Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Spring 2022

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-220
Spring 2022
African American Foodways
Johnson, Lynn
This course examines the multifarious ways in which food has influenced the expressions of African American identity and culture. We will begin with a discussion of food as a cultural connector that preserves the ties between African Americans and their African antecedents. Subsequently, we will consider specific African American culinary practices and the origins of soul food. Additionally, we will analyze the roles of food in African American social activism. In so doing, we will pay particular attention to the relationships that exist among food consumption, human rights, and African American communal health, as represented by the anti-soul food and black vegetarianism/veganism movements.
SCON
AFST-320
Spring 2022
African Women's History
Ball, Jeremy
This course examines the role of women in African societies since the nineteenth century. Lectures and readings will be arranged thematically. Themes include sexuality and reproduction, the household, women's economic activity, political power, religion, colonialism, and democracy. After a discussion of gender, we will analyze pre-colonial production and reproduction, family life and religion in the twentieth century, women's roles in nationalist politics, the politics of female genital mutilation, and the lives of two contemporary African women leaders. Readings, including historical studies and novels, songs, and art, will be drawn from across the cultures and languages of Africa.
SCON

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-101
Spring 2022
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Gruszko, Mariel
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-260
Spring 2022
Environmental Archaeology
Biwer, Matthew
The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 260. Offered every two years.
SCON
ANTH-262
Spring 2022
South American Archaeology
Biwer, Matthew
This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
SCON

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-218
Spring 2022
Geographic Information Systems
Sak, Peter
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
SCON
ARCH-260
Spring 2022
Environmental Archaeology
Biwer, Matthew
The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 260. Offered every two years.
SCON
ARCH-262
Spring 2022
South American Archaeology
Biwer, Matthew
This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.
SCON
ARCH-318
Spring 2022
Advanced Applications in GIS
STAFF, ENST
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318 and ERSC 318. Offered every two years.
SCON

Art & Art History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARTH-260
Spring 2022
Sustainable Printmaking
Arsenault, Todd
This course will explore approaches to printmaking that make the practice environmentally sustainable in regard to materials. Conceptually, the course will utilize the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals as a starting point for making art that addresses issues related to the social, economic, and environmental aspects of sustainability. With this in mind, we will examine the challenges related to developing works of art that respond to challenging subject matter. The course will explore the fundamental areas of printmaking through the processes of engraving, screenprinting, woodcut, collagraph, and monotype among others. Digital process and computer manipulation will also be utilized.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-131
Spring 2022
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Wingert, Harold
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-332
Spring 2022
Natural History of Vertebrates w/Lab
Boback, Scott
An exploration into the lifestyles of vertebrates heavily focused on field biology. Natural history is strongly dependent on descriptive anatomy and systematics and therefore this course will cover the evolutionary relationships among vertebrates highlighting unique features that facilitated the success of the major groups. In field labs, students will develop observational skills such as how to identify a bird by its song, a frog by its call, a mammal by the color of its pelage, and a snake by its shed skin. Indoor labs will focus on identifying species from preserved specimens as well as providing students with the skills necessary to preserve vertebrates for future study. Preservation methods could include preparing museum-quality mammal and bird skins, formalin fixation of fish, and skeletal preparations. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: one 200-level biology course or ERSC 307. Offered every two years.
SCON
BIOL-342
Spring 2022
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
SCON

Chemistry

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
CHEM-132
Spring 2022
General Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
SCON
CHEM-242
Spring 2022
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Gavenonis, Jason
Holden, Michael
Rathbun, Colin
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
SCON
CHEM-342
Spring 2022
Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Connor, Rebecca
This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as BIOL 342.
SCON

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-230
Spring 2022
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended)
SCON
ECON-351
Spring 2022
Gender and Development
Kongar, Mesude
This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980’s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288.
SCON
ECON-496
Spring 2022
Economic Demography and Sustainable Development
Underwood, Anthony
Permission of instructor required.
SCON

