In 1783, Benjamin Rush, a revolutionary in both spirit and life, established Dickinson College with the intent of providing a different kind of liberal-arts education.

Here, students are encouraged to be actively engaged with the wider world and challenged to think differently and act boldly. Dickinsonians are guided by a core set of tenets—to be decisive, useful, curious and unafraid to take risks.

We produce critical thinkers who see how everything is connected. Graduates forever ready to make a difference.

This is how we’ve taught successful graduates of all kinds, from lawyers to researchers to writers to CEOs. Dickinson’s brand of liberal arts has been around for more than 200 years for one reason—it works.



QUICK FACTS

  • 2,339 full-time students
  • ?44 U.S. states and territories and 44 foreign countries represented
  • 10:1 student-faculty ratio
  • ?More than 50 percent of students study abroad
  • ?11 men’s and 12 women’s varsity sports, plus club and intramural sports and intercollegiate squash coming in 2014-15

MISSION

Chartered in 1783, just days after the conclusion of the American Revolution, Dickinson’s founder envisioned the college offering a distinctively original form of American education—one that was rigorously rooted in the traditional liberal arts and was also ultimately useful. As we face the challenges and complexities of the 21st century, Dickinson continues to seek direction from this revolutionary heritage within a contemporary context.