Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Spring 2019

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-220
Spring 2019
African American Foodways
Johnson, Lynn
This course examines the multifarious ways in which food has influenced the expressions of African American identity and culture. We will begin with a discussion of food as a cultural connector that preserves the ties between African Americans and their African antecedents. Subsequently, we will consider specific African American culinary practices and the origins of soul food. Additionally, we will analyze the roles of food in African American social activism. In so doing, we will pay particular attention to the relationships that exist among food consumption, human rights, and African American communal health, as represented by the anti-soul food and black vegetarianism/veganism movements.
SCON
AFST-220
Spring 2019
After Genocide and Apartheid: Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation
Ball, Jeremy
Karegeye, Jean-Pierre
Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic. This course examines how two societies–Rwanda after the 1994 genocide and South Africa after the end of apartheid–uncovered the atrocities of the past, delivered justice to perpetrators, and engendered reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. After learning about the histories of these two societies, we will study institutions–the International Criminal Court for Rwanda (ICTR), Gacaca, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Finally, we will consider how these two societies commemorate and memorialize victims. Our course will culminate in an optional, two-week Mosaic in Rwanda. In Rwanda, we will meet with genocide survivors and perpetrators and think deeply about how to engender reconciliation in a post-genocide society.
SCON

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-100
Spring 2019
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Marshack, Joshua
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
SCON
ANTH-101
Spring 2019
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Ellison, James
Enge, Kjell
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-110
Spring 2019
Archaeology and World Prehistory
Bruno, Maria
Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
SCON
ANTH-229
Spring 2019
Principles of Human Variation and Adaptation
Weinstein, Karen
This course explores anthropological perspectives on modern human biological diversity. We examine genetic variation, biological and cultural responses to environmental stressors, including climate, altitude, nutrition, infectious and chronic diseases, and population growth and demography. We use our understanding of human biological diversity to examine the notion that race is a social phenomenon with no true biological meaning. Offered every other year.
SCON
ANTH-233
Spring 2019
Anthropology of Religion
Hill, Ann
A cross-cultural survey of the functions of religion, magic, and myth in simple and complex societies. Religion and communication. Myth and social structure. A historical summary of the scientific study of religion. Offered every other year.
SCON
ANTH-235
Spring 2019
State and Ethnicity in Upland Asia
Hill, Ann
This course examines the borderlands shared by states in upland Southeast Asia, such as Thailand, Burma and Laos, with China. It looks at dimensions of contemporary migrations and transnationalism among populations historically marginalized, such as the Hmong, and among populations that have a strong identification with states. Linked to political economies and global markets, nationalism and other ideologies defining peoples and their cultures are explored with an eye toward understanding how ideas about race and the other take shape. Offered every other year.
SCON
ANTH-262
Spring 2019
South American Archaeology
Bruno, Maria
This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
SCON
ANTH-290
Spring 2019
Archaeological Methods
Maggidis, Christofilis
This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
SCON
ANTH-331
Spring 2019
Principles of Human Evolution
Weinstein, Karen
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
SCON

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-110
Spring 2019
Archaeology and World Prehistory
Bruno, Maria
Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
SCON
ARCH-262
Spring 2019
South American Archaeology
Bruno, Maria
This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.
SCON
ARCH-290
Spring 2019
Archaeological Methods
Maggidis, Christofilis
This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
SCON

Art & Art History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARTH-205
Spring 2019
Japanese Architecture
Ren, Wei
This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
SCON
ARTH-360
Spring 2019
The Natural and Social Landscape
Bale, Andrew
Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic.This course introduces critical issues and practices in documentary and location photography/video. Explores the influence of social documentarians and landscape photographers. Examines the relationship of word and image, the role of photo editors and the development of the photo-essay through experiential learning, studio experience and discussions. Students will have a unique experience to learn about land and wildlife conservation both locally and abroad, as well as, community involvement in those efforts. As part of a mini mosaic participants in the course will have the option of traveling to Rwanda at the end of the semester.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-131
Spring 2019
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Wingert, Harold
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-131
Spring 2019
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Potthoff, Michael
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-342
Spring 2019
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
SCON

Chemistry

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
CHEM-132
Spring 2019
General Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
SCON
CHEM-242
Spring 2019
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Crouch, R David
Holden, Michael
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
SCON
CHEM-342
Spring 2019
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
SCON

