Spring 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 101-01 Elementary French
Instructor: Ann Hudson
Course Description:
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.
0930:MTWRF   BOSLER 315
FREN 102-01 Elementary French
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent.
0930:MTWRF   BOSLER 214
FREN 102-02 Elementary French
Instructor: Ann Hudson
Course Description:
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent.
0830:MTWRF   BOSLER 315
FREN 201-01 Intermediate French
Instructor: Lucile Duperron
Course Description:
Intensive second-year study of French, with attention to grammar review, conversation, reading in a cultural context and some writing. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
0830:MTWRF   BOSLER 309
FREN 201-02 Intermediate French
Instructor: Lucile Duperron
Course Description:
Intensive second-year study of French, with attention to grammar review, conversation, reading in a cultural context and some writing. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
0930:MTWRF   BOSLER 309
FREN 201-03 Intermediate French
Instructor: Benjamin Ngong
Course Description:
Intensive second-year study of French, with attention to grammar review, conversation, reading in a cultural context and some writing. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
1030:MTWRF   BOSLER 308
FREN 230-01 Communication in French and Francophone Contexts
Instructor: Burleigh Hendrickson
Course Description:
Intensive oral and written practice of French in the context of issues and themes such as a sense of place, the lessons of time, the social contract, and intellectual and artistic life. This course makes use of texts, films, multi media and interactive computer strategies in the development of conversational and writing skills. Intended as the gateway to the major or minor in French and Francophone Studies. Prerequisite: 201 or the equivalent.
1330:MW   BOSLER 306
1330:TR   BOSLER 306
FREN 230-02 Communication in French and Francophone Contexts
Instructor: Hanna Roman
Course Description:
Intensive oral and written practice of French in the context of issues and themes such as a sense of place, the lessons of time, the social contract, and intellectual and artistic life. This course makes use of texts, films, multi media and interactive computer strategies in the development of conversational and writing skills. Intended as the gateway to the major or minor in French and Francophone Studies. Prerequisite: 201 or the equivalent.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 110
0930:MW   ALTHSE 206
FREN 236-01 Introduction to Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Hanna Roman
Course Description:
An introduction to the practice of reading and writing about French and francophone themes in an analytical and contextualized way. This course considers how cultural production conveys ideologies, values and norms expressed in both historical and contemporary contexts. Normally offered as writing-intensive. Prerequisite: 230.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 109
FREN 236-02 Introduction to Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Lucile Duperron
Course Description:
An introduction to the practice of reading and writing about French and francophone themes in an analytical and contextualized way. This course considers how cultural production conveys ideologies, values and norms expressed in both historical and contemporary contexts. Normally offered as writing-intensive. Prerequisite: 230.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 222
FREN 245-01 Contemporary Issues in French Society
Instructor: Dominique Laurent
Course Description:
Designed to give students an understanding of the main tensions and controversies of contemporary French culture. Focusing on political, social, and economic topics such as Americanization, regionalism, immigration, France's place in the European Union, the course should facilitate acculturation in France or provide an academic substitute for that experience. Prerequisite: 236.
1230:MWF   BOSLER 213
FREN 246-01 Introduction to Francophone Cultures
Instructor: Benjamin Ngong
Course Description:
This course explores the relationship between literature and Francophone cultures (Vietnam, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa). Topics include: "Ngritude," the negro-African identity, "cultural mtissage," the status of women, the dialogue between tradition and modernity, independence, and post-colonial disillusionment. Historical overview of the international context of Francophonie will be examined through short stories, novels, poems, critical essays, feature and documentary films. Prerequisite: 236.
1330:MR   STERN 103
FREN 362-01 Of A Beautiful Mind: Literature and Philosophy at Crossroads
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Karegeye
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 261-04 and ENGL 222-03. A 2012 New York Times article entitled Is Philosophy Literature? raised the following question: Do people read philosophy for pleasure? The question clearly suggests that the articles author links pleasure to literature. Indeed, in a general manner, literature is understood as a work of aesthetic language and, above all, imagination through its narrative, spatiotemporal, mythical, and symbolic manifestations. There are those who would assert that philosophy is reflection on the whole of reality- the study of ideas about knowledge. In other words, literature refers to the beauty and philosophy suggest reason; however, these distinctions about pleasure and knowledge/rationality are neither radical nor absolute. Conversely, we may explore how literature makes you think and how philosophy delves into interpretation of Literature. While distinct, the two disciplines have always been in dialogue. This course will scrutinize the encounter or dialogue between literary and philosophical texts in light of critical theory, as well as through the examination of case-topics (e.g. moral choices, human freedom, existence, commitment). Readings will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Grard Genette, Paul Ricoeur, Simone de Beauvoir, Aim Csaire, Mudimbe. We will follow three axes: - The discovery of literature as a vehicle for philosophical ideas - A discussion of philosophical content posed by the literature in view - A discussion of critical theories that blend literature and philosophy, including Narratology, (Post-)Structuralism, Phenomenology, Deconstruction, Post colonial and Feminist studies. This course is taught in English. Students from the French department are required to write their papers in French and to meet every three weeks, for an hour, for a Caf philo-littraire that will consist of discussing in French students papers written in French and of revisiting French Theory.
1330:T   ALTHSE 207
FREN 364-01 Women of the Middle East: Stories of Resistance
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-01 and WGSS 201-04. This course focuses on women's stories from the Middle East with particular attention to zones of armed conflict. It examines questions related to gender representations, sexual identity, and trauma through various reading materials (comics or graphic novels, novels and poems) and visual materials (film/photography).
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
FREN 365-01 History and Literature
Instructor: Dominique Laurent
Course Description:
This seminar will focus on the way major episodes of modern and contemporary French history have been reflected in French literature. We will begin with the French Revolution, since this colossal event marks the birth of modern France. Through a selection of passages from major authors of the early 19th Century (such as Restif de la Bretonne, Chateaubriand, and Hugo), we will examine how this period was reflected in the works of each author and what this reveals about them. We will proceed in the same way with other main chapters of the 19th Century (the Napoleon era, the Restoration, the Second Empire, the Third Republic, and the Dreyfus Affair) and the 20th Century (the First World War, interwar France, the Second World War, the colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria, and finally the birth of the Fifth Republic). The students will learn -- or relearn -- important moments that have fashioned France and the French since the Revolution. They will also learn or review the major movements and authors in French literary history in the 19th and 20th Centuries. For their final project, the students will have to focus on one French author of the 19th or 20th Century and examine that author's literary career, and in particular their works dealing with the history of their time. In addition to the readings, the students will be required to watch a selection of French movies illustrating some of the historical episodes studied in class throughout the semester.
1330:W   BOSLER 213
FREN 500-01 African Cultural Heritage and the Restitution Dilemma
Instructor: Benjamin Ngong
Course Description: