Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Fall 2020

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-170
Fall 2020
African Civilizations to 1850
Ball, Jeremy
Synchronous This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as HIST 170.
SCON

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-100
Fall 2020
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Weinstein, Karen
Synchronous meetings over Zoom for lecture (MWF 8:30-920) and also for lab sections (W 1:30-4:30). This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
SCON
ANTH-101
Fall 2020
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Ellison, James
he full class will meet remotely on Mondays, almost always synchronously. For much of the semester, half of the students will meet remotely with the professor on Wednesdays, and the other half will meet remotely with the professor on Fridays. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-101
Fall 2020
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Bender, Shawn
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-245
Fall 2020
The Archaeology of Farming
Bruno, Maria
Weekly lectures, readings, videos, and other materials will be posted to Moodle each week to be completed asynchronously. Class will meet via Zoom up to two days a week (TBD) to review, discuss, and ask questions about posted materials. There will also be student presentations using Zoom to individual assignments. Students will also be using ArcGIS Online for projects. In this course, students will explore the long-term histories of food production systems that developed across the globe through examination of archaeological, anthropological, biological, historical, and agroecological sources. We will learn about the processes and trajectories of domestication of plants and animals, modification of landscapes for farming, and intensification strategies. We will consider how the environment and climate played a role in shaping how these systems developed in distinct regions. We will also consider the social and political dimensions of farming including division of labor, generation of surplus and redistribution, and ritual. This long-term perspective will allow students to better understand our current food production systems and consider how ancient/traditional practices might contribute to sustainable farming practices for the future.
SINV

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-200
Fall 2020
The Archaeology of Farming
Bruno, Maria
Weekly lectures, readings, videos, and other materials will be posted to Moodle each week to be completed asynchronously. Class will meet via Zoom up to two days a week (TBD) to review, discuss, and ask questions about posted materials. There will also be student presentations using Zoom to individual assignments. Students will also be using ArcGIS Online for projects. In this course, students will explore the long-term histories of food production systems that developed across the globe through examination of archaeological, anthropological, biological, historical, and agroecological sources. We will learn about the processes and trajectories of domestication of plants and animals, modification of landscapes for farming, and intensification strategies. We will consider how the environment and climate played a role in shaping how these systems developed in distinct regions. We will also consider the social and political dimensions of farming including division of labor, generation of surplus and redistribution, and ritual. This long-term perspective will allow students to better understand our current food production systems and consider how ancient/traditional practices might contribute to sustainable farming practices for the future.
SINV
ARCH-218
Fall 2020
Geographic Information Systems
Ciarrocca, James
Sinha, Deb
The course will include attending online lectures, participating in virtual discussions and presentations, and completing GIS exercises using a computer and/or smartphone. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-131
Fall 2020
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Potthoff, Michael
The overall goal of this course is to give students an understanding of the biology of marine communities. This includes principles of marine science, organisms of the ocean, structure/function of marine ecosystems, and the interactions between humans and the ocean.
SINV
BIOL-131
Fall 2020
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Arnold, Thomas
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-221
Fall 2020
Animal Diversity w/Lab
Pires, Anthony
Lectures and labs will take place remotely and synchronously via Zoom. An exploration of the enormous diversity of animal life. We will study developmental processes and evolutionary patterns as a coherent approach to comprehending the organizational principles of disparate animal body plans. Students will be introduced to the morphological and physiological adaptations of the major phyla that fit them to their ecological roles in marine, aquatic and terrestrial environments. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; For Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125.
SCON
BIOL-314
Fall 2020
Ecology w/Lab
Boback, Scott
Study of the interactions of organisms with each other, and with their environment, at the level of the individual, the population, the community, and the ecosystem. Lectures and readings consider both the theory of ecology and data from empirical research in the classic and current literature. Laboratory and field studies explore how ecologists perform quantitative tests of hypotheses about complex systems in nature. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequiste is NRSC 200.
SCON

