Sustainability-related courses explore social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability challenges and solutions. The courses vary in the degree to which sustainability is a focus of study and are classified into two categories. Sustainability Investigations courses (SINV) engage students in a deep and focused study of problems with sustainability as a major emphasis of the course. Sustainability Connections courses (SCON) engage students in making connections between the main topic of the course and sustainability. Sustainability is related to but is not a major focus of SCON courses. Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students must complete a sustainability course as a graduation requirement.


Sustainability Course Search


Sustainability Courses
in Spring 2018

Africana Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
AFST-220
Spring 2018
Race, Ethnicity, and Hybridity
van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy, Patricia
This course examines the constructions, lived experiences and politics of race, ethnicity and hybridity. The course will explore the historical evolution of the concept of race, the ways in which race and ethnicity are overlapping classification categories that are embedded in relations of power, and the social, cultural and biological outcomes of extended contact and mixture. Whereas the majority of scholarship on race and ethnicity considers the dynamics of these social scientific categories and processes of formation through the lens of interactions between a dominant group (usually occupying the racial category of white) and a subordinated or minoritized group (usually racialized as black or brown), this course shifts the gaze to the politics of race and ethnicity between historically oppressed ethnic groups—those of African ethnic origin and those of various Asian ethnicities. Using case studies mainly from the Caribbean, but also from the US and Africa, we will examine the anthropological, sociological, literary, musical and filmic documentation and analyses of Afro/Asian mixture and will explore how racial identities, interethnic relations, gender, sexuality, religious practices, politics, and festivity have been influenced by mixing and creolizing processes.
SCON

Anthropology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ANTH-100
Spring 2018
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Marshack, Joshua
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
SCON
ANTH-290
Spring 2018
Archaeological Methods
Bruno, Maria
This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
SCON

Archaeology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARCH-290
Spring 2018
Archaeological Methods
Bruno, Maria
This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
SCON
ARCH-318
Spring 2018
Advanced Applications in GIS
Ciarrocca, James
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318 and ERSC 318. Offered every two years.
SINV

Art & Art History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ARTH-130
Spring 2018
Art and Sustainability
Cervino, Anthony
This course promotes themes of sustainability and social engagement as the catalyst for artmaking. Primarily investigated through the design and construction of sculptures, installation art or other creative acts, students will explore creative practices exemplified by land art, social practice art, collaborative art, and social sculpture, among others.
SCON

Biology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
BIOL-131
Spring 2018
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Potthoff, Michael
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-131
Spring 2018
Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Plant Ecology
Smith, Jason
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 – Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
SINV
BIOL-301
Spring 2018
Field Biology, Tools, Techniques and Protocols
Van Fleet, Pamela
Permission of Instructor Required. This course will provide students with a solid foundation and hands on experiences regarding the practical use of specific tools and the application of field methods and techniques used in both environmental consulting and wildlife sciences today. Course work will focus on numerous topics including research and experimental design; collection, management and analysis of data; identification of animals and marking techniques; measuring animal abundance; assessment of wildlife habitat, the role of radio and satellite telemetry; and the practical application of spatial technology (GIS). Student will gain hands on experience in reading and using topographic maps, interpreting aerial photos,using a compass and hand held GPS, orienteering, and creating maps in GIS. Students will also learn about employing and in many cases conducting point counts, nest searches, transect surveys, live trapping and marking, use of remote cameras; telemetry; and the use of mist nets for capturing birds and mammals. At least one field trip will include a day long (weekend) visit to an active research site.
SCON
BIOL-301
Spring 2018
Ornithology
Van Fleet, Pamela
The classroom component of this course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and conservation biology of birds. Students will have numerous opportunities both in and outside of the classroom to examine conservation issues and actions as they relate to the functioning of natural ecosystems, the consequences of anthropogenic impacts to those environments and learn how sustainability practices influence many bird species, populations and communities. The lab portion of this course will focus on hands-on learning through a variety of tools, mechanisms and field experiences including but not limited to use of study skins and skeletons, field guides, optics and field-monitoring techniques. Students will be regularly immersed in living labs during field trips both local and regional including visits to a bird banding station, state wildlife management areas and research study sites. In addition students will learn how to identify birds through specific behaviors, visual field marks, songs and calls. There will be at least one day-long field trip during a weekend, one extended lab field trip to a waterfowl stopover habitat during spring migration and an optional 4-5 day field trip over spring break to visit other sites utilized by birds in and outside of Pennsylvania. Each student will also complete a research paper on selected ornithological topics.
SINV
BIOL-301
Spring 2018
Wildlife Ecology
Wingert, Harold
Wildlife Ecology is designed for majors in both Environmental Science and Biology. This course approaches ecology from the aspect of focusing on individual organisms and the role they play in their environment. Students will visit various habitats in Pennsylvania and view wildlife first hand. The texts are both place based focusing on Northeastern forests and Northeastern vernal ponds. These two ecosystems are intimately linked and the health of one influences the other. Students will have hands on labs with living organisms and investigate the roles each of these organisms play in the forest and vernal pool environment. A focus of the course will be how we must manage these ecosystems if they are to be enjoyed by our grandchildren. Both of these ecosystems are being changed by human ignorance and global climate change. We are at a “squeak point” in our ability to sustain these ecosystems. Only a complete understanding of their ecology and rapid action will sustain them for future generations.
SINV