English

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENGL-341
Spring 2022
The Start of the Anthropocene? Environment and Sustainability in Enlightenment France
Roman, Hanna
Scientists today often attribute the beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the ‘Anthropocene’, to changes in culture, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What were the intellectual and philosophical ideas behind these changes, and how did they contribute to modern-day conceptions of the natural environment and the human role within it? What did questions of sustainability and climate change look like in the eighteenth century? This seminar will address these sustainability-themed questions through the lens of the literature of Enlightenment France, which imagined new ways of perceiving and altering nature. It will engage with the Enlightenment movement as both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction of both natural and human environments. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful to our contemporary understandings of sustainability and which have become harmful to the future of our species and planet. Readings include works of fiction, philosophy, natural history, and science fiction by famous Enlightenment authors such as Diderot, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Voltaire, as well as by less well-known, but equally important, voices such as Bernadin de Saint-Pierre, Mme de Graffigny, and Quesnay. Field trips to the Dickinson Farm, to natural areas around Carlisle, to rare books collections, and an optional GIS portion of the class focusing on foodways in Toulouse, France, are also part of the course. Readings, assignments, and discussions for this class are in English. As a FLIC course, students with the ability to read advanced French as well as French majors can complete readings and assignments in French. If you are a FFS major, you must enroll in the FLIC/FR section of the class (not the English section).
SCON

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-162
Spring 2022
Integrative Environmental Science
Decker, Allyssa
Strock, Kristin
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
SINV
ENST-218
Spring 2022
Geographic Information Systems
Sak, Peter
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
SCON
ENST-280
Spring 2022
Environmental and Social Justice
Bedi, Heather
This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices. This course is cross-listed with SOCI 230.
SINV
ENST-318
Spring 2022
Advanced Applications in GIS
STAFF, ENST
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 318 and ARCH 318. Offered every two years.
SCON
ENST-330
Spring 2022
Environmental Policy
Beevers, Michael
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 161 and 162, or permission of instructor.
SINV
ENST-406
Spring 2022
Environmental Innovations and Activism Capstone
Bedi, Heather
Innovative approaches are needed to address urgent environmental and social concerns, including the climate crisis. As a capstone in Environmental Studies and Science, this course will examine environmental challenges, innovations, and activism from natural science, social science, and humanities perspectives. Following a review of key course concepts, the group will explore how diverse actors, groups, and governments approach environmental action and activism. Students will each select an environmental challenge and examine related innovations and activism for their capstone project. These student topics will frame the focal areas for course case studies and will allow the class to examine how a range of stakeholders attempt to contest and address pressing environmental issues.
SCON

Earth Sciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ERSC-142
Spring 2022
Earth's Changing Climate
Key, Marcus
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate “players” such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV
ERSC-151
Spring 2022
Foundations of Earth Sciences
Thibodeau, Alyson
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
SCON
ERSC-218
Spring 2022
Geographic Information Systems
Sak, Peter
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
SCON
ERSC-250
Spring 2022
Introduction to Arctic Studies
Edwards, Benjamin
Permission of instructor required.Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Iceland. This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the physical/social geography, geology and ecology of the Arctic region of earth particularly through the lens of global climate change. Students will use a variety of media (lectures, readings, videos, blogs) to build knowledge about this critical region of earth to serve as a basis for individual and group projects on a specific Arctic region (e.g., Siberia, Svalbard, Greenland, Iceland, Nunavut, Alaska) and topic (e.g., climate change, Arctic tourism, Arctic flora/fauna species, Arctic archeology, Arctic exploration). Learning goals include: i) exposure to spatial analysis and Geographic Information Systems, ii) foundational knowledge of the Arctic cryosphere and its response to climate change, geological history, human geography and ecological systems, and iii) mastery of Arctic geography. Course meetings will include student presentations, fieldtrips and basic GIS instruction.
SCON
ERSC-305
Spring 2022
Earth Materials
Edwards, Benjamin
Completion of both ERSC 305 and ERSC 309 fulfills the WID Requirement. This gives students a basic understanding of the tools and techniques used in modern science to identify and characterize solid earth materials at the macroscopic (hand samples), microscopic (polarized light), and sub-microscopic (X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy) levels. Emphasis in the first part of the course will be on minerals, while the second part of the course will introduce students to characterization techniques of other solid earth materials (soils and rocks) and their conditions of formation. This course is required for the Earth Sciences major, and will be useful to students interested in agricultural science, archeology, environmental science, forensic science, planetary science, and solid state chemistry and physics. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 151 or permission of instructor. Completion of both 305 and 309 fulfills the WID graduation requirement. Offered every other year.
SCON
ERSC-318
Spring 2022
Advanced Applications in GIS
STAFF, ENST
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318 and ARCH 318. Offered every two years.
SCON

