the field's commitment to the promotion of social change through research and action. This course is a Health Studies elective. This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology--a field that focuses on persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals' mental health and wellbeing. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore the field's application to a range of clinical and social issues; and (d) emulate the field's commitment to the promotion of social change through research and action. This course is a Health Studies elective.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
WEISS 221
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 116-01 Religion, Nature, and the Environment
Instructor: Jodie Vann
Course Description:
This course explores how various religious and spiritual traditions have understood, conceptualized, and interacted with the natural world. Incorporating from both conventional religions (such as Catholicism, Judaism, and Buddhism) as well as newer spiritual forms (like Contemporary Paganism), the course provides a comparative survey of the relationships between religiosity and nature. Themes under examination include notions of human dominion, stewardship, panentheism, and naturalism. Students will consider how religious ideologies have shaped conceptions of nature, and how changing understandings of the natural world have challenged religious ideas. This course explores how various religious and spiritual traditions have understood, conceptualized, and interacted with the natural world. Incorporating from both conventional religions (such as Catholicism, Judaism, and Buddhism) as well as newer spiritual forms (like Contemporary Paganism), the course provides a comparative survey of the relationships between religiosity and nature. Themes under examination include notions of human dominion, stewardship, panentheism, and naturalism. Students will consider how religious ideologies have shaped conceptions of nature, and how changing understandings of the natural world have challenged religious ideas.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 203
RELG 116-02 Religion, Nature, and the Environment
Instructor: Jodie Vann
Course Description:
This course explores how various religious and spiritual traditions have understood, conceptualized, and interacted with the natural world. Incorporating from both conventional religions (such as Catholicism, Judaism, and Buddhism) as well as newer spiritual forms (like Contemporary Paganism), the course provides a comparative survey of the relationships between religiosity and nature. Themes under examination include notions of human dominion, stewardship, panentheism, and naturalism. Students will consider how religious ideologies have shaped conceptions of nature, and how changing understandings of the natural world have challenged religious ideas. This course explores how various religious and spiritual traditions have understood, conceptualized, and interacted with the natural world. Incorporating from both conventional religions (such as Catholicism, Judaism, and Buddhism) as well as newer spiritual forms (like Contemporary Paganism), the course provides a comparative survey of the relationships between religiosity and nature. Themes under examination include notions of human dominion, stewardship, panentheism, and naturalism. Students will consider how religious ideologies have shaped conceptions of nature, and how changing understandings of the natural world have challenged religious ideas.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
TOME 117
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Ya Su
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 212
SOCI 110-02 Social Analysis
Instructor: Ya Su
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 212
SOCI 227-01 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 230-01 and WGSS 202-02. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended). This course is cross-listed as ECON 230 & WGSS 202.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 206
SOCI 230-04 Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Instructor: Neil Leary
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with SUST 200-01. What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
KAUF 178
SOCI 244-01 Quantitative Research Methods
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Quantitative Research Methods introduces students to basic principles of sociological research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students learn to conceptualize a research question, operationalize key concepts, identify relevant literature, and form research hypotheses. Then, using elementary tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, they choose appropriate statistical methods, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions. Special emphasis is given to interpreting numbers with clear, persuasive language, in both oral and written formats. Students will become proficient in using quantitative software for data analysis. Two and a half hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 110. Quantitative Research Methods introduces students to basic principles of sociological research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students learn to conceptualize a research question, operationalize key concepts, identify relevant literature, and form research hypotheses. Then, using elementary tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, they choose appropriate statistical methods, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions. Special emphasis is given to interpreting numbers with clear, persuasive language, in both oral and written formats. Students will become proficient in using quantitative software for data analysis. Two and a half hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 110.
01:30 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 112
Courses Offered in SUST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SUST 200-01 Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Instructor: Neil Leary
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with SOCI 230-04. What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
KAUF 178
Courses Offered in WGSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 202-02 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 230-01 and SOCI 227-01. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.br>For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended)
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 206
WGSS 302-01 Gender and Development
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 351-01 and INST 351-01.Permission of Instructor Required.This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 201