Chemistry

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
CHEM-132
Spring 2018
General Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
A continuation of Chemistry 131. Topics covered in the second semester will include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, and buffers, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 131.
SCON
CHEM-242
Spring 2018
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Barker, Kathryn
Crouch, R David
Gavenonis, Jason
Holden, Michael
This course continues the study of the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules started in 241. Particular emphasis is placed on unsaturated systems. Laboratory work continues investigations into the synthesis, analysis, and identification of organic and inorganic molecules begun in 241. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 241.
SCON

East Asian Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
EASN-206
Spring 2018
The Politics of Environmental Protection in Asia
Diamant, Neil
This course takes a close look at the political, social, and legal issues that affect environmental protection in Asia. Focusing attention on China, Taiwan, Japan, and India, and by drawing upon scholarly literature in political science, sociology, law, and history, the course aims to provide students with a multidisciplinary understanding of the myriad factors, which shape the content of environmental legislation and policies and how these are implemented in society. Does China's authoritarian system give environmental law more "bite"? What roles do NGO play in Asia? Does Confucianism or Hinduism make people more or less inclined to protect the environment? How do Asians deal with the impact of rapid economic growth? In short, we will try to understand the complex interaction between political, legal, and social dimensions of environmental protection in a region that is home to half of the world's population and three of the world's current and future economic powerhouses.
SINV

Economics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ECON-222
Spring 2018
Environmental Economics
Underwood, Anthony
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
SINV
ECON-288
Spring 2018
Contending Economic Perspectives
Kongar, Mesude
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
SCON
ECON-496
Spring 2018
Political Economy of Health
Kongar, Mesude
Permission of Instructor Required. In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is as low as 49 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to nutrition, care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? In this course, students will examine the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. The emphasis throughout the course will be on how socioeconomic inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality and other social categories affect health and well-being outcomes.
SCON