Food Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FDST-401
Spring 2022
Capstone Seminar
Johnson, Lynn
This capstone seminar builds on the introductory Food Studies course (FDST 201). It requires students to reflect, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through their academic coursework and experiential learning experiences. A substantive, reflective piece which could take many forms will be required. Students will work collaboratively to organize a symposium, performance, event, or other public presentation of their work. In order to register for FDST 401, students must have completed FDST 201 and at least 3 of the four electives, along with the experiential learning component. The latter may be taken simultaneously with FDST 401.Prerequisite: FDST 201, at least three of the four electives, and the experiential component which can be take simultaneously with FDST 401.
SCON

French

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FREN-364
Spring 2022
The Start of the Anthropocene? Environment and Sustainability in Enlightenment France
Roman, Hanna
Scientists today often attribute the beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the ‘Anthropocene’, to changes in culture, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What were the intellectual and philosophical ideas behind these changes, and how did they contribute to modern-day conceptions of the natural environment and the human role within it? What did questions of sustainability and climate change look like in the eighteenth century? This seminar will address these sustainability-themed questions through the lens of the literature of Enlightenment France, which imagined new ways of perceiving and altering nature. It will engage with the Enlightenment movement as both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction of both natural and human environments. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful to our contemporary understandings of sustainability and which have become harmful to the future of our species and planet. Readings include works of fiction, philosophy, natural history, and science fiction by famous Enlightenment authors such as Diderot, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Voltaire, as well as by less well-known, but equally important, voices such as Bernadin de Saint-Pierre, Mme de Graffigny, and Quesnay. Field trips to the Dickinson Farm, to natural areas around Carlisle, to rare books collections, and an optional GIS portion of the class focusing on foodways in Toulouse, France, are also part of the course. Readings, assignments, and discussions for this class are in English. As a FLIC course, students with the ability to read advanced French as well as French majors can complete readings and assignments in French. If you are a FFS major, you must enroll in the FLIC/FR section of the class (not the English section).
SCON

History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-131
Spring 2022
Modern Latin American History since 1800
Borges, Marcelo
Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as LALC 231.
SCON
HIST-151
Spring 2022
History of Environment
Plater, Marika
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
SINV
HIST-211
Spring 2022
EnvironmentalismS
Plater, Marika
Many people have advocated for the environment over the course of U.S. history -- for different reasons and in different ways -- and this course will explore their stories. We will consider the modern environmental movement that launched with Earth Day celebrations in 1970 and environmentalist ancestors who created national parks in the late nineteenth and earlier twentieth centuries. The love of wilderness that has often driven this vein of environmental advocacy, we will find, could also lead towards eugenicist and nativist thinking. We will also meet people who are not remembered as environmentalists, but who defended the environment and their communities' relationships with the environment. This course aims to broaden the history of environmentalism to include immigrants who petitioned and protested against the neglect of urban green space, women reformers who condemned industrial smoke, enslaved gardeners, and Native peoples displaced by the creation of national parks who broke rules to steward the land in their own way. An inclusive history of environmentalism will help us understand and analyze tensions among environmentalists of the present.
SINV
HIST-211
Spring 2022
Parks in U.S. History
Plater, Marika
This course will explore how shifting ideas about and functions of green space have shaped United States landscapes since the eighteenth-century emergence of the first urban parks. Looking to the past, we will ask: why are city, county, state, and national parks located where they are? What did parks replace and who did they displace? What values have shaped the rules in parks, and how have visitors violated authorities' visions in order to make these lands their own? Parks belong to the full public in theory, but how have systems of exclusion and inclusion determined who feels welcome in these common grounds? Why have parks been centers of urban protest and what role has public space played in movements for social and environmental change? We will see that the struggles over belonging, order, democracy, and justice that have defined the history of parks continue to rage in the present.
SINV
HIST-374
Spring 2022
African Women's History
Ball, Jeremy
This course examines the role of women in African societies since the nineteenth century. Lectures and readings will be arranged thematically. Themes include sexuality and reproduction, the household, women's economic activity, political power, religion, colonialism, and democracy. After a discussion of gender, we will analyze pre-colonial production and reproduction, family life and religion in the twentieth century, women's roles in nationalist politics, the politics of female genital mutilation, and the lives of two contemporary African women leaders. Readings, including historical studies and novels, songs, and art, will be drawn from across the cultures and languages of Africa. Offered every two years.
SCON

Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Spring 2022
Fundamentals of Business
Paff, Uwe
Sarcone, David
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
SCON
INBM-200
Spring 2022
Global Economy
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
SCON
INBM-200
Spring 2022
Global Economy
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
SCON
INBM-240
Spring 2022
Marketing in a Global Context
Ritchey, Sherry
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
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International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-200
Spring 2022
Global Economy
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
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INST-351
Spring 2022
Gender and Development
Kongar, Mesude
This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980’s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288.
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Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Spring 2022
Intermediate Italian
Lanzilotta, Luca
Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
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Lat Am/Latinx/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-231
Spring 2022
Modern Latin American History since 1800
Borges, Marcelo
Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as HIST 131.
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LALC-242
Spring 2022
Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Castellanos, Carolina
Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Brazil. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines - literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film - and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as PORT 242. Offered every year.
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LALC-262
Spring 2022
South American Archaeology
Biwer, Matthew
This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1) What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and ANTH 262.
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Mathematics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MATH-325
Spring 2022
Probability and Statistics II
Forrester, Jeffrey
A continuation of Introduction to Probability and Statistics I. Topics include additional discrete and continuous distributions, conditional distributions, additional hypothesis tests, simple linear regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and goodness of fit tests. Special topics may include nonparametric tests, nonlinear regression, and time series analysis.Prerequisites: 171 and 225. Offered every spring.
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Middle East Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MEST-233
Spring 2022
U.S. Public Diplomacy in the Arab World
Siekert, Magda
This course introduces the students to the theory and practice of U.S. public diplomacy in the Arab world from a historical and a comparative perspective, looking at past challenges, successes and failures. The course examines the role of public diplomacy in the context of U.S. strategic interests in the region, U.S. efforts to promote democratic governance in the Arab world through the use of public diplomacy tools including traditional and new media, cultural exchanges, and educational programs. Students will debate whether public diplomacy should be integrated into the policy-making process, and how it could complement traditional diplomacy and advance political, military, and economic policies.
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Physics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHYS-212
Spring 2022
Introduction to Relativistic and Quantum Physics
English, Lars
Completion of both PHYS 211 and PHYS 212 fulfills the WID Requirement. A project-based course focusing on special relativity and quantum physics. Projects, such as the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation, relativistic mass increase, or the investigation of delayed choice experiments, are used to understand the concepts of the atom, nuclear structure, relativity, and quantum mechanics. Prerequisite: 132 or 142, and Math 171 or permission of instructor. NOTE: Completion of both 211 and 212 fulfills the WID graduation requirement.
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Portuguese

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PORT-242
Spring 2022
Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Castellanos, Carolina
Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Brazil. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines - literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film - and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as LALC 242. Offered every year.
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Religion

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RELG-116
Spring 2022
Religion, Nature, and the Environment
Vann, Jodie
This course explores how various religious and spiritual traditions have understood, conceptualized, and interacted with the natural world. Incorporating from both conventional religions (such as Catholicism, Judaism, and Buddhism) as well as newer spiritual forms (like Contemporary Paganism), the course provides a comparative survey of the relationships between religiosity and nature. Themes under examination include notions of human dominion, stewardship, panentheism, and naturalism. Students will consider how religious ideologies have shaped conceptions of nature, and how changing understandings of the natural world have challenged religious ideas.
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Soc Innovation/Entrepreneurshp

