Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Fall 2024

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-170
Fall 2024
African Civilizations to 1850
Ball, Jeremy
This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as HIST 170.
SCON

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-101
Fall 2024
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Pesantes Villa, Maria
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
SCON
ANTH-345
Fall 2024
Life and the Anthropocene
Ellison, James
Increased attention to human influences on Earth's climates and geology has given rise to a much-discussed Anthropocene epoch. Whether we locate the start of the epoch thousands of years ago with the origins of agriculture, with the industrial revolution, or more recently with nuclear bomb technologies, we can understand the label through rapid successions of record high temperatures and severe weather events, polar ice melts and rising sea levels, and astonishing numbers of extinctions, all of which play out in disparate ways across the globe. These changes call for new ways to understand how humans live in the world. In this course we examine what it means to be human in these times, and how people live in mutual and dynamic relationships with technologies, environments, and other species in ways that shape these processes and that are shaped by them. Our organizing frame will be ethnography, with examples drawn from throughout the world. Sustainability will be a persistent question during the semester.
SINV

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-218
Fall 2024
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 , GEOS 218 and GISP 218.
SCON

Art & Art History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARTH-205
Fall 2024
Japanese Architecture
Ren, Wei
This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
SCON
ARTH-226
Fall 2024
Ceramic Sculpture
Eng, Rachel
This introductory course examines the principal attributes of sculpture with a focus on clay as the primary fabrication material. Students will examine a range of firing, glazing, and construction techniques. Satisfies 3D requirement for the studio art major.
SCON
ARTH-260
Fall 2024
Sustainable Printmaking
Arsenault, Todd
This course will explore approaches to printmaking that make the practice environmentally sustainable in regard to materials. Conceptually, the course will utilize the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals as a starting point for making art that addresses issues related to the social, economic, and environmental aspects of sustainability. With this in mind, we will examine the challenges related to developing works of art that respond to challenging subject matter. The course will explore the fundamental areas of printmaking through the processes of engraving, screenprinting, woodcut, collagraph, and monotype among others. Digital process and computer manipulation will also be utilized.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-131
Fall 2024
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Potthoff, Michael
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV

East Asian Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
EASN-205
Fall 2024
Japanese Architecture
Ren, Wei
This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
SCON

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-222
Fall 2024
Environmental Economics
STAFF, ECON
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
SINV
ECON-230
Fall 2024
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended) This course is cross-listed as SOCI 227 & WGSS 202.
SCON
ECON-351
Fall 2024
Gender and Development
Kongar, Mesude
This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980’s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as INST 351& WGSS 302.
SCON

