Major

A minimum of 11 courses beyond 201, including 236, one course in Francophone studies, and two 300-level courses taken on the Carlisle campus during the senior year, one of which must be a senior seminar. One of the 11 courses may take the following form: (1) an internship completed in Toulouse; or (2) For students who do not study abroad, one course in another department on the Carlisle campus in which a substantial portion of the content is related to French or Francophone areas or issues. If this course is available as a FLIC in French, students are required to do the reading and written assignments in French. Students will consult with the department chair regarding the suitability of the course to meet the French or Francophone studies requirement.

Minor

Five courses beyond 201, including 236.

Suggested curricular flow through the major

PROVISIONAL MAJOR DESCRIPTION FOR THE 2022 GRADUATING CLASS

A minimum of 11 courses beyond 201, including 236, one course in Francophone Studies,and two 300-level courses taken on the Carlisle campus during the senior year, one of which must be a senior seminar. FFS majors who wish to study abroad in a French-speaking country during their senior year are relieved of taking one 300-level course for each semester they study abroad. For example, if they study abroad in the Fall, they will only need to take one 300-level topics course OR a 300-level seminar during the spring of their senior year. As a reminder, all students who wish to study abroad during the Spring of their senior year must petition to CGSE (POC Katie DeGuzman) per Dickinson College guidelines. The 11th course may take the following form: one course in another department on the Carlisle campus in which a substantial portion of the content is related to French or Francophone areas or issues. If this course is available as a FLIC in French, students are required to do the reading and written assignments in French. The Department will be flexible regarding the number of FLIC courses that contribute to the FFS major for students impacted by the pandemic. However, students must consult with the department chair regarding the suitability of the courses to meet the French or Francophone studies major requirement.

Note to students: If you would like to study abroad during your senior year, we recommend beginning this conversation with your advisor NOW. In all cases, we encourage you to be in touch with your advisors to make sure you are on track to meet the FFS major requirements. Please note that these changes apply only to the 2021-2022 academic year due to the pandemic. We will revise as needed, going forward.

 

REGULAR  MAJOR DESCRIPTION

A minimum of 11 courses beyond 201, including 236, one course in Francophone studies, and two 300-level courses taken on the Carlisle campus during the senior year, one of which must be a senior seminar. One of the 11 courses may take the following form: (1) an internship completed in Toulouse; or (2) a course taken in France or in Cameroon in which more than 50 percent of course content is related to either French or Francophone area or issues; or (3) for students who do not study abroad, one course in another department on the Carlisle campus in which a substantial portion of the content is related to French or Francophone areas or issues. If this course is available as a FLIC in French, students are required to do the reading and written assignments in French. Students will consult with the department chair regarding the suitability of the course to meet the French or Francophone studies requirement.   

 

MINOR (5 courses taught in French beyond FREN 201, including FREN 236):

First Year
FREN 101 in the fall and FREN 102 in the spring

or FREN 102, FREN 201

or FREN 230, 236

or FREN 236 followed by FREN 240, or 245, or 246

NOTE:  Entrance level dependent on the results of a placement examination.

Sophomore Year
FREN 201 in the fall and FREN 230 in the spring

or FREN 230, 236

or FREN 236 followed by FREN 240, or 245, or 246

or any combination of FREN 240, 245, and 246 in the fall and spring semester.

NOTE: Check if you can combine any related and cross-listed electives taught in the FFS program if you are also a major or minor in another field such as Enviromental Studies, Food Studies, INBM, IS, MES, or WGSS.

Junior Year
Study in Toulouse, France, and/or Rabat, Morocco in the fall, spring, or all year, and/or Yaoundé, Cameroon (spring only)

or  FREN 240, or 245, or 246 in the fall and a 300-level topics course in the spring

or two 300-level topics courses.

Senior Year:

Any combination of 300-level courses

NOTE: Cross-listed courses taught as FLIC courses (bilingual courses in French and English) must be taken in French to count toward the FFS minor (e.g., English; Environmental Studies; Food Studies; Middle East Studies; Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies).

 

MAJOR  (11 courses beyond FREN 201, one of which can be a pre-approved internship abroad or a pre-approved course taught in English outside the FFS Department on campus or during study abroad).

First Year
FREN 101 in the fall and FREN 102 in the spring

or FREN 102, FREN 201

or FREN 201, 230

or FREN 230, 236

or FREN 236 followed by FREN 240, or 245, or 246

NOTE:

-Entrance level dependent on the results of a placement examination.

