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Environmental Studies Current Courses

Spring 2024

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 162-01 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Wande Benka-Coker
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 179
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 113
ENST 162-02 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Wande Benka-Coker
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 179
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 113
ENST 162-03 Integrative Environmental Science
Instructor: Allyssa Decker
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
KAUF 113
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 227
ENST 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with GEOS 218-01, GISP 218-01 and ARCH 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, GEOS 218 and GISP 218.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
LIBRY DSRL
ENST 250-01 Environmental Data Analysis in Practice
Instructor: Maggie Douglas
Course Description:
Realms of environmental study as different as climate change, land/water management, environmental health, environmental justice, and many others share something in common: they often depend on collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data. This course will introduce students to data analysis as it is used to answer environmental questions. Lecture will include activities to understand data organization and statistical concepts, and to critique environmental data as it is presented and interpreted in scholarly and popular sources. During lab, students will learn to write code in the R statistical language to import, wrangle, analyze, and visualize data. These skills will be applied to a real-world project in collaboration with a campus or community partner, culminating in a final product that is shaped by the needs of the partner. No previous coding experience is expected or required. Three hours lecture and three hours lab a week. Prerequisites: 162 or BIOL 131.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
LIBRY ALDEN
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
KAUF 116
ENST 280-01 Environmental and Social Justice
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-02. This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices. This course is cross-listed with SOCI 230.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 187
ENST 303-01 Food Insecurity, Poverty, and Public Policy
Instructor: Zach Zook
Course Description:
This course will provide an overview of the poverty and food insecurity issues in the United States and examine governmental and community responses. Domestic anti-poverty programs are implemented at federal, state, and local levels and in the non-profit sector and other localized solutions, and the course will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different program designs. General topics covered in the course include the history and development of public welfare programs and various issues related to the modern social safety net, with a special emphasis on food insecurity issues and its corresponding community and governmental solutions. Intended to help students develop practical public policy analysis skills and apply them to issues of domestic poverty and food insecurity, the main assignments of the course will be deliverables regularly seen in a policy context, including a talking points memo, a policy memo and/or a policy brief on a poverty issue of each students choosing.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
KAUF 187
ENST 303-02 Radical Hope in the Age of the Anthropocene
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
As we live through times with rapidly worsening social and ecological conditions, it is difficult to feel a sense of hope in the future of our species and the planet. While there are numerous proposed plans and solutions, we seem to be failing to meet the growing world crisis at social, political, economic and environmental levels. During these times of overwhelming ecological crises, it is important not to be soothed by narratives of techno-optimism or greening of business as usual resolving our current crisis. The purpose of this course is to help us understand how to rediscover hope by identifying our current existential blind spots, reject the notion that we cannot change the ways things are at present, and embrace the idea that positive collective change is essential to thrive in the age of the Anthropocene. To be truly radical is to make hope possible, rather than despair convincing - Raymond Williams.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 315
ENST 305-02 Ornithology
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
The class room component of this course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and conservation biology of birds. Students will have numerous opportunities both in and outside of the classroom to examine conservation issues and actions as they relate to the functioning of natural ecosystems, the consequences of anthropocentric impacts to those environments and learn how sustainability practices influence many bird species, populations and communities. The lab portion of this course will focus on hands-on learning through a variety of tools, mechanisms and field experiences including but not limited to use of study skins and skeletons, field guides, optics and field-monitoring techniques. Students will be regularly immersed in living labs during field trips both local and regional including visits to a bird banding station, state wildlife management areas and research study sites. In addition students will learn how to identify birds through specific behaviors, visual field marks, songs and calls. There will be a least one day-long field trip during a weekend, one extended lab field trip to a waterfowl stopover habitat during spring migration and an optional 4-5 day field trip over spring break to visit other sites utilized by birds in and outside of Pennsylvania. Each student will also complete a research paper on selected ornithological topics.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 109
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 109
ENST 305-03 Vegetation Monitoring
Instructor: Sarah Sterner
Course Description:
In this course, students will learn standard vegetation and ecological monitoring methods used by research institutions, government agencies, and vegetation monitoring programs nationwide as they explore the ecosystems of the Cumberland Valley. During labs students will gain on the ground experience monitoring native plant communities, learn the basics of plant identification, explore ecosystem relationships and habitat types, develop a familiarity with local flora, create their own pressed herbarium collections, and enter and analyze field data. Lectures will prepare students for outdoor lab sessions as well as highlight current vegetation research and monitoring trends, ethnobotanical uses of native plants, and habitat management practices.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 116
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 116
ENST 305-04 Wildlife Monitoring Methods and Technology
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:
