Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Fall 2019

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-320
Fall 2019
Ecological History of Africa
Ball, Jeremy
This course provides an introduction to the ecological history of Africa. We will focus in some detail on demography, the domestication of crops and animals, climate, the spread of New World crops (maize, cassava, cocoa), and disease environments from the earliest times to the present. Central to our study will be the idea that Africa's landscapes are the product of human action. Therefore, we will examine case studies of how people have interacted with their environments. African ecology has long been affected indirectly by decisions made at a global scale. Thus we will explore Africa's engagement with imperialism and colonization and the global economy in the twentieth century. The course ends with an examination of contemporary tensions between conservation and economic development.
SCON

American Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AMST-101
Fall 2019
Introduction to Native American Studies
Dragone, Nicholle
This course will introduce students to the major strands of Native American Studies including contemporary issues, cultural representations (music, dance, literature, art . . . ) law, history, and methodology, by addressing some of the following questions: What contemporary issues are Native Americans dealing with today? Who are they? Where do they live? How do Native nations relate to the U.S.? How do Native Hawai’ans and Alaska Natives fit into this discussion? To address these questions, students will take part in events scheduled for the centennial of the closing of the Carlisle Indian School, the first boarding school sponsored by the U.S. government to colonize and assimilate Native children into American society. Students will explore historic representations of American Indians and the continued legacy of these representations; as well as, contemporary Native self-representations through literature and film, art, dance and music. Additionally, the class will learn from Native storytellers, authors, playwrights and artists.
SINV

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-101
Fall 2019
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Ellison, James
Pomales, Tony
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-216
Fall 2019
Medical Anthropology
Pomales, Tony
Comparative analysis of health, illness, and nutrition within environmental and socio-cultural contexts. Evolution and geographical distribution of disease, how different societies have learned to cope with illness, and the ways traditional and modern medical systems interact. Offered every other year.
SCON
ANTH-260
Fall 2019
Environmental Archaeology
Bruno, Maria
The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 260. Offered every two years.
SINV

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-218
Fall 2019
Geographic Information Systems
Ciarrocca, James
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
SINV
ARCH-260
Fall 2019
Environmental Archaeology
Bruno, Maria
The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 260. Offered every two years.
SINV

Art & Art History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARTH-130
Fall 2019
Art and Sustainability
Cervino, Anthony
This course promotes themes of sustainability and social engagement as the catalyst for artmaking. Primarily investigated through the design and construction of sculptures, installation art or other creative acts, students will explore creative practices exemplified by land art, social practice art, collaborative art, and social sculpture, among others.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-131
Fall 2019
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Wingert, Harold
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-131
Fall 2019
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Arnold, Thomas
Potthoff, Michael
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-221
Fall 2019
Animal Diversity w/Lab
Pires, Anthony
An exploration of the enormous diversity of animal life. We will study developmental processes and evolutionary patterns as a coherent approach to comprehending the organizational principles of disparate animal body plans. Students will be introduced to the morphological and physiological adaptations of the major phyla that fit them to their ecological roles in marine, aquatic and terrestrial environments. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; For Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125.
SCON
BIOL-314
Fall 2019
Ecology w/Lab
Boback, Scott
Study of the interactions of organisms with each other, and with their environment, at the level of the individual, the population, the community, and the ecosystem. Lectures and readings consider both the theory of ecology and data from empirical research in the classic and current literature. Laboratory and field studies explore how ecologists perform quantitative tests of hypotheses about complex systems in nature. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequiste is NRSC 200.
SINV

East Asian Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
EASN-206
Fall 2019
The Politics of Parks
Strand, David
Whether located at the center of a city or in the midst of a wilderness, public parks comprise a uniquely modern public good, designed to meet competing and complementary needs for social recreation, open space, and the conservation of nature and preservation of biodiversity. Worldwide they host endangered animals like Bengal tigers and "urban animals" like pigeons, squirrels and household pets. They are home to cricket and softball leagues as well as history-changing protests and orations. We will examine public and national parks as public policy, objects of planning and design, expressions of political culture and social change, and opportunities to represent and rethink the relationship between humankind and the natural world.
SINV