Environmental Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ENST-162
Spring 2018
Integrative Environmental Science
Douglas, Margaret
Pedersen, Brian
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary environmental science. Students will learn to draw upon a variety of natural sciences to identify and address environmental challenges. Students will examine environmental issues analytically, learn to evaluate existing data, and begin to develop skills for acquiring new knowledge via the scientific method. They will be exposed to basic techniques for assessing environmental problems in lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 161
SINV
ENST-280
Spring 2018
Environmental and Social Justice
Bedi, Heather
This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices. This course is cross-listed with SOCI 230.
SINV
ENST-310
Spring 2018
Air Pollution and Health
Arashiro, Maiko
This course will focus on the sources and cause of air pollutants in ambient and indoor environments and its impact on public health. Other course topics include current and past environmental regulation and air pollution control technology. Laboratory and field studies and will focus on air pollution monitoring techniques and local air quality.
SINV
ENST-310
Spring 2018
Ornithology
Van Fleet, Pamela
The classroom component of this course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and conservation biology of birds. Students will have numerous opportunities both in and outside of the classroom to examine conservation issues and actions as they relate to the functioning of natural ecosystems, the consequences of anthropogenic impacts to those environments and learn how sustainability practices influence many bird species, populations and communities. The lab portion of this course will focus on hands-on learning through a variety of tools, mechanisms and field experiences including but not limited to use of study skins and skeletons, field guides, optics and field-monitoring techniques. Students will be regularly immersed in living labs during field trips both local and regional including visits to a bird banding station, state wildlife management areas and research study sites. In addition students will learn how to identify birds through specific behaviors, visual field marks, songs and calls. There will be at least one day-long field trip during a weekend, one extended lab field trip to a waterfowl stopover habitat during spring migration and an optional 4-5 day field trip over spring break to visit other sites utilized by birds in and outside of Pennsylvania. Each student will also complete a research paper on selected ornithological topics.
SINV
ENST-311
Spring 2018
Environmental Leadership and Organizing for Sustainable Social Change
Beevers, Michael
Loeffler, Carol
The goal of this class is to think about ourselves as agents of change and focus on forging solutions to environmental and social problems. Students will form a deep understanding of the theories, approaches and practices of social change and become familiar with issue campaigns, community organizing, new and traditional media, diversity and alliance building, facilitation and group process and power analysis. Students will enhance their understanding of what leadership is, and explore the passions, values and skills they bring to this work. Students will learn from leaders and organizers and get hands-on experience putting their ideas for social change into practice. The course is applicable to those that want to understand how non-profit organizations work for sustained change as well as those interested in being entrepreneurs or policy makers that want to initiate change.
SINV
ENST-311
Spring 2018
Field Biology, Tools, Techniques and Protocols
Van Fleet, Pamela
Permission of Instructor Required. This course will provide students with a solid foundation and hands on experiences regarding the practical use of specific tools and the application of field methods and techniques used in both environmental consulting and wildlife sciences today. Course work will focus on numerous topics including research and experimental design; collection, management and analysis of data; identification of animals and marking techniques; measuring animal abundance; assessment of wildlife habitat, the role of radio and satellite telemetry; and the practical application of spatial technology (GIS). Student will gain hands on experience in reading and using topographic maps, interpreting aerial photos,using a compass and hand held GPS, orienteering, and creating maps in GIS. Students will also learn about employing and in many cases conducting point counts, nest searches, transect surveys, live trapping and marking, use of remote cameras; telemetry; and the use of mist nets for capturing birds and mammals. At least one field trip will include a day long (weekend) visit to an active research site.
SCON
ENST-311
Spring 2018
Food, Poverty and Place
Bedi, Heather
Permission of Instructor Required.This community service learning course examines food access, agriculture, poverty, and social justice concerns in Central Pennsylvania. Increased reliance on food assistance programs reflect rising poverty and food insecurity in Cumberland County. Working closely with community partners, students in the class will conduct qualitative research in the county to document these vulnerabilities and highlight food opportunities. Drawing from their research, students will collectively complete a food assessment and will present the report to community members. The class will also create an online story map using spatial tools to visually communicate the food assessment to a larger audience.
SCON
ENST-318
Spring 2018
Advanced Applications in GIS
Ciarrocca, James
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 318 and ARCH 318. Offered every two years.
SINV
ENST-330
Spring 2018
Environmental Policy
Beevers, Michael
Loeffler, Carol
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 130, or permission of instructor.
SINV
ENST-406
Spring 2018
Seminar in Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies
Pedersen, Brian
A keystone seminar designed to integrate and apply students' past coursework, internships, and other educational experiences, and to provide a basis for future professional and academic endeavors. The course format varies depending on faculty and student interests, and scholarly concerns in the field. Course components may include developing written and oral presentations, reading and discussing primary literature, and defining and performing individual or group research. Students in this course will be particularly responsible for acquiring and disseminating knowledge. This course is not equivalent to an independent study or independent research course. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of the instructor. Normally offered in Spring semester.
SCON
ENST-406
Spring 2018
Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Beevers, Michael
Loeffler, Carol
This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
SCON