East Asian Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
EASN-205
Spring 2019
Japanese Architecture
Ren, Wei
This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
SCON
EASN-206
Spring 2019
Asian Urban Ecology
Strand, David
Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with “ecological modernization,” the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jakarta, Manila, Kolkata, Mumbai and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.
SINV
EASN-206
Spring 2019
State and Ethnicity in Upland Asia
Hill, Ann
This course examines the borderlands shared by states in upland Southeast Asia, such as Thailand, Burma and Laos, with China. It looks at dimensions of contemporary migrations and transnationalism among populations historically marginalized, such as the Hmong, and among populations that have a strong identification with states. Linked to political economies and global markets, nationalism and other ideologies defining peoples and their cultures are explored with an eye toward understanding how ideas about race and the other take shape.
SCON

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-214
Spring 2019
Introduction to Economics of Food Security in South Africa
Mudhara, Maxwell
Pawley, Emily
This course will introduce the concept of food security, investigating what food security means, who is vulnerable, and how it is measured. We will examine food security from a national, regional, and household/individual level and discuss its connections to gender, agriculture, and climate change. Students will learn about the policies, strategies, programs, and projects currently in place to handle food access, availability, utilization, and stability and will suggest and evaluate possible solutions to food insecurity. Prerequisite: ECON 111.
SCON
ECON-214
Spring 2019
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
SCON
ECON-222
Spring 2019
Environmental Economics
Tynan, Nicola
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
SINV
ECON-288
Spring 2019
Contending Economic Perspectives
Kongar, Mesude
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
SCON
ECON-496
Spring 2019
Economic Demography and Sustainable Development
Underwood, Anthony
Permission of Instructor Required. Demography is the study of the determinants and consequences of population change. It is concerned with effectively everything that influences or can be influenced by population size, population growth or decline, population processes, population spatial distribution, population structure, and population characteristics. As we go from the historical pattern of high birth and death rates to the increasingly common pattern of low birth and death rates, we pass through the demographic transition. This is actually a whole set of transitions relating to changes in health and mortality, fertility, migration, age structure, urbanization, and family and household structure. Each of these separate, but interrelated, changes have serious consequences for the way societies and economies work and the natural environment they are built upon. Thus, the objectives of this course are threefold: (1) to develop knowledge of the underlying demographic theories explaining these transitions; (2) to use this knowledge to understand the interrelationships between these transitions; and (3) to determine the implications of these transitions for sustainable development, that is, for social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Some questions we will consider include (but are not limited to): Why are so many adults living alone? Why are women having fewer babies? What impact do sub-replacement birth rates have on economies and societies? What role do the rights of women have in demographic transitions? Why are adults waiting so long to get married or not getting married at all? What happens when the population ages? Why are more and more people choosing to live in cities? Is this expected growth of cities sustainable? Often for familiarity and simplicity we will use data and readings focused on the United States, but since these transitions have evolved in ways that vary from one part of the world to another, this course will often have a necessarily international focus. Naturally, given the expansive subject matter, this course will require much from you – it is reading and writing intensive.
SCON
ECON-496
Spring 2019
Political Economy of Health
Kongar, Mesude
Permission of Instructor Required. In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is as low as 49 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to nutrition, care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? In this course, students will examine the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. The emphasis throughout the course will be on how socioeconomic inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality and other social categories affect health and well-being outcomes.
SCON