-Students who place beyond FREN 236 must contact the Chair of the Department if they wish to take a French course during their first year.

Sophomore Year
FREN 201, 230

or FREN 230, 236

or FREN 236 followed by FREN 240, or 245, or 246

or any combination of FREN 240, 245, and 246 in the fall and spring semester.

NOTE:

-Students planning an international internship must contact their advisor in the spring of their sophomore year.

- Check how you can combine any related and cross-listed electives listed in the FFS program if you are also a major or minor in another field such as Environmental Studies, Food Studies, INBM, IS, MES, or WGSS.

Junior Year
Study in Toulouse, France, and/or Rabat, Morocco in the fall, spring, or all year, and/or Yaoundé, Cameroon (spring only)

or a FREN 240, or 245, or 246 in the fall, and a 300-level topics course in the spring

or two 300-level topics courses.

NOTE: Students planning to pursue honors should contact their advisors in the Spring semester of their junior year.

Senior Year
Two 300-level courses, including one Senior Seminar either in the fall or spring.

or an Honors Thesis (see detailed description below).

NOTE: 

-Normally, French and Francophone Studies majors may not take 200-level courses during their senior year.

-One approved related elective taught in English can count toward the major (e.g. History of Modern France, African History; History of the Middle East). Please consult the Chair of the Department for approved courses.

-Cross-listed courses taught as FLIC courses (bilingual courses in French and English) must be taken in French to count toward the FFS major (e.g., English; Environmental Studies; Food Studies; Middle East Studies; Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies).

 

INTERNSHIPS

Thanks to its study abroad programming in three geographical regions, the Department of  French and Francophone Studies is well positioned to support students who seek international internships to advance their professional profile and experience. Developing career-ready skills in the global market place starts as soon as the first year of college. While students prepare the grounds for an international experience by taking a French class, they should also familiarize themselves with the Center for Advising, Internships & Lifelong Career Development in order to develop a résumé to be shared with their advisor. During their Sophomore Year, students should begin making plans for an internship abroad by consulting with the Center for Global Study and Engagement about their opportunities and potential funding, and by meeting with their advisor and the department's study abroad coordinator. During Junior Year, internships may be available for students studying in Rabat, Toulouse, or Yaoundé. Think of international internships as providing lifelong opportunities for professional development. Thanks to their international experience and their capacity to understand people and cultures other than their own, our majors are ready to intern and work in leading professional contexts ranging from education to government, NGOs, law, international business, banking, and the press. For example, FFS Alumna Shiobhan O'Grady '13 studied in Yaoundé and in Rabat, found her calling when she interned  in a bilingual news agency in Rabat, and is now the Cairo Bureau Chief for the Washington Post.

 

HONORS

Students who wish to be considered for honors in French and Francophone Studies must have an overall GPA of at least 3.50 and they will register for an Independent Research (550) both in the fall and the spring of their senior year in lieu of the regular 300-level senior sequence. The students must identify a faculty member who is willing to serve as their Thesis Advisor, must submit a proposal, and must write a thesis, which will be evaluated by the faculty to receive honors.

An Honors Thesis meets the equivalent of two academic credits--one in the fall, and one in the spring respectively--and honors are conferred as a special designation on the students' academic transcript and diploma. In the event that students do not wish to continue with their thesis work into the spring semester, or if the independent research completed in the fall does not meet the standards of an honors thesis, the students will still receive academic credit for their Independent Research (550) in the fall, and they can enroll in either a topics or a senior seminar in the spring of their senior year to meet the senior year requirement.

The proposal must be written in French and must be submitted no later than two (2) weeks before the beginning of the fall semester (5 pages). The proposal should provide a detailed description of the research project, as well as explain the questions to be addressed, the current state of scholarship on this issue, the project’s contribution to current scholarship, and a tentative answer to the research question (i.e. a “thesis statement”). A proposed outline of the thesis chapters (1 page)  should also be included. There should also be a fairly extensive bibliography (1-2 pages) that lists primary and secondary sources under separate headings.

 

HONORS THESIS TIMELINE

May of Junior Year:

-Student approaches faculty member as a potential thesis advisor to declare their intention to write an honors thesis.

•Summer before graduation:

-Student submits a short proposal and reading bibliography (see above).