This field course will provide students with a solid foundation and hands on experiences regarding the practical use of specific tools and the application of field methods and techniques used in both environmental consulting and wildlife sciences today. Coursework will focus on numerous topics including research and experimental design; collection, management and analysis of data; identification of animals and marking techniques; measuring animal abundance; assessment of wildlife habitat, the role of radio and satellite telemetry; and the practical application of spatial technology (GIS). Students will gain hands on experience in reading and using topographic maps, interpreting aerial photos, using a compass and hand held GPS, orienteering, and creating maps in GIS. Students will also learn about employing and in many cases practicing various monitoring techniques such as spot mapping, area searches, conducting point counts, nest searches, transect surveys, live trapping and marking, use of remote cameras; telemetry; and the use of mist nets for capturing birds and mammals. At least one field trip will include a day long (weekend) visit to an active research site.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
KAUF 109
ENST 372-01 Environment, Conflict and Peace
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03. The goal of this class is to examine the complex relationships between the environment, conflict and peace. We will discuss the emergence of the environment as a topic of conflict and peace studies, and ask if the environment should be a security concern. We will scrutinize the extent to which environmental degradation, resource scarcity, natural resource wealth, and even climate change, increases the likelihood of violent conflict, and discuss the environmental consequences of war itself. We will explore whether environmental cooperation reduces the risk of violent conflicts, and whether responses to environmental problems can serve as catalyst for peace. We will strive to understand how international institutionsgovernmental, intergovernmental and non-governmentalact to address security and peacebuilding challenges linked to the environment. The course approaches the topic from different levels of analysis (local, national, transnational and supranational), diverse theoretical frameworks and analytical methods and range of environmental issue areas. Finally, we will use a broad range of materials, employ lectures and seminar-like discussions and incorporate field trips and guest speakers. Prerequisite: 161 or INST/POSC 170.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 187
ENST 406-01 What Does the Earth Ask of Us
Instructor: Maggie Douglas
Course Description:
The question motivating this senior seminar is drawn from the work of Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer, an ecologist and member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. Dr. Kimmerer invites us to consider not only what benefits humans derive from the Earth, but also what gifts we have to offer in return. In this senior seminar, we will explore this question individually and collectively, taking an interdisciplinary approach that draws on both scholarly/creative work and the work of practitioners in the environmental field. We will critically examine paradigms that have been put forward to help repair the human relationship to the Earth (e.g. restoration, reconciliation, regeneration) and case studies in which such paradigms have been put into practice, with varying degrees of success. Students will help lead class discussions and develop a capstone project focused on a particular environmental challenge. Throughout, students will be encouraged to reflect on their education and experiences to identify the gifts they have to offer the Earth in their post-graduation pursuits.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
KAUF 178
ENST 406-02 Environmental Innovations and Activism Capstone
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Innovative approaches are needed to address urgent environmental and social concerns, including the climate crisis. As a capstone in Environmental Studies and Science, this course will examine environmental challenges, innovations, and activism from natural science, social science, and humanities perspectives. Following a review of key course concepts, the group will explore how diverse actors, groups, and governments approach environmental innovations and activism. Students will each select an environmental challenge and examine related innovations or activism for their capstone project. These student topics will frame the focal areas for course case studies and will allow the class to examine how a range of stakeholders attempt to contest and address pressing environmental issues.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
ENST 560-01 Mammal Survey Targeting Weasels at Reineman Wildlife Sanctuary
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:

Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 220-05 Ecological History of Africa
Instructor: Robin Crigler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 284-01. This course provides an introduction to the ecological history of Africa. We will focus in some detail on demography, the domestication of crops and animals, climate, the spread of New World crops (maize, cassava, cocoa), and disease environments from the earliest times to the present. Central to our study will be the idea that Africa's landscapes are the product of human action. Therefore, we will examine case studies of how people have interacted with their environments. African ecology has long been affected indirectly by decisions made at a global scale. Thus we will explore Africa's engagement with imperialism and colonization and the global economy in the twentieth century. The course ends with an examination of contemporary tensions between conservation and economic development.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 103
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-04 Indigenous Environmental Justice
Instructor: Daniel Schniedewind
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 205-01. Environmental justice--as both a social movement and an affiliated area of scholarship--emphasizes the disproportionate impact of environmental harm on human communities already marginalized because of factors like race, class, and indigeneity. While Indigenous activists and scholars have strategically mobilized under the banner of environmental justice, conventional U.S. environmental justice frameworks have not always acknowledged the unique status of Indigenous communities as sovereign political and legal entities. How does this status make for distinctive articulations of "justice?" Likewise, in what ways is the term "environment" inadequate in describing the more-than-human relationships that Indigenous peoples maintain? This course will explore how Indigenous land and water protectors have long put forward visions for collective futures that diverge from intertwined histories of social and ecological violence, including through multiracial collaborations and campaigns. The course will be global in scope and will draw on a deeply interdisciplinary range of course materials.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 211
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
ANTH 205-01 Indigenous Environmental Justice
Instructor: Daniel Schniedewind
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-04.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 211
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 211
Courses Offered in ARCH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
ARCH 218-02 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with GEOS 218-01, ENST 218-01 and GISP 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 , GEOS 218 and GISP 218.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
