Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Spring 2021

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-220
Spring 2021
African American Foodways
Johnson, Lynn
This course examines the multifarious ways in which food has influenced the expressions of African American identity and culture. We will begin with a discussion of food as a cultural connector that preserves the ties between African Americans and their African antecedents. Subsequently, we will consider specific African American culinary practices and the origins of soul food. Additionally, we will analyze the roles of food in African American social activism. In so doing, we will pay particular attention to the relationships that exist among food consumption, human rights, and African American communal health, as represented by the anti-soul food and black vegetarianism/veganism movements.
SCON

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-101
Spring 2021
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Bender, Shawn
Classroom and remote mix. Class will meet Thursday. Monday will be asynchronous. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-101
Spring 2021
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Ellison, James
Remote Mondays. Combination of in-person and remote Wednesdays and Fridays, for half-class group meetings. Some in-person office hours. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-110
Spring 2021
Archaeology and World Prehistory
Bruno, Maria
This course will consist of both asynchronous lectures and synchronous class meetings and discussions. There will also be in-person office hours and other in person opportunities to meet in smaller groups, space and social-distancing permitting. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
SCON
ANTH-229
Spring 2021
Human Variation and Adaptation
Weinstein, Karen
There will be opportunities for in person office hours when students are living on campus. This course explores anthropological perspectives on modern human biological diversity. We examine genetic variation, biological and cultural responses to environmental stressors, including climate, altitude, nutrition, infectious and chronic diseases, and population growth and demography. We use our understanding of human biological diversity to examine the notion that race is a social phenomenon with no true biological meaning. Offered every other year.
SCON
ANTH-290
Spring 2021
Archaeological Methods
Bruno, Maria
This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
SCON
ANTH-345
Spring 2021
Life in the Anthropocene
Ellison, James
Some group work will involve in-person meetings with on-campus students and remote meetings with off-campus students. Some in-person office hours. Increased attention human influences on Earth’s climates and geology has given rise to a much-discussed Anthropocene epoch. Whether we locate the start of the epoch thousands of years ago with the origins of agriculture, with the industrial revolution, or even more recently with nuclear bomb technologies, we find reasons for the label in rapid successions of record high temperatures and severe weather events, polar ice melts and rising sea levels, and astonishing numbers of extinctions, all of which play out in disparate ways across the globe. These changes call for new ways to understand how humans live in the world. In this course we will examine what it means to be human in these times, and how people interact with technologies, environments, and other species in ways that shape these processes and that are shaped by them. Our organizing frame will be ethnography, with examples drawn from throughout the world. Sustainability will be a persistent question during the semester.
SINV

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-110
Spring 2021
Archaeology and World Prehistory
Bruno, Maria
This course will consist of both asynchronous lectures and synchronous class meetings and discussions. There will also be in-person office hours and other in person opportunities to meet in smaller groups, space and social-distancing permitting. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
SCON
ARCH-218
Spring 2021
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
SCON
ARCH-290
Spring 2021
Archaeological Methods
Bruno, Maria
This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
SCON
ARCH-318
Spring 2021
Advanced Applications in GIS
Ciarrocca, James
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318 and ERSC 318. Offered every two years.
SCON

Art & Art History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARTH-130
Spring 2021
Art and Sustainability
Eng, Rachel
This course promotes themes of sustainability and social engagement as the catalyst for artmaking. Primarily investigated through the design and construction of sculptures, installation art or other creative acts, students will explore creative practices exemplified by land art, social practice art, collaborative art, and social sculpture, among others.
SCON
ARTH-205
Spring 2021
Japanese Architecture
Ren, Wei
This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-131
Spring 2021
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Potthoff, Michael
Labs will have some asynchronous components. Students will be assigned to a 2-hr time block within the lab time window.
SINV
BIOL-301
Spring 2021
Wildlife Ecology
Wingert, Harold
Wildlife Ecology is designed for majors in both Environmental Science and Biology. This course approaches ecology from the aspect of focusing on individual organisms and the role they play in their environment. Students will visit various habitats in Pennsylvania and view wildlife first hand. The texts are both place based focusing on Northeastern forests and Northeastern vernal ponds. These two ecosystems are intimately linked and the health of one influences the other. Students will have hands on labs with living organisms and investigate the roles each of these organisms play in the forest and vernal pool environment. A focus of the course will be how we must manage these ecosystems if they are to be enjoyed by our grandchildren. Both of these ecosystems are being changed by human ignorance and global climate change. We are at a “squeak point” in our ability to sustain these ecosystems. Only a complete understanding of their ecology and rapid action will sustain them for future generations.
SINV
BIOL-342
Spring 2021
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
The lecture will be hybrid with both synchronous and asynchronous components. Will consider remote only students on case-by-case as situation evolves. Labs will alternate in person and remote, with students being in person every other week. Off-week labs will involve online laboratory activities. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
SCON