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-162
Spring 2019
Integrative Environmental Science
Arashiro, Maiko
Douglas, Margaret
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
SINV
ENST-303
Spring 2019
Urban Planning and Environmental Systems
Kalafatis, Scott
With an increasing majority of the world’s population living in urban areas, cities have emerged as key sites for addressing the environmental challenges that society faces. Students in this course will explore the roles that urban areas play in society, their connections with the natural world, and their emerging efforts to lead the transition to a more sustainable future. To shed light on dynamics driving their actions and impact, we will use systems thinking to analyze urbanization from several different angles. Through doing so, we will reveal how cities represent physical, social, governmental, and environmental systems that fundamentally shape humanities’ relationship with the natural world.
SCON
ENST-305
Spring 2019
Conservation Biology
Strock, Kristin
We appear to be entering the sixth major extinction of biodiversity in the history of life on earth. Unlike the previous five mass extinctions, this one is largely a result of human activity. The field of conservation biology has developed to face the challenge of protecting the world’s biological diversity and to better understand human impacts on species, communities, and ecosystems. In this course, we will examine the biological diversity of life on Earth: what is it, where is it, and how do we measure it? As a class, we will explore the history of diversity change through geologic time and discuss the implications of human activities on biodiversity. Through a series of readings, case studies, and hands-on activities, this course will cover the principles of conservation biology, as well as the ways in which we value biodiversity, including ecological, economic, and ethical perspectives. This course may count as a theme course in both the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies major or as an Applications of Environmental Science course.
SCON
ENST-330
Spring 2019
Environmental Policy
Kalafatis, Scott
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 161 and 162, or permission of instructor.
SINV
ENST-372
Spring 2019
Environment, Conflict and Peace
Beevers, Michael
The goal of this class is to examine the complex relationships between the environment, conflict and peace. We will discuss the emergence of the environment as a topic of conflict and peace studies, and ask if the environment should be a security concern. We will scrutinize the extent to which environmental degradation, resource scarcity, natural resource wealth, and even climate change, increases the likelihood of violent conflict, and discuss the environmental consequences of war itself. We will explore whether environmental cooperation reduces the risk of violent conflicts, and whether responses to environmental problems can serve as catalyst for peace. We will strive to understand how international institutions—governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental—act to address security and peacebuilding challenges linked to the environment. The course approaches the topic from different levels of analysis (local, national, transnational and supranational), diverse theoretical frameworks and analytical methods and range of environmental issue areas. Finally, we will use a broad range of materials, employ lectures and seminar-like discussions and incorporate field trips and guest speakers.
SCON
ENST-406
Spring 2019
Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Beevers, Michael
This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
SCON

Earth Sciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ERSC-141
Spring 2019
Earth's Hazards
Hayes, Jorden
This course examines natural processes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mass wasting events, and floods that have the potential to produce disastrous consequences for humans. All of these processes result from interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere directly or indirectly, which is the realm of earth sciences. Increasing global populations and increasingly interdependent national economies mean that few disasters are now only ‘local’. This course will use examples such as case studies of recent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions to examine how natural processes can be hazardous, and whether or not humans can anticipate and mitigate these kinds of hazards to prevent future disasters. Laboratory work will include analog experiments, field trips, and video analysis of historic disasters. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV
ERSC-142
Spring 2019
Earth's Changing Climate
Thibodeau, Alyson
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate “players” such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV

Food Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FDST-401
Spring 2019
Capstone Seminar
Halpin, Jennifer
This capstone seminar builds on the introductory Food Studies course (FDST 201). It requires students to reflect, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through their academic coursework and experiential learning experiences. A substantive, reflective piece which could take many forms will be required. Students will work collaboratively to organize a symposium, performance, event, or other public presentation of their work. In order to register for FDST 401, students must have completed FDST 201 and at least 3 of the four electives, along with the experiential learning component. The latter may be taken simultaneously with FDST 401.Prerequisite: FDST 201, at least three of the four electives, and the experiential component which can be take simultaneously with FDST 401.
SCON