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-222
Fall 2020
Environmental Economics
Underwood, Anthony
Most lectures will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied with synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop or discussion format every Friday during scheduled class time. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
SINV
ECON-222
Fall 2020
Environmental Economics
Underwood, Anthony
Most lectures will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied with synchronous meetings (via Zoom) in workshop or discussion format every Friday during our scheduled class time. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
SINV
ECON-332
Fall 2020
Economics of Natural Resource Sustainability
Tynan, Nicola
All lectures and assignments will be delivered asynchronously online via Moodle. This will be accompanied by synchronous meetings (via Zoom). The first meeting will take place at 1:30pm ET on Monday 17th August. Subsequent meetings will take place every Thursday at 1:30pm ET (our originally scheduled class time) and at one other time to be determined based on student time zones. You will be asked to participate in at least one meeting each week. This course uses microeconomics to analyze the use and conservation of natural resources, including energy, minerals, fisheries, forests, and water resources, among others. Broad themes include the roles of property rights, intergenerational equity, and sustainable development in an economy based on resource exploitation. Prerequisite: 278. For ENST, ENSC and INST majors, prerequisite is ECON 222.
SINV

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-121
Fall 2020
Environmental Science for Non-Majors
Van Fleet, Pamela
Class lecture & labs will occur live via Zoom on the regularly scheduled days and times. Attendance will be taken. Lectures will be recorded as will portions of labs including lab introduction, instructions, and wrap up. Lectures: The lecture part of the course will include a combination of PowerPoint presentations, assigned readings, periodic class discussions, open Q & A throughout the class period and one or more documentary videos. Labs: A variety of materials, methods and technology will be employed depending on lab topic/activity. There will be a brief introduction, instructions, and possibly a video demonstration provided at the beginning of each lab. There will be a brief wrap-up at the end of labs. In addition, your instructor will be available throughout the lab to answer any questions. Students will often be paired up with one or two other classmates to work on and complete each lab assignment during the scheduled time. All work will be submitted by the end of each lab. Two labs will involve recorded video tours of local facilities. Each video tour will be played during those scheduled lab times and will be followed by a live Q&A with the person who provided the tour. Moodle will be used to distribute and receive most course materials including the following: course syllabus, assigned readings, lecture and lab exams & quizzes, lab materials, and submission of student assignments. Ensemble will be utilized for access to particular videos. This introductory environmental science course will explore the integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human interactions with them. Students will use scientific principles to explore the consequences of human activity. Students will be exposed to basic techniques for investigating environmental topics in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. This is an introductory course for non-majors. Students intending to major in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science should enroll in ENST 161.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course does not count towards the B.A. in Environmental Studies or B.S. in Environmental Science.
SINV
ENST-121
Fall 2020
Environmental Science for Non-Majors
Van Fleet, Pamela
Class lecture & labs will occur live via Zoom on the regularly scheduled days and times. Attendance will be taken. Lectures will be recorded as will portions of labs including lab introduction, instructions, and wrap up. Lectures: The lecture part of the course will include a combination of PowerPoint presentations, assigned readings, periodic class discussions, open Q & A throughout the class period and one or more documentary videos. Labs: A variety of materials, methods and technology will be employed depending on lab topic/activity. There will be a brief introduction, instructions, and possibly a video demonstration provided at the beginning of each lab. There will be a brief wrap-up at the end of labs. In addition, your instructor will be available throughout the lab to answer any questions. Students will often be paired up with one or two other classmates to work on and complete each lab assignment during the scheduled time. All work will be submitted by the end of each lab. Two labs will involve recorded video tours of local facilities. Each video tour will be played during those scheduled lab times and will be followed by a live Q&A with the person who provided the tour. Moodle will be used to distribute and receive most course materials including the following: course syllabus, assigned readings, lecture and lab exams & quizzes, lab materials, and submission of student assignments. Ensemble will be utilized for access to particular videos. This introductory environmental science course will explore the integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human interactions with them. Students will use scientific principles to explore the consequences of human activity. Students will be exposed to basic techniques for investigating environmental topics in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. This is an introductory course for non-majors. Students intending to major in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science should enroll in ENST 161.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course does not count towards the B.A. in Environmental Studies or B.S. in Environmental Science.