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-121
Fall 2024
Environmental Science for Non-Majors
Van Fleet, Pamela
This introductory environmental science course will explore the integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human interactions with them. Students will use scientific principles to explore the consequences of human activity. Students will be exposed to basic techniques for investigating environmental topics in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. This is an introductory course for non-majors. Students intending to major in Environmental Studies or Environmental Science should enroll in ENST 161.Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course does not count towards the B.A. in Environmental Studies or B.S. in Environmental Science.
SINV
ENST-161
Fall 2024
Environmental Connections
Beevers, Michael
This introductory environmental studies course draws from the influences of the humanities and natural sciences on the social sciences in relation to the environment. The course will examine the ideas, concepts, and debates central to the field. Students will examine the relationship between humans and the environment and become familiar with a range of environmental challenges, with an emphasis on how these challenges have emerged over time and space. The course will investigate and evaluate a variety of strategies that are currently being pursued to address these environmental challenges. The course stresses the importance of “seeing connections”, thinking carefully and critically about environmental issues, and appreciating that complex questions rarely have a single solution. This is an introductory course for those majoring in environmental studies and environmental science. Non-majors should enroll in ENST 121 Introduction to Environmental Science. This course has no laboratory section.
SINV
ENST-218
Fall 2024
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, GEOS 218 and GISP 218.
SCON
ENST-302
Fall 2024
The Start of the Anthropocene? Environment and Sustainability in Enlightenment France
Roman, Hanna
The beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the 'Anthropocene', is often attributed to changes in culture, philosophy, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What did questions of sustainability, climate, environment, and climate change look like in the eighteenth century? How did they impact modern-day assumptions of the natural environment and the human role within it? We will examine these sustainability-themed topics through the lens of the literature, science, and philosophy of Enlightenment France, during which new ways of perceiving and treating natural environments emerged. The Enlightenment movement was both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction of both natural and human environments. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful to our contemporary understandings of sustainability and which have become harmful to the future of our species and planet.
SINV
ENST-303
Fall 2024
Topics in Society & Environment
STAFF, ENST
An interdisciplinary course in Society & Environment. The topic is determined by faculty availability and student interest. Three hours classroom a week.Br> Depending on the topic, this course may also include three or four hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisite: dependent upon topic.
SCON
ENST-305
Fall 2024
Introduction to Environmental Health
Benka-Coker, Akinwande
This course provides an overview of the science and practice of environmental health (EH). Students will learn about the environment - the air we breathe, the water we drink, the weather we experience, the buildings in which we live, work and learn, the constant change and flux of our ecosystems and how this all impacts our health. Students will also learn major EH concepts (epidemiology, toxicology, and exposure assessment methods) while becoming familiar with practices, policies, and regulatory frameworks. Overall, this course will provide the tools to promote public health, prevent and control adverse environmental exposures in communities, and emphasize the role of public health communication and strategy. Students will apply information learned through lectures, class exercises, case studies, laboratory exercises and discussion of relevant literature to explore the complex relationship between exposures to environmental chemicals and pollutants (ECPs) and human health outcomes. Students will learn about systems thinking as applied to the primary sciences of environmental health, and approaches for exploring environmental health quality and associated impacts on health, as well as the tools and data resources available for guiding public health prevention and intervention strategies. This experience will culminate in a field research project that explores indoor and outdoor environmental quality, and air pollution.
SCON
ENST-305
Fall 2024
Topics in Applications of Environmental Science
STAFF, ENST
An interdisciplinary course in Applications of Environmental Science. The topic is determined by faculty availability and student interest. Three hours classroom a week. Depending on the topic, this course may also include three or four hours of laboratory a week.Prerequisite: Dependent upon topic.
SCON
ENST-355
Fall 2024
Green Infrastructure
Decker, Allyssa
The majority of the global population lives in urban areas; therefore, studying ways to create more sustainable and resilient communities is a crucial part of environmental science. In Green Infrastructure, students will learn about and investigate concepts and challenges of urban design through an environmental lens by drawing on concepts from the natural sciences and urban planning/design. This interdisciplinary course examines different types of green infrastructure systems and how the components of each system work together to provide intended benefits. Topics may include rainwater harvesting, permeable pavements, bioswales/bioretention, green streets and parking, and green roofs. There will be an added focus on components of the water cycle within these systems including precipitation, infiltration, runoff, and evapotranspiration. Prerequisites: 162 or BIOL 131.
SCON
ENST-406
Fall 2024
Air Quality in Our Changing Global Environment
Benka-Coker, Akinwande
This course offers an exploration of the dynamics of air quality within the context of a rapidly changing global environment. Grounded in interdisciplinary perspectives, students will have the opportunity to examine the scientific principles, societal impacts, and policy responses related to air quality. Through a combination of lectures, discussions, case studies, and fieldwork, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the factors influencing air quality, the health and environmental consequences of air pollution, and strategies for sustainable air quality management in a changing world. Final student presentations will provide the students an opportunity to evaluate and synthesize the quantitative and qualitative impacts of air pollution, while emphasizing a global perspective.
SINV

Food Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FDST-201
Fall 2024
Advanced Topic in Film and Media Studies
Halpin, Jennifer
An advanced course in a topic in film or media studies, such as Hollywood genres, the video game, or superheroes. This course introduces students to Food Studies, an interdisciplinary field that examines food through biological, cultural, ecological, economic, and other perspectives. We will treat questions of hunger, food production/procurement, inequality, ecology, food labor, health, including psychology, and the diversity of ethical, cultural, and spiritual meanings regarding food. The course will include opportunities for students to engage in active observation, experimentation, and hands-on learning through community partnerships and the College Farm. Students will encounter reading/viewing assignments from a wide range of disciplines. This course will also be open to students who do not intend to complete the Food Studies certificate but would simply like an interdisciplinary understanding of the workings of food.Prerequisite: One Food Studies elective course; the elective may be taken concurrently with FDST 201 with permission of instructor.
SINV

