Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Fall 2021

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-170
Fall 2021
African Civilizations to 1850
Ball, Jeremy
This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as HIST 170.
SCON
AFST-310
Fall 2021
Natural Disasters and Tropical Paradises: Fictions of the Contemporary Caribbean
Past, Mariana
This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly “natural” disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers’ responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers’ preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.
SCON

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-101
Fall 2021
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Bruno, Maria
Gruszko, Mariel
Pesantes Villa, Maria
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-331
Fall 2021
Human Evolution
Weinstein, Karen
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
SCON

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-218
Fall 2021
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
SCON

Art & Art History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARTH-130
Fall 2021
Art and Sustainability
Cervino, Anthony
This course promotes themes of sustainability and social engagement as the catalyst for artmaking. Primarily investigated through the design and construction of sculptures, installation art or other creative acts, students will explore creative practices exemplified by land art, social practice art, collaborative art, and social sculpture, among others.
SCON
ARTH-224
Fall 2021
Wheelwork Ceramics
Cervino, Anthony
Shiles, Robert
A studio course exploring expressive possibilities offered by the potters wheel. Students will examine both utilitarian and sculptural aspects of the medium. A variety of clays, glazes and firing approaches will be examined.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-221
Fall 2021
Animal Diversity w/Lab
Pires, Anthony
An exploration of the enormous diversity of animal life. We will study developmental processes and evolutionary patterns as a coherent approach to comprehending the organizational principles of disparate animal body plans. Students will be introduced to the morphological and physiological adaptations of the major phyla that fit them to their ecological roles in marine, aquatic and terrestrial environments. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; For Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125.
SCON
BIOL-301
Fall 2021
Eurasian Invasion, The Columbian Exchange: Biology That Changed the World
Wingert, Harold
All lecture synchronous and most labs the same.Beginning in 1492 there has been an exchange of all levels of fauna and flora across the globe. This exchange is known as the Columbian Exchange. The biological consequences of this exchange have been dramatic and all ecosystems on this globe have been altered. Today there exists two Europes, two Africas and two Asias as a result of this exchange of species. One of each exists in the original geographic location and the other in the United States. This course will explore the impact of invasive species on the ecosystems in Central Pennsylvania and to a lesser extent the rest of the United States and the World. This is a field based course. Students will visit local examples of invasive damage, local labs and meet scientists that manage invasive species. Students will also discover the controversies surrounding the purposeful introduction of many species that have become important parts of our local ecosystems.
SCON
BIOL-314
Fall 2021
Ecology w/Lab
Boback, Scott
Study of the interactions of organisms with each other, and with their environment, at the level of the individual, the population, the community, and the ecosystem. Lectures and readings consider both the theory of ecology and data from empirical research in the classic and current literature. Laboratory and field studies explore how ecologists perform quantitative tests of hypotheses about complex systems in nature. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequiste is NRSC 200.
SCON
BIOL-412
Fall 2021
Coastal Biology
Arnold, Thomas
Through detailed study of the primary biological literature, students acquire an understanding of the methodology and philosophy of scientific research. Includes study of the formulation of hypotheses, the design of experiments or observations to test these hypotheses, and the interpretation of results. This course will normally require a major research-based presentation and/or paper and may also involve the conduct of research by students. This course satisfies the requirement for a research experience for the biology major. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129, and one upper-level biology course.
SINV

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-222
Fall 2021
Environmental Economics
Tynan, Nicola
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
SINV
ECON-288
Fall 2021
Contending Economic Perspectives
Kongar, Mesude
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
SCON

English

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENGL-321
Fall 2021
Natural Disasters and Tropical Paradises: Fictions of the Contemporary Caribbean
Past, Mariana
This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly “natural” disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers’ responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers’ preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.
SCON