Earth Sciences

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ERSC-141
Spring 2018
Earth's Hazards
Edwards, Benjamin
This course examines natural processes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mass wasting events, and floods that have the potential to produce disastrous consequences for humans. All of these processes result from interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere directly or indirectly, which is the realm of earth sciences. Increasing global populations and increasingly interdependent national economies mean that few disasters are now only ‘local’. This course will use examples such as case studies of recent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions to examine how natural processes can be hazardous, and whether or not humans can anticipate and mitigate these kinds of hazards to prevent future disasters. Laboratory work will include analog experiments, field trips, and video analysis of historic disasters. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV
ERSC-142
Spring 2018
Earth's Changing Climate
Thibodeau, Alyson
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate “players” such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
SINV
ERSC-309
Spring 2018
Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Key, Marcus
Completion of both ERSC 305 and ERSC 309 fulfills the WID Requirement. A study of the processes and patterns of sedimentation as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of rock strata. This includes the origin, transportation, deposition, lithification, and diagenesis of sediments. Lithology, geochemistry, paleontology, geochronology, and seismology will be used to understand the history of rock strata. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 141 and 142, or permission of instructor. Completion of both 305 and 309 fulfills the WID graduation requirement. Offered every other year.
SCON
ERSC-310
Spring 2018
Environmental Geophysics
Hayes, Jorden
Lecture/Lab course on special topics which vary depending on faculty and student interest and need. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: dependent upon topic.
SCON
ERSC-311
Spring 2018
Introduction to Arctic and Alpine Climate Change
Edwards, Benjamin
Permission of Instructor Required. This course will prepare students to engage in discussions and data collection relevant to understanding how the Arctic and lower latitude alpine environments are responding to climate change. We will use a variety of remote sensing tools to examine changes in ice cover over the past two decades, as well as developing field-based skills related to GPS (global positioning systems), water chemistry, and soil characteristics. This is required for students selected for the 2018 DC Arctic and Alpine Climate Change Research Experience.
SINV
ERSC-318
Spring 2018
Advanced Applications in GIS
Ciarrocca, James
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318 and ARCH 318. Offered every two years.
SINV

German

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
GRMN-210
Spring 2018
Exploring German Cultures
McGaughey, Sarah
In this course, students learn about key periods and topics of German-speaking cultures in their historical contexts. The course exposes students to various cultural forms such as music, literature, art, and patterns of daily life. It provides students with a basic level of understanding of German cultures and allows them to reflect on German cultures in English. Classes meet three days a week. Offered in English. This course counts toward the German minor. The course will count for the German major, if taken as FLIC. Prerequisite, if taken as FLIC: 202, or the equivalent.
SCON

Health Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HEST-250
Spring 2018
Global Health
Winchester, Margaret
This course introduces students to a range of critical global health issues and potential solutions. We will focus on in-depth case studies, covering a range of health issues and regions, such as infectious diseases, chronic disease management, maternal and child health, immigrant and refugee health, the political economy of health, and health disparities. The class adopts an interdisciplinary lens, with readings drawn from public health, medical anthropology, epidemiology, and other health sciences, and will include films and guest lectures.
SCON

History

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
HIST-211
Spring 2018
Food and American Environment
Pawley, Emily
This class examines the ways that the culture and politics of food have reshaped North American landscapes and social relations from colonial to modern times. We will explore, for example, how the new taste for sweetness fueled the creation of plantations worked by enslaved, the ways that the distribution of frozen meat helped build cities and clear rangeland, and the ways that the eating of fresh fruit came to depend on both a new population of migrant laborers and a new regime of toxic chemicals. Other topics will include catastrophes such as the Dustbowl, the controversial transformations of the Green Revolution, and the modern debates about the obesity epidemic.
SINV

Intl Business & Management

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INBM-100
Spring 2018
Fundamentals of Business
Ritchey, Sherry
Takacs, C Helen
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
SCON
INBM-200
Spring 2018
Global Economy
Fratantuono, Michael
Concentration upon strategies pursued by nation states in their interaction with international business enterprises and nongovernmental organizations. Students will work from an interdisciplinary perspective, with case studies of episodes in U.S. economic history and of selected countries from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. To facilitate their analysis, students will study concepts drawn from trade theory, commercial and industrial policy, balance of payments accounting, exchange rate determination, and open-economy macroeconomics. As such, the course will draw heavily from the introductory economics courses. This approach will help develop an appreciation for the complex environment in which both political leaders and corporate managers operate. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
SCON
INBM-200
Spring 2018
Global Economy
Fratantuono, Michael
Concentration upon strategies pursued by nation states in their interaction with international business enterprises and nongovernmental organizations. Students will work from an interdisciplinary perspective, with case studies of episodes in U.S. economic history and of selected countries from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. To facilitate their analysis, students will study concepts drawn from trade theory, commercial and industrial policy, balance of payments accounting, exchange rate determination, and open-economy macroeconomics. As such, the course will draw heavily from the introductory economics courses. This approach will help develop an appreciation for the complex environment in which both political leaders and corporate managers operate. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
SCON
INBM-300
Spring 2018
Business & Climate Change
Takacs, C Helen
In 2017, Dickinson College signed the "We Are Still In" open letter on climate change. More than 1,500 companies - including Facebook, Apple, Google, Amazon, Nestle and Nike - have also signed this letter to publicly express their commitments to addressing climate change. In this course, we will explore the wide array of risks and opportunities that climate change presents for business; the many way that businesses are already responding to climate change; and, perhaps most importantly, how business can lead the effort to mitigate climate change.
SINV
INBM-300
Spring 2018
Social Impact Through Communication and Storytelling
Ritchey, Sherry
Through the creation of storytelling students will develop social impact strategies for clients in both the non-profit and for-profit sections of our local community and national arenas focusing on healthcare, business, and community conflict areas. Students will learn to effectively incorporate non-violent communication into aspects of influence, negotiation, and imagery. By linking strategy with storytelling, a value proposition that drives purpose and provides profit can be communicated
SCON

International Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
INST-170
Spring 2018
International Relations
Nation, Robert
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
SCON
INST-200
Spring 2018
Global Economy
Fratantuono, Michael
Concentration upon strategies pursued by nation states in their interaction with international business enterprises and nongovernmental organizations. Students will work from an interdisciplinary perspective, with case studies of episodes in U.S. economic history and of selected countries from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. To facilitate their analysis, students will study concepts drawn from trade theory, commercial and industrial policy, balance of payments accounting, exchange rate determination, and open-economy macroeconomics. As such, the course will draw heavily from the introductory economics courses. This approach will help develop an appreciation for the complex environment in which both political leaders and corporate managers operate. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
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INST-277
Spring 2018
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and MEST 266.
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INST-280
Spring 2018
American Foreign Policy
Stuart, Douglas
A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
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INST-290
Spring 2018
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
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INST-290
Spring 2018
Politics of Oil, Arms, Peace & War: U.S./Russia/Middle East Relations in the 20th & 21st C
McGinnis, Joseph
From the time of the First World War the United States and Russia have been drawn into the Middle East economically, militarily, and politically. This course will examine those forces and the origins and results of a 100-year relationship, at times cooperative, but for the most part, confrontational. Oil has been a dominant factor, but religion, competition for influence, historic ties, and 65-plus years of Arab-Israeli tensions are equally important. We will review the history and politics of the relationship, using case studies where appropriate, including the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, when the U.S. and the Soviet Union almost came to blows placing their respective nuclear forces on alert. Where possible, the course will draw on individuals with experience in the region to share their expertise and first-hand knowledge of major events such as the Middle East Peace Process.
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Italian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
ITAL-201
Spring 2018
Intermediate Italian
Lanzilotta, Luca
Intensive introduction to conversation and composition, with special attention to grammar review and refinement. Essays, fiction and theater, as well as Italian television and films, provide opportunities to improve familiarity with contemporary Italian language and civilization. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
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Lat Am/Latino/Caribbean Stdies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
LALC-200
Spring 2018
Race, Ethnicity, and Hybridity
van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy, Patricia
This course examines the constructions, lived experiences and politics of race, ethnicity and hybridity. The course will explore the historical evolution of the concept of race, the ways in which race and ethnicity are overlapping classification categories that are embedded in relations of power, and the social, cultural and biological outcomes of extended contact and mixture. Whereas the majority of scholarship on race and ethnicity considers the dynamics of these social scientific categories and processes of formation through the lens of interactions between a dominant group (usually occupying the racial category of white) and a subordinated or minoritized group (usually racialized as black or brown), this course shifts the gaze to the politics of race and ethnicity between historically oppressed ethnic groups—those of African ethnic origin and those of various Asian ethnicities. Using case studies mainly from the Caribbean, but also from the US and Africa, we will examine the anthropological, sociological, literary, musical and filmic documentation and analyses of Afro/Asian mixture and will explore how racial identities, interethnic relations, gender, sexuality, religious practices, politics, and festivity have been influenced by mixing and creolizing processes.
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LALC-295
Spring 2018
Introduction to U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture
Reyes Zaga, Hector
This interdisciplinary introduction to Latina/o Studies discusses foundational historical, cultural, political, artistic, and literary texts of the U.S. Latina/o community. This class will cover diasporic movements and issues of identity, with a particular focus on the Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban-American diaspora. Prerequisite: SPAN 231. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 295.
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LALC-300
Spring 2018
Pretty, Maidenlike, and a Housewife?
Tordin, Giseli
In 2016 a Brazil's right-leaning magazine published an article on the wife of Brazil's vice-president, entitled “Pretty, Maidenlike, and a Housewife”. Subtly the magazine supported the idea that women do not occupy powerful positions. Instead, they must accompany a man. Unlike this stereotype (objected with a whole of outrage in social media), throughout the twentieth-century, a considerable number of Brazilian authors like Clarice Lispector, Marina Colassanti, Lygia Fagundes Telles, Adélia Prado, Guimarães Rosa, Patrícia Melo, Lya Luft, Sônia Coutinho, and filmmakers like Fernanda Vairelle, and Kléber Mendonça, among others have designed other destinies for the underrepresentation of women. Exploring themes like madness, eroticism, and aging, these authors subvert a set of beliefs that permeate the image of women insofar as reinstate women center-stage. We will study how a variety of authors believe that there is an overarching cultural background underlying minority or excluded groups. Therefore, this course aims at examining a broad range of Brazilian texts and films to understand how it is not homogeneity, but diversity, that pervades the cultures of social groups.
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Middle East Studies