Chemistry

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
CHEM-132
Spring 2021
General Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
Synchronous required attendance at the scheduled class time. Office hours and study/review sessions may be offered with an in-person option. A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
SCON
CHEM-242
Spring 2021
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
Holden, Michael
Rathbun, Colin
Alternating weeks in lab and online. This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
SCON
CHEM-242
Spring 2021
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
Gavenonis, Jason
Holden, Michael
Rathbun, Colin
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
SCON
CHEM-242
Spring 2021
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Holden, Michael
Completely remote, partially asynchronous. This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
SCON
CHEM-342
Spring 2021
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
The lecture will be hybrid with both synchronous and asynchronous components.. Will consider remote only students on case-by-case as situation evolves. Labs will alternate in person and remote, with students being in person every other week. Off-week labs will involve online laboratory activities. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
SCON
CHEM-490
Spring 2021
Drug Discovery and Development
Gavenonis, Jason
Partially asynchronous. This course will provide a broad overview of the history of pharmaceutical industry, from the initial development of antibiotics such as sulfanilamide as an offshoot of the dye industry to the advent of structure-based drug design and post-genomic approaches to target identification. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of small-molecule drugs. We will explore each step of the drug-discovery process, and students will present an overview of a particular drug's journey through this process, including in the context of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, to their peers. Prerequisites: CHEM 342.
SCON

East Asian Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
EASN-205
Spring 2021
Japanese Architecture
Ren, Wei
This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
SCON
EASN-205
Spring 2021
Nature and the Environment in Japanese Fiction and Film
Bates, Peter
This course explores the relationship between humanity and nature in Japanese literature and film. Though we will draw from earlier examples, the majority of the course will be focused on the modern era (post 1868). Some topics for exploration include: the role of animals in Japanese culture, nature as a reflection of the self, natural and industrial disasters, and nature in the imagination. As we move through the class, we will also work to understand and apply “ecocriticism” as an approach to cultural texts in relation to the science of ecology.
SINV

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-222
Spring 2021
Environmental Economics
Tynan, Nicola
Depending on the distribution of students (on or off campus), these classes will be in-person or synchronous remote. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
SINV
ECON-288
Spring 2021
Contending Economic Perspectives
Kongar, Mesude
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
SCON
ECON-314
Spring 2021
Gender and Development
Kongar, Mesude
This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980’s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.
SCON
ECON-496
Spring 2021
Economic Demography and Sustainable Development
Underwood, Anthony
Permission of Instructor Required. Demography is the study of the determinants and consequences of population change. It is concerned with effectively everything that influences or can be influenced by population size, population growth or decline, population processes, population spatial distribution, population structure, and population characteristics. As we go from the historical pattern of high birth and death rates to the increasingly common pattern of low birth and death rates, we pass through the demographic transition. This is actually a whole set of transitions relating to changes in health and mortality, fertility, migration, age structure, urbanization, and family and household structure. Each of these separate, but interrelated, changes have serious consequences for the way societies and economies work and the natural environment they are built upon. Thus, the objectives of this course are threefold: (1) to develop knowledge of the underlying demographic theories explaining these transitions; (2) to use this knowledge to understand the interrelationships between these transitions; and (3) to determine the implications of these transitions for sustainable development, that is, for social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Some questions we will consider include (but are not limited to): Why are so many adults living alone? Why are women having fewer babies? What impact do sub-replacement birth rates have on economies and societies? What role do the rights of women have in demographic transitions? Why are adults waiting so long to get married or not getting married at all? What happens when the population ages? Why are more and more people choosing to live in cities? Is this expected growth of cities sustainable? Often for familiarity and simplicity we will use data and readings focused on the United States, but since these transitions have evolved in ways that vary from one part of the world to another, this course will often have a necessarily international focus. Naturally, given the expansive subject matter, this course will require much from you – it is reading and writing intensive.
SCON
ECON-496
Spring 2021
Political Economy of Health
Kongar, Mesude
Permission of Instructor Required. In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is as low as 49 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to nutrition, care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? In this course, students will examine the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. The emphasis throughout the course will be on how socioeconomic inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality and other social categories affect health and well-being outcomes.
SCON