History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-151
Spring 2019
History of Environment
Pawley, Emily
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
SINV
HIST-206
Spring 2019
American Environmental History
Pawley, Emily
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in the history of North America. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of the North America environment form the pre-colonial period to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: American Indian uses of the environment, colonial frontiers, agricultural change, industrialization, urbanization, westward expansion, the Progressive-Era conservation movement, changes in lifestyle and consumption including their increasingly global impact, shifts in environmental policy, and the rise of the post-World War II environmental movement.
SINV
HIST-215
Spring 2019
After Genocide and Apartheid: Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation
Ball, Jeremy
Karegeye, Jean-Pierre
Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic. This course examines how two societies–Rwanda after the 1994 genocide and South Africa after the end of apartheid–uncovered the atrocities of the past, delivered justice to perpetrators, and engendered reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. After learning about the histories of these two societies, we will study institutions–the International Criminal Court for Rwanda (ICTR), Gacaca, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Finally, we will consider how these two societies commemorate and memorialize victims. Our course will culminate in an optional, two-week Mosaic in Rwanda. In Rwanda, we will meet with genocide survivors and perpetrators and think deeply about how to engender reconciliation in a post-genocide society.
SCON
HIST-215
Spring 2019
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims From Their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
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Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Spring 2019
Fundamentals of Business
Riccio, Steven
Ritchey, Sherry
Takacs, C Helen
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
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INBM-200
Spring 2019
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
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INBM-200
Spring 2019
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
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INBM-400
Spring 2019
Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
Ritchey, Sherry
Takacs, C Helen
This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations. Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement.
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International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-170
Spring 2019
International Relations
Webb, Edward
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
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INST-200
Spring 2019
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
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INST-280
Spring 2019
American Foreign Policy
Stuart, Douglas
A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
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INST-290
Spring 2019
Environment, Conflict and Peace
Beevers, Michael
The goal of this class is to examine the complex relationships between the environment, conflict and peace. We will discuss the emergence of the environment as a topic of conflict and peace studies, and ask if the environment should be a security concern. We will scrutinize the extent to which environmental degradation, resource scarcity, natural resource wealth, and even climate change, increases the likelihood of violent conflict, and discuss the environmental consequences of war itself. We will explore whether environmental cooperation reduces the risk of violent conflicts, and whether responses to environmental problems can serve as catalyst for peace. We will strive to understand how international institutions—governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental—act to address security and peacebuilding challenges linked to the environment. The course approaches the topic from different levels of analysis (local, national, transnational and supranational), diverse theoretical frameworks and analytical methods and range of environmental issue areas. Finally, we will use a broad range of materials, employ lectures and seminar-like discussions and incorporate field trips and guest speakers.
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INST-290
Spring 2019
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
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Interdisciplinary

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INTD-250
Spring 2019
Sustainable Livelihoods: Options for Food Security
Mudhara, Maxwell
This course will define and analyze the core principles of sustainable livelihoods in developing countries. We will use a sustainable livelihoods framework to analyze assets, institutions, strategies, and outcomes. Students will be able to identify the key building blocks of sustainable livelihoods in developing countries and the implications of changes in shocks, stresses, trends and policies on the livelihoods in general, and food security in particular. This course will also investigate ways to promote household sustainable livelihood options in South Africa.
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Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Spring 2019
Intermediate Italian
Lanzilotta, Luca
Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
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Judaic Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
JDST-215
Spring 2019
Jewish Environmental Ethics
Lieber, Andrea
Since the 1960's many writers on environmental issues have blamed our contemporary environmental crises in part on a so-called "Judeo-Christian" worldview, rooted in the Hebrew Bible. Such writers assert that the biblical heritage shared by these two religious traditions, advocates an unhealthy relationship between humanity and nature, one in which human beings are destined to conquer the earth and master it. In this course we will explore Jewish perspectives on nature and the natural world through close readings of biblical and other classical Jewish theology, history and ritual practice, we will also examine the ways in which this motif is re-conceptualized in modern secular contexts (ie, Zionism, and the kibbutz movement). We will conclude by studying contemporary varieties of Jewish environmental advocacy. In addition to texts focused specifically on Judeo-Christian traditions, the syllabus will include other classic works of Environmental ethics foundational to the field of Environmental studies. Offered every three years in rotation with the offering of ENST 111. This course is cross-listed as RELG 215.
SINV

Lat Am/Latino/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-200
Spring 2019
Reading the Southern Cone: Lessons in Sustainability
DeLutis-Eichenberger, Angela
In September 2015, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It was built from 17 Sustainable Development Goals aimed at attaining sustainable development for our world. These objectives are: No Poverty; Zero Hunger; Good Health and Well-Being; Quality Education; Gender Equality; Clean Water and Sanitation; Affordable and Clean Energy; Decent Work and Economic Growth; Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure; Reduced Inequalities; Sustainable Cities and Communities; Responsible Consumption and Production; Climate Action; Life Below Water; Life on Land; Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions; Partnerships for the Goals. Dickinson’s working definition of sustainability captures many of the UN’s articulated goals. It states that, “sustainability is about more than recycling and the environment. Sustainability is about answering a fundamental question: How do we improve the human condition equitably in this and future generations, while conserving environmental systems necessary to support healthy and vibrant societies? […] Like most definitions, ours is born of a concern for the future of the planet, its people and its living systems, which are threatened by a growing human footprint that is consuming and degrading environmental resources at a rapid pace. It recognizes essential needs of vast numbers of people are not being met in the present, and that poverty and inequality are amplifiers of vulnerability to environmental and other hazards. It is motivated by values that seek balance among economic development, eradication of poverty and hunger, advancement of social justice, and protection of the natural world.” Inspired by such approaches to sustainability and such definitions, this course examines a variety of environmental and sociopolitical issues affecting the Southern Cone, as they appear in a series of contemporary literary pieces. Widening the analytical frame, the course also discusses these issues as they may apply to private/personal, local, state, national, and global contexts. Please note that there will be several required field trips for this class (i.e. to Fur and Fowl Barn or Haldeman Island and to the Dickinson College Farm). This course is writing intensive.
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LALC-200
Spring 2019
Reading the Southern Cone: Lessons in Sustainability
DeLutis-Eichenberger, Angela
>p>In September 2015, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It was built from 17 Sustainable Development Goals aimed at attaining sustainable development for our world. These objectives are: No Poverty; Zero Hunger; Good Health and Well-Being; Quality Education; Gender Equality; Clean Water and Sanitation; Affordable and Clean Energy; Decent Work and Economic Growth; Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure; Reduced Inequalities; Sustainable Cities and Communities; Responsible Consumption and Production; Climate Action; Life Below Water; Life on Land; Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions; Partnerships for the Goals. Dickinson’s working definition of sustainability captures many of the UN’s articulated goals. It states that, “sustainability is about more than recycling and the environment. Sustainability is about answering a fundamental question: How do we improve the human condition equitably in this and future generations, while conserving environmental systems necessary to support healthy and vibrant societies? […] Like most definitions, ours is born of a concern for the future of the planet, its people and its living systems, which are threatened by a growing human footprint that is consuming and degrading environmental resources at a rapid pace. It recognizes essential needs of vast numbers of people are not being met in the present, and that poverty and inequality are amplifiers of vulnerability to environmental and other hazards. It is motivated by values that seek balance among economic development, eradication of poverty and hunger, advancement of social justice, and protection of the natural world.” Inspired by such approaches to sustainability and such definitions, this course examines a variety of environmental and sociopolitical issues affecting the Southern Cone, as they appear in a series of contemporary literary pieces. Widening the analytical frame, the course also discusses these issues as they may apply to private/personal, local, state, national, and global contexts. Please note that there will be several required field trips for this class (i.e. to Fur and Fowl Barn or Haldeman Island and to the Dickinson College Farm). This course is writing intensive.
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LALC-242
Spring 2019
Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Castellanos, Carolina
In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines - literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film - and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as PORT 242. Offered every year.
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LALC-262
Spring 2019
South American Archaeology
Bruno, Maria
This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1) What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and ANTH 262.
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Mathematics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MATH-325
Spring 2019
Probability and Statistics II
Forrester, Jeffrey
A continuation of Introduction to Probability and Statistics I. Topics include additional discrete and continuous distributions, conditional distributions, additional hypothesis tests, simple linear regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and goodness of fit tests. Special topics may include nonparametric tests, nonlinear regression, and time series analysis.Prerequisites: 171, 225 and completion of, or concurrent registration in 270. Offered in odd numbered spring semesters.
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Middle East Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MEST-200
Spring 2019
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims From Their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
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MEST-233
Spring 2019
U.S. Public Diplomacy in the Arab World
Siekert, Magda
This course introduces the students to the theory and practice of U.S. public diplomacy in the Arab world from a historical and a comparative perspective, looking at past challenges, successes and failures. The course examines the role of public diplomacy in the context of U.S. strategic interests in the region, U.S. efforts to promote democratic governance in the Arab world through the use of public diplomacy tools including traditional and new media, cultural exchanges, and educational programs. Students will debate whether public diplomacy should be integrated into the policy-making process, and how it could complement traditional diplomacy and advance political, military, and economic policies.
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Physics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHYS-132
Spring 2019
Introductory Physics
Hamilton-Drager, Catrina
Morgan, Windsor
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
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PHYS-314
Spring 2019
Energy & Environmental Physics
Pfister, Hans
A project-oriented approach to the study of the thermodynamics of fossil fuel engines and devices, the physics of solar and other alternative energy sources, energy conservation principles, the physics of nuclear fission reactors and nuclear fusion research, the physics of the atmosphere, air pollution, global climate change, and ozone depletion. Examples of projects include: energy conservation analysis, and the design, construction and testing of modern wind turbines or solar energy sources. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 141 and 142, and 211 or permission of instructor. Offered every two years.
SINV

