Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 102-01 Elementary French
Instructor: Dominique Laurent
Course Description:
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday -- synchronous online instruction; Thursday and Friday -- synchronous in person instruction on campus. Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent.
0930:MTWRF   ALISON ROOM 1
FREN 102-02 Elementary French
Instructor: Hanna Roman
Course Description:
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday -- synchronous online instruction; Thursday and Friday -- synchronous in person instruction on campus. Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent.
1030:MTW   DIST
1030:RF   ALISON ROOM 1
FREN 201-01 Intermediate French
Instructor: Benjamin Ngong
Course Description:
Synchronous instruction. Intensive second-year study of French, with attention to grammar review, conversation, reading in a cultural context and some writing. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
1030:MTWRF   DIST
FREN 230-01 Communication in French and Francophone Contexts
Instructor: Dominique Laurent
Course Description:
Intensive oral and written practice of French in the context of issues and themes such as a sense of place, the lessons of time, the social contract, and intellectual and artistic life. This course makes use of texts, films, multi media and interactive computer strategies in the development of conversational and writing skills. Intended as the gateway to the major or minor in French and Francophone Studies. Prerequisite: 201 or the equivalent.
1030:MWF   BOSLER 314
FREN 236-01 Introduction to Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Monday and Wednesday -- in person synchronous instruction; Friday -- remote synchronous instruction. An introduction to the practice of reading and writing about French and francophone themes in an analytical and contextualized way. This course considers how cultural production conveys ideologies, values and norms expressed in both historical and contemporary contexts. Normally offered as writing-intensive. Prerequisite: 230.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 109
FREN 236-02 Introduction to Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Synchronous instruction. An introduction to the practice of reading and writing about French and francophone themes in an analytical and contextualized way. This course considers how cultural production conveys ideologies, values and norms expressed in both historical and contemporary contexts. Normally offered as writing-intensive. Prerequisite: 230.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 109
FREN 245-01 Contemporary Issues in French Society
Instructor: Dominique Laurent
Course Description:
Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in France. Designed to give students an understanding of the main tensions and controversies of contemporary French culture. Focusing on political, social, and economic topics such as Americanization, regionalism, immigration, France's place in the European Union, the course should facilitate acculturation in France or provide an academic substitute for that experience. Prerequisite: 236.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 106
FREN 246-01 Introduction to Francophone Cultures
Instructor: Benjamin Ngong
Course Description:
Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Cameroon.Synchronous instruction. This course explores the relationship between literature and Francophone cultures (Vietnam, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa). Topics include: "Ngritude," the negro-African identity, "cultural mtissage," the status of women, the dialogue between tradition and modernity, independence, and post-colonial disillusionment. Historical overview of the international context of Francophonie will be examined through short stories, novels, poems, critical essays, feature and documentary films. Prerequisite: 236.
1330:MR   DIST
FREN 363-01 From "baragouiner" to "kiffer:" Mutilingual French Identities
Instructor: Lucile Duperron
Course Description:
Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in France.Monday: In person synchronous instruction; Thursday: remote synchronous instruction.How the French communicate with each other today is built on a long historical and still present tension between a centralized linguistic authority and multilingual voices from the borderlands, the regions, the cities (e.g. slangs such as verlan), and other nations. In this seminar, we will examine how linguistic ideologies have impacted multilingual communities in France. Students will engage with the intersections between language, identity, and politics through legal, scholarly, and artistic works, spanning from the 16th to the 21st Century. This course aims to give students an understanding of the transformative powers of multilingualism on French society. Taught in French.
1500:MR   HUB SOC HALL W
FREN 364-01 Words and Worlds: Imagining Science in the French Enlightenment
Instructor: Hanna Roman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-03.Tuesday -- online/synchronous; Friday -- on campus/synchronous. The French Enlightenment has long been thought of as an age of science and reason, when literature split off from more technical-minded, objective disciplines. However, many important ideas and events in the history of science were invented, developed, and criticized through the imaginative and poetic voices of literature. This course takes a long perspective on the French Enlightenment, tracing how a period of scientific revolution, discovery, colonization, secularization, and industrialization (roughly 1650-1850) was imagined, described, and criticized in works of literature and philosophy. These works include not only expected and recognizable forms of literature such as science fiction but also other forms of world-building and creativity such as philosophical treatises, thought experiments, imaginary and real accounts of voyages, books of natural and earth history, and encyclopedic endeavors. This course will explore the inseparability of science and literature through themes such as race and colonization, anthropology, natural history, climate, voyages, and technology. Readings, assignments, and discussions for this class are in English. However, as this is a FLIC course, there is an option for students with the ability to read advanced French/French majors to complete readings and assignments in French. Does not count toward pre- or post-1800 English courses.
1330:F   HUB SOC HALL E
1330:T   DIST
FREN 364-02 Women of the Middle East: Stories of Resistance
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 222-01, MEST 200-03 and WGSS 201-02.Monday -- synchronous in person instructions; Thursday -- online synchronous instruction. The condition of women writers in post-colonial, predominantly Arab countries is heavily marked by the dual legacy of the region's Muslim heritage and the cultural imprint of former colonizers, which are intertwined with ethnic, religious, linguistic and other differences that in varying ways traverse the region as a whole. The tensions associated with these differences erupted in wars in some countries and violence and discrimination against women in some others. Several women writers stood up against injustice and sexism by writing to defend women's rights and render justice. Their writing served to bear witness and preserve the victim's memory. This class focuses on narratives (texts and films) from the following countries: Algeria, Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon.
1330:M   ALTHSE 201
1330:R   DIST
FREN 364-03 Women of the Middle East: Stories of Resistance
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 222-03, MEST 200-06 and WGSS 201-05.Monday -- synchronous in person instructions; Thursday -- online synchronous instruction. The condition of women writers in post-colonial, predominantly Arab countries is heavily marked by the dual legacy of the region's Muslim heritage and the cultural imprint of former colonizers, which are intertwined with ethnic, religious, linguistic and other differences that in varying ways traverse the region as a whole. The tensions associated with these differences erupted in wars in some countries and violence and discrimination against women in some others. Several women writers stood up against injustice and sexism by writing to defend women's rights and render justice. Their writing served to bear witness and preserve the victim's memory. This class focuses on narratives (texts and films) from the following countries: Algeria, Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon.
1500:M   ALTHSE 201
1500:R   DIST