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-162
Spring 2021
Integrative Environmental Science
Douglas, Margaret
Lab during the first half of the semester will incorporate in-person activities. Office hours are likely to be offered in-person as well as virtually. Lecture format is to-be-determined but will be synchronous if remote. This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
SINV
ENST-162
Spring 2021
Integrative Environmental Science
Decker, Allyssa
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
SINV
ENST-218
Spring 2021
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
SCON
ENST-303
Spring 2021
Environmental Research Methods and Civic Engagement
Bedi, Heather
In this course, students will learn core environmental research methods skills and will apply select research methods to complete a project for a community partner. The spring 2021 course will focus on climate equity research, which is a need identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Office of Environmental Justice. The DEP requested a report and presentation outlining best practices for using revenue from greenhouse gas reduction programs to prevent pollution concentration in environmental injustice communities in Pennsylvania. Students will gain tangible environmental research method skills in the course while creating a product that may inform state policy.
SCON
ENST-305
Spring 2021
Conservation Biology
Strock, Kristin
We appear to be entering the sixth major extinction of biodiversity in the history of life on earth. Unlike the previous five mass extinctions, this one is largely a result of human activity. The field of conservation biology has developed to face the challenge of protecting the world’s biological diversity and to better understand human impacts on species, communities, and ecosystems. In this course, we will examine the biological diversity of life on Earth: what is it, where is it, and how do we measure it? As a class, we will explore the history of diversity change through geologic time and discuss the implications of human activities on biodiversity. Through a series of readings, case studies, and hands-on activities, this course will cover the principles of conservation biology, as well as the ways in which we value biodiversity, including ecological, economic, and ethical perspectives. This course may count as a theme course in both the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies major or as an Applications of Environmental Science course.
SCON
ENST-318
Spring 2021
Advanced Applications in GIS
Ciarrocca, James
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 318 and ARCH 318. Offered every two years.
SCON
ENST-330
Spring 2021
Environmental Policy
Beevers, Michael
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 161 and 162, or permission of instructor.
SINV
ENST-406
Spring 2021
Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Beevers, Michael
The class will combine synchronous discussions and activities during scheduled class time along with asynchronous readings, lectures and assignments. This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
SCON

Earth Sciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ERSC-141
Spring 2021
Earth's Hazards
Hayes, Jorden
This course examines natural processes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mass wasting events, and floods that have the potential to produce disastrous consequences for humans. All of these processes result from interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere directly or indirectly, which is the realm of earth sciences. Increasing global populations and increasingly interdependent national economies mean that few disasters are now only ‘local’. This course will use examples such as case studies of recent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions to examine how natural processes can be hazardous, and whether or not humans can anticipate and mitigate these kinds of hazards to prevent future disasters. Laboratory work will include analog experiments, field trips, and video analysis of historic disasters. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV
ERSC-151
Spring 2021
Foundations of Earth Sciences
Thibodeau, Alyson
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
SCON
ERSC-218
Spring 2021
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
SCON
ERSC-318
Spring 2021
Advanced Applications in GIS
Ciarrocca, James
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318 and ARCH 318. Offered every two years.
SCON

