Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Spring 2020

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-304
Spring 2020
Afro-Brazilian Literature
Castellanos, Carolina
Course taught in English. This class analyzes the literary production of Afro-Brazilians writers, as well as the representation of Afro-Brazilian characters in literary texts. It reviews different literary periods and the images those periods created and/or challenged and how they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Afro-Brazilians. Also, by paying particular attention to gender and social issues in different regional contexts, the class considers how Brazilian authors of African descent critically approach national discourses, such as racial democracy and Brazilianness. Taught in English. Available as a FLIC option in Portuguese. This course is cross-listed as PORT 304 and LALC 304. Offered every two years.
SCON

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-101
Spring 2020
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Bender, Shawn
Pomales, Tony
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-110
Spring 2020
Archaeology and World Prehistory
Bruno, Maria
Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
SCON
ANTH-222
Spring 2020
Anthropology of Latin America
Pomales, Tony
This course is an ethnographic exploration of contemporary life in Latin America. It is designed to introduce students to the major themes and debates in the anthropology of Latin America. It is aimed at understanding the cultural and historical development of Latin America, and it seeks to make sense of the cultural similarities and differences that have both captured the interest of anthropologists and helped to make Latin America an important site of anthropological study and theorizing. In the process of examining the histories and cultures of Latin America, we will also look at how power and structural inequalities have shaped the region. The course will study Latin American cultures and societies in relation to neighboring nations - the United States, Canada and the Caribbean - given their shared history and experiences of colonialism and slavery as well as their economic interdependence.This course is cross-listed as LALC 222. Offered every other year.
SCON
ANTH-261
Spring 2020
Archaeology of North America
Bruno, Maria
This course reviews Pre-Columbian landscapes north of Mesoamerica. We consider topics including the timing and process of the initial peopling of the continent, food production, regional systems of exchange, development of social hierarchies, environmental adaption and the nature of initial colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans. These questions are addressed primarily by culture area and region. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 261. Offered every two years.
SCON
ANTH-290
Spring 2020
Archaeological Methods
Maggidis, Christofilis
This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
SCON
ANTH-331
Spring 2020
Human Evolution
Weinstein, Karen
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
SCON

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-110
Spring 2020
Archaeology and World Prehistory
Bruno, Maria
Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
SCON
ARCH-218
Spring 2020
Geographic Information Systems
Ciarrocca, James
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
SINV
ARCH-261
Spring 2020
Archaeology of North America
Bruno, Maria
This course reviews Pre-Columbian landscapes north of Mesoamerica. We consider topics including the timing and process of the initial peopling of the continent, food production, regional systems of exchange, development of social hierarchies, environmental adaption and the nature of initial colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans. These questions are addressed primarily by culture area and region. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 261. Offered every two years.
SCON
ARCH-290
Spring 2020
Archaeological Methods
Maggidis, Christofilis
This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-131
Spring 2020
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ecology of Animals, Plants & Fungi
Loeffler, Carol
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-131
Spring 2020
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Potthoff, Michael
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-301
Spring 2020
Wildlife Ecology
Wingert, Harold
Wildlife Ecology is designed for majors in both Environmental Science and Biology. This course approaches ecology from the aspect of focusing on individual organisms and the role they play in their environment. Students will visit various habitats in Pennsylvania and view wildlife first hand. The texts are both place based focusing on Northeastern forests and Northeastern vernal ponds. These two ecosystems are intimately linked and the health of one influences the other. Students will have hands on labs with living organisms and investigate the roles each of these organisms play in the forest and vernal pool environment. A focus of the course will be how we must manage these ecosystems if they are to be enjoyed by our grandchildren. Both of these ecosystems are being changed by human ignorance and global climate change. We are at a “squeak point” in our ability to sustain these ecosystems. Only a complete understanding of their ecology and rapid action will sustain them for future generations.
SINV
BIOL-332
Spring 2020
Natural History of Vertebrates w/Lab
Boback, Scott
An exploration into the lifestyles of vertebrates heavily focused on field biology. Natural history is strongly dependent on descriptive anatomy and systematics and therefore this course will cover the evolutionary relationships among vertebrates highlighting unique features that facilitated the success of the major groups. In field labs, students will develop observational skills such as how to identify a bird by its song, a frog by its call, a mammal by the color of its pelage, and a snake by its shed skin. Indoor labs will focus on identifying species from preserved specimens as well as providing students with the skills necessary to preserve vertebrates for future study. Preservation methods could include preparing museum-quality mammal and bird skins, formalin fixation of fish, and skeletal preparations. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: one 200-level biology course or ERSC 307. Offered every two years.
SCON
BIOL-342
Spring 2020
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
SCON