French

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
FREN-232
Fall 2024
Professional French
Soldin, Adeline
This course prepares students for professional work in international and multilingual contexts, with a particular focus on the francophone world. Students will acquire communication and intercultural skills specific to professional environments. As a WiD class, this course develops students’ written expression through the practice of professional genres such as CVs and cover letters, publicity, memoranda, and business proposals. It further advances students’ linguistic and intercultural proficiency by stressing the use of specialized vocabulary and appropriate registers when conducting business in French and Francophone workplaces. Students will learn about various sectors of the economy, including public health, international relations, and global marketing, with a general emphasis on sustainable business practices. Most importantly, students will have the opportunity to apply what they are studying in the classroom through a service-learning component. Students will complete 20-25 hours of volunteer work interpreting and translating health-related material for migrant workers in the region, allowing them to gain valuable professional skills and experience. This course prepares students for professional work in a Francophone context. Students will learn about the job search and application process as well as cultural norms and practices in Francophone workplaces. Emphasis is placed on developing professional communication and intercultural skills specific to professional contexts. As a WID class, this course develops students’ written expression with a focus on professional genres such as CVs and cover letters, publicity, memoranda, and business proposals. It further advances students’ linguistic and intercultural proficiency by teaching them how to use specialized vocabulary and appropriate registers to conduct business in French and Francophone working environments. Students will learn about different types of organizations from various sectors of the economy, preparing them for work in a range of fields. This course also contains experiential learning components that develop oral communication including interaction with francophone companies and institutions and mock job interviews.Prerequisite: FREN 202 or equivalent.
SCON
FREN-364
Fall 2024
The Start of the Anthropocene? Environment and Sustainability in Enlightenment France
Roman, Hanna
The beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the 'Anthropocene', is often attributed to changes in culture, philosophy, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What did questions of sustainability, climate, environment, and climate change look like in the eighteenth century? How did they impact modern-day assumptions of the natural environment and the human role within it? We will examine these sustainability-themed topics through the lens of the literature, science, and philosophy of Enlightenment France, during which new ways of perceiving and treating natural environments emerged. The Enlightenment movement was both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction of both natural and human environments. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful to our contemporary understandings of sustainability and which have become harmful to the future of our species and planet.
SINV

Geosciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
GEOS-141
Fall 2024
Earth's Hazards
Sak, Peter
This course examines natural processes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mass wasting events, and floods that have the potential to produce disastrous consequences for humans. All of these processes result from interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere directly or indirectly, which is the realm of earth sciences. Increasing global populations and increasingly interdependent national economies mean that few disasters are now only ‘local’. This course will use examples such as case studies of recent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions to examine how natural processes can be hazardous, and whether or not humans can anticipate and mitigate these kinds of hazards to prevent future disasters. Laboratory work will include analog experiments, field trips, and video analysis of historic disasters. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV
GEOS-151
Fall 2024
Foundations of Earth Sciences
Thibodeau, Alyson
How do mountains and oceans form? Why do the positions of continents shift? Can rocks bend or flow? What is the history of life on our planet? This course explores the materials that make up the Earth and the processes that shape it, both at and below the surface. Students will take field trips around the Carlisle area as well as complete analytical and computer laboratory activities in order to acquire basic field, laboratory, and computer modelling skills. This course serves as a gateway to the Earth Sciences major, but is also appropriate for non-majors. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
SCON
GEOS-202
Fall 2024
Energy Resources
Key, Marcus
The study of the origin, geologic occurrence, and distribution of petroleum, natural gas, coal, and uranium. Discussions include the evaluation and exploitation, economics, law, and the environmental impact of these resources and their alternatives, including geothermal, wind, solar, tidal, and ocean thermal power. Prerequisites: One introductory lab science or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.
SCON
GEOS-218
Fall 2024
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and GISP 218.
SCON
GEOS-250
Fall 2024
Introduction to Arctic Studies
Edwards, Benjamin
This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the physical/social geography, geology and ecology of the Arctic region of earth particularly through the lens of global climate change. Students will use a variety of media (lectures, readings, videos, blogs) to build knowledge about this critical region of earth to serve as a basis for individual and group projects on a specific Arctic region (e.g., Siberia, Svalbard, Greenland, Iceland, Nunavut, Alaska) and topic (e.g., climate change, Arctic tourism, Arctic flora/fauna species, Arctic archeology, Arctic exploration). Learning goals include: i) exposure to spatial analysis and Geographic Information Systems, ii) foundational knowledge of the Arctic cryosphere and its response to climate change, geological history, human geography and ecological systems, and iii) mastery of Arctic geography. Course meetings will include student presentations, fieldtrips and basic GIS instruction.
SCON
GEOS-309
Fall 2024
Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Key, Marcus
Completion of both GEOS 305 and GEOS 309 fulfills the WID Requirement. A study of the processes and patterns of sedimentation as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of rock strata. This includes the origin, transportation, deposition, lithification, and diagenesis of sediments. Lithology, geochemistry, paleontology, geochronology, and seismology will be used to understand the history of rock strata. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 151 or permission of instructor. Completion of both 305 and 309 fulfills the WID graduation requirement. Offered every other year.
SCON