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-214
Fall 2019
Introduction to Economic Demography
Underwood, Anthony
Permission of Instructor Required.Part of the Carlisle Mosaic: People, Place and Policy. This mosaic course examines the economic and social determinants and consequences of population change, with a particular emphasis on Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Demography is concerned with effectively everything that influences or can be influenced by population size, population growth or decline, population processes, population spatial distribution, population structure, and population characteristics. As we go from the historical pattern of high birth and death rates to the increasingly common pattern of low birth and death rates, we pass through the demographic transition. This is actually a whole set of transitions relating to changes in health and mortality, fertility, migration, age structure, urbanization, and family and household structure. Each of these separate, but interrelated, changes have serious consequences for the way societies and economies function and the natural environment they are built upon. Often for familiarity and simplicity we will use data and readings focused on the United States. Since demographic transitions have evolved in ways that vary from one part of the nation (and world) to another we will determine to what degree Carlisle can be analyzed as a microcosm of these national/global patterns and when it cannot. Open only to students enrolled in the Carlisle Mosaic.
SCON

English

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENGL-101
Fall 2019
American Nature Writing: Environment, Cultures and Values
Nichols, B Ashton
Perhaps no genre of literature is as uniquely American as American nature writing. No genre can tell us as much about our environment, environmental culture, and the values that derive from and depend upon our natural environment. We will also work to define "nature" and to understand the complex connections between humans and the nonhuman environment they inhabit. Our guides will be Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Terry Tempest Williams, Bill McKibben, and others. The course will be a study of metaphor, poetic and prose styles, and the link between literary and naturalistic observation. Our texts will be literary; our contexts will be environmental, cultural, and ethically ecological. Are humans a part of the natural environment? Do we see ourselves as distinct from nature? Is our environment beautiful and benign (sunsets, daffodils, puffins) or ugly and destructive (hurricanes, cancer, death)? We will examine the current importance (as well as the controversial aspects) of evolutionary ideas, and we will emphasize the role played by literature in the development of our own environmental assumptions and values. Two essays and a final exam.
SINV
ENGL-101
Fall 2019
Doomsday Books: Apocalypse and Revolution in English Literature
Sider Jost, Jacob
Global warming is changing our world, quickly and violently. In this class we will explore how a millennium of English authors responded to prior moments of traumatic change. We will look at invasions, plagues, religious struggles, wars, and economic and environmental transformations. Authors may include the poets of Beowulf and the mystery plays, Langland, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Defoe, Goldsmith, Blake, Shelley, Scott, and Marx. We will learn from how others have faced catastrophe.
SCON

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-111
Fall 2019
American Nature Writing: Environment, Cultures and Values
Nichols, B Ashton
A study of the effects of scientific, religious, and philosophical values on human attitudes toward the environment and how these attitudes may affect our way of life. By focusing on a particular current topic, and by subjecting the basis of our behavior in regard to that topic to careful criticism, alternative models of behavior are considered together with changes in lifestyle and consciousness that these may involve.
SINV
ENST-121
Fall 2019
Environmental Science for Non-Majors
Van Fleet, Pamela
This introductory environmental science course will explore the integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human interactions with them. Students will use scientific principles to explore the consequences of human activity. Students will be exposed to basic techniques for investigating environmental topics in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. This is an introductory course for non-majors. Students intending to major in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science should enroll in ENST 161.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course does not count towards the B.A. in Environmental Studies or B.S. in Environmental Science.
SINV
ENST-161
Fall 2019
Environmental Connections
Beevers, Michael
This introductory environmental studies course draws from the influences of the humanities and natural sciences on the social sciences in relation to the environment. The course will examine the ideas, concepts, and debates central to the field. Students will examine the relationship between humans and the environment and become familiar with a range of environmental challenges, with an emphasis on how these challenges have emerged over time and space. The course will investigate and evaluate a variety of strategies that are currently being pursued to address these environmental challenges. The course stresses the importance of “seeing connections”, thinking carefully and critically about environmental issues, and appreciating that complex questions rarely have a single solution. This is an introductory course for those majoring in environmental studies and environmental science. Non-majors should enroll in ENST 121 Introduction to Environmental Science. This course has no laboratory section.
SINV
ENST-218
Fall 2019
Geographic Information Systems
Ciarrocca, James
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
SINV
ENST-305
Fall 2019
Agroecology
Douglas, Margaret
How can agricultural systems be designed to nourish a growing human population while sustaining the natural resources upon which agriculture ultimately depends? In this course, students will learn how to use ecological principles as a lens to understand the food system from farm to fork and back again. Topics will include crop genetic resources, soil and pest management, the role of animals in agriculture, and energy in the food system. Class meetings will incorporate significant student participation including presentation and discussion of primary scientific literature. Laboratory meetings will orient students to agroecosystems in the region and provide opportunities for hands-on learning and investigation.
SINV
ENST-330
Fall 2019
Environmental Policy
Bedi, Heather
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 161 and 162, or permission of instructor.
SINV
ENST-335
Fall 2019
Analysis and Management of the Aquatic Environment
Strock, Kristin
An interdisciplinary study of the aquatic environment, with a focus on the groundwater and surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin. This course provides a scientific introduction to the dynamics of rivers, lakes, wetlands, and estuarine systems as well as an appreciation of the complexity of the political and social issues involved in the sustainable use of these aquatic resources. Students conduct an original, cooperative, field-based research project on a local aquatic system that will involve extensive use of analytical laboratory and field equipment. Extended field trips to sample freshwater and estuarine systems and to observe existing resource management practices are conducted. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 162. Generally offered in the fall in a two-year alternating sequence with 340.
SCON
ENST-370
Fall 2019
Environment and Society
Bedi, Heather
Society defines how collections of humans are organized around shared bonds including cultures, contexts, or identities. Margaret Mead famously warned, “we won’t have a society if we destroy the environment.” Drawing from social science methods, this class highlights how societies are intimately dependent on natural resources, and how human actions alter the environment. Students will examine how collections of humans experience, use, and change the environment. The class will discuss the social construction and production of the environment, understand structures of power, and learn about social change at the local and national scales.Prerequisite: 161.
SINV