Chemistry

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
CHEM-132
Spring 2020
General Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
SCON
CHEM-242
Spring 2020
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
Crouch, R David
Gavenonis, Jason
Holden, Michael
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
SCON
CHEM-342
Spring 2020
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
SCON

East Asian Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
EASN-206
Spring 2020
Asian Urban Ecology
Strand, David
Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with “ecological modernization,” the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jakarta, Delhi, Hô Chí Minh City, Taipei, Varanasi, Manila and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.
SINV

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-214
Spring 2020
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
SCON
ECON-222
Spring 2020
Environmental Economics
Tynan, Nicola
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
SINV
ECON-288
Spring 2020
Contending Economic Perspectives
Kongar, Mesude
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
SCON

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-162
Spring 2020
Integrative Environmental Science
Douglas, Margaret
Hawkins, Irene
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
SINV
ENST-218
Spring 2020
Geographic Information Systems
Ciarrocca, James
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
SINV
ENST-280
Spring 2020
Environmental and Social Justice
Bedi, Heather
This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices. This course is cross-listed with SOCI 230.
SINV
ENST-406
Spring 2020
Environmental Innovations and Activism Capstone
Bedi, Heather
Innovative approaches are needed to address urgent environmental and social concerns, including the climate crisis. As a capstone in Environmental Studies and Science, this course will examine environmental challenges, innovations, and activism from natural science, social science, and humanities perspectives. Following a review of key course concepts, the group will explore how diverse actors, groups, and governments approach environmental action and activism. Students will each select an environmental challenge and examine related innovations and activism for their capstone project. These student topics will frame the focal areas for course case studies and will allow the class to examine how a range of stakeholders attempt to contest and address pressing environmental issues.
SCON
ENST-406
Spring 2020
Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Beevers, Michael
This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
SCON

Earth Sciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ERSC-218
Spring 2020
Geographic Information Systems
Ciarrocca, James
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
SINV
ERSC-305
Spring 2020
Earth Materials
Edwards, Benjamin
Completion of both ERSC 305 and ERSC 309 fulfills the WID Requirement. This gives students a basic understanding of the tools and techniques used in modern science to identify and characterize solid earth materials at the macroscopic (hand samples), microscopic (polarized light), and sub-microscopic (X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy) levels. Emphasis in the first part of the course will be on minerals, while the second part of the course will introduce students to characterization techniques of other solid earth materials (soils and rocks) and their conditions of formation. This course is required for the Earth Science major, and will be useful to students interested in agricultural science, archeology, environmental science, forensic science, planetary science, and solid state chemistry and physics. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: Prerequisite: 151 or permission of instructor. Completion of both 305 and 309 fulfills the WID graduation requirement. Offered every other year.
SCON

Food Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FDST-401
Spring 2020
Capstone Seminar
Marini Maio, Nicoletta
This capstone seminar builds on the introductory Food Studies course (FDST 201). It requires students to reflect, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through their academic coursework and experiential learning experiences. A substantive, reflective piece which could take many forms will be required. Students will work collaboratively to organize a symposium, performance, event, or other public presentation of their work. In order to register for FDST 401, students must have completed FDST 201 and at least 3 of the four electives, along with the experiential learning component. The latter may be taken simultaneously with FDST 401.Prerequisite: FDST 201, at least three of the four electives, and the experiential component which can be take simultaneously with FDST 401.
SCON

German

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
GRMN-215
Spring 2020
German Environments
Pfannkuchen, Antje
Known for their contemporary environmentalism, German-speaking cultures have a long cultural history that speaks to complex understandings and relationships with nature. At times ideological, political, religious, spiritual, and critical, it is a turbulent history. This course will focus on the environment in German-speaking cultures while posing questions about how cultures’ relationship to the environment is informed by and informs contemporary German-speaking cultures. Topics might include understanding the significant role of nature in Romanticism that continues to influence concepts today, the industrialization of Central Europe, 20th and 21st century environmentalism, or the ways in which media (i.e. literature, film, music) underscore or contradict certain assumptions about nature. This course may be taught in German or in English.Prerequisite: GRMN 202 if offered in German, or permission of the instructor. No prerequisite, if offered in English.
SINV

History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-211
Spring 2020
Food and American Environment
Pawley, Emily
This class examines the ways that the culture and politics of food have reshaped North American landscapes and social relations from colonial to modern times. We will explore, for example, how the new taste for sweetness fueled the creation of plantations worked by enslaved, the ways that the distribution of frozen meat helped build cities and clear rangeland, and the ways that the eating of fresh fruit came to depend on both a new population of migrant laborers and a new regime of toxic chemicals. Other topics will include catastrophes such as the Dustbowl, the controversial transformations of the Green Revolution, and the modern debates about the obesity epidemic.
SINV

Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Spring 2020
Fundamentals of Business
Riccio, Steven
Ritchey, Sherry
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
SCON

International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-170
Spring 2020
International Relations
Nation, Robert
Webb, Edward
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
SCON

Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Spring 2020
Intermediate Italian
Lanzilotta, Luca
Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
SCON

Lat Am/Latino/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-200
Spring 2020
Ecocritical Literary Tours through South America
DeLutis-Eichenberger, Angela
Students may not enroll in this class if they have previously taken any SPAN 231 class.This course examines a selection of contemporary literary works primarily from Chile and Argentina through an ecocritical lens. Authors to be studied may include: Baldomero Lillo, Horacio Quiroga, Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Julio Cortázar, Braulio Arenas, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Francisco Coloane, Luis Sepúlveda, Pía Barros, Luisa Valenzuela, Pedro Lemebel, and Nicanor Parra.
SCON
LALC-222
Spring 2020
Anthropology of Latin America
Pomales, Tony
This course is an ethnographic exploration of contemporary life in Latin America. It is designed to introduce students to the major themes and debates in the anthropology of Latin America. It is aimed at understanding the cultural and historical development of Latin America, and it seeks to make sense of the cultural similarities and differences that have both captured the interest of anthropologists and helped to make Latin America an important site of anthropological study and theorizing. In the process of examining the histories and cultures of Latin America, we will also look at how power and structural inequalities have shaped the region. The course will study Latin American cultures and societies in relation to neighboring nations - the United States, Canada and the Caribbean - given their shared history and experiences of colonialism and slavery as well as their economic interdependence.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 222. Offered every other year.
SCON
LALC-242
Spring 2020
Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Castellanos, Carolina
NOTE: Taught in English. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines - literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film - and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as PORT 242. Offered every year.
SCON
LALC-304
Spring 2020
Afro-Brazilian Literature
Castellanos, Carolina
Course taught in English. This class analyzes the literary production of Afro-Brazilians writers, as well as the representation of Afro-Brazilian characters in literary texts. It reviews different literary periods and the images those periods created and/or challenged and how they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Afro-Brazilians. Also, by paying particular attention to gender and social issues in different regional contexts, the class considers how Brazilian authors of African descent critically approach national discourses, such as racial democracy and Brazilianness. Taught in English. Available as a FLIC option in Portuguese.This course is cross-listed as PORT 304 and AFST 304. Offered every two years.
SCON

Physics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHYS-114
Spring 2020
Climate Change and Renewable Energies
Pfister, Hans
An introduction to the physics of global climate change and a hands-on exposure to several types of renewable energy. The first third of this project-centered course introduces the basic physical principles of global climate change with a focus on radiative equilibrium, greenhouse effect, energy balance, and entropy. Since the energy sources of an energetically sustainable future will consist of renewable energies and possibly thermonuclear fusion energy, the remaining two thirds of the course is devoted to an exploration of wind turbines, solar concentrators, thermoelectric convertors, and photovoltaic systems. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics. Offered every two years.
SINV
PHYS-132
Spring 2020
Introductory Physics
Jackson, David
Pearson, Brett
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
SCON

Portuguese

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PORT-242
Spring 2020
Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Castellanos, Carolina
NOTE: Taught in English. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines - literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film - and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as LALC 242. Offered every year.
SCON
PORT-304
Spring 2020
Afro-Brazilian Literature
Castellanos, Carolina
Course taught in English. This class analyzes the literary production of Afro-Brazilians writers, as well as the representation of Afro-Brazilian characters in literary texts. It reviews different literary periods and the images those periods created and/or challenged and how they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Afro-Brazilians. Also, by paying particular attention to gender and social issues in different regional contexts, the class considers how Brazilian authors of African descent critically approach national discourses, such as racial democracy and Brazilianness. Taught in English. Available as a FLIC option in Portuguese. This course is cross-listed as AFST 304 and LALC 304. Offered every two years.
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Political Science

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
POSC-170
Spring 2020
International Relations
Nation, Robert
Webb, Edward
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
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POSC-290
Spring 2020
Asian Urban Ecology
Strand, David
Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with “ecological modernization,” the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jakarta, Delhi, Hô Chí Minh City, Taipei, Varanasi, Manila and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.
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Religion