Portuguese

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PORT-242
Spring 2019
Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Castellanos, Carolina
In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines - literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film - and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as LALC 242. Offered every year.
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Political Science

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
POSC-170
Spring 2019
International Relations
Webb, Edward
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
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POSC-280
Spring 2019
American Foreign Policy
Stuart, Douglas
A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
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POSC-290
Spring 2019
Asian Urban Ecology
Strand, David
Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with “ecological modernization,” the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jakarta, Manila, Kolkata, Mumbai and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.
SINV
POSC-290
Spring 2019
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
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Psychology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PSYC-120
Spring 2019
Introduction to Health Psychology
Guardino, Christine
This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the interdisciplinary field of health psychology, which uses scientific research methods to study the bi-directional relationship between psychology and health. We will discuss psychological states such as stress and how they affect the body, and mental processes such as finding meaning that are associated with effective coping and positive health outcomes. We will also study health behaviors such as exercise, sleep, eating, and substance use. Finally, we will explore how psychological concepts and research can be applied to health promotion and illness prevention. Course content will be especially relevant to students considering careers in health care or public health.
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Religion

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RELG-215
Spring 2019
Jewish Environmental Ethics
Lieber, Andrea
Since the 1960's many writers on environmental issues have blamed our contemporary environmental crises in part on a so-called "Judeo-Christian" worldview, rooted in the Hebrew Bible. Such writers assert that the biblical heritage shared by these two religious traditions advocates an unhealthy relationship between humanity and nature, one in which human beings are destined to conquer the earth and master it. In this course we will explore Jewish perspectives on nature and the natural world through close readings of biblical and other classical Jewish theology, history and ritual practice, we will also examine the ways in which this motif is re-conceptualized in modern secular contexts (ie, Zionism, and the kibbutz movement). We will conclude by studying contemporary varieties of Jewish environmental advocacy. In addition to texts focused specifically on Judeo-Christian traditions, the syllabus will include other classic works of Environmental ethics foundational to the field of Environmental studies.Offered every three years in rotation with the offering of ENST 111. This course is cross-listed as JDST 215.
SINV
RELG-260
Spring 2019
After Genocide and Apartheid: Peach, Justice, and Reconciliation
Ball, Jeremy
Karegeye, Jean-Pierre
Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic.This course examines how two societies–Rwanda after the 1994 genocide and South Africa after the end of apartheid–uncovered the atrocities of the past, delivered justice to perpetrators, and engendered reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. After learning about the histories of these two societies, we will study institutions–the International Criminal Court for Rwanda (ICTR), Gacaca, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Finally, we will consider how these two societies commemorate and memorialize victims. Our course will culminate in an optional, two-week Mosaic in Rwanda. In Rwanda, we will meet with genocide survivors and perpetrators and think deeply about how to engender reconciliation in a post-genocide society.
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RELG-260
Spring 2019
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims From Their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
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Soc Innovation/Entrepreneurshp