SINV
ENST-161
Fall 2020
Environmental Connections
Bedi, Heather
This course will be a synchronous course. Students need to be active participants online during the assigned class time. There will be additional small group tutorial sessions at various times throughout the semester, which students will sign-up for out of a selection of time options. This introductory environmental studies course draws from the influences of the humanities and natural sciences on the social sciences in relation to the environment. The course will examine the ideas, concepts, and debates central to the field. Students will examine the relationship between humans and the environment and become familiar with a range of environmental challenges, with an emphasis on how these challenges have emerged over time and space. The course will investigate and evaluate a variety of strategies that are currently being pursued to address these environmental challenges. The course stresses the importance of “seeing connections”, thinking carefully and critically about environmental issues, and appreciating that complex questions rarely have a single solution. This is an introductory course for those majoring in environmental studies and environmental science. Non-majors should enroll in ENST 121 Introduction to Environmental Science. This course has no laboratory section.
SINV
ENST-218
Fall 2020
Geographic Information Systems
Ciarrocca, James
Sinha, Deb
The course will include attending online lectures, participating in virtual discussions and presentations, and completing GIS exercises using a computer and/or smartphone. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
SCON
ENST-305
Fall 2020
Green Infrastructure
Beevers, Michael
Decker, Allyssa
This course will consist of mostly asynchronous learning with one synchronous component per week. Green infrastructure reduces and treats stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social, and economic benefits. This interdisciplinary course will examine different types of green infrastructure systems and how the components of each system work together to provide intended benefits. Topics may include rainwater harvesting, permeable pavements, bioswales/bioretention, green streets and parking, and green roofs. There will be an added focus on components of the water cycle within these systems including precipitation, infiltration, runoff, and evapotranspiration. Students will learn how to acquire, organize and analyze green infrastructure information and data using qualitative and quantitative methods. Three hours of laboratory per week.
SCON
ENST-335
Fall 2020
Analysis and Management of the Aquatic Environment
Strock, Kristin
An interdisciplinary study of the aquatic environment, with a focus on the groundwater and surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin. This course provides a scientific introduction to the dynamics of rivers, lakes, wetlands, and estuarine systems as well as an appreciation of the complexity of the political and social issues involved in the sustainable use of these aquatic resources. Students conduct an original, cooperative, field-based research project on a local aquatic system that will involve extensive use of analytical laboratory and field equipment. Extended field trips to sample freshwater and estuarine systems and to observe existing resource management practices are conducted. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 162.
SCON
ENST-371
Fall 2020
Global Environmental Politics
Beevers, Michael
The class will combine synchronous discussions and activities during scheduled class time along with asynchronous readings, lectures and assignments. Global environmental politics seeks to understand how the global environment is being changed by humanity and how states, organizations, individuals, communities, societies, movements and corporations are responding to planetary environmental issues. In this course, we discuss the causes of global environmental problems and how solutions have been conceptualized and put into practice over the last several decades. We examine trends in global environmental governance, and focus on the role of the sovereign state and global organizations in designing, implementing and enforcing effective international environmental agreements and regimes. We study the growing role in global environmental politics of ‘global civil society’ and multinational corporations. Finally, we consider the major tensions and controversies that characterize global environmental politics such as the impact of economics and trade, sustainable development, and the role of knowledge, power and science. This course engages with a broad range of materials from the global environmental politics literature and endeavors to represent different methodological and conceptual approaches. The course is not organized around environmental ‘issue areas’ but rather focuses on the underlying dynamics of power, authority, interests, legitimacy and ideas that ultimately shape environmental debates. We focus on how theory informs policy making and learn to recognize the constraints and opportunities available for addressing environmental challenges in a changing world. The course will incorporate lectures and seminar discussions as well as possible field trip and guest speakers. Prerequisite: ENST 161 or INST/POSC 170.
SINV
ENST-406
Fall 2020
Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Beevers, Michael
The class will combine synchronous discussions and activities during scheduled class time along with asynchronous readings, lectures and assignments. This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
SCON