Earth Sciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ERSC-142
Fall 2019
Earth's Changing Climate
Key, Marcus
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate “players” such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV
ERSC-151
Fall 2019
Foundations of Earth Sciences
Edwards, Benjamin
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
SCON
ERSC-218
Fall 2019
Geographic Information Systems
Ciarrocca, James
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
SINV
ERSC-221
Fall 2019
Oceanography
Hayes, Jorden
An interdisciplinary introduction to the marine environment, including the chemistry of seawater, the physics of currents, water masses and waves, the geology of ocean basins, marine sediments and coastal features, and the biology of marine ecosystems. Topics include the theory of plate tectonics as an explanation for ocean basins, mid-ocean ridges, trenches, and island arcs. The interaction of man as exploiter and polluter in the marine environment is also considered. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: One introductory lab science or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.
SCON
ERSC-309
Fall 2019
Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Key, Marcus
Completion of both ERSC 305 and ERSC 309 fulfills the WID Requirement. A study of the processes and patterns of sedimentation as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of rock strata. This includes the origin, transportation, deposition, lithification, and diagenesis of sediments. Lithology, geochemistry, paleontology, geochronology, and seismology will be used to understand the history of rock strata. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 151 or permission of instructor. Completion of both 305 and 309 fulfills the WID graduation requirement. Offered every other year.
SCON

Food Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FDST-201
Fall 2019
Introduction to Food Studies
Trazzi, Luca
This course introduces students to Food Studies, an interdisciplinary field that examines food through biological, cultural, ecological, economic, and other perspectives. We will treat questions of hunger, food production/procurement, inequality, ecology, food labor, health, including psychology, and the diversity of ethical, cultural, and spiritual meanings regarding food. The course will include opportunities for students to engage in active observation, experimentation, and hands-on learning through community partnerships and the College Farm. Students will encounter reading/viewing assignments from a wide range of disciplines. This course will also be open to students who do not intend to complete the Food Studies certificate but would simply like an interdisciplinary understanding of the workings of food.
SINV
FDST-250
Fall 2019
Food and Energy in Israel and the United States
Halpin, Jennifer
This course aims to guide students in learning about issues and solutions pertaining to food and energy in the United States and Israel, from food production methods, sustainable agriculture innovations, and culinary traditions to technologies including solar electric, solar thermal, and low-tech biofuels. In addition to the main themes of food and energy, the class will provide students with an understanding of Israeli culture, history, and contemporary issues. During the fall semester, the class will be taught using lecture and hands-on learning formats, including field trips and student projects. A winter travel option is available to enrolled students during which time the class will assume an immersive format including hands-on work, guest lectures, and site visits. The proposed trip to Israel in January 2020 provides a culminating experience for students enrolled in the Food and Energy course scheduled for the 2019 fall semester.
SINV