Food Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FDST-401
Spring 2021
Capstone Seminar
Bedi, Heather
This capstone seminar builds on the introductory Food Studies course (FDST 201). It requires students to reflect, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through their academic coursework and experiential learning experiences. A substantive, reflective piece which could take many forms will be required. Students will work collaboratively to organize a symposium, performance, event, or other public presentation of their work. In order to register for FDST 401, students must have completed FDST 201 and at least 3 of the four electives, along with the experiential learning component. The latter may be taken simultaneously with FDST 401.Prerequisite: FDST 201, at least three of the four electives, and the experiential component which can be take simultaneously with FDST 401.
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Film & Media Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FMST-210
Spring 2021
Nature and the Environment in Japanese Fiction and Film
Bates, Peter
This course explores the relationship between humanity and nature in Japanese literature and film. Though we will draw from earlier examples, the majority of the course will be focused on the modern era (post 1868). Some topics for exploration include: the role of animals in Japanese culture, nature as a reflection of the self, natural and industrial disasters, and nature in the imagination. As we move through the class, we will also work to understand and apply “ecocriticism” as an approach to cultural texts in relation to the science of ecology.
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History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-131
Spring 2021
Modern Latin American History since 1800
Borges, Marcelo
This class will combine weekly asynchronous activities with synchronous meetings. Most synchronous meetings will take place on Thursdays during scheduled class time. Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as LALC 231.
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HIST-151
Spring 2021
History of Environment
Pawley, Emily
This course will consist of a weekly asynchronous lecture, which students should try to do on Sunday or Monday, and two weekly discussion sections on Wednesday and Friday. Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
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HIST-219
Spring 2021
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
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Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Spring 2021
Fundamentals of Business
Paff, Uwe
Takacs, C Helen
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
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INBM-200
Spring 2021
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
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INBM-240
Spring 2021
Marketing in a Global Context
Ritchey, Sherry
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
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INBM-400
Spring 2021
Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
Ritchey, Sherry
This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations. Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement.
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International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-170
Spring 2021
International Relations
Webb, Edward
Asynchronous presentations of content, chunked for digestibility, will be delivered via Moodle. Discussion sessions will meet twice weekly in smaller groups. I will divide the scheduled class time (TF 130P - 245P) among three groups. Students and I will meet via Zoom (video optional for students), for around 25 minutes, then the next group will switch in. Sessions will be recorded so students can review their own group discussion as well as others, ensuring equity. Students abroad or who are for any other reason unable to participate in synchronous sessions can review the recordings of those group discussions and then schedule one-on-one conversations with me. Assessment will be a combination of weekly low-stakes quizzes, participation points for contributions to synchronous and asynchronous (forum) discussions, and essay-based exams. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
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INST-200
Spring 2021
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
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INST-277
Spring 2021
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and MEST 266.
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INST-290
Spring 2021
Gender and Development
Kongar, Mesude
This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980’s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.
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INST-290
Spring 2021
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
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Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Spring 2021
Intermediate Italian
Lanzilotta, Luca
Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
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Lat Am/Latinx/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-231
Spring 2021
Modern Latin American History since 1800
Borges, Marcelo
This class will combine weekly asynchronous activities with synchronous meetings. The synchronous meetings will take place on Thursdays during the scheduled class time. Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as HIST 131.
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Mathematics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MATH-325
Spring 2021
Probability and Statistics II
Forrester, Jeffrey
A continuation of Introduction to Probability and Statistics I. Topics include additional discrete and continuous distributions, conditional distributions, additional hypothesis tests, simple linear regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and goodness of fit tests. Special topics may include nonparametric tests, nonlinear regression, and time series analysis.Prerequisites: 171, 225 and completion of, or concurrent registration in 270. Offered in odd numbered spring semesters.
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Middle East Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MEST-200
Spring 2021
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
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MEST-266
Spring 2021
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics.This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and INST 277.
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Philosophy