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-121
Fall 2021
Environmental Science for Non-Majors
Van Fleet, Pamela
This introductory environmental science course will explore the integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human interactions with them. Students will use scientific principles to explore the consequences of human activity. Students will be exposed to basic techniques for investigating environmental topics in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. This is an introductory course for non-majors. Students intending to major in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science should enroll in ENST 161.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course does not count towards the B.A. in Environmental Studies or B.S. in Environmental Science.
SINV
ENST-161
Fall 2021
Environmental Connections
Bedi, Heather
This introductory environmental studies course draws from the influences of the humanities and natural sciences on the social sciences in relation to the environment. The course will examine the ideas, concepts, and debates central to the field. Students will examine the relationship between humans and the environment and become familiar with a range of environmental challenges, with an emphasis on how these challenges have emerged over time and space. The course will investigate and evaluate a variety of strategies that are currently being pursued to address these environmental challenges. The course stresses the importance of “seeing connections”, thinking carefully and critically about environmental issues, and appreciating that complex questions rarely have a single solution. This is an introductory course for those majoring in environmental studies and environmental science. Non-majors should enroll in ENST 121 Introduction to Environmental Science. This course has no laboratory section.
SINV
ENST-218
Fall 2021
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
SCON
ENST-303
Fall 2021
The Politics of Climate Change
Beevers, Michael
Climate change is the most significant challenge in the 21st century. It will alter weather patterns, increase sea levels, make storms more unpredictable and change agricultural output worldwide, mostly for the worse. Mitigating climate change will require massive economic transformations, affecting energy, transportation, and industrial sectors. This class examines the politics of that transformation and the political forces obstructing it. It will explore how can social movements, institutions, and economic interests can interact to shape the national and global response to climate change. This class will also amplify diverse voices to show how the environment affects different people in different ways, complicating the need for a collective response. Finally, the class centers on solutions. Students will be asked to analyze what works for meeting the challenge of a changing climate.
SINV
ENST-305
Fall 2021
Green Infrastructure
Decker, Allyssa
Green infrastructure reduces and treats stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social, and economic benefits. This interdisciplinary course will examine different types of green infrastructure systems and how the components of each system work together to provide intended benefits. Topics may include rainwater harvesting, permeable pavements, bioswales/bioretention, green streets and parking, and green roofs. There will be an added focus on components of the water cycle within these systems including precipitation, infiltration, runoff, and evapotranspiration. Students will learn how to acquire, organize and analyze green infrastructure information and data using qualitative and quantitative methods. Three hours of laboratory per week.
SCON
ENST-306
Fall 2021
Environmental Leadership and Organizing for Sustainable Social Change
Beevers, Michael
The goal of this class is to think about ourselves as agents of change and focus on forging solutions to environmental and social problems. Students will form a deep understanding of the theories, approaches and practices of social change and become familiar with issue campaigns, community organizing, new and traditional media, diversity and alliance building, facilitation and group process and power analysis. Students will enhance their understanding of what leadership is, and explore the passions, values and skills they bring to this work. Students will learn from leaders and organizers and get hands-on experience putting their ideas for social change into practice. The course is applicable to those that want to understand how non-profit organizations work for sustained change as well as those interested in being entrepreneurs or policy makers that want to initiate change.
SCON
ENST-335
Fall 2021
Analysis and Management of the Aquatic Environment
Strock, Kristin
An interdisciplinary study of the aquatic environment, with a focus on the groundwater and surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin. This course provides a scientific introduction to the dynamics of rivers, lakes, wetlands, and estuarine systems as well as an appreciation of the complexity of the political and social issues involved in the sustainable use of these aquatic resources. Students conduct an original, cooperative, field-based research project on a local aquatic system that will involve extensive use of analytical laboratory and field equipment. Extended field trips to sample freshwater and estuarine systems and to observe existing resource management practices are conducted. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 162.
SCON
ENST-345
Fall 2021
Agroecology
Douglas, Margaret
How can agricultural systems be designed to nourish a growing human population while sustaining the natural resources upon which agriculture ultimately depends? In this course, students will learn to use ecological principles as a lens to understand and improve the food system. Topics may include crop genetic resources, soil and pest management, the role of animals in agriculture, and agriculture as a producer and user of energy. Class meetings will incorporate significant student participation including presentation and discussion of primary scientific literature and other readings. Laboratory meetings will orient students to agroecosystems in the region and provide opportunities for hands-on learning and scientific investigation. Three hours of laboratory per week.Prerequisites: ENST 162 or BIOL 131.
SINV
ENST-406
Fall 2021
What Does the Earth Ask of Us
Douglas, Margaret
The question motivating this senior seminar is drawn from the work of Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer, an ecologist and member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. Dr. Kimmerer invites us to consider not only what benefits humans derive from the Earth, but also what gifts we have to offer in return. In this senior seminar, we will explore this question individually and collectively, taking an interdisciplinary approach that draws on both scholarly/creative work and the work of practitioners in the environmental field. We will critically examine paradigms that have been put forward to help repair the human relationship to the Earth (e.g. restoration, reconciliation, regeneration) and case studies in which such paradigms have been put into practice, with varying degrees of success. Students will help lead class discussions and develop a capstone project focused on a particular environmental challenge. Throughout, students will be encouraged to reflect on their education and experiences to identify the gifts they have to offer the Earth in their post-graduation pursuits.
SCON

Earth Sciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ERSC-151
Fall 2021
Foundations of Earth Sciences
Thibodeau, Alyson
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
SCON
ERSC-202
Fall 2021
Energy Resources
Key, Marcus
The study of the origin, geologic occurrence, and distribution of petroleum, natural gas, coal, and uranium. Discussions include the evaluation and exploitation, economics, law, and the environmental impact of these resources and their alternatives, including geothermal, wind, solar, tidal, and ocean thermal power. Prerequisites: One introductory lab science or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.
SCON
ERSC-218
Fall 2021
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ARCH 218.
SCON
ERSC-309
Fall 2021
Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Key, Marcus
Completion of both ERSC 305 and ERSC 309 fulfills the WID Requirement. A study of the processes and patterns of sedimentation as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of rock strata. This includes the origin, transportation, deposition, lithification, and diagenesis of sediments. Lithology, geochemistry, paleontology, geochronology, and seismology will be used to understand the history of rock strata. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 151 or permission of instructor. Completion of both 305 and 309 fulfills the WID graduation requirement. Offered every other year.
SCON