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SINE-201
Spring 2019
Introduction to Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Underwood, Anthony
This course introduces students to the essential concepts, mindsets and skill sets associated with social entrepreneurship. We begin with an overview of the field of social entrepreneurship. We will then develop a conceptual foundation in systems thinking and the community capital framework. The former allows students to grasp the complexity of social and environmental issues by viewing these issues through the lens of systems theory. The latter recognizes multiple forms of capital that are essential to developing sustainable communities: natural, physical, economic, human, social, and cultural capital. Other course topics may include creativity, innovation, social justice, alternative approaches to economics and business, and sustainability. Through definitional readings, case studies and/or biographies, students gain an understanding of the power of social entrepreneurship to create shared value at the local, regional, and global level. This course serves as the introduction to the Certificate in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship, but it is open to all students from all academic disciplines who wish to develop their own capacities to initiate meaningful change in our world.offered every spring.
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Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-230
Spring 2019
After Genocide and Apartheid: Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation
Ball, Jeremy
Karegeye, Jean-Pierre
Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic. This course examines how two societies–Rwanda after the 1994 genocide and South Africa after the end of apartheid–uncovered the atrocities of the past, delivered justice to perpetrators, and engendered reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. After learning about the histories of these two societies, we will study institutions–the International Criminal Court for Rwanda (ICTR), Gacaca, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Finally, we will consider how these two societies commemorate and memorialize victims. Our course will culminate in an optional, two-week Mosaic in Rwanda. In Rwanda, we will meet with genocide survivors and perpetrators and think deeply about how to engender reconciliation in a post-genocide society.
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SOCI-230
Spring 2019
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
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SOCI-230
Spring 2019
Sustainability: Social Justice and Human Rights
Bylander, Joyce
History "is a crab scuttling sideways, a drip of soft water wearing away stone, an earthquake breaking centuries of tension." (Solnit, Rebecca, Hope in the Dark, 2004). This course will examine the importance of the environmental movement and broader definitions of sustainability. We will explore examples of direct action, of serendipitous change, and of world-changing events that have moved us more clearly toward an understanding of "our" shared future on this planet. We will survey the issues connected to sustainable systems and will focus more specifically on issues related to food, water and energy. Through readings, film, and experiential activities the course will challenge us to analyze the impact of various actors and assess our own responsibility.
SINV

Spanish

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SPAN-231
Spring 2019
Reading the Southern Cone: Lessons in Sustainability
DeLutis-Eichenberger, Angela
In September 2015, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It was built from 17 Sustainable Development Goals aimed at attaining sustainable development for our world. These objectives are: No Poverty; Zero Hunger; Good Health and Well-Being; Quality Education; Gender Equality; Clean Water and Sanitation; Affordable and Clean Energy; Decent Work and Economic Growth; Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure; Reduced Inequalities; Sustainable Cities and Communities; Responsible Consumption and Production; Climate Action; Life Below Water; Life on Land; Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions; Partnerships for the Goals. Dickinson’s working definition of sustainability captures many of the UN’s articulated goals. It states that, “sustainability is about more than recycling and the environment. Sustainability is about answering a fundamental question: How do we improve the human condition equitably in this and future generations, while conserving environmental systems necessary to support healthy and vibrant societies? […] Like most definitions, ours is born of a concern for the future of the planet, its people and its living systems, which are threatened by a growing human footprint that is consuming and degrading environmental resources at a rapid pace. It recognizes essential needs of vast numbers of people are not being met in the present, and that poverty and inequality are amplifiers of vulnerability to environmental and other hazards. It is motivated by values that seek balance among economic development, eradication of poverty and hunger, advancement of social justice, and protection of the natural world.” Inspired by such approaches to sustainability and such definitions, this course examines a variety of environmental and sociopolitical issues affecting the Southern Cone, as they appear in a series of contemporary literary pieces. Widening the analytical frame, the course also discusses these issues as they may apply to private/personal, local, state, national, and global contexts. Please note that there will be several required field trips for this class (i.e. to Fur and Fowl Barn or Haldeman Island and to the Dickinson College Farm). This course is writing intensive.
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Sustainability

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SUST-490
Spring 2019
Baird Honors Colloquium
Leary, Cornelius
Permission of Instructor Required Students accepted into the Baird Sustainability Fellows program will explore questions about sustainability from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and build leadership and professional skills as agents of change. The specific assignments and content of the colloquium will be decided in concert with the admitted students. These may include conversations with invited scholars and practitioners, discussions of selected readings and public lectures, individual or collaborative projects, written essays, presentations of student research and service projects, student led class sessions, workshops, and field trips. Each student will create an electronic portfolio to document attainment of sustainability learning goals. The colloquium is a half-credit course that will meet for 90 minutes each week. Grading for the course will be credit/no credit.
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Theatre & Dance

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
THDA-214
Spring 2019
Community Engagement and Artistic Activism
Crawley-Woods, Erin
This course examines and applies theoretical and/or scientific study to the dancing body through experiential investigation, reading and lecture. Prerequisite: Proficiency in ballet or modern dance at the intermediate level or permission of instructor.
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Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Spring 2019
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Oliviero, Kathryn
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
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WGSS-202
Spring 2019
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
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