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SINE-201
Spring 2022
Introduction to Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
STAFF, SINE
This course introduces students to the essential concepts, mindsets and skill sets associated with social entrepreneurship. We begin with an overview of the field of social entrepreneurship. We will then develop a conceptual foundation in systems thinking and the community capital framework. The former allows students to grasp the complexity of social and environmental issues by viewing these issues through the lens of systems theory. The latter recognizes multiple forms of capital that are essential to developing sustainable communities: natural, physical, economic, human, social, and cultural capital. Other course topics may include creativity, innovation, social justice, alternative approaches to economics and business, and sustainability. Through definitional readings, case studies and/or biographies, students gain an understanding of the power of social entrepreneurship to create shared value at the local, regional, and global level. This course serves as the introduction to the Certificate in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship, but it is open to all students from all academic disciplines who wish to develop their own capacities to initiate meaningful change in our world.offered every spring.
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Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-227
Spring 2022
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended)
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SOCI-230
Spring 2022
Environmental and Social Justice
Bedi, Heather
This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices.
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SOCI-230
Spring 2022
Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Leary, Cornelius
What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States.
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Spanish

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SPAN-231
Spring 2022
Argentine Adventures through Contemporary Literature
DeLutis-Eichenberger, Angela
Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Argentina.Students will complete the course for 1 credit on campus during the regularly scheduled Spring semester. At the conclusion of the semester, students completing the course as a "globally integrated program" will continue their studies for 3 weeks in Mendoza, Argentina to earn an additional half credit. This experience will culminate in a final reflection paper on their lived experiences and a short video highlighting how their abroad experience has led to a deeper understanding of the work first studied in Carlisle. Projected enrichment activities in Mendoza include: a guided visit through Mendoza; a tour of the Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (UNCUYO); a visit to the Cerro de la Gloria (commemorating San Martín and the independence of Argentina, Chile and Peru); a picnic in el Parque General San Martín (students will sip mate and meet students from UNCUYO); a trek in Mendoza’s mountains; a cooking class (students will learn how to cook typical Argentine dishes); a visit to several bodegas (wineries); a visit to the Museo del Área Fundacional and to the ruins of San Francisco; a visit to Lavalle, Altos Limpios, Reserva de Telteca, Asunción; workshops with members from the huarpe community; a trek in Potrerillos; a tango class; a visit to D2 (a clandestine detention center from the dictatorship era); a visit to the Termas de Cacheuta (hot springs); and a trek to Cerro Arco. Pleasure, vice, punishment, apocalypse, death, golems, virtue, dance, dreams, creation, power...this course embarks on a series of literary adventures crafted by some of the most well-known contemporary authors tied to Argentina. These include: Leopoldo Lugones, Horacio Quiroga, Alfonsina Storni, Jorge Luis Borges, Luisa Valenzuela, Julio Cortázar, and Adolfo Bioy Casares. In the latter part of the semester, special attention is given to literary works by authors specifically from Mendoza: Juan Draghi Lucero, Liliana Bodoc, Antonio Di Benedetto, and Ricardo Sarmiento. These works engage a series of themes that dialogue with a Mendoza context: slavery, independence, dictatorship, and the indigenous (los huarpes). Using the selected texts as vehicles for literary analysis, students will write and revise a series of formal papers throughout the semester, culminating in a final research paper of longer extension.
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SPAN-231
Spring 2022
Gastronomy and Health in the Hispanic World
Arnedo-Aldrich, Asuncion
This course examines food narratives (literatura gastronómica) in order to learn about culture, eating habits, diet, food trends, and how these factors affect health. Reading materials (all in Spanish) will include novels, poetry, critical essays, documentaries, and gastroblogs to review the ways in which individuals, communities, and society produce, distribute, and consume foods. Sustainable food systems and food security will also be discussed. Students will learn about the basic principles of nutrition by studying key concepts such as digestion, metabolism, and requirements for a healthy diet. In addition to a research paper and short analytic papers, students will have the opportunity to engage in experiential activities at the College Farm and Stern Kitchen, and to do a creative project through contributions with varied content (gastro-multimedia, creation of a tasting menu, cooking demonstrations, food related music, etc.). Note: Due to COVID-19 some experiences may have to be adjusted.
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SPAN-299
Spring 2022
Conflict in Texts from the Southern Cone
DeLutis-Eichenberger, Angela
The goal of this course is to introduce students to techniques and/or approaches to read and interpret a variety of texts (literature, film, art, music, etc.), while developing the necessary skills in the field to examine discourses, analyze arguments, and construct and defend arguments of their own, orally and in writing. In this section, students will read, view, and listen to literary texts, films, and music, respectively, from the Southern Cone (primarily Argentina and Chile) in Spanish. They will read theoretical texts used to analyze them in English. Literary, film, and music content is framed around the theme of conflict. Students may explore how texts can be read to: dialog with difficult authorial, cultural, or historical moments; portray conflict while viewed as autonomous works; present psychological conflict; engage socioeconomic struggle; depict power conflict in a reflection of and/or challenge to conventional gender roles; play with language and conflicting meanings; raise questions or issues about nature and the environment; and address matters related to indigenous communities.
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Sustainability