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
MEST-200
Spring 2018
Politics of Oil, Arms, Peace & War: U.S./Russia/Middle East Relations in the 20th & 21st C
McGinnis, Joseph
From the time of the First World War the United States and Russia have been drawn into the Middle East economically, militarily, and politically. This course will examine those forces and the origins and results of a 100-year relationship, at times cooperative, but for the most part, confrontational. Oil has been a dominant factor, but religion, competition for influence, historic ties, and 65-plus years of Arab-Israeli tensions are equally important. We will review the history and politics of the relationship, using case studies where appropriate, including the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, when the U.S. and the Soviet Union almost came to blows placing their respective nuclear forces on alert. Where possible, the course will draw on individuals with experience in the region to share their expertise and first-hand knowledge of major events such as the Middle East Peace Process.
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MEST-266
Spring 2018
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics.This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and INST 277.
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Philosophy

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHIL-285
Spring 2018
Justice in World Politics
Reiner, Jason
An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as POSC 208. Prerequisite: 180 or POSC 170, 180, or permission of the instructor.
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Physics

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PHYS-114
Spring 2018
Climate Change and Renewable Energies
Pfister, Hans
An introduction to the physics of global climate change and a hands-on exposure to several types of renewable energy. The first third of this project-centered course introduces the basic physical principles of global climate change with a focus on radiative equilibrium, greenhouse effect, energy balance, and entropy. Since the energy sources of an energetically sustainable future will consist of renewable energies and possibly thermonuclear fusion energy, the remaining two thirds of the course is devoted to an exploration of wind turbines, solar concentrators, thermoelectric convertors, and photovoltaic systems. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics. Offered every two years.
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PHYS-132
Spring 2018
Introductory Physics
Hamilton-Drager, Catrina
Pfister, Hans
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
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Portuguese

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
PORT-380
Spring 2018
Pretty, Maidenlike, and a Housewife?
Tordin, Giseli
In 2016 a Brazil's right-leaning magazine published an article on the wife of Brazil's vice-president, entitled “Pretty, Maidenlike, and a Housewife”. Subtly the magazine supported the idea that women do not occupy powerful positions. Instead, they must accompany a man. Unlike this stereotype (objected with a whole of outrage in social media), throughout the twentieth-century, a considerable number of Brazilian authors like Clarice Lispector, Marina Colassanti, Lygia Fagundes Telles, Adélia Prado, Guimarães Rosa, Patrícia Melo, Lya Luft, Sônia Coutinho, and filmmakers like Fernanda Vairelle, and Kléber Mendonça, among others have designed other destinies for the underrepresentation of women. Exploring themes like madness, eroticism, and aging, these authors subvert a set of beliefs that permeate the image of women insofar as reinstate women center-stage. We will study how a variety of authors believe that there is an overarching cultural background underlying minority or excluded groups. Therefore, this course aims at examining a broad range of Brazilian texts and films to understand how it is not homogeneity, but diversity, that pervades the cultures of social groups.
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Political Science