Geographic Info Systems Prog

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
GISP-218
Fall 2024
Geographic Information Systems
Sinha, Deb
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours per week. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 218, ENST 218 and GEOS 218.
SCON

Health Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HEST-250
Fall 2024
Reproductive Justice
Oliviero, Kathryn
Reproductive Justice is a global social movement strategy and human rights platform that places reproductive power in the context of the larger social, racial and economic well-being of women, communities and families (Ross 2011). This course explores the origins and applications of reproductive justice. It investigates how the reproductive lives of many people, particularly women of color, are embedded in embattled legal, social, economic, racial and national frameworks that shape their capacity to control their intimate and procreative lives. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course first maps reproductive justice’s origins, exploring: political philosophies of sexual and reproductive liberty; racialized and disability-based histories of eugenics, population control, and adoption; the black women’s health movement; birth control and abortion law; social welfare and healthcare politics; the reproductive politics of incarceration and state violence; disability and prenatal testing; and the transnational and LGBTQ applications of assisted reproductive technologies. The course will subsequently explore how reproductive justice platforms can enable diverse people to thrive: making the decision to prevent, terminate or have a pregnancy a real choice. It will assess the conditions that enable access to quality health care, economic security, racial justice, women’s equality, transgender and queer rights, environmental sustainability, disability justice, sexual autonomy, and community vitality.
SCON

History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-130
Fall 2024
Early Latin American History to 1800
Borges, Marcelo
Survey of pre-Colombian and colonial Latin American history. Students explore the major ancient civilizations of the Americas, the background and characteristics of European conquest and colonization, the formation of diverse colonial societies, and the breakdown of the colonial system that led to independence. The course includes both the Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas from a comparative perspective. This course is cross-listed as LALC 230.
SCON
HIST-151
Fall 2024
History of Environment
Pawley, Emily
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
SINV
HIST-170
Fall 2024
African Civilizations to 1850
Ball, Jeremy
This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as AFST 170.
SCON
HIST-211
Fall 2024
History of Climate Change
Pawley, Emily
While we may think of climate change mostly in terms of the futures it threatens, it's a human-created disaster and so has a human history. So too do the solutions currently underway to respond to it. In this U.S.-focused class we'll examine and research the rise of fossil fuels, the building of unequal and vulnerable landscapes, the birth and development of climate science, the intentional construction of climate denial, and the consequent failures of climate politics. However, we'll also look at the histories of renewable energy, soil building, mass forest planting, ocean farming, organic farming, protest, movement-building, regulation, and political action. In doing so, we'll help create usable histories for a survivable and ethical future.
SINV
HIST-219
Fall 2024
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims, from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
SCON

Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Fall 2024
Fundamentals of Business
Middaugh, Joy
Riccio, Steven
Wang, Xiaolu
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
SCON
INBM-300
Fall 2024
Investments
Zhu, Mengnan
This course is a basic course in investment analysis and portfolio management. We will cover the core concepts of finance theory - namely, the capital asset pricing model, risk-return trade-offs, analysis of bond pricing, and equity valuation. In addition, we will look at the organization and functioning of capital markets, asset allocation strategies, some basic principles of options and futures markets and finally global portfolio management. This course will use problem-solving and Excel spreadsheet analysis to apply the theoretical concepts. Prerequisite: INBM 110
SCON
INBM-300
Fall 2024
Investments
Zhu, Mengnan
This course is a basic course in investment analysis and portfolio management. We will cover the core concepts of finance theory - namely, the capital asset pricing model, risk-return trade-offs, analysis of bond pricing, and equity valuation. In addition, we will look at the organization and functioning of capital markets, asset allocation strategies, some basic principles of options and futures markets and finally global portfolio management. This course will use problem-solving and Excel spreadsheet analysis to apply the theoretical concepts. Prerequisite: INBM 110
SCON

International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-170
Fall 2024
International Relations
Webb, Edward
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
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INST-290
Fall 2024
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
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INST-351
Fall 2024
Gender and Development
Kongar, Mesude
This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980’s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as ECON 351 & WGSS 302.
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Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Fall 2024
Intermediate Italian
Galli, Sara
Lanzilotta, Luca
Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
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Lat Am/Latinx/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-230
Fall 2024
Early Latin American History to 1800
Borges, Marcelo
Survey of pre-Colombian and colonial Latin American history. Students explore the major ancient civilizations of the Americas, the background and characteristics of European conquest and colonization, the formation of diverse colonial societies, and the breakdown of the colonial system that led to independence. The course includes both the Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas from a comparative perspective. This course is cross-listed as HIST 130.
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LALC-239
Fall 2024
Spanish for the Health Professions
Sagastume, Jorge
This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or above, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 239.
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Middle East Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MEST-200
Fall 2024
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims, from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
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Philosophy

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHIL-261
Fall 2024
The Start of the Anthropocene? Environment and Sustainability in Enlightenment France
Roman, Hanna
The beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the 'Anthropocene', is often attributed to changes in culture, philosophy, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What did questions of sustainability, climate, environment, and climate change look like in the eighteenth century? How did they impact modern-day assumptions of the natural environment and the human role within it? We will examine these sustainability-themed topics through the lens of the literature, science, and philosophy of Enlightenment France, during which new ways of perceiving and treating natural environments emerged. The Enlightenment movement was both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction of both natural and human environments. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful to our contemporary understandings of sustainability and which have become harmful to the future of our species and planet.
SINV

Physics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHYS-314
Fall 2024
Renewable Energy Engineering
Pfister, Hans
A project-centered approach to the study of renewable energy sources, energy storage, and energy efficiency. Examples of projects include: the Solar Air Heater (SAH), Evacuated Tube Solar Collectors, Photovoltaic (PV) Arrays, Thermal Storage Devices based on Phase Change Materials (PCMs), LED lighting, modern wind turbines, adiabatic compression and expansion, and the coefficient of performance (COP) of heat pumps. In particular, students design, build, test, and re-engineer their own SAH with an absorber based on physics principles learned in the course. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 141 and 142, and 211 or permission of instructor. Offered every two years.
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Political Science

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
POSC-170
Fall 2024
International Relations
Webb, Edward
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
SCON
POSC-290
Fall 2024
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
SCON

Religion

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RELG-111
Fall 2024
From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Schadler, Peter
This course will survey relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims, from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
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Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-227
Fall 2024
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended). This course is cross-listed as ECON 230 & WGSS 202.
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Spanish

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SPAN-231
Fall 2024
Argentine Adventures through Contemporary Literature
DeLutis-Eichenberger, Angela
This class embarks on a series of literary adventures, - led by tales of love, tragedy, madness, oppression, murder, mirrors, myth, and war-, crafted by some of the most well-known contemporary authors tied to Argentina. These may include: Horacio Quiroga, Alfonsina Storni, Macedonio Fernández, Adolfo Bioy Casares, Roberto Arlt, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Silvina Ocampo, and Adolfo Bioy Casares. Additional texts by Juan Draghi Lucero, Antonio Di Benedetto, and Liliana Bodoc will allow for the study of the history and folklore related to Mendoza (the site of one of our study abroad programs). Using the selected texts as vehicles for literary analysis, students will write and revise several formal papers as part of this writing intensive course.
SCON
SPAN-239
Fall 2024
Spanish for the Health Professions
Sagastume, Jorge
This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: 202 or 205. This course is cross-listed as LALC 239.
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Sustainability