French

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FREN-365
Fall 2019
Perceiving the Natural World in the French Enlightenment
Roman, Hanna
Scientists today often attribute the beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the 'Anthropocene', to changes in culture, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What were the intellectual and philosophical ideas behind these changes, and how did they contribute to modern-day conceptions of the natural environment and humankind's role within it? This seminar will address these questions through the lens of the literature of Enlightenment France and its power to invent and imagine new ways of perceiving and altering nature. It will engage with the Enlightenment movement as both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful today and which have become harmful to the future of our planet. Readings include works of fiction, philosophy, natural history, and science fiction by famous Enlightenment authors such as Diderot, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Voltaire, as well as by less well-known, but equally important, voices such as Bernadin de Saint-Pierre, Mme de Graffigny, and the comte de Grainville.
SCON

History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-151
Fall 2019
History of Environment
Pawley, Emily
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
SINV
HIST-373
Fall 2019
Ecological History of Africa
Ball, Jeremy
This course provides an introduction to the ecological history of Africa. We will focus in some detail on demography, the domestication of crops and animals, climate, the spread of New World crops (maize, cassava, cocoa), and disease environments from the earliest times to the present. Central to our study will be the idea that Africa's landscapes are the product of human action. Therefore, we will examine case studies of how people have interacted with their environments. African ecology has long been affected indirectly by decisions made at a global scale. Thus we will explore Africa's engagement with imperialism and colonization and the global economy in the twentieth century. The course ends with an examination of contemporary tensions between conservation and economic development. Offered every two years.
SCON
HIST-377
Fall 2019
Consumerism, Nationalism and Gender
Sweeney, Regina
This reading seminar examines the development of consumerism and nationalism in Europe and America beginning in the late 18th century and continuing on into the post-WWII era - from American Revolutionary boycotts to French fast food establishments. We will look for overlaps or polarities between the movements and the way gender interacted with both of them. Students may be surprised at the gendered aspects of both movements. We will consider, for example, the historical development of the image of women loving to shop, and we will study propaganda from the two world wars with men in uniform and women on the "home front." Our readings will include both promoters and critics of each movement. Offered every two or three years.
SCON

Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Fall 2019
Fundamentals of Business
Riccio, Steven
Ritchey, Sherry
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
SCON
INBM-200
Fall 2019
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
SCON
INBM-300
Fall 2019
Investments
Bai, Qing
This course teaches how to make sound investment decisions through in-depth knowledge of the financial markets and trading simulation. Also, students gain hands-on experience with data analysis, forecasting, and other quantitative techniques by completing the several group assignments. Topics include: investing in common stock, fixed-income securities, and derivatives; cryptocurrencies and initial coin offerings; big data and artificial intelligence in investment management.
SCON
INBM-400
Fall 2019
Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
Ritchey, Sherry
This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations. Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement.
SCON

International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-170
Fall 2019
International Relations
Nation, Robert
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
SCON
INST-200
Fall 2019
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
SCON
INST-277
Fall 2019
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and MEST 266.
SCON

Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Fall 2019
Intermediate Italian
Lanzilotta, Luca
McMenamin, James
Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
SCON
ITAL-323
Fall 2019
Hunger and Abundance: Understanding Italy’s Food Cultures
Pagano, Tullio
Food is Culture. We will take as a point of departure Massimo Montanari’s statement to understand the formation of a multifaceted Italian food identity, starting from the fall of the Roman Empire to the present. We will look at the many factors that influenced this process, including global conflicts, class divisions, religious rituals and the emergence of modern capitalism. We will analyze historical and sociological essays, films, fiction and recipe books from different historical periods. The class is taught in English with an additional weekly FLIC session in Italian for Italian Studies majors, Italian minors and INBM/IS majors.
SCON

Judaic Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
JDST-216
Fall 2019
Food and Energy in Israel and the United States
Halpin, Jennifer
This course aims to guide students in learning about issues and solutions pertaining to food and energy in the United States and Israel, from food production methods, sustainable agriculture innovations, and culinary traditions to technologies including solar electric, solar thermal, and low-tech biofuels. In addition to the main themes of food and energy, the class will provide students with an understanding of Israeli culture, history, and contemporary issues. During the fall semester, the class will be taught using lecture and hands-on learning formats, including field trips and student projects. A winter travel option is available to enrolled students during which time the class will assume an immersive format including hands-on work, guest lectures, and site visits. The proposed trip to Israel in January 2020 provides a culminating experience for students enrolled in the Food and Energy course scheduled for the 2019 fall semester.
SINV