LIBRY DSRL
ARCH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 211
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
JAMESR 2228
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2228
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Mike Potthoff
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
JAMESR 1206
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2228
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
JAMESR 2206
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2206
BIOL 224-01 Plant Geography & Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Analysis of factors determining the distribution and abundance of plant species, including study of plant migration patterns today and in the distant past. Lecture includes examples and readings from classic and recent research. Field, laboratory, and greenhouse studies focus on plant demography, plant-animal interactions, plant community structure, competition, soil and water relations, and other topics. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132 OR ENST 161 and 162. Analysis of factors determining the distribution and abundance of plant species, including study of plant migration patterns today and in the distant past. Lecture includes examples and readings from classic and recent research. Field, laboratory, and greenhouse studies focus on plant demography, plant-animal interactions, plant community structure, competition, soil and water relations, and other topics. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132 OR ENST 161 and 162.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 2319
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MW
ALTHSE 201
BIOL 224-02 Plant Geography & Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Analysis of factors determining the distribution and abundance of plant species, including study of plant migration patterns today and in the distant past. Lecture includes examples and readings from classic and recent research. Field, laboratory, and greenhouse studies focus on plant demography, plant-animal interactions, plant community structure, competition, soil and water relations, and other topics. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132 OR ENST 161 and 162. Analysis of factors determining the distribution and abundance of plant species, including study of plant migration patterns today and in the distant past. Lecture includes examples and readings from classic and recent research. Field, laboratory, and greenhouse studies focus on plant demography, plant-animal interactions, plant community structure, competition, soil and water relations, and other topics. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132 OR ENST 161 and 162.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
RNORTH 2319
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MW
ALTHSE 201
BIOL 313-01 Cell Biology w/Lab
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
An introduction to the structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. The course will involve discussion-oriented lectures and readings from the current literature. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying state of the art techniques to cell biological experiments. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
KAUF 179
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
JAMESR 1218
BIOL 334-01 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy w/lab
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory course exploring the functional morphology and evolution of vertebrates. Students will apply foundational content from lecture and intensive techniques of manual tissue dissection in the laboratory to fully evaluate the structure & function integrative design of selected, preserved specimens. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
RNORTH 1317
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
RNORTH 1317
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, R
STUART 2112
BIOL 342-02 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun, Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Cross-listed with CHEM 342-02. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 2112
BIOL 423-01 Plant Physiological Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
A study of how plants function and respond to their environment. Topics include mineral nutrition, cellular and whole plant water relations, photosynthesis and sugar metabolism, hormonal regulation, sensing, induced defense responses, and reproduction. The course focuses the interactions between plants and a rapidly changing environment, including climate warming, accelerating CO2 rise, drought, flooding, and pollution. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162. A study of how plants function and respond to their environment. Topics include mineral nutrition, cellular and whole plant water relations, photosynthesis and sugar metabolism, hormonal regulation, sensing, induced defense responses, and reproduction. The course focuses the interactions between plants and a rapidly changing environment, including climate warming, accelerating CO2 rise, drought, flooding, and pollution. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 178
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 178
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor. Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 1316
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 115
Courses Offered in CHEM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CHEM 132-01 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 132-02 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Cindy Samet
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 132-03 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
STUART 1104
CHEM 132-L1 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 1121
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 1113
CHEM 132-L2 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
STUART 1113
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
STUART 1121
CHEM 132-L3 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Christine O'Neill
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 1113
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 1121
CHEM 132-L4 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Katie Barker
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
STUART 1121
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
STUART 1113
CHEM 132-L5 General Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Brian Wladkowski
Course Description:
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 1121
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 1113
CHEM 242-01 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Jim Rego
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
STUART 1104
CHEM 242-02 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
STUART 1104
CHEM 242-L1 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
12:30 PM-01:00 PM, M
STUART 1113
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L2 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Michael Holden
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, T
STUART 1118
01:15 PM-01:45 PM, T
STUART 1104
CHEM 242-L3 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
12:30 PM-01:00 PM, W
STUART 1113
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 1118
CHEM 242-L4 Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Instructor: Jim Rego
Course Description:
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, R
STUART 1118
01:15 PM-01:45 PM, R
STUART 1104
CHEM 243-01 Modern Chemical Analysis w/Lab
Instructor: Brian Wladkowski
Course Description:
The theory of chemical equilibrium as it pertains to acid-base, metal-ligand, redox, and EDTA titrations. Topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, and the optimization and validation of experimental results will be covered. Statistical analysis of data will also be included. This class is meant to aid students in developing both a sound knowledge of experimental protocols (i.e. How many samples do we need to collect? How do we extract our analyte from the matrix? How much sample must be extracted in order to obtain a measurable result? How do we measure what's present? and in the critical evaluation of experimental results (How much confidence do we have that our results are representative of the system under study?). Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141. The theory of chemical equilibrium as it pertains to acid-base, metal-ligand, redox, and EDTA titrations. Topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, and the optimization and validation of experimental results will be covered. Statistical analysis of data will also be included. This class is meant to aid students in developing both a sound knowledge of experimental protocols (i.e. How many samples do we need to collect? How do we extract our analyte from the matrix? How much sample must be extracted in order to obtain a measurable result? How do we measure what's present? and in the critical evaluation of experimental results (How much confidence do we have that our results are representative of the system under study?). Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
STUART 1113
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STUART 2112
CHEM 244-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Instructor: Sarah St. Angelo
Course Description:
The fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics will be presented with a view towards providing an understanding of the concept of chemical equilibrium. Introductory concepts in chemical kinetics will also be discussed. Laboratory will focus on experiments illustrating the principles of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 132 or 141, MATH 171 or concurrent enrollment.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 122
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
STUART 2117
CHEM 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Cross-listed with BIOL 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, R
STUART 2112
CHEM 342-02 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor, Colin Rathbun
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Cross-listed with BIOL 342-02. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 2112
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
Courses Offered in COMP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
COMP 130-02 Introduction to Computing
Instructor: Mohammad Naderi Dehkordi
Course Description:
An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good.Students may not take this course for credit if they have already received credit for COMP 132 or COMP 232. An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good.Students may not take this course for credit if they have already received credit for COMP 132 or COMP 232.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 118
03:00 PM-05:00 PM, W
TOME 118
COMP 130-03 Introduction to Computing
Instructor: William Goble
Course Description:
An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good.Students may not take this course for credit if they have already received credit for COMP 132 or COMP 232. An introduction to computer science as a scientific discipline. The key elements of computer programming will be introduced, using the Python programming language. This leads to techniques for solving problems and conducting scientific investigations via computation. Core topics include: programming constructs such as conditionals, loops, functions, and parameters; data structures such as arrays and dictionaries; libraries and objects; algorithmic techniques such as recursion; and software engineering techniques such as testing and debugging. Additional topics include social, legal and ethical issues raised by computing and computing for the greater good.Students may not take this course for credit if they have already received credit for COMP 132 or COMP 232.
12:30 PM-01:20 PM, MWF
TOME 118
03:00 PM-05:00 PM, F
TOME 118
COMP 132-01 Principles of Object-Oriented Design
Instructor: Matthew Lambert
Course Description:
An introduction to object-oriented software design using Java. Topics include objects, classes, code modularity and reusability, abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Additional topics include unit testing, recursion, empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: Equivalent of one course of prior programming experience. See Advising Guide for placement advice for 130 and 132. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester. An introduction to object-oriented software design using Java. Topics include objects, classes, code modularity and reusability, abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Additional topics include unit testing, recursion, empirical and theoretical comparison of elementary algorithms. The lab component focuses on programming as a tool for solving problems and simulating real-world events. Prerequisite: Equivalent of one course of prior programming experience. See Advising Guide for placement advice for 130 and 132. Three hours classroom and two hours laboratory a week. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-05:00 PM, M
TOME 118
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 118
COMP 180-01 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Mark D'Arcy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with DATA 180-01 and MATH 180-01. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as DATA 180 and MATH 180. Offered every semester.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 120
COMP 180-02 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Mark D'Arcy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with DATA 180-02 and MATH 180-02. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as DATA 180 and MATH 180. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 120
COMP 241-01 Computational Mathematics
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MATH 241-01. An introduction to a broad range of numerical methods for solving mathematical problems that arise in science and engineering. Focus is given to developing a basic understanding of numerical algorithms, their applicability, and their limitations. Topics typically include floating-point number representation, sources of error, conditioning and numerical stability, root finding, solutions of both linear and nonlinear systems, least squares, splines and polynomial interpolation, optimization, and numerical differentiation and integration. The implementation and validation of algorithms through computer programming is also emphasized. No prior programming experience is required. Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following courses: MATH 170,171, 211 and 270. This course is cross-listed as MATH 241. Offered in even numbered spring semesters.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 121
Courses Offered in DATA
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
DATA 180-01 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Mark D'Arcy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-01 and MATH 180-01. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required. Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and MATH 180. Offered every semester.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 120
DATA 180-02 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Mark D'Arcy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-02 and MATH 180-02. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required. Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and MATH 180. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 120
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Sam Singh
Course Description:
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
Courses Offered in GEOS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
GEOS 151-01 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Ben Edwards
Course Description:
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 179
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
KAUF 140
GEOS 151-02 Foundations of Earth Sciences
Instructor: Ben Edwards
Course Description:
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 179
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
KAUF 140
GEOS 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01, ENST 218-01 and GISP 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and GISP 218.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
LIBRY DSRL
GEOS 221-01 Oceanography
Instructor: Jorden Hayes
Course Description:
An interdisciplinary introduction to the marine environment, including the chemistry of seawater, the physics of currents, water masses and waves, the geology of ocean basins, marine sediments and coastal features, and the biology of marine ecosystems. Topics include the theory of plate tectonics as an explanation for ocean basins, mid-ocean ridges, trenches, and island arcs. The interaction of man as exploiter and polluter in the marine environment is also considered. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: One introductory lab science or permission of instructor. Offered every other year. An interdisciplinary introduction to the marine environment, including the chemistry of seawater, the physics of currents, water masses and waves, the geology of ocean basins, marine sediments and coastal features, and the biology of marine ecosystems. Topics include the theory of plate tectonics as an explanation for ocean basins, mid-ocean ridges, trenches, and island arcs. The interaction of man as exploiter and polluter in the marine environment is also considered. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: One introductory lab science or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 178
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 146
GEOS 250-01 Introduction to Arctic Studies
Instructor: Ben Edwards
Course Description:
This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the physical/social geography, geology and ecology of the Arctic region of earth particularly through the lens of global climate change. Students will use a variety of media (lectures, readings, videos, blogs) to build knowledge about this critical region of earth to serve as a basis for individual and group projects on a specific Arctic region (e.g., Siberia, Svalbard, Greenland, Iceland, Nunavut, Alaska) and topic (e.g., climate change, Arctic tourism, Arctic flora/fauna species, Arctic archeology, Arctic exploration). Learning goals include: i) exposure to spatial analysis and Geographic Information Systems, ii) foundational knowledge of the Arctic cryosphere and its response to climate change, geological history, human geography and ecological systems, and iii) mastery of Arctic geography. Course meetings will include student presentations, fieldtrips and basic GIS instruction. This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the physical/social geography, geology and ecology of the Arctic region of earth particularly through the lens of global climate change. Students will use a variety of media (lectures, readings, videos, blogs) to build knowledge about this critical region of earth to serve as a basis for individual and group projects on a specific Arctic region (e.g., Siberia, Svalbard, Greenland, Iceland, Nunavut, Alaska) and topic (e.g., climate change, Arctic tourism, Arctic flora/fauna species, Arctic archeology, Arctic exploration). Learning goals include: i) exposure to spatial analysis and Geographic Information Systems, ii) foundational knowledge of the Arctic cryosphere and its response to climate change, geological history, human geography and ecological systems, and iii) mastery of Arctic geography. Course meetings will include student presentations, fieldtrips and basic GIS instruction.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 106
GEOS 310-01 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems for Field Scientists
Instructor: Peter Sak
Course Description:
Lecture/Lab course on special topics which vary depending on faculty and student interest and need. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: dependent upon topic.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
LIBRY DSRL
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 153
GEOS 331-01 Geochemistry
Instructor: Alyson Thibodeau
Course Description:
An introduction to the origin, distribution, and behavior of elements in the geochemical cycles and processes of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Topics include the chemistry of magma, hydrothermal fluids, weathering, fresh and ocean waters, sediment digenesis, hydrocarbons, and metamorphism. Includes radiometric dating and stable isotope applications. Lab will focus on sampling, instrumental analysis, and data interpretation of earth materials. Prerequisites: 151 and CHEM 131 or 141, or permission of instructor. Offered every other year. An introduction to the origin, distribution, and behavior of elements in the geochemical cycles and processes of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Topics include the chemistry of magma, hydrothermal fluids, weathering, fresh and ocean waters, sediment digenesis, hydrocarbons, and metamorphism. Includes radiometric dating and stable isotope applications. Lab will focus on sampling, instrumental analysis, and data interpretation of earth materials. Prerequisites: 151 and CHEM 131 or 141, or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 134
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 134
Courses Offered in GISP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
GISP 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01, ENST 218-01 and GEOS 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and GEOS 218.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
LIBRY DSRL
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 206-01 American Environmental History
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in the history of North America. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of the North America environment form the pre-colonial period to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: American Indian uses of the environment, colonial frontiers, agricultural change, industrialization, urbanization, westward expansion, the Progressive-Era conservation movement, changes in lifestyle and consumption including their increasingly global impact, shifts in environmental policy, and the rise of the post-World War II environmental movement. Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in the history of North America. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of the North America environment form the pre-colonial period to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: American Indian uses of the environment, colonial frontiers, agricultural change, industrialization, urbanization, westward expansion, the Progressive-Era conservation movement, changes in lifestyle and consumption including their increasingly global impact, shifts in environmental policy, and the rise of the post-World War II environmental movement.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 311
HIST 284-01 Ecological History of Africa
Instructor: Robin Crigler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05. This course provides an introduction to the ecological history of Africa. We will focus in some detail on demography, the domestication of crops and animals, climate, the spread of New World crops (maize, cassava, cocoa), and disease environments from the earliest times to the present. Central to our study will be the idea that Africa's landscapes are the product of human action. Therefore, we will examine case studies of how people have interacted with their environments. African ecology has long been affected indirectly by decisions made at a global scale. Thus we will explore Africa's engagement with imperialism and colonization and the global economy in the twentieth century. The course ends with an examination of contemporary tensions between conservation and economic development. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 103
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 290-03 Environment, Conflict and Peace
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 372-01.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 187
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and ARCH 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1) What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and ANTH 262.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 211
Courses Offered in MATH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MATH 121-01 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Jackie Campbell
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
TOME 117
MATH 121-02 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Tony Mixell
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 121
MATH 121-03 Elementary Statistics
Instructor: Jackie Campbell
Course Description:
An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester. An introduction to the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. The focus is on data presentation and statistical reasoning based upon the analysis of data sets. Topics include the study of sampling methods, observational and experimental studies, graphical and numerical summaries of data, probability, sampling distributions, significance testing, estimation, and simple linear regression. Does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics.Students cannot take this course concurrently with 225. Students who have received credit for 225 cannot take this course for credit. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
TOME 117
MATH 151-01 Introduction to Calculus
Instructor: Tony Mixell
Course Description:
An introduction to limits and derivatives together with a review of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: departmental placement. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 121
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, T
TOME 118
MATH 170-01 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Barry Tesman
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 117
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, R
TOME 120
MATH 170-02 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Holley Friedlander
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 120
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, W
TOME 118
MATH 170-03 Single Variable Calculus
Instructor: Holley Friedlander
Course Description:
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 120
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, R
TOME 120
MATH 171-01 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Paul Kinlaw
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:50 PM, W
TOME 120
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 118
MATH 171-02 Multivariable Calculus
Instructor: Paul Kinlaw
Course Description:
Multivariable calculus including parametric and polar equations, vectors, three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Additional topics if time permits.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 170 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:20 PM, W
TOME 120
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 118
MATH 180-01 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Mark D'Arcy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-01 and DATA 180-01. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and DATA 180. Offered every semester.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 120
MATH 180-02 Introduction to Data Science
Instructor: Mark D'Arcy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COMP 180-02 and DATA 180-02. An introduction to theprinciples and tools of data science focusing on exploratory data analysis. Topics include types of variables, mathematical representations of data, data wrangling and transformations, data visualization and numerical summaries, and supervised and unsupervisedmachinelearning. The course will include an introduction to computational tools such as the R statistical environment. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisites: MATH 170 or department placement. This course is cross-listed as COMP 180 and DATA 180. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 120
MATH 211-01 Foundations of Higher Mathematics
Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics and computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic, sets, functions, and methods of proof. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 130 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 117
MATH 211-02 Foundations of Higher Mathematics
Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
Course Description:
An introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts used in mathematics and computer science, with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. The course presents the principles of mathematical logic, sets, functions, and methods of proof. Prerequisite: 170 or COMP 130 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 117
MATH 241-01 Computational Mathematics
Instructor: Dick Forrester
Course Description:
Cross-listed with COM 241-01. An introduction to a broad range of numerical methods for solving mathematical problems that arise in science and engineering. Focus is given to developing a basic understanding of numerical algorithms, their applicability, and their limitations. Topics typically include floating-point number representation, sources of error, conditioning and numerical stability, root finding, solutions of both linear and nonlinear systems, least squares, splines and polynomial interpolation, optimization, and numerical differentiation and integration. The implementation and validation of algorithms through computer programming is also emphasized. No prior programming experience is required.Prerequisite: Completion of two of the following courses: 170, 171, 211 and 270. This course is cross-listed as COMP 241. Offered in even numbered spring semesters.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 121