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SUST-200
Fall 2024
The Start of the Anthropocene? Environment and Sustainability in Enlightenment France
Roman, Hanna
The beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the 'Anthropocene', is often attributed to changes in culture, philosophy, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What did questions of sustainability, climate, environment, and climate change look like in the eighteenth century? How did they impact modern-day assumptions of the natural environment and the human role within it? We will examine these sustainability-themed topics through the lens of the literature, science, and philosophy of Enlightenment France, during which new ways of perceiving and treating natural environments emerged. The Enlightenment movement was both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction of both natural and human environments. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful to our contemporary understandings of sustainability and which have become harmful to the future of our species and planet.
SINV
SUST-490
Fall 2024
Baird Honors Practicum
Leary, Cornelius
Students accepted for the Baird Sustainability Fellows program and enrolled in the Baird Honors Practicum will gain practical skills for creating a sustainable and equitable society by working as part of a collaborative, interdisciplinary team to analyze a selected societal challenge and create a viable solution that is socially, economically and environmentally sustainable. The course will engage students in better understanding interdependence and intersections of issues such as social justice, racism, environmental quality, ecological resilience, biodiversity conservation, climate change, resource use, economic development, and human wellbeing. Applying a sustainability lens, students will also reflect on, interpret and present their evolving worldviews, college experiences and competencies in preparation for pursuing academic, career and other opportunities after Dickinson. Prerequisites: Students must apply and be accepted to the Baird Sustainability Fellows Program. Rising seniors and rising juniors from all majors are eligible to apply.
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Theatre & Dance

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
THDA-102
Fall 2024
Introduction to Global Dance Studies
Crawley-Woods, Erin
This is an introductory course that explores dance forms from six different regions: Africa, India, North America, Europe, South America and Asia. Focus will be on how dance functions within various social structures and how these functions operate to re-inscribe, contest or legitimate race, class, and gender identity formations. Issues such as authenticity, hybridity, cultural tourism and globalization will be examined. Through an interactive classroom, guest artists and studio work, we will gain a deeper kinesthetic understanding of how dance can operate as a powerful cultural tool, glue or agent for social change. Offered every two years.
SCON
THDA-130
Fall 2024
Introduction to Stage Technology
Bounds, Julianne
STAFF, THDA
An introduction to the backstage technology of the world of theatre and dance including the areas of costuming, lighting technology, and scenic construction. Students will learn basic construction techniques in hands on production work in the department’s scenic and costume studios and will learn lighting technology while working on performances in Mathers Theatre and the Cubiculo. Two hours classroom and three hours lab per week.
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Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Fall 2024
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Rebeiz, Mireille
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
SCON
WGSS-202
Fall 2024
Political Economy of Gender
Kongar, Mesude
Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
SCON
WGSS-224
Fall 2024
Reproductive Justice
Oliviero, Kathryn
Reproductive Justice is a global social movement strategy and human rights platform that places reproductive power in the context of the larger social, racial and economic well-being of women, communities and families (Ross 2011). This course explores the origins and applications of reproductive justice. It investigates how the reproductive lives of many people, particularly women of color, are embedded in embattled legal, social, economic, racial and national frameworks that shape their capacity to control their intimate and procreative lives. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course first maps reproductive justice’s origins, exploring: political philosophies of sexual and reproductive liberty; racialized and disability-based histories of eugenics, population control, and adoption; the black women’s health movement; birth control and abortion law; social welfare and healthcare politics; the reproductive politics of incarceration and state violence; disability and prenatal testing; and the transnational and LGBTQ applications of assisted reproductive technologies. The course will subsequently explore how reproductive justice platforms can enable diverse people to thrive: making the decision to prevent, terminate or have a pregnancy a real choice. It will assess the conditions that enable access to quality health care, economic security, racial justice, women’s equality, transgender and queer rights, environmental sustainability, disability justice, sexual autonomy, and community vitality.
SCON
WGSS-300
Fall 2024
Feminist Perspectives and Theories
Oliviero, Kathryn
This course deepens students’ understandings of how feminist perspectives situate power and privilege in relationship to interlocking categories of gender, race, class, sexuality, ability and nation. Through foundational theoretical texts, it expands students’ understandings of significant theoretical frameworks that inform women’s, gender, critical race and sexuality studies, as well as debates and tensions within them. Frameworks may include political activisms, materialist feminism, standpoint epistemologies, critiques of scientific objectivity, intersectionality, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, transnational critique and feminist legal theory. Helps students develop more nuanced understandings of the relationship between everyday experiences, political institutions, forms of resistance and theoretical meaning-making. Prerequisite: WGSS 100 or 208.
SCON
WGSS-302
Fall 2024
Gender and Development
Kongar, Mesude
This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980's economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288.
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