Lat Am/Latino/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-239
Fall 2019
Spanish for the Health Professions
Arnedo-Aldrich, Asuncion
This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or above, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 239.
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Middle East Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MEST-200
Fall 2019
Food and Energy in Israel and the United States
Halpin, Jennifer
This course aims to guide students in learning about issues and solutions pertaining to food and energy in the United States and Israel, from food production methods, sustainable agriculture innovations, and culinary traditions to technologies including solar electric, solar thermal, and low-tech biofuels. In addition to the main themes of food and energy, the class will provide students with an understanding of Israeli culture, history, and contemporary issues. During the fall semester, the class will be taught using lecture and hands-on learning formats, including field trips and student projects. A winter travel option is available to enrolled students during which time the class will assume an immersive format including hands-on work, guest lectures, and site visits. The proposed trip to Israel in January 2020 provides a culminating experience for students enrolled in the Food and Energy course scheduled for the 2019 fall semester.
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MEST-266
Fall 2019
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics.This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and INST 277.
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Philosophy

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHIL-285
Fall 2019
Justice in World Politics
Reiner, Jason
An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as POSC 208. Prerequisite: 180 or POSC 170, 180, or permission of the instructor.
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Political Science

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
POSC-170
Fall 2019
International Relations
Nation, Robert
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
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POSC-208
Fall 2019
Justice in World Politics
Reiner, Jason
An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 285. Prerequisite: 170, 180 or PHIL 180, or permission of the instructor.
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POSC-277
Fall 2019
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as MEST 266 and INST 277.
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POSC-290
Fall 2019
The Politics of Parks
Strand, David
Whether located at the center of a city or in the midst of a wilderness, public parks comprise a uniquely modern public good, designed to meet competing and complementary needs for social recreation, open space, and the conservation of nature and preservation of biodiversity. Worldwide they host endangered animals like Bengal tigers and "urban animals" like pigeons, squirrels and household pets. They are home to cricket and softball leagues as well as history-changing protests and orations. We will examine public and national parks as public policy, objects of planning and design, expressions of political culture and social change, and opportunities to represent and rethink the relationship between humankind and the natural world.
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Religion

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RELG-116
Fall 2019
Religion, Nature, and the Environment
Vann, Jodie
This course explores how various religious and spiritual traditions have understood, conceptualized, and interacted with the natural world. Incorporating from both conventional religions (such as Catholicism, Judaism, and Buddhism) as well as newer spiritual forms (like Contemporary Paganism), the course provides a comparative survey of the relationships between religiosity and nature. Themes under examination include notions of human dominion, stewardship, panentheism, and naturalism. Students will consider how religious ideologies have shaped conceptions of nature, and how changing understandings of the natural world have challenged religious ideas.
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RELG-117
Fall 2019
Religion and Contemporary Issues
Cozort, Daniel
Religion remains a very strong force in the contemporary world and most people are guided in their moral decision-making by the principles of their faiths. In this course, students will learn about the nuances of several issues of great current importance and will explore the ways in which the important values of the world’s major religious traditions have been brought to bear on them. Topics may vary from one iteration to the next, but will include issues such as globalization, war, terrorism, ecology, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, suicide, capital punishment, incarceration, sexual orientation, or the good society.
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RELG-311
Fall 2019
Buddhism and the Environment
Cozort, Daniel
Although protection of the environment is not a Buddhist goal per se, it is involved in the quest for enlightenment. The course will apply the Buddhist perspective to questions about the relations between humans and the rest of nature, to specific environmental problems, to the tradeoffs between human good and protection of other species, and to consumption and consumerism. Offered every two years
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Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-230
Fall 2019
Introduction to Economic Demography
Underwood, Anthony
Permission of Instructor Required.Part of the Carlisle Mosaic: People, Place and Policy. This mosaic course examines the economic and social determinants and consequences of population change, with a particular emphasis on Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Demography is concerned with effectively everything that influences or can be influenced by population size, population growth or decline, population processes, population spatial distribution, population structure, and population characteristics. As we go from the historical pattern of high birth and death rates to the increasingly common pattern of low birth and death rates, we pass through the demographic transition. This is actually a whole set of transitions relating to changes in health and mortality, fertility, migration, age structure, urbanization, and family and household structure. Each of these separate, but interrelated, changes have serious consequences for the way societies and economies function and the natural environment they are built upon. Often for familiarity and simplicity we will use data and readings focused on the United States. Since demographic transitions have evolved in ways that vary from one part of the nation (and world) to another we will determine to what degree Carlisle can be analyzed as a microcosm of these national/global patterns and when it cannot. Open only to students enrolled in the Carlisle Mosaic.
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SOCI-230
Fall 2019
Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Leary, Cornelius
Permission of Instructor Required.Part of the Carlisle Mosaic: People, Place and Policy. There is a growing movement of communities embracing sustainability and resilience as goals of community development, giving weight to meeting the needs of present and future generations for economic security, human health, nutritious food, clean air, clean water, healthy ecosystems, social and environmental justice, and participation in civil society. We will examine this movement and explore theories, practices and prospects for envisioning and developing sustainable and resilient communities in a time of growing inequality, persistent racial segregation, changing land use patterns, globalization, technological and social innovations and global climate change. Student learning will be enriched and reinforced by applying systems thinking and sustainable community development concepts to understand Carlisle, a small urban community set in the rural landscape of south-central Pennsylvania.
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Spanish