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SUST-200
Spring 2022
Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Leary, Cornelius
What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States.
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Theatre & Dance

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
THDA-230
Spring 2022
Design Principles and Practices for the Stage
Barrett, Kent
Harper-McCombs, Sherry
A study of the language, principles, elements, and tools designers use to both formulate and communicate ideas as part of the collaborative process. Students will learn the basic elements of composition for stage design and will see how these elements function in the areas of costuming, lighting, scenery, and sound. Two hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week.
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Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Spring 2022
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Rebeiz, Mireille
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
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WGSS-202
Spring 2022
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.br>For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended)
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WGSS-224
Spring 2022
Reproductive Justice
Oliviero, Kathryn
Reproductive Justice is a global social movement strategy and human rights platform that places reproductive power in the context of the larger social, racial and economic well-being of women, communities and families (Ross 2011). This course explores the origins and applications of reproductive justice. It investigates how the reproductive lives of many people, particularly women of color, are embedded in embattled legal, social, economic, racial and national frameworks that shape their capacity to control their intimate and procreative lives. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course first maps reproductive justice’s origins, exploring: political philosophies of sexual and reproductive liberty; racialized and disability-based histories of eugenics, population control, and adoption; the black women’s health movement; birth control and abortion law; social welfare and healthcare politics; the reproductive politics of incarceration and state violence; disability and prenatal testing; and the transnational and LGBTQ applications of assisted reproductive technologies. The course will subsequently explore how reproductive justice platforms can enable diverse people to thrive: making the decision to prevent, terminate or have a pregnancy a real choice. It will assess the conditions that enable access to quality health care, economic security, racial justice, women’s equality, transgender and queer rights, environmental sustainability, disability justice, sexual autonomy, and community vitality.
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WGSS-301
Spring 2022
Queer Politics
Oliviero, Kathryn
How does queerness expand upon LGB, trans and feminist understandings of sexual behavior and gendered expression, particularly as they are shaped by race, nation, ability, class and culture? In what ways does approaching queerness not only as an identity but as a politics contribute to our understandings of the relationship between people’s lives and institutional forces like racism, poverty, gender binaries, globalization, homophobia medicine, law and violence? Drawing from feminist of color, trans, nonbinary and transnational perspectives, this course explores how queerness – as a lived experience and a politics – expands intersectional understandings of racial justice, gender diversity, sexual freedom, coalition-building, immigration and world building. Through their final projects, students will explore how queer politics’ evolving debates apply to a topic of their choice.
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WGSS-302
Spring 2022
African Women's History
Ball, Jeremy
This course examines the role of women in African societies since the nineteenth century. Lectures and readings will be arranged thematically. Themes include sexuality and reproduction, the household, women's economic activity, political power, religion, colonialism, and democracy. After a discussion of gender, we will analyze pre-colonial production and reproduction, family life and religion in the twentieth century, women's roles in nationalist politics, the politics of female genital mutilation, and the lives of two contemporary African women leaders. Readings, including historical studies and novels, songs, and art, will be drawn from across the cultures and languages of Africa.
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WGSS-302
Spring 2022
Gender and Development
Kongar, Mesude
This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980’s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288.
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