Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Spring 2023

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-220
Spring 2023
African American Foodways
Johnson, Lynn
This course examines the multifarious ways in which food has influenced the expressions of African American identity and culture. We will begin with a discussion of food as a cultural connector that preserves the ties between African Americans and their African antecedents. Subsequently, we will consider specific African American culinary practices and the origins of soul food. Additionally, we will analyze the roles of food in African American social activism. In so doing, we will pay particular attention to the relationships that exist among food consumption, human rights, and African American communal health, as represented by the anti-soul food and black vegetarianism/veganism movements.
SCON

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-101
Spring 2023
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Bender, Shawn
Ellison, James
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-345
Spring 2023
Life and the Anthropocene
Ellison, James
Increased attention to human influences on Earth's climates and geology has given rise to a much-discussed Anthropocene epoch. Whether we locate the start of the epoch thousands of years ago with the origins of agriculture, with the industrial revolution, or more recently with nuclear bomb technologies, we can understand the label through rapid successions of record high temperatures and severe weather events, polar ice melts and rising sea levels, and astonishing numbers of extinctions, all of which play out in disparate ways across the globe. These changes call for new ways to understand how humans live in the world. In this course we examine what it means to be human in these times, and how people live in mutual and dynamic relationships with technologies, environments, and other species in ways that shape these processes and that are shaped by them. Our organizing frame will be ethnography, with examples drawn from throughout the world. Sustainability will be a persistent question during the semester.
SINV

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-218
Spring 2023
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 , ERSC 218 and GISP 218.
SCON
ARCH-218
Spring 2023
Geographic Information Systems
Sak, Peter
. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 , ERSC 218 and GISP 218.
SCON
ARCH-318
Spring 2023
Advanced Applications in GIS
Cromley, Gordon
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or GISP 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours of classroom per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318, ERSC 318 & GISP 318. Offered every two years.
SCON

Art & Art History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARTH-205
Spring 2023
Japanese Architecture
Ren, Wei
This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
SCON
ARTH-224
Spring 2023
Wheelwork Ceramics
Eng, Rachel
A studio course exploring expressive possibilities offered by the potters wheel. Students will examine both utilitarian and sculptural aspects of the medium. A variety of clays, glazes and firing approaches will be examined.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-301
Spring 2023
Wildlife Ecology
Wingert, Harold
Wildlife Ecology is designed for majors in both Environmental Science and Biology. This course approaches ecology from the aspect of focusing on individual organisms and the role they play in their environment. Students will visit various habitats in Pennsylvania and view wildlife first hand. The texts are both place based focusing on Northeastern forests and Northeastern vernal ponds. These two ecosystems are intimately linked and the health of one influences the other. Students will have hands on labs with living organisms and investigate the roles each of these organisms play in the forest and vernal pool environment. A focus of the course will be how we must manage these ecosystems if they are to be enjoyed by our grandchildren. Both of these ecosystems are being changed by human ignorance and global climate change. We are at a "squeak point" in our ability to sustain these ecosystems. Only a complete understanding of their ecology and rapid action will sustain them for future generations.
SINV
BIOL-342
Spring 2023
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
Rathbun, Colin
Permission of instructor required. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
SCON

Chemistry

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
CHEM-132
Spring 2023
General Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
SCON
CHEM-342
Spring 2023
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
Rathbun, Colin
Permission of instructor required. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
SCON

East Asian Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
EASN-205
Spring 2023
Japanese Architecture
Ren, Wei
This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
SCON

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-226
Spring 2023
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
SCON
ECON-230
Spring 2023
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended) This course is cross-listed as SOCI 227 & WGSS 202.
SCON
ECON-332
Spring 2023
Economics of Natural Resource Sustainability
Tynan, Nicola
This course uses microeconomics to analyze the use and conservation of natural resources, including energy, minerals, fisheries, forests, and water resources, among others. Broad themes include the roles of property rights, intergenerational equity, and sustainable development in an economy based on resource exploitation. Prerequisite: 278. For ENST, ENSC and INST majors, prerequisite is ECON 222.
SINV
ECON-496
Spring 2023
Political Economy of Health
Kongar, Mesude
Permission of instructor required. In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is as low as 49 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to nutrition, care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? In this course, students will examine the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. The emphasis throughout the course will be on how socioeconomic inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality and other social categories affect health and well-being outcomes.
SCON