-Student registers for an independent research for the fall semester with their appointed thesis advisor.

•Fall semester of graduation:

-The student writes a 20-page research paper supervised by their thesis advisor that elaborates on the proposal.

-Before the last day of classes, the thesis advisor connects with the department and shares the student's research.

-By the end of the exam period, the FFS Chair and the committee will inform the prospective honors student whether the independent research completed in the fall meets the requirements for a thesis so far.

-If approved, the thesis advisor assigns a second reader. A third external reader might be contacted depending on the nature of the proposal. The student receives a grade for their independent research and registers for another independent research for the spring semester.

-If not approved, or if the student changes their mind about completing a thesis, the student receives credit toward the 300-level senior seminar to meet the 300-level major sequence requirement during their senior year.

•Spring semester of graduation:

-The student continues writing (20 pages)

-The advisor communicates the title of the senior thesis to the Registrar via the FFS Chair by the end of February.

-Mid semester check-in with the thesis committee.

•Two weeks before the date of the oral defense:

-The advisor will ensure that the candidate shares their best version of their thesis with the committee members. The document will be about 50 pages, excluding the bibliography.

-The advisor will share the defense information with the rest of the dept and FFS majors /minors with the permission of the candidate.

•Before the oral defense:

-Faculty will meet and discuss whether the thesis meets the criteria of an honors thesis.

-They will vote on conferring provisional honors.

•During the oral defense:

-Faculty will ask questions probing, for example, the source base, evidence, methodology, and conclusions.

-Faculty will also offer advice for editing and revising the thesis in preparation for its submission (if approved for final honors) to the Dickinson College Archives.

-Honors will be conferred upon a student's successful completion of the oral defense.

•After the oral defense:

-The advisor will inform the Registrar's office (usually Marcia) whether the candidate has received honors or not (we will probably receive a deadline reminder from the Registrar soon - it's typically by May 14).

•Before graduation:

-The candidate will make final directed revisions essential for formal submission of the approved honors project according to the guidelines set by the Archives.

-Since 2016, the candidate may choose to publish their thesis in Dickinson Scholar with the approval of their advisor.

•Following graduation (or as early as possible):

-The ADC will generate an internal req. order with the FFS Chair to authorize payment toward the printing and binding of 3 copies of the thesis (student-archives-dept).

Independent study and independent research

Students interested in Independent Study or Independent Research in French or Francophone Studies should consult with the faculty member with whom they hope to work. Independent Study may not duplicate a class already being offered in a particular semester.

Independent Research is usually reserved for the senior year and for students who have a GPA of 3.50 or higher in the French major.  Research may be carried out over one or two semesters for one or more credits. An independent research project comprises a substantial paper written in French, and is characterized by an independent and in-depth study of an advanced topic including a literature search, reading of original sources and a novel formulation of results.  There is an oral defense at its completion. The project is supervised by two members in the department. When independent research is interdisciplinary in nature, a third faculty member from outside the department is invited to participate. 

Honors

Departmental honors in French are normally granted to students who have completed independent research projects and, after an oral defense, receive an A or A-.

Internships

Internships may be available for interested students. The department chair or the coordinator in Toulouse should be consulted for information. Some students have served as interns in Carlisle with the Northeast Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and at the French Embassy in Washington, DC. Students on the Dickinson in France program have interned in Business and Marketing, Public Administration, Applied Sciences and Medicine, The Arts, The Media, and Education.

Opportunities for off-campus study

Junior Year: All students intending to major in French are strongly urged to plan their program of studies to allow for study abroad during the junior year at Dickinson's Study Center in Toulouse, France and/or in Yaoundé, Cameroon. The coordinators for Dickinson programs in these countries should be consulted with any questions.

Summer Immersion Program: The French Department occasionally offers a five-week student immersion program in Toulouse, depending upon student interest. This program, which has a prerequisite of 201 (Intermediate French), is of particular interest to French minors. The Department chairperson should be contacted for additional information.

Co-curricular activities/programs

The Department of French and Francophone Studies hosts regular events throughout the academic year.  Dickinson students, faculty, and international exchange students gather weekly at  the French Table to share a meal and informal discussion in French at all levels of proficiency. The Department also sponsors yearly a film festival thanks to the Cultural Services of the French Embassy. Moreover, students can practice their French by living in the Romance Language House  where French exchange students from the University of Toulouse lead various activities ranging from game nights to French meals and bad movie nights! In consultation with the FFS department, the French Club sponsors films, field trips, lectures, dinners, picnics, and special events with Alumni.