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
POSC-170
Spring 2018
International Relations
Nation, Robert
An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
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POSC-208
Spring 2018
Justice in World Politics
Reiner, Jason
An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 285. Prerequisite: 170, 180 or PHIL 180, or permission of the instructor.
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POSC-233
Spring 2018
Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Marchetti, Kathleen
Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.This course is cross-listed as WGSS 202. Prerequisite: 120 or AP credit equivalent.
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POSC-277
Spring 2018
International Politics of the Middle East
Webb, Edward
This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as MEST 266 and INST 277.
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POSC-280
Spring 2018
American Foreign Policy
Stuart, Douglas
A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
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POSC-290
Spring 2018
Global Security
Nation, Robert
The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
SCON
POSC-290
Spring 2018
Politics of Oil, Arms, Peace & War: U.S./Russia/Middle East Relations in the 20th & 21st C
McGinnis, Joseph
From the time of the First World War the United States and Russia have been drawn into the Middle East economically, militarily, and politically. This course will examine those forces and the origins and results of a 100-year relationship, at times cooperative, but for the most part, confrontational. Oil has been a dominant factor, but religion, competition for influence, historic ties, and 65-plus years of Arab-Israeli tensions are equally important. We will review the history and politics of the relationship, using case studies where appropriate, including the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, when the U.S. and the Soviet Union almost came to blows placing their respective nuclear forces on alert. Where possible, the course will draw on individuals with experience in the region to share their expertise and first-hand knowledge of major events such as the Middle East Peace Process.
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POSC-290
Spring 2018
The Politics of Environmental Protection in Asia
Diamant, Neil
This course takes a close look at the political, social, and legal issues that affect environmental protection in Asia. Focusing attention on China, Taiwan, Japan, and India, and by drawing upon scholarly literature in political science, sociology, law, and history, the course aims to provide students with a multidisciplinary understanding of the myriad factors, which shape the content of environmental legislation and policies and how these are implemented in society. Does China's authoritarian system give environmental law more "bite"? What roles do NGO play in Asia? Does Confucianism or Hinduism make people more or less inclined to protect the environment? How do Asians deal with the impact of rapid economic growth? In short, we will try to understand the complex interaction between political, legal, and social dimensions of environmental protection in a region that is home to half of the world's population and three of the world's current and future economic powerhouses.
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Religion

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RELG-110
Spring 2018
Religion and Modern Culture
Donaldson, Mara
Drawing upon popular examples from film, drama, and narrative, as well as critical essays, the course explores both the religious dimensions of modern culture myth, sacred space and time, nature spirituality and the cultural contexts of contemporary theologies gender, race, economics.
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RELG-250
Spring 2018
Mother Earth: Religion and Sustainability
Donaldson, Mara
This course explores the following: the ways religious traditions both contribute to the environmental crisis and provide resources for addressing that crisis; the emergence of sustainability as a defining value in colleges and universities; the roles that Bill McKibben as a writer and climate change activist continues to play in promoting conversations and policy decisions related to values grounded in religious, spiritual, and scientific values.
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Russian

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
RUSS-260
Spring 2018
Politics of Oil, Arms, Peace & War: U.S./Russia/Middle East Relations in the 20th & 21st C
McGinnis, Joseph
Taught in English. From the time of the First World War the United States and Russia have been drawn into the Middle East economically, militarily, and politically. This course will examine those forces and the origins and results of a 100-year relationship, at times cooperative, but for the most part, confrontational. Oil has been a dominant factor, but religion, competition for influence, historic ties, and 65-plus years of Arab-Israeli tensions are equally important. We will review the history and politics of the relationship, using case studies where appropriate, including the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, when the U.S. and the Soviet Union almost came to blows placing their respective nuclear forces on alert. Where possible, the course will draw on individuals with experience in the region to share their expertise and first-hand knowledge of major events such as the Middle East Peace Process.
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Soc Innovation/Entrepreneurshp

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SINE-201
Spring 2018
Introduction to Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Staub, Shalom
This course introduces students to the essential concepts, mindsets and skill sets associated with social entrepreneurship. We begin with an overview of the field of social entrepreneurship. We will then develop a conceptual foundation in systems thinking and the community capital framework. The former allows students to grasp the complexity of social and environmental issues by viewing these issues through the lens of systems theory. The latter recognizes multiple forms of capital that are essential to developing sustainable communities: natural, physical, economic, human, social, and cultural capital. Other course topics may include creativity, innovation, social justice, alternative approaches to economics and business, and sustainability. Through definitional readings, case studies and/or biographies, students gain an understanding of the power of social entrepreneurship to create shared value at the local, regional, and global level. This course serves as the introduction to the Certificate in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship, but it is open to all students from all academic disciplines who wish to develop their own capacities to initiate meaningful change in our world.offered every spring.
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Sociology

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SOCI-230
Spring 2018
Environmental & Social Justice
Bedi, Heather
This course reviews social inequities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of notions of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we will explore how marginalized communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across places exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. A review of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to explore collective action to contest social and environmental injustices.
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Spanish

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SPAN-295
Spring 2018
Introduction to U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture
Reyes Zaga, Hector
This interdisciplinary introduction to Latina/o Studies discusses foundational historical, cultural, political, artistic, and literary texts of the U.S. Latina/o community. This class will cover diasporic movements and issues of identity, with a particular focus on the Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban-American diaspora. Prerequisite: 231. This course is cross-listed as LALC 295
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Sustainability

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
SUST-301
Spring 2018
Environmental Leadership and Organizing for Sustainable Social Change
Beevers, Michael
Loeffler, Carol
The goal of this class is to think about ourselves as agents of change and focus on forging solutions to environmental and social problems. Students will form a deep understanding of the theories, approaches and practices of social change and become familiar with issue campaigns, community organizing, new and traditional media, diversity and alliance building, facilitation and group process and power analysis. Students will enhance their understanding of what leadership is, and explore the passions, values and skills they bring to this work. Students will learn from leaders and organizers and get hands-on experience putting their ideas for social change into practice. The course is applicable to those that want to understand how non-profit organizations work for sustained change as well as those interested in being entrepreneurs or policy makers that want to initiate change.
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SUST-490
Spring 2018
Baird Honors Colloquium
Leary, Cornelius
Lyons, Lindsey
Permission of Instructor Required. Students accepted into the Baird Sustainability Fellows program will explore questions about sustainability from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and build leadership and professional skills as agents of change. The specific assignments and content of the colloquium will be decided in concert with the admitted students. These may include conversations with invited scholars and practitioners, discussions of selected readings and public lectures, individual or collaborative projects, written essays, presentations of student research and service projects, student led class sessions, workshops, and field trips. Each student will create an electronic portfolio to document attainment of sustainability learning goals. The colloquium is a half-credit course that will meet for 90 minutes each week. Grading for the course will be credit/no credit.
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Theatre & Dance

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
THDA-230
Spring 2018
Design Principles and Practices for the Stage
Barrett, Kent
Brennan, Lauren
A study of the language, principles, elements, and tools designers use to both formulate and communicate ideas as part of the collaborative process. Students will learn the basic elements of composition for stage design and will see how these elements function in the areas of costuming, lighting, scenery, and sound. Two hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week.
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Women's, Gender & Sexuality St

Course Number/Term Title/Instructor/Description Designation
WGSS-100
Spring 2018
Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Schweighofer, Katherine
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
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WGSS-202
Spring 2018
Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Marchetti, Kathleen
Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.
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WGSS-301
Spring 2018
Pretty, Maidenlike, and a Housewife?
Tordin, Giseli
In 2016 a Brazil's right-leaning magazine published an article on the wife of Brazil's vice-president, entitled “Pretty, Maidenlike, and a Housewife”. Subtly the magazine supported the idea that women do not occupy powerful positions. Instead, they must accompany a man. Unlike this stereotype (objected with a whole of outrage in social media), throughout the twentieth-century, a considerable number of Brazilian authors like Clarice Lispector, Marina Colassanti, Lygia Fagundes Telles, Adélia Prado, Guimarães Rosa, Patrícia Melo, Lya Luft, Sônia Coutinho, and filmmakers like Fernanda Vairelle, and Kléber Mendonça, among others have designed other destinies for the underrepresentation of women. Exploring themes like madness, eroticism, and aging, these authors subvert a set of beliefs that permeate the image of women insofar as reinstate women center-stage. We will study how a variety of authors believe that there is an overarching cultural background underlying minority or excluded groups. Therefore, this course aims at examining a broad range of Brazilian texts and films to understand how it is not homogeneity, but diversity, that pervades the cultures of social groups.
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WGSS-301
Spring 2018
Queer Politics and Feminist Thought
Oliviero, Kathryn
Drawing from queer, women of color, transgender and transnational perspectives, this course explores key concepts and tensions between queer politics and feminist thought. How does queerness complicate feminist understandings of gendered bodies and sexual behavior, particularly as they are shaped by race, nation, ability, and culture? In what ways does approaching queerness not only as an identity but as a politics contribute to feminist