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SPAN-239
Fall 2019
Spanish for the Health Professions
Arnedo-Aldrich, Asuncion
This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: 202 or 205. This course is cross-listed as LALC 239.
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Sustainability

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SUST-200
Fall 2019
Food and Energy in Israel and the United States
Halpin, Jennifer
This course aims to guide students in learning about issues and solutions pertaining to food and energy in the United States and Israel, from food production methods, sustainable agriculture innovations, and culinary traditions to technologies including solar electric, solar thermal, and low-tech biofuels. In addition to the main themes of food and energy, the class will provide students with an understanding of Israeli culture, history, and contemporary issues. During the fall semester, the class will be taught using lecture and hands-on learning formats, including field trips and student projects. A winter travel option is available to enrolled students during which time the class will assume an immersive format including hands-on work, guest lectures, and site visits. The proposed trip to Israel in January 2020 provides a culminating experience for students enrolled in the Food and Energy course scheduled for the 2019 fall semester.
SINV
SUST-301
Fall 2019
Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Leary, Cornelius
Permission of Instructor Required.This course is offered as part of the four-course Carlisle Mosaic. Only students who apply and are accepted into the Mosaic may enroll. There is a growing movement of communities embracing sustainability and resilience as goals of community development, giving weight to meeting the needs of present and future generations for economic security, human health, nutritious food, clean air, clean water, healthy ecosystems, social and environmental justice, and participation in civil society. We will examine this movement and explore theories, practices and prospects for envisioning and developing sustainable and resilient communities in a time of growing inequality, persistent racial segregation, changing land use patterns, globalization, technological and social innovations and global climate change. Student learning will be enriched and reinforced by applying systems thinking and sustainable community development concepts to understand Carlisle, a small urban community set in the rural landscape of south-central Pennsylvania.
SINV

Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Fall 2019
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
STAFF, WGSS
Yost, Megan
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
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WGSS-300
Fall 2019
Feminist Perspectives and Theories
Bickford, Donna
This course deepens students’ understandings of how feminist perspectives situate power and privilege in relationship to interlocking categories of gender, race, class, sexuality, ability and nation. Through foundational theoretical texts, it expands students’ understandings of significant theoretical frameworks that inform women’s, gender, critical race and sexuality studies, as well as debates and tensions within them. Frameworks may include political activisms, materialist feminism, standpoint epistemologies, critiques of scientific objectivity, intersectionality, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, transnational critique and feminist legal theory. Helps students develop more nuanced understandings of the relationship between everyday experiences, political institutions, forms of resistance and theoretical meaning-making. Prerequisite: WGSS 100 and 200, or co-requisite with permission of instructor.
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WGSS-302
Fall 2019
Consumerism, Nationalism and Gender
Sweeney, Regina
This reading seminar examines the development of consumerism and nationalism in Europe and America beginning in the late 18th century and continuing on into the post-WWII era - from American Revolutionary boycotts to French fast food establishments. We will look for overlaps or polarities between the movements and the way gender interacted with both of them. Students may be surprised at the gendered aspects of both movements. We will consider, for example, the historical development of the image of women loving to shop, and we will study propaganda from the two world wars with men in uniform and women on the "home front." Our readings will include both promoters and critics of each movement.
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