More details can be found on the FFS FaceBook Page.

Courses

The following courses are offered in Toulouse; the prerequisite is FREN 236 for all courses, except FREN 220:

220 Language and Civilization Immersion
An intensive language and civilization course designed to increase oral proficiency, improve written expression, and develop cross-cultural observation skills through immersion in the Toulouse region. Social and cultural phenomena will be studied through interaction with French families, directed observation at a variety of sites, participation in class activities, and tutorials. The exclusive use of French during the five and one-half week immersion is expected of all students. Designed as content-based and writing intensive, the course emphasizes the teaching of language through a unified subject matter. This approach allows students to benefit from maximum exposure to the French language while they build their content knowledge of the French-speaking world through the study of a specific topic. Students will develop a study-abroad portfolio.
Prerequisite: 201 or its equivalent. Offered only in summer at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse. This course meets the equivalent of FREN 230 (on-campus gateway to the major) and can count towards the major or minor in French.
Attributes: Writing in the Discipline

255 French Literature & Society
A historically differentiated interpretation of French culture through examination of French literature from the Middle Ages to the present in conjunction with study of political, economic, and social structures of each period. Intellectual and artistic currents that inform and are informed by these structures. Introduction of new critical perspectives such as psychoanalytical and structuralist literary theory.
Offered only at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse.
Attributes: Humanities

256 French Literature & Society II
A historically differentiated interpretation of French culture through examination of French literature from the Middle Ages to the present in conjunction with study of political, economic, and social structures of each period. Intellectual and artistic currents that inform and are informed by these structures. Introduction of new critical perspectives such as psychoanalytical and structuralist literary theory.
Offered only at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse.
Attributes: Humanities

260 Writing Workshop
Offers a reinforcement of French written skills through practice in lexical expansion, idiomatic expression, and syntactical patterns. Students are given the tools necessary (vocabulary, syntax, grammar) to free and enrich their writing styles, primarily through creative writing. Exposition to various literary forms taken from French art and culture (literature, painting, music, theater, cinema) is an additional component.
One credit. Mandatory course offered each semester at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse.

273 Topics in Applied French
Continued study of the French language designed to take advantage of issues of current interest in French society or culture (e.g., electoral seasons, important historical commemorations, current social or cultural controversies). Ample opportunity for written work and discussion of the topic chosen.
One-half course credit. Offered only at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse.

300 The Toulouse Colloquium
An interdisciplinary colloquium focusing on the history and contemporary culture of the city of Toulouse. This course is composed of intensive written and oral language study, and introduction to French university methods of argumentation, visits of local museums and regional cities, and exploration of the various neighborhoods of Toulouse. This course is designed to acquaint students with the city and the region in which they will be spending the academic year.
One-half course credit. Offered every semester at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse.

320 Topics in Intercultural Communication
Contemporary French society examined through theoretical reading and discussion as well as directed experiential observation. Explicit reference to French and American perceptions of cultural concepts so as to provide ideas, insights, and methods by which to understand and analyze the two societies. Readings, reports, discussions, field projects, and use of local resources comprise the work of the course.
Offered only at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse.

French Courses

101 Elementary French
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year

102 Elementary French
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.
Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year

201 Intermediate French
Intensive second-year study of French, with attention to grammar review, conversation, reading in a cultural context and some writing.
Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year

230 Communication in French and Francophone Contexts
Intensive oral and written practice of French in the context of issues and themes such as a sense of place, the lessons of time, the social contract, and intellectual and artistic life. This course makes use of texts, films, multi media and interactive computer strategies in the development of conversational and writing skills. Intended as the gateway to the major or minor in French and Francophone Studies.
Prerequisite: 201 or the equivalent.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, Writing in the Discipline

236 Introduction to Cultural Analysis
An introduction to the practice of reading and writing about French and francophone themes in an analytical and contextualized way. This course considers how cultural production conveys ideologies, values and norms expressed in both historical and contemporary contexts. Normally offered as writing-intensive.
Prerequisite: 230.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, Writing in the Discipline