Earth Sciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ERSC-142
Fall 2020
Earth's Changing Climate
Key, Marcus
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate “players” such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV
ERSC-151
Fall 2020
Foundations of Earth Sciences
Hayes, Jorden
Students can expect regular class periods to have small group discussions in zoom break out sessions. Lab kits containing rock samples and other lab materials will be sent to students' homes. How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
SCON
ERSC-218
Fall 2020
Geographic Information Systems
Ciarrocca, James
Sinha, Deb
The course will include attending online lectures, participating in virtual discussions and presentations, and completing GIS exercises using a computer and/or smartphone. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
SCON
ERSC-301
Fall 2020
Field Geology
Sak, Peter
A course in some of the basic geological field techniques, with the preparation of topographic and geologic maps and reports from data obtained by the student in the field. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 151 or permission of instructor.
SCON

Food Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FDST-201
Fall 2020
Introduction to Food Studies
Halpin, Jennifer
The Intro to Food Studies class will meet via Zoom each Monday and Wednesday from 1:30 to 2:45 unless otherwise communicated. On occasion Wednesday classes will run until 4:30pm (with no class on Monday). These class meetings are clearly communicated in the syllabus with follow up in-person reminders. The majority of class lectures will be live-stream with a few that will be delivered either in a pre-recorded or written format. Many of our classes will include live-stream guest lectures by faculty from other campus departments. In addition to weekly lectures, students will be assigned readings with prompts for in-class discussion. A goal for maintaining a synchronous format to our class is to facilitate lively interactions and learning experiences despite the physical distance between us. This course introduces students to Food Studies, an interdisciplinary field that examines food through biological, cultural, ecological, economic, and other perspectives. We will treat questions of hunger, food production/procurement, inequality, ecology, food labor, health, including psychology, and the diversity of ethical, cultural, and spiritual meanings regarding food. The course will include opportunities for students to engage in active observation, experimentation, and hands-on learning through community partnerships and the College Farm. Students will encounter reading/viewing assignments from a wide range of disciplines. This course will also be open to students who do not intend to complete the Food Studies certificate but would simply like an interdisciplinary understanding of the workings of food.Prerequisite: One Food Studies elective course; the elective may be taken concurrently with FDST 201 with permission of instructor.
SINV

Film & Media Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FMST-320
Fall 2020
Dickinson Wears Prada
Marini Maio, Nicoletta
In Italian culture, fashion plays a vital role in enabling individual to construct, sculpt and express their identities. This course examines Italian fashion as a cultural dimension, an industry, and an indicator of social change. We will analyze fashion “texts,” such as ads, pictures, feature films, documentaries, television shows, fashion shows, magazines, and literary pieces to investigate the fashion universe from multiple critical perspectives (including history, semiotics, culture, ethnicity, and gender). A specific section will be devoted to explore sustainable fashion. Elena Dall’Acqua, from the Dickinson Staff in Bologna Program, collaborates from Italy to support students’ projects on local resources. This course offers 90 mins of synchronous instruction via Zoom with Prof. Nicoletta Marini-Maio + 60 mins of asynchronous instruction per week. Students will meet with the professor in 3 short meetings of 25-30 minutes, in alternate small groups, according to this schedule: - W 1:30-2:45pm - W 3-4:30pm - W 9-9:55pm (students in time difference zones) - F 11:30-12:45pm The group organization will be decided after August 11 (Adjustment Period). Individual short meetings via Zoom will also be scheduled with each student. Asynchronous instruction includes video-lectures, videoclips, films, and blogs. This course is taught in English with FLIC in Italian exclusively for Italian minors/majors and INBM majors (who have completed ITAL231). The FLIC consists of a Zoom meeting on R 3:30-4:15pm and asynchronous instruction.
SCON