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RELG-110
Spring 2020
Religion and Modern Culture
Vann, Jodie
Drawing upon popular examples from film, drama, and narrative, as well as critical essays, the course explores both the religious dimensions of modern culture myth, sacred space and time, nature spirituality and the cultural contexts of contemporary theologies gender, race, economics.
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Russian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RUSS-248
Spring 2020
Russian Culture and the Environment
DeBlasio, Alyssa
NOTE: Taught in English. Russia is the largest country in the world. It contains some of our largest supplies of natural resources, including the most voluminous freshwater lake and the most square miles of forest. Russia and the Soviet Union have also been home to devastating environmental catastrophes, such as the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. It is thus fitting that the theme of the environment—both natural and man-made—have played a pivotal role in the Russian cultural imagination of the past two centuries. This course will look at how Russian and Soviet culture from the nineteenth century to the present engage with the theme of the environment over a variety of genres, including literature, film, journalism, and art. No knowledge of Russian is required. Taught in English. Offered every three years.
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Soc Innovation/Entrepreneurshp

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SINE-201
Spring 2020
Introduction to Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Beevers, Michael
This course introduces students to the essential concepts, mindsets and skill sets associated with social entrepreneurship. We begin with an overview of the field of social entrepreneurship. We will then develop a conceptual foundation in systems thinking and the community capital framework. The former allows students to grasp the complexity of social and environmental issues by viewing these issues through the lens of systems theory. The latter recognizes multiple forms of capital that are essential to developing sustainable communities: natural, physical, economic, human, social, and cultural capital. Other course topics may include creativity, innovation, social justice, alternative approaches to economics and business, and sustainability. Through definitional readings, case studies and/or biographies, students gain an understanding of the power of social entrepreneurship to create shared value at the local, regional, and global level. This course serves as the introduction to the Certificate in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship, but it is open to all students from all academic disciplines who wish to develop their own capacities to initiate meaningful change in our world.offered every spring.
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SINE-400
Spring 2020
Senior Seminar in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Fratantuono, Michael
This capstone course builds on and integrates the key concepts of the introductory course in this certificate program by requiring students to reflect on, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through their academic programs and experiential learning experiences. The focus will be on creating shared value, which simultaneously enriches social, ecological, and economic systems. Through exercises in strategy formulation and implementation, students will gain an appreciation for the challenges and rewards associated with conceiving and transforming innovative solutions into new products, services, and/or initiatives that change our world in meaningful ways. In imagining these pathways for success, we will also address the importance of compassionate leadership, tools that nurture vital social connections, and the power of our own agency.offered every fall.
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Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-230
Spring 2020
Environmental and Social Justice
Bedi, Heather
This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices
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SOCI-230
Spring 2020
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
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Spanish

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SPAN-231
Spring 2020
Ecocritical Literary Tours through South America
DeLutis-Eichenberger, Angela
This course examines a selection of contemporary literary works primarily from Chile and Argentina through an ecocritical lens. Authors to be studied may include: Baldomero Lillo, Horacio Quiroga, Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Julio Cortázar, Braulio Arenas, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Francisco Coloane, Luis Sepúlveda, Pía Barros, Luisa Valenzuela, Pedro Lemebel, and Nicanor Parra.
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Sustainability

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SUST-490
Spring 2020
Baird Honors Colloquium
Leary, Cornelius
Permission of Instructor Required Students accepted into the Baird Sustainability Fellows program will explore questions about sustainability from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and build leadership and professional skills as agents of change. The specific assignments and content of the colloquium will be decided in concert with the admitted students. These may include conversations with invited scholars and practitioners, discussions of selected readings and public lectures, individual or collaborative projects, written essays, presentations of student research and service projects, student led class sessions, workshops, and field trips. Each student will create an electronic portfolio to document attainment of sustainability learning goals. The colloquium is a half-credit course that will meet for 90 minutes each week. Grading for the course will be credit/no credit.
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Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Spring 2020
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Vooris, Jessica
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
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WGSS-202
Spring 2020
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
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Writing Program

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WRPG-102
Spring 2020
Topics in Sustainability and Academic Writing for International Students
Katunich, John
This course introduces international students to critical topics in sustainability while also explaining the forms, conventions, and expectations of U.S. academic writing. Students will think critically about a contemporary topic in sustainability (such as climate change or biodiversity loss) in order to analyze rhetorical moves and assumptions in popular texts on this issue. Students will also learn about U.S. academic discourse by practicing a functional, recursive writing process in order to produce thesis-driven arguments about a contemporary sustainability debate and/or sustainability action.
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