Food Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FDST-201
Fall 2021
Introduction to Food Studies
Trazzi, Luca
This course introduces students to Food Studies, an interdisciplinary field that examines food through biological, cultural, ecological, economic, and other perspectives. We will treat questions of hunger, food production/procurement, inequality, ecology, food labor, health, including psychology, and the diversity of ethical, cultural, and spiritual meanings regarding food. The course will include opportunities for students to engage in active observation, experimentation, and hands-on learning through community partnerships and the College Farm. Students will encounter reading/viewing assignments from a wide range of disciplines. This course will also be open to students who do not intend to complete the Food Studies certificate but would simply like an interdisciplinary understanding of the workings of food.Prerequisite: One Food Studies elective course; the elective may be taken concurrently with FDST 201 with permission of instructor.
SINV
FDST-250
Fall 2021
Food Systems Exploration: A Bioregional Perspective
Halpin, Jennifer
Oftentimes, we are unaware of existing food systems that surround us and the historical, cultural, and environmental influences that shape contemporary agricultural and culinary practices. In this class, we will explore the bioregion of the Cumberland Valley and the many ways in which the land, people, and natural resources have shaped place-based foodways over time. Students will learn about bioregional theory and practice, in addition to active investigations of food production and procurement systems, distribution models, and consumption practices specific to the Cumberland Valley region.
SCON

French

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FREN-240
Fall 2021
Food, France, and Cultural Identity
Soldin, Adeline
This course aims to examine the past, present and future of French food culture while attending to a multitude of intersections, including gender, race, class, and sustainability. This course will investigate France's epicurean traditions and agricultural systems to understand the complex relationships among gastronomic practices, food and farming industries, and French identity. An inquiry of this type must certainly consider numerous questions relating to the sustainability and/or development of traditions, values, systems, and resources. Moreover, students will be asked to reflect on their own culinary customs as well as the agro-business systems of their native countries and the globalized world. Through intercultural analysis, students will learn more about how a region's food habits and ideologies relate to and affect the environmental, socio-economic, and health concerns of its inhabitants.
SCON

History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-151
Fall 2021
History of Environment
Pawley, Emily
Plater, Marika
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
SINV
HIST-170
Fall 2021
African Civilizations to 1850
Ball, Jeremy
This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as AFST 170.
SCON

Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Fall 2021
Fundamentals of Business
Paff, Uwe
Riccio, Steven
Sarcone, David
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
SCON
INBM-200
Fall 2021
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
SCON
INBM-400
Fall 2021
Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
Ritchey, Sherry
This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations. Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement.
SCON

International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-200
Fall 2021
Global Economy
Alam, Shamma
Fratantuono, Michael
The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
SCON
INST-290
Fall 2021
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
SCON

Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Fall 2021
Intermediate Italian
Lanzilotta, Luca
McMenamin, James
Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
SCON

Lat Am/Latinx/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-239
Fall 2021
Spanish for the Health Professions
Arnedo-Aldrich, Asuncion
Permission of Instructor Required. This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or above, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 239.
SCON
LALC-285
Fall 2021
Natural Disasters and Tropical Paradises: Fictions of the Contemporary Caribbean
Past, Mariana
This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly “natural” disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers’ responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers’ preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.
SCON

Political Science

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
POSC-290
Fall 2021
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
SCON

Religion

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RELG-250
Fall 2021
Faith, Interfaith and Equity: Critical Approaches to Religious Understanding & Justice in N America
Nielsen, Jacob
This course examines the history of the “interfaith” movement, beginning with the 1896 Parliament of the World’s Religions and the 20th century’s reactionary movements toward religious inclusion. This course will examine the ways in which the interfaith movement has and has not changed religious experience in North America. Using a variety of methods, including the study of film and mass media, historical analysis, and experiential learning opportunities, students will gain an understanding of the movement toward religious equity in North America. Students will also critically evaluate systems of religious inequity as contributing to systemic and structural racism and colonialism.
SINV

Soc Innovation/Entrepreneurshp

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SINE-400
Fall 2021
Senior Seminar in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Fratantuono, Michael
This capstone course builds on and integrates the key concepts of the introductory course in this certificate program by requiring students to reflect on, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through their academic programs and experiential learning experiences. The focus will be on creating shared value, which simultaneously enriches social, ecological, and economic systems. Through exercises in strategy formulation and implementation, students will gain an appreciation for the challenges and rewards associated with conceiving and transforming innovative solutions into new products, services, and/or initiatives that change our world in meaningful ways. In imagining these pathways for success, we will also address the importance of compassionate leadership, tools that nurture vital social connections, and the power of our own agency.Offered every fall.
SINV

Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-237
Fall 2021
Global Inequality
Lee, Helene
Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year.
SCON

Spanish

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SPAN-239
Fall 2021
Spanish for the Health Professions
Arnedo-Aldrich, Asuncion
Permission of Instructor Required. This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: 202 or 205. This course is cross-listed as LALC 239.
SCON
SPAN-380
Fall 2021
Natural Disasters and Tropical Paradises: Fictions of the Contemporary Caribbean
Past, Mariana
This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly “natural” disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers’ responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers’ preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.
SCON

Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Fall 2021
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Rebeiz, Mireille
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
SCON