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHIL-113
Spring 2021
Philosophy and the Environment
Feldman, Susan
This course introduces students to philosophy by exploring ideas about, and valuation of, the non-human natural environment. We will analyze concepts of ‘nature’, ‘natural’, ‘wilderness’, and attitudes which go along with them, probe the ramifications of treating non-humans as rights holders, examine the distinction between anthropocentric and non-anthropocentric views, and that between holist and individualist outlooks. Our readings will include classic and contemporary works in environmental philosophy.
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PHIL-285
Spring 2021
Justice in World Politics
Reiner, Jason
In-person office hours will be available and optional in-person discussion sections on the quad once spring arrives and it is warm enough to gather outside. An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as POSC 208. Prerequisite: 180 or POSC 170, 180, or permission of the instructor.
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Political Science

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
POSC-170
Spring 2021
International Relations
Webb, Edward
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
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POSC-208
Spring 2021
Justice in World Politics
Reiner, Jason
In-person office hours will be available and optional in-person discussion sections on the quad once spring arrives and it is warm enough to gather outside. An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 285. Prerequisite: 170, 180 or PHIL 180, or permission of the instructor.
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POSC-277
Spring 2021
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as MEST 266 and INST 277.
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POSC-290
Spring 2021
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
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Psychology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PSYC-120
Spring 2021
Introduction to Health Psychology
Guardino, Christine
Lectures will be recorded and posted to Moodle. Students will meet once per week for discussion and small group activities. This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the interdisciplinary field of health psychology, which uses scientific research methods to study the bi-directional relationship between psychology and health. We will discuss psychological states such as stress and how they affect the body, and mental processes such as finding meaning that are associated with effective coping and positive health outcomes. We will also study health behaviors such as exercise, sleep, eating, and substance use. Finally, we will explore how psychological concepts and research can be applied to health promotion and illness prevention. Course content will be especially relevant to students considering careers in health care or public health.
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Religion

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RELG-111
Spring 2021
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims, from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
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RELG-311
Spring 2021
Buddhism and the Environment
Cozort, Daniel
Although protection of the environment is not a Buddhist goal per se, it is involved in the quest for enlightenment. The course will apply the Buddhist perspective to questions about the relations between humans and the rest of nature, to specific environmental problems, to the tradeoffs between human good and protection of other species, and to consumption and consumerism. Offered every two years
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Soc Innovation/Entrepreneurshp

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SINE-201
Spring 2021
Introduction to Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Kirk, Gary
This course introduces students to the essential concepts, mindsets and skill sets associated with social entrepreneurship. We begin with an overview of the field of social entrepreneurship. We will then develop a conceptual foundation in systems thinking and the community capital framework. The former allows students to grasp the complexity of social and environmental issues by viewing these issues through the lens of systems theory. The latter recognizes multiple forms of capital that are essential to developing sustainable communities: natural, physical, economic, human, social, and cultural capital. Other course topics may include creativity, innovation, social justice, alternative approaches to economics and business, and sustainability. Through definitional readings, case studies and/or biographies, students gain an understanding of the power of social entrepreneurship to create shared value at the local, regional, and global level. This course serves as the introduction to the Certificate in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship, but it is open to all students from all academic disciplines who wish to develop their own capacities to initiate meaningful change in our world.offered every spring.
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Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-238
Spring 2021
Consumer Culture
Schubert, J Daniel
The sociology of consumerism is a major specialty in European sociology, and is only recently receiving attention by American sociologists. In this class, we will examine the increasing importance of consumerism in daily life and the degree to which culture has become commercialized. We will discuss the sign value of commodities, as well as the shift from a stratification system based on the relationship of the means of production to one based on styles and patterns of consumption. We will also concern ourselves with the relationships between consumption and more traditional sociological concerns such as gender, race, and social class.Offered every two years.
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Spanish

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SPAN-231
Spring 2021
Argentine Adventures through Contemporary Literature
DeLutis-Eichenberger, Angela
Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Argentina.Pleasure, vice, punishment, apocalypse, death, golems, virtue, dance, dreams, creation, power, animals, legends...this course embarks on a series of literary adventures of diverse themes crafted by some of the most well-known contemporary Argentine authors, to include: Leopoldo Lugones, Horacio Quiroga, Alfonsina Storni, Jorge Luis Borges, Luisa Valenzuela, Julio Cortázar, and Adolfo Bioy Casares. Special attention is also given to literary works by several authors from Mendoza (Draghi Lucero, Antonio Di Benedetto, Liliana Bodoc, among others).
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SPAN-231
Spring 2021
Gastronomy and Health in the Hispanic World
Arnedo-Aldrich, Asuncion
This course examines food narratives (literatura gastronómica) in order to learn about culture, eating habits, diet, food trends, and how these factors affect health. Reading materials (all in Spanish) will include novels, poetry, critical essays, documentaries, and gastroblogs to review the ways in which individuals, communities, and society produce, distribute, and consume foods. Sustainable food systems and food security will also be discussed. Students will learn about the basic principles of nutrition by studying key concepts such as digestion, metabolism, and requirements for a healthy diet. In addition to a research paper and short analytic papers, students will have the opportunity to engage in experiential activities at the College Farm and Stern Kitchen, and to do a creative project through contributions with varied content (gastro-multimedia, creation of a tasting menu, cooking demonstrations, food related music, etc.). Note: Due to COVID-19 some experiences may have to be adjusted.
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Sustainability

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SUST-490
Spring 2021
Baird Honors Colloquium
Leary, Cornelius
Permission of Instructor Required. Students accepted into the Baird Sustainability Fellows program will explore questions about sustainability from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and build leadership and professional skills as agents of change. The specific assignments and content of the colloquium will be decided in concert with the admitted students. These may include conversations with invited scholars and practitioners, discussions of selected readings and public lectures, individual or collaborative projects, written essays, presentations of student research and service projects, student led class sessions, workshops, and field trips. Each student will create an electronic portfolio to document attainment of sustainability learning goals. The colloquium is a half-credit course that will meet for 90 minutes each week. Grading for the course will be credit/no credit.
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Theatre & Dance

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
THDA-230
Spring 2021
Design Principles and Practices for the Stage
Barrett, Kent
Harper-McCombs, Sherry
A study of the language, principles, elements, and tools designers use to both formulate and communicate ideas as part of the collaborative process. Students will learn the basic elements of composition for stage design and will see how these elements function in the areas of costuming, lighting, scenery, and sound. Two hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week.
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Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Spring 2021
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Oliviero, Kathryn
Class will meet synchronously on Mondays and Thursdays for on-campus students (one day will be a class session and the other day will be small group work, with the occasional asynchronous session as needed). Remote students will have at least one synchronous session a week on Zoom. This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
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WGSS-301
Spring 2021
Immigration Politics: Gender, Race and Sexuality in Contemporary Migration
Oliviero, Kathryn
Prior to Spring Break, class will be held synchronously on Zoom on Tuesdays and Thursdays.  Following Spring Break, class will meet synchronously on Tuesdays and Thursdays for on-campus students (one day will be a class session and the other day may include class, small group work, or asynchronous sessions).  Remote students will have at least one synchronous session a week on Zoom.Why do global controversies over immigration so often center on migrant women’s fertility and their children’s access to government benefits? Why do some countries accept LGBT migrants but deny them the right to adopt, use assisted reproductive technologies, or extend citizenship to their children? How are efforts to limit marriage-and-family based migration racialized and classed? What are the gendered implications when nurses are a country’s central export? Could building a border wall or sending refugees back stop unwanted immigration? This course examines how intersecting gender, sexual and ethnic hierarchies shape and are shaped by immigration. Applying insights from feminist and queer theories of migration, students will explore how the gendered processes surrounding immigration craft concepts of nation, borders and citizenship. Readings and films examine how sexual and racial norms are renegotiated through the selection and regulation of immigrants. Central to our investigation is how transnational and economic forces compel migration, reshaping understandings of national belonging, workplaces, and family in the process. We will particularly consider how migrants negotiate multiple marginalizations, and in turn refashion understandings of community, identities, culture, and politics. An interdisciplinary framework combines media, law, activist, film, literary and historical accounts.
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WGSS-302
Spring 2021
Gender and Development
Kongar, Mesude
This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980’s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.
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