French

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FREN-240
Fall 2020
Food, France, and Cultural Identity
Soldin, Adeline
This course aims to examine the past, present and future of French food culture and systems through a multitude of lenses, including gender, race, class, and environmental. This course will investigate France's epicurean traditions and agricultural systems to understand the complex relationships among gastronomic practices, food and farming industries, and French identity. An inquiry of this type must certainly consider numerous questions relating to sustainability: the sustainability and/or development of traditions, values, systems, and resources. Moreover, students will be asked to reflect on their own culinary customs as well as the agro-business systems of their native countries and the globalized world. Through intercultural analysis, students will learn more about how a region's food habits and ideologies relate to and affect environmental and health concerns of its inhabitants.
SCON
FREN-240
Fall 2020
Food, France, and Cultural Identity
Soldin, Adeline
This class will meet in the classroom on Thursdays.This course aims to examine the past, present and future of French food culture and systems through a multitude of lenses, including gender, race, class, and environmental. This course will investigate France's epicurean traditions and agricultural systems to understand the complex relationships among gastronomic practices, food and farming industries, and French identity. An inquiry of this type must certainly consider numerous questions relating to sustainability: the sustainability and/or development of traditions, values, systems, and resources. Moreover, students will be asked to reflect on their own culinary customs as well as the agro-business systems of their native countries and the globalized world. Through intercultural analysis, students will learn more about how a region's food habits and ideologies relate to and affect environmental and health concerns of its inhabitants.
SCON

History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-170
Fall 2020
African Civilizations to 1850
Ball, Jeremy
Synchronous This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as AFST 170.
SCON
HIST-211
Fall 2020
History of Climate Change
Pawley, Emily
This remote class will require whole group and small group zoom meetings, as well as individual meetings with the professor and significant independent research. Students should keep the listed class time slot, TF 1:30-2:45, available on their weekly schedules for synchronous discussions/activities.While we may think of climate change mostly in terms of the futures it threatens, it’s a human-created disaster and so has a human history. So too do the solutions currently underway to respond to it. In this U.S.-focused class we’ll examine and research the rise of fossil fuels, the building of unequal and vulnerable landscapes, the birth and development of climate science, the intentional construction of climate denial, and the consequent failures of climate politics. However, we’ll also look at the histories of renewable energy, soil building, mass forest planting, ocean farming, organic farming, protest, movement-building, regulation, and political action. In doing so, we’ll help create usable histories for a survivable and ethical future.
SINV

Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Fall 2020
Fundamentals of Business
Riccio, Steven
The course will be taught in a synchronous format. Students will be divided into groups of 20 and will participate in forty minute class discussions during the alloted time periods. Pre-work materials and assignments will be submitted to Moodle for completion prior to the class discussions. This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
SCON
INBM-100
Fall 2020
Fundamentals of Business
Ritchey, Sherry
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
SCON
INBM-200
Fall 2020
Global Economy
Fratantuono, Michael
The Professor will use Zoom and meet with students for all 42 sessions. Each session will be recorded, with transcripts added, and will be posted in Moodle folder for the day. Depending on the material for the day, the pedagogy will range from lectures, to informal cooperative learning, to breakout rooms for student conversations. The Professor will NOT administer exams. Nor will he assign a class preparation and participation grade. Instead, each week, the professor will appoint students to a new team of 3 students. The professor will post a problem set: It will be due 10 days later. Each team of will submit one set of answers and each student on the team will receive the same grade. In total, each student will work with others on 12 problem sets. Since each will be worth 100 points, there will be 1200 possible points to earn during the semester. With respect to intangible outcomes, the course will stress the ability to collaborate with others, one of the most important skill in addressing the complex problems of the 21st Century. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
SCON
INBM-200
Fall 2020
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
SCON
INBM-300
Fall 2020
Business & Climate Change
Takacs, C Helen
This course will be taught remotely using on-line pre-recorded mini-lectures, assignment worksheets, discussion forums, and synchronous Zoom sessions.Climate change, spurred by greenhouse gas emissions that have climbed since the industrial revolution, is being described as the most important challenge of our time. The business community, once hesitant to act on and even skeptical about climate change, is now stepping up. For example, the world’s largest investment company, Blackrock, Inc., announced at the start of this year that it will begin incorporating climate change into its portfolio decisions. In this course, we will explore the wide array of risks and opportunities that climate change presents for businesses; the many ways that businesses are responding to climate change; and, perhaps most importantly, how businesses can lead the effort to mitigate climate change and even contribute to the reversal or drawdown of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere.
SINV

International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-200
Fall 2020
Global Economy
Fratantuono, Michael
The Professor will use Zoom and meet with students for all 42 sessions. Each session will be recorded, with transcripts added, and will be posted in Moodle folder for the day. Depending on the material for the day, the pedagogy will range from lectures, to informal cooperative learning, to breakout rooms for student conversations. The Professor will NOT administer exams. Nor will he assign a class preparation and participation grade. Instead, each week, the professor will appoint students to a new team of 3 students. The professor will post a problem set: It will be due 10 days later. Each team of will submit one set of answers and each student on the team will receive the same grade. In total, each student will work with others on 12 problem sets. Since each will be worth 100 points, there will be 1200 possible points to earn during the semester. With respect to intangible outcomes, the course will stress the ability to collaborate with others, one of the most important skill in addressing the complex problems of the 21st Century. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
SCON
INST-200
Fall 2020
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
SCON
INST-290
Fall 2020
Global Environmental Politics
Beevers, Michael
The class will combine synchronous discussions and activities during scheduled class time along with asynchronous readings, lectures and assignments. Global environmental politics seeks to understand how the global environment is being changed by humanity and how states, organizations, individuals, communities, societies, movements and corporations are responding to planetary environmental issues. In this course, we discuss the causes of global environmental problems and how solutions have been conceptualized and put into practice over the last several decades. We examine trends in global environmental governance, and focus on the role of the sovereign state and global organizations in designing, implementing and enforcing effective international environmental agreements and regimes. We study the growing role in global environmental politics of ‘global civil society’ and multinational corporations. Finally, we consider the major tensions and controversies that characterize global environmental politics such as the impact of economics and trade, sustainable development, and the role of knowledge, power and science. This course engages with a broad range of materials from the global environmental politics literature and endeavors to represent different methodological and conceptual approaches. The course is not organized around environmental ‘issue areas’ but rather focuses on the underlying dynamics of power, authority, interests, legitimacy and ideas that ultimately shape environmental debates. We focus on how theory informs policy making and learn to recognize the constraints and opportunities available for addressing environmental challenges in a changing world. The course will incorporate lectures and seminar discussions as well as possible field trip and guest speakers.
SINV

Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Fall 2020
Intermediate Italian
McMenamin, James
Trazzi, Luca
Some days synchronous via Zoom, other days asynchronous on Moodle. Days and times will not vary, same as the ones published. M-F, 9:30-10:20am, ET. The course offers 150 mins (60%) of synchronous instruction (Zoom) with the Professor + 100 mins (40%) of asynchronous instruction (Moodle). Elena Giulia Dall’Acqua (from the Dickinson Staff in our Bologna Program) collaborates from Italy to help with oral conversation and with cultural contents. Students will also watch three Italian movies and participate in other co-curricular events, such as “Working at Prada and Gucci”, “Style and the Sacred in La dolce vita,” “Cinema and Fashion,” and “Italy in a Jar,” among others. Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
SCON
ITAL-201
Fall 2020
Intermediate Italian
Trazzi, Luca
Some days synchronous via Zoom, other days asynchronous on Moodle. Days and times will not vary, same as the ones published. M-F, 10:30-11:20am, ET. The course offers 150 mins (60%) of synchronous instruction (Zoom) with the Professor + 100 mins (40%) of asynchronous instruction (Moodle). Elena Giulia Dall’Acqua (from the Dickinson Staff in our Bologna Program) collaborates from Italy to help with oral conversation and with cultural contents. Students will also watch three Italian movies and participate in other co-curricular events, such as “Working at Prada and Gucci”, “Style and the Sacred in La dolce vita,” “Cinema and Fashion,” and “Italy in a Jar,” among others. Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
SCON
ITAL-323
Fall 2020
Dickinson Wears Prada
Marini Maio, Nicoletta
In Italian culture, fashion plays a vital role in enabling individual to construct, sculpt and express their identities. This course examines Italian fashion as a cultural dimension, an industry, and an indicator of social change. We will analyze fashion “texts,” such as ads, pictures, feature films, documentaries, television shows, fashion shows, magazines, and literary pieces to investigate the fashion universe from multiple critical perspectives (including history, semiotics, culture, ethnicity, and gender). A specific section will be devoted to explore sustainable fashion. Elena Dall’Acqua, from the Dickinson Staff in Bologna Program, collaborates from Italy to support students’ projects on local resources. This course offers 110 mins (60%) of synchronous instruction (both in person and remotely) with Prof. Nicoletta Marini-Maio + 70 mins (40%) of asynchronous instruction per week. Students will meet with the professor in 3 short meetings of 25-30 minutes, in alternate small groups, according to this schedule: - W 1:30-2:45pm via Zoom - W 3-4:30pm in person - R 11:30-12:45pm via Zoom The group organization will be decided after August 14 (Adjustment Period). Off-campus students need to inform the Professor at their earliest convenience. This course is taught in English with FLIC in Italian exclusively for Italian minors/majors and INBM majors. The FLIC consists of a Zoom meeting on R 3:30-4:15pm and asynchronous instruction.
SCON

Lat Am/Latinx/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-239
Fall 2020
Spanish for the Health Professions
Arnedo-Aldrich, Asuncion
MWF synchronous zoom sessions with add'l asynchronous components. This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or above, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 239.
SCON

Political Science

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
POSC-204
Fall 2020
Competing Political Ideologies
Reiner, Jason
This class surveys the major ideologies that compete for political support in Western societies, such as liberalism, conservatism, and socialism, as well as radical alternatives (anarchism and fascism), and new perspectives such as feminism and ecologism/environmentalism. We will also examine the nature of ideology, and whether it is possible to develop a neutral, non-ideological perspective on politics. Prerequisite: 180, or permission of the instructor.
SCON

Psychology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PSYC-120
Fall 2020
Introduction to Health Psychology
Guardino, Christine
Each week, students will watch short video lectures posted to Moodle and read a chapter in the course text. Students will be assigned to a smaller weekly synchronous discussion section that will meet Wednesday OR Friday morning at 10:30 a.m. Students should plan to watch the lecture videos and complete the reading assignment prior to attending the discussion section. To ensure equity, discussion sections will be recorded and students who are unable to participate synchronously can review the recordings and participate asynchronously by posting in a discussion forum. Course requirements include participation (through contributions to synchronous discussion sections or the asynchronous discussion forum), weekly quizzes on the reading and lectures, brief writing assignments, a group project, a course paper, a midterm exam, and a final exam. This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the interdisciplinary field of health psychology, which uses scientific research methods to study the bi-directional relationship between psychology and health. We will discuss psychological states such as stress and how they affect the body, and mental processes such as finding meaning that are associated with effective coping and positive health outcomes. We will also study health behaviors such as exercise, sleep, eating, and substance use. Finally, we will explore how psychological concepts and research can be applied to health promotion and illness prevention. Course content will be especially relevant to students considering careers in health care or public health.
SCON