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-162
Spring 2023
Integrative Environmental Science
Benka-Coker, Akinwande
Decker, Allyssa
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
SINV
ENST-218
Spring 2023
Geographic Information Systems
Sak, Peter
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ERSC 218 and GISP 218.
SCON
ENST-305
Spring 2023
Mammalogy
Van Fleet, Pamela
This lecture and lab course will provide students with a solid foundation in the study of mammals. Students will be introduced to the different taxonomic groups of mammals through various topics including evolutionary history, adaptations, physiology, diversity, biogeography, behavioral ecology, community ecology, and conservation. Familiarity of mammalian groups to the family level and identification of Pennsylvania fauna to species level will be expected of each participant. Labs will incorporate the use of existing mammal skins and skulls as well as the providing students the opportunity to learn how to prepare museum specimens (optional), along with a museum field trip and visits to one or more active research sites.
SCON
ENST-305
Spring 2023
Wildlife Monitoring Methods and Technology
Van Fleet, Pamela
This field course will provide students with a solid foundation and hands on experiences regarding the practical use of specific tools and the application of field methods and techniques used in both environmental consulting and wildlife sciences today. Coursework will focus on numerous topics including research and experimental design; collection, management and analysis of data; identification of animals and marking techniques; measuring animal abundance; assessment of wildlife habitat, the role of radio and satellite telemetry; and the practical application of spatial technology (GIS). Students will gain hands on experience in reading and using topographic maps, interpreting aerial photos, using a compass and hand held GPS, orienteering, and creating maps in GIS. Students will also learn about employing and in many cases practicing various monitoring techniques such as spot mapping, area searches, conducting point counts, nest searches, transect surveys, live trapping and marking, use of remote cameras; telemetry; and the use of mist nets for capturing birds and mammals. At least one field trip will include a day long (weekend) visit to an active research site.
SCON
ENST-318
Spring 2023
Advanced Applications in GIS
Cromley, Gordon
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or GISP 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 318, ARCH 318 and GISP 318. Offered every two years.
SCON
ENST-338
Spring 2023
A Just Energy Transition
Bedi, Heather
Permission of instructor required. Part of the Sustainability and Energy Transition in Germany Mosaic. With advancing climate change, many nations are undertaking energy transitions, which involve a comprehensive effort to shift to low or no-carbon energy systems. This major undertaking, perhaps the largest global transition since the industrial revolution, focuses predominantly on the economics of the energy debate, with corporations, countries, and institutions rarely mentioning the need for the transition to be ‘just’. Students in this course will explore what the energy transition and nascent efforts to prioritize justice. The ‘just transition’ term encapsulates efforts to undergo these energy transitions using justice as a guiding principle, acknowledging that environmental and social inequalities will endure as nations pursue lower-carbon alternatives unless power and resource inequalities are acknowledged and addressed. As energy access is intimately connected to human development indicators, a just energy transition prioritizes equity concerns, including disproportionate pollution exposure, health access, and educational attainment. A key step to implementing a development-centered approach to an energy transition that is socially and environmentally responsible is to consider recognitional, procedural, and distributional justice concerns in all decisions regarding renewable energy. In this Writing in the Discipline course, students will select and research an energy transition case study. Through research, peer review, and multiple rounds of editing, students will explore the elements of justice in relation to their energy transition case study.ENST 161 or permission of instructor.
SCON
ENST-406
Spring 2023
Urban Sustainability Senior Seminar
Decker, Allyssa
The United Nations Brundtland Commission defined sustainability as “meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” Some critics argue that urban sustainability is a contradiction within itself. With the current climate crisis, it is becoming increasingly critical for cities to rethink urban planning, development, and management to ensure sustainable use of natural resources. In this senior seminar we will explore the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of sustainable urbanism. We will discuss a range of student led topics throughout the semester, which may include components of urban form, transportation, green space, buildings and energy, or flows of water, food, and waste. Recent journal articles and student led topics will be the focus of class discussions. As a class we will analyze these topics collaboratively and we will use this class as a space to learn from one another and to engage in civil discourse.
SCON