240 French Identity
This course examines the representation of French identity from its origins in the Ancien Régime to its present forms. Examples are drawn from history and human geography, politics, economics, aesthetics, religion, and philosophy. Depending on the instructor, these may include, for example, the representation of the State, the tension between Paris and the provinces, the semiotics of social rituals, and other subjects of cultural study.
Prerequisite: 236 or permission of instructor.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year

245 Contemporary Issues in French Society
Designed to give students an understanding of the main tensions and controversies of contemporary French culture. Focusing on political, social, and economic topics such as Americanization, regionalism, immigration, France's place in the European Union, the course should facilitate acculturation in France or provide an academic substitute for that experience.
Prerequisite: 236.
Attributes: Sustainability Connections

246 Introduction to Francophone Cultures
This course explores the relationship between literature and Francophone cultures (Vietnam, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa). Topics include: "Négritude," the negro-African identity, "cultural métissage," the status of women, the dialogue between tradition and modernity, independence, and post-colonial disillusionment. Historical overview of the international context of Francophonie will be examined through short stories, novels, poems, critical essays, feature and documentary films.
Prerequisite: 236.
Attributes: AFST - Africa Course, Global Diversity, Humanities, INST Africa Course

352 Classical Theatre and Social Myths
This course studies the theatre as an ideological instrument, asking how the plays of 17th century France reinforce, modify, or undermine the ways in which society sees itself. Myths addressed include those concerning gender, monarchy, class structure, and the power of language. The ideological work of the stage is related to such historical developments as the rise of absolutism and attempts to stimulate the French economy. Plays by Corneille, Racine, and Moliere and the principal texts, along with selections from the major moralists.
Prerequisite: 255, or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Offered every other year.

354 Reason and Revolution
The Enlightenment: a century of intellectual ferment which challenged the values of the establishment and swept them away in a revolution. Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. Offered on occasion as a bilingual course in French and English.
Prerequisite: 255, or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Offered every other year.

357 Romantics, Realists, and Rebels: 19th-century French Novel and Poetry
An investigation of the major literary movements and authors of the century, to include the theory and practice of romanticism and realism in French letters; reaction to society by authors in revolt against bourgeois standards, and in pursuit of new modes of literary expression.
Prerequisite: 256, or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Offered every other year.

358 Contemporary Fiction and Film
Studies in the theory and evolution of narrative in the 20th century, with particular attention to issues of language, identity, difference and power. This course looks at a selection of novels and films as scenes for the practice of writing as cultural resistance.
Prerequisite: 256, or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Offered every other year.

361 French Literature in the Renaissance
Major works from prose, poetry, and theatre, with particular emphasis on Rabelais and the development of humanism, the theory and practice of the Pléiade, and Montaigne.
Prerequisite: 255, or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Offered every other year.

362 Seminar in French and Francophone Literatures
A thorough investigation of a major figure or important literary trend (chosen at the discretion of the instructor and in consultation with the majors) in French or Francophone literature with emphasis on seminar reports and discussion. Recent themes have been Algerian War; Love or Marriage in 17th and 18th century literature; Relations Between the Sexes; Francophone Novelists of the African Diaspora.
Prerequisite: 245 or 246, or at least a semester of study in Toulouse or Yaoundé, or permission of the instructor. Priority given to senior majors in French.

363 Topics in French and Francophone Cultures
In-depth analysis and discussion of selected aspects of French and Francophone cultures not normally covered in other advanced offerings. Recent topics have included Cinema and Society, Introduction to Sociolinguistics, The French Press, Post-War France, Global Sororities.
Prerequisites: 245 or 246, or at least a semester of study in Toulouse or Yaoundé, or permission of the instructor. Priority given to senior majors in French.

364 Topics in French and Francophone Literatures
In-depth analysis and discussion of selected areas of French and Francophone literature not normally covered in other advanced offerings. Recent topics have included Literature of Immigration, Love Letters; Hate Mail, French Theater & Society.
Prerequisite: 245 or 246, or at least a semester of study in Toulouse or Yaoundé, or permission of the instructor. Priority given to senior majors in French.
Attributes: Humanities

365 Seminar in French and Francophone Civilizations
Investigation of a broad theme or selected area of French or Francophone civilization through pertinent readings, media forms and research in both literary and non-literary materials. Past topics have included America Through French Eyes, L'Entre-deux-guerres, Francophone Diaspora, Remembering Vichy.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: 245 or 246, or at least a semester of study in Toulouse or Yaoundé, or permission of the instructor. Priority given to senior majors in French.