Soc Innovation/Entrepreneurshp

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SINE-400
Fall 2020
Senior Seminar in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Takacs, C Helen
This course will be taught remotely using on-line pre-recorded mini-lectures, assignment worksheets, discussion forums, and synchronous Zoom sessions. This capstone course builds on and integrates the key concepts of the introductory course in this certificate program by requiring students to reflect on, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through their academic programs and experiential learning experiences. The focus will be on creating shared value, which simultaneously enriches social, ecological, and economic systems. Through exercises in strategy formulation and implementation, students will gain an appreciation for the challenges and rewards associated with conceiving and transforming innovative solutions into new products, services, and/or initiatives that change our world in meaningful ways. In imagining these pathways for success, we will also address the importance of compassionate leadership, tools that nurture vital social connections, and the power of our own agency.Offered every fall.
SINV

Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-230
Fall 2020
Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Leary, Cornelius
What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States. We will meet synchronously using Zoom during scheduled class sessions for discussions, learning activities, and occasional lectures. Asynchronous course elements will include readings, videos, assignments to be completed outside of class meeting times, and some short pre-recorded lectures.
SINV

Spanish

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SPAN-231
Fall 2020
Writing About Literature, Art, Film, and Current Affairs
Sagastume, Jorge
Tuesdays and Fridays: synchronous.The overarching goal of this course is to introduce students to aspects of college-level academic work, in Spanish: critical thinking, effective writing, careful reading, and engaged discussion. In reading, writing, and discussion, the course will focus on the concept of argument, its construction and effective communication, in Spanish. Based on logical thinking and evidence, students will develop the ability to recognize and critique the arguments of others and to formulate and defend their own. This particular course has been designed with specific ideas in mind: through Latin American literature, film, art, and current affairs, the following questions will be addressed: Who am I?, What can I know? and How shall I live?, emphasizing our place in this world and the civic responsibilities we have in the society we share with others.
SCON
SPAN-239
Fall 2020
Spanish for the Health Professions
Arnedo-Aldrich, Asuncion
MWF synchronous zoom sessions with add'l asynchronous components. This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: 202 or 205. This course is cross-listed as LALC 239.
SCON

Sustainability

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SUST-200
Fall 2020
Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Leary, Cornelius
What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States. We will meet synchronously using Zoom during scheduled class sessions for discussions, learning activities, and occasional lectures. Asynchronous course elements will include readings, videos, assignments to be completed outside of class meeting times, and some short pre-recorded lectures.
SINV

Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Fall 2020
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Rebeiz, Mireille
One in person meeting of the full class each week, and one synchronous online meeting each week. Note: the first few weeks may be fully in person. This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
SCON
WGSS-300
Fall 2020
Feminist Perspectives and Theories
Bickford, Donna
The class will meet synchronously (T/Th 9:00-10:15) each class period for the first few weeks, and then will likely transition to one synchronous class per week depending on the needs of the class. This course deepens students’ understandings of how feminist perspectives situate power and privilege in relationship to interlocking categories of gender, race, class, sexuality, ability and nation. Through foundational theoretical texts, it expands students’ understandings of significant theoretical frameworks that inform women’s, gender, critical race and sexuality studies, as well as debates and tensions within them. Frameworks may include political activisms, materialist feminism, standpoint epistemologies, critiques of scientific objectivity, intersectionality, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, transnational critique and feminist legal theory. Helps students develop more nuanced understandings of the relationship between everyday experiences, political institutions, forms of resistance and theoretical meaning-making. Prerequisite: WGSS 100.
SCON