Earth Sciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ERSC-142
Spring 2023
Earth's Changing Climate
Key, Marcus
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate “players” such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV
ERSC-151
Spring 2023
Foundations of Earth Sciences
Thibodeau, Alyson
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
SCON
ERSC-218
Spring 2023
Geographic Information Systems
Sak, Peter
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and GISP 218.
SCON
ERSC-250
Spring 2023
Introduction to Arctic Studies
Edwards, Benjamin
This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the physical/social geography, geology and ecology of the Arctic region of earth particularly through the lens of global climate change. Students will use a variety of media (lectures, readings, videos, blogs) to build knowledge about this critical region of earth to serve as a basis for individual and group projects on a specific Arctic region (e.g., Siberia, Svalbard, Greenland, Iceland, Nunavut, Alaska) and topic (e.g., climate change, Arctic tourism, Arctic flora/fauna species, Arctic archeology, Arctic exploration). Learning goals include: i) exposure to spatial analysis and Geographic Information Systems, ii) foundational knowledge of the Arctic cryosphere and its response to climate change, geological history, human geography and ecological systems, and iii) mastery of Arctic geography. Course meetings will include student presentations, fieldtrips and basic GIS instruction.
SCON
ERSC-311
Spring 2023
Treetop to Bedrock: An Introduction to the Critical Zone
Hayes, Jorden
The critical zone (CZ) is the thin life-sustaining veneer of planet Earth that extends from treetop to bedrock. The CZ is constantly evolving as rock, water, atmosphere, soil and biota interact to support terrestrial life at the surface. The CZ also determines the availability of resources such as food production and water quality. Thus, an understanding of critical zone processes and functions is crucial to a sustainable future and particularly as climate and land use continue to stress life at the surface. Critical zone science is a transdisciplinary endeavor that requires diverse perspectives and we will explore these perspectives throughout the course content. In this course we will study the CZ using data from NSF-supported networks and observatories, embark on fieldtrips, and discuss the grand challenges facing society and its relationship to the CZ. At the end of this course students will be able to use a large variety of principles to analyze how Earth's terrestrial surface works and describe the CZ as a complex system. Three hours of classroom a week.
SCON
ERSC-318
Spring 2023
Advanced Applications in GIS
Cromley, Gordon
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ARCH 218 or GISP 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 318, ENST 318 and GISP 318. Offered every two years.
SCON
ERSC-333
Spring 2023
Environmental Geophysics
Hayes, Jorden
Geophysics combines geological knowledge with fundamental principles from physics, mathematics, and computer science to indirectly image and elucidate Earth’s subsurface structure. This course focuses on understanding geophysical methods commonly applied to Earth’s shallow subsurface (less than 200 m) to solve environmental, geological, archaeological, and civil engineering problems. This course will include physical theory, field methodology (e.g., survey design and data collection), data analysis and interpretation. Course topics include refraction and reflection seismology, ground penetrating radar, electrical resistivity and conductivity, magnetism and magnetic surveying, nuclear magnetic resonance, and gravity. This course will involve collecting and integrating datasets from multiple geophysical surveys and culminate in a final project. Lectures, discussions, laboratories, and field trips. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 151.
SCON

Food Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FDST-401
Spring 2023
Capstone Seminar
Soldin, Adeline
This capstone seminar builds on the introductory Food Studies course (FDST 201). It requires students to reflect, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through their academic coursework and experiential learning experiences. A substantive, reflective piece which could take many forms will be required. Students will work collaboratively to organize a symposium, performance, event, or other public presentation of their work. In order to register for FDST 401, students must have completed FDST 201 and at least 3 of the four electives, along with the experiential learning component. The latter may be taken simultaneously with FDST 401.Prerequisite: FDST 201, at least three of the four electives, and the experiential component which can be take simultaneously with FDST 401.
SCON

French

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FREN-232
Spring 2023
Professional French
Soldin, Adeline
This course prepares students for professional work in a Francophone context. Students will learn about the job search and application process as well as cultural norms and practices in Francophone workplaces. Emphasis is placed on developing professional communication and intercultural skills specific to professional contexts. As a WID class, this course develops students’ written expression with a focus on professional genres such as CVs and cover letters, publicity, memoranda, and business proposals. It further advances students’ linguistic and intercultural proficiency by teaching them how to use specialized vocabulary and appropriate registers to conduct business in French and Francophone working environments. Students will learn about different types of organizations from various sectors of the economy, preparing them for work in a range of fields. This course also contains experiential learning components that develop oral communication including interaction with francophone companies and institutions and mock job interviews.Prerequisite: FREN 202 or equivalent.
SCON