MATH 262-01 Linear Algebra
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
An introduction to matrix algebra and abstract vector spaces with an emphasis on writing mathematical arguments. Topics include linear systems and matrices, vector spaces, linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.Prerequisite: 211 or permission of the instructor. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
TOME 120
MATH 270-01 Integration and Infinite Series
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
The study of methods of integration, applications of the integral, elementary differential equations, and infinite sequences and series.Prerequisite: 171 or departmental placement. Offered every spring.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 231
MATH 270-02 Integration and Infinite Series
Instructor: Tracy McKay
Course Description:
The study of methods of integration, applications of the integral, elementary differential equations, and infinite sequences and series.Prerequisite: 171 or departmental placement. Offered every spring.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 231
MATH 325-01 Probability and Statistics II
Instructor: Chris Fowler
Course Description:
A continuation of Introduction to Probability and Statistics I. Topics include additional discrete and continuous distributions, conditional distributions, additional hypothesis tests, simple linear regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and goodness of fit tests. Special topics may include nonparametric tests, nonlinear regression, and time series analysis.Prerequisites: 171 and 225. Offered every spring.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
TOME 121
Courses Offered in MUAC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUAC 357-01 Ear to the Earth
Instructor: Ellen Gray
Course Description:
What might we learn about our relationships to the environment by orienting our ears to the earth? From the sounds of melting glaciers in the Antarctic to indigenous sound worlds in the rainforest of Papua New Guinea, where a gifted composer might have once collaborated with sounds of waterfalls and birds--- what can learn about our environment by listening to it? What perspectives might tuning into sound lend to thinking about climate change and resilience? This interdisciplinary seminar introduces students to a diverse range of approaches to using sound and music as modalities through which to understand human relationships to the natural world and the environment, from diverse historical moments, cultural contexts, and geographies. Our explorations will include: environmental sound recordings and soundscape compositions, documentary films and ethnographic accounts, and emerging work at the intersection of acoustic ecology, the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences. Students will conduct local place-based observations in select outdoor environments. Guided writing assignments on sound recordings, site observations, readings, and viewings, will assist students in developing skills in description, analysis, and reflection. No musical note reading skills are necessary. Prerequisites: MUAC 209, 210, 211, or 212 OR ENST 161 (for ENST/ENSC majors) OR permission of instructor What might we learn about our relationships to the environment by orienting our ears to the earth? From the sounds of melting glaciers in the Antarctic to indigenous sound worlds in the rainforest of Papua New Guinea, where a gifted composer might have once collaborated with sounds of waterfalls and birds--- what can learn about our environment by listening to it? What perspectives might tuning into sound lend to thinking about climate change and resilience? This interdisciplinary seminar introduces students to a diverse range of approaches to using sound and music as modalities through which to understand human relationships to the natural world and the environment, from diverse historical moments, cultural contexts, and geographies. Our explorations will include: environmental sound recordings and soundscape compositions, documentary films and ethnographic accounts, and emerging work at the intersection of acoustic ecology, the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences. Students will conduct local place-based observations in select outdoor environments. Guided writing assignments on sound recordings, site observations, readings, and viewings, will assist students in developing skills in description, analysis, and reflection. No musical note reading skills are necessary. Prerequisites: MUAC 209, 210, 211, or 212 OR ENST 161 (for ENST/ENSC majors) OR permission of instructor
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
EASTC 411
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 104-01 Practical Ethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
This course introduces students to contemporary debates in practical ethics. Course materials investigate how theoretical approaches to ethics apply to practical issues, including discussions of animal ethics, environmental ethics, reproductive ethics, civil disobedience, and the ethics of mass incarceration and the death penalty. This course is best suited for students interested in thinking about the relationship between ethical theory and practice, with an emphasis on how power, privilege, and responsibility intersect in our everyday lives. This course introduces students to contemporary debates in practical ethics. Course materials investigate how theoretical approaches to ethics apply to practical issues, including discussions of animal ethics, environmental ethics, reproductive ethics, civil disobedience, and the ethics of mass incarceration and the death penalty. This course is best suited for students interested in thinking about the relationship between ethical theory and practice, with an emphasis on how power, privilege, and responsibility intersect in our everyday lives.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
Courses Offered in PHYS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHYS 114-01 Climate Change and Renewable Energies
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
An introduction to the physics of global climate change and a hands-on exposure to several types of renewable energy. The first third of this project-centered course introduces the basic physical principles of global climate change with a focus on radiative equilibrium, greenhouse effect, energy balance, and entropy. Since the energy sources of an energetically sustainable future will consist of renewable energies and possibly thermonuclear fusion energy, the remaining two thirds of the course is devoted to an exploration of wind turbines, solar concentrators, thermoelectric convertors, and photovoltaic systems. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics. Offered every two years. An introduction to the physics of global climate change and a hands-on exposure to several types of renewable energy. The first third of this project-centered course introduces the basic physical principles of global climate change with a focus on radiative equilibrium, greenhouse effect, energy balance, and entropy. Since the energy sources of an energetically sustainable future will consist of renewable energies and possibly thermonuclear fusion energy, the remaining two thirds of the course is devoted to an exploration of wind turbines, solar concentrators, thermoelectric convertors, and photovoltaic systems. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics. Offered every two years.