Geographic Info Systems Prog

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
GISP-218
Spring 2023
Geographic Information Systems
Sak, Peter
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
SCON
GISP-318
Spring 2023
Advanced Applications in GIS
Cromley, Gordon
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 318, ENST 318 and ERSC 318. Offered every two years.
SCON

German

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
GRMN-215
Spring 2023
German Environments
Pfannkuchen, Antje
Note: Part of the Sustainability and Energy Transition in Germany Mosaic Known for their contemporary environmentalism, German-speaking cultures have a long cultural history that speaks to complex understandings and relationships with nature. At times ideological, political, religious, spiritual, and critical, it is a turbulent history. This course will focus on the environment in German-speaking cultures while posing questions about how cultures’ relationship to the environment is informed by and informs contemporary German-speaking cultures. Topics might include understanding the significant role of nature in Romanticism that continues to influence concepts today, the industrialization of Central Europe, 20th and 21st century environmentalism, or the ways in which media (i.e. literature, film, music) underscore or contradict certain assumptions about nature. This course may be taught in German or in English.Prerequisite: GRMN 202 if offered in German, or permission of the instructor. No prerequisite, if offered in English.
SINV

History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-131
Spring 2023
Modern Latin American History since 1800
Borges, Marcelo
Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as LALC 231.
SCON
HIST-211
Spring 2023
Food and American Environment
Pawley, Emily
This class examines the ways that the culture and politics of food have reshaped North American landscapes and social relations from colonial to modern times. We will explore, for example, how the new taste for sweetness fueled the creation of plantations worked by enslaved, the ways that the distribution of frozen meat helped build cities and clear rangeland, and the ways that the eating of fresh fruit came to depend on both a new population of migrant laborers and a new regime of toxic chemicals. Other topics will include catastrophes such as the Dustbowl, the controversial transformations of the Green Revolution, and the modern debates about the obesity epidemic.
SINV
HIST-219
Spring 2023
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims, from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
SCON
HIST-384
Spring 2023
Immigration, Race and the Nation in Latin America
Borges, Marcelo
Characterized by a racially and ethnically diverse population, race has been contested terrain in the countries of Latin America. After independence, some countries embraced the mixed heritage of their societies as a distinctive feature of their national identities while others tried to change it by implementing active policies of immigration as well as policies of marginalization and erasure of Indigenous and Black populations. By looking at different national cases in comparison, this course explores how notions of race, ethnicity, and nationhood have varied in Latin America over time. It discusses such topics the legacies of slavery, racial democracy, Indigenous policies, nationalism, and nativism. It incorporates the experiences of European and Asian immigrants in the region and the impact immigration had on Indigenous and Afro Latin American populations. Class materials will give special attention to the different ways in which scholars have approached these topics over time.Cross-listed as LALC 384.
SCON

Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Spring 2023
Fundamentals of Business
Grimm, Ashley
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
SCON
INBM-300
Spring 2023
Consumer Behavior
Wade, Wade
Marketing requires an understanding of the needs, wants, and values of consumers. This course is designed to introduce students to the psychology of consumption and provide tools for understanding how individuals make decisions in marketplace contexts. In this course, we will draw upon a research-based curriculum to explore how motivation, attitude, attention, memory, cultural background, emotion, and other factors shape consumer behavior. We will learn how consumers process information and use products to solve problems. Additionally, we will explore the insights that marketing reveals about the workings of the consumer mind.
SCON

International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-170
Spring 2023
International Relations
Jacobs, Rachel
Webb, Edward
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
SCON
INST-200
Spring 2023
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ECON 226.
SCON
INST-277
Spring 2023
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics.Prerequisite: one course in any of International Studies, Middle East Studies, or Political Science. This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and MEST 266.
SCON

Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Spring 2023
Intermediate Italian
Lanzilotta, Luca
Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
SCON