01:30 PM-04:00 PM, TF
TOME 103
PHYS 132-01 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
09:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
TOME 101
PHYS 142-01 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Will Riihiluoma, Robert Boyle
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 115
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
TOME 105
PHYS 142-02 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Will Riihiluoma, Robert Boyle
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
TOME 105
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
TOME 115
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 116-01 Religion, Nature, and the Environment
Instructor: Jodie Vann
Course Description:
This course explores how various religious and spiritual traditions have understood, conceptualized, and interacted with the natural world. Incorporating from both conventional religions (such as Catholicism, Judaism, and Buddhism) as well as newer spiritual forms (like Contemporary Paganism), the course provides a comparative survey of the relationships between religiosity and nature. Themes under examination include notions of human dominion, stewardship, panentheism, and naturalism. Students will consider how religious ideologies have shaped conceptions of nature, and how changing understandings of the natural world have challenged religious ideas. This course explores how various religious and spiritual traditions have understood, conceptualized, and interacted with the natural world. Incorporating from both conventional religions (such as Catholicism, Judaism, and Buddhism) as well as newer spiritual forms (like Contemporary Paganism), the course provides a comparative survey of the relationships between religiosity and nature. Themes under examination include notions of human dominion, stewardship, panentheism, and naturalism. Students will consider how religious ideologies have shaped conceptions of nature, and how changing understandings of the natural world have challenged religious ideas.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 311
Courses Offered in RUSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RUSS 248-01 Russian Culture and the Environment
Instructor: Alyssa DeBlasio
Course Description:
Russia is the largest country in the world. It contains some of our largest supplies of natural resources, including the most voluminous freshwater lake and the most square miles of forest. Russia and the Soviet Union have also been home to devastating environmental catastrophes, such as the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. It is thus fitting that the theme of the environmentboth natural and man-madehave played a pivotal role in the Russian cultural imagination of the past two centuries. This course will look at how Russian and Soviet culture from the nineteenth century to the present engage with the theme of the environment over a variety of genres, including literature, film, journalism, and art. No knowledge of Russian is required. Taught in English. Offered every three years. Russia is the largest country in the world. It contains some of our largest supplies of natural resources, including the most voluminous freshwater lake and the most square miles of forest. Russia and the Soviet Union have also been home to devastating environmental catastrophes, such as the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. It is thus fitting that the theme of the environmentboth natural and man-madehave played a pivotal role in the Russian cultural imagination of the past two centuries. This course will look at how Russian and Soviet culture from the nineteenth century to the present engage with the theme of the environment over a variety of genres, including literature, film, journalism, and art. No knowledge of Russian is required. Taught in English. Offered every three years.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 213
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 230-02 Environmental and Social Justice
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 280-01. This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 187
SOCI 237-01 Global Inequality
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year. Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 104
Courses Offered in THDA
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
THDA 214-01 Body and Place
Instructor: Erin Crawley-Woods
Course Description:
"Body is our first environment. It is the medium through which we know the earth." Andrea Olsen Drawing from movement ecology, somatic practice, site-specific artistic investigation, and current conversations in the multidisciplinary field of Environmental Humanities, this course is an embodied interrogation of Olsen's statement. How can we explore our body as an environment? What does it mean for this to be the medium through which we know the earth? What is this knowing good for? Through reading, discussion and creative projects (many of which will take place outdoors) we will investigate how our interactions with built and natural environments influences our perception of space and place and our role within it. What shifts in our relationship and approach to the pressing environmental issues of our time when we experience ourselves as a part of nature?
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
2527WH DANCE STU