Lat Am/Latinx/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-231
Spring 2023
Modern Latin American History since 1800
Borges, Marcelo
Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as HIST 131.
SCON
LALC-384
Spring 2023
Immigration, Race and the Nation in Latin America
Borges, Marcelo
Characterized by a racially and ethnically diverse population, race has been contested terrain in the countries of Latin America. After independence, some countries embraced the mixed heritage of their societies as a distinctive feature of their national identities while others tried to change it by implementing active policies of immigration as well as policies of marginalization and erasure of Indigenous and Black populations. By looking at different national cases in comparison, this course explores how notions of race, ethnicity, and nationhood have varied in Latin America over time. It discusses such topics the legacies of slavery, racial democracy, Indigenous policies, nationalism, and nativism. It incorporates the experiences of European and Asian immigrants in the region and the impact immigration had on Indigenous and Afro Latin American populations. Class materials will give special attention to the different ways in which scholars have approached these topics over time.Cross-listed as HIST 384.
SCON

Mathematics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MATH-325
Spring 2023
Probability and Statistics II
Forrester, Jeffrey
A continuation of Introduction to Probability and Statistics I. Topics include additional discrete and continuous distributions, conditional distributions, additional hypothesis tests, simple linear regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and goodness of fit tests. Special topics may include nonparametric tests, nonlinear regression, and time series analysis.Prerequisites: 171 and 225. Offered every spring.
SCON

Middle East Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MEST-200
Spring 2023
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims, from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
SCON
MEST-266
Spring 2023
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics.Prerequisite: one course in any of International Studies, Middle East Studies, or Political Science. This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and INST 277.
SCON

Physics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHYS-114
Spring 2023
Climate Change and Renewable Energies
Pfister, Hans
An introduction to the physics of global climate change and a hands-on exposure to several types of renewable energy. The first third of this project-centered course introduces the basic physical principles of global climate change with a focus on radiative equilibrium, greenhouse effect, energy balance, and entropy. Since the energy sources of an energetically sustainable future will consist of renewable energies and possibly thermonuclear fusion energy, the remaining two thirds of the course is devoted to an exploration of wind turbines, solar concentrators, thermoelectric convertors, and photovoltaic systems. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics. Offered every two years.
SINV

Political Science

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
POSC-170
Spring 2023
International Relations
Jacobs, Rachel
Webb, Edward
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
SCON
POSC-277
Spring 2023
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. Prerequisite: one course in any of International Studies, Middle East Studies, or Political Science. This course is cross-listed as MEST 266 and INST 277.
SCON

Religion

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RELG-111
Spring 2023
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims, from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
SCON
RELG-116
Spring 2023
Religion, Nature, and the Environment
Vann, Jodie
This course explores how various religious and spiritual traditions have understood, conceptualized, and interacted with the natural world. Incorporating from both conventional religions (such as Catholicism, Judaism, and Buddhism) as well as newer spiritual forms (like Contemporary Paganism), the course provides a comparative survey of the relationships between religiosity and nature. Themes under examination include notions of human dominion, stewardship, panentheism, and naturalism. Students will consider how religious ideologies have shaped conceptions of nature, and how changing understandings of the natural world have challenged religious ideas.
SCON
RELG-250
Spring 2023
Faith, Interfaith and Equity: Critical Approaches to Religious Understanding & Justice in N America
Nielsen, Jacob
This course examines the history of the "interfaith" movement, highlighting the history and especially 20th century's reactionary movements toward religious inclusion. One part history, one part practice, this course will examine the ways in which the interfaith movement has changed religious experience in North America and how it has not. Using a variety of methods, including film, mass media, in-class debate from readings, and experiential learning opportunities, students will gain skills in self-awareness regarding their roles and active participation in religious equity movements. Students will as well gain a critical lens in evaluating systems of religious inequity as an aspect of systemic and structural racism and colonialism.
SCON

Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-227
Spring 2023
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended). This course is cross-listed as ECON 230 & WGSS 202.
SCON
SOCI-230
Spring 2023
Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Leary, Cornelius
What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States.
SINV
SOCI-237
Spring 2023
Global Inequality
Lee, Helene
Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year.
SCON

Sustainability

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SUST-200
Spring 2023
Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Leary, Cornelius
What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States.
SINV

Theatre & Dance

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
THDA-230
Spring 2023
Design Principles and Practices for the Stage
Harper-McCombs, B Kevin
Harper-McCombs, Sherry
A study of the language, principles, elements, and tools designers use to both formulate and communicate ideas as part of the collaborative process. Students will learn the basic elements of composition for stage design and will see how these elements function in the areas of costuming, lighting, scenery, and sound. Two hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week.
SCON

Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Spring 2023
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Oliviero, Kathryn
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
SCON
WGSS-202
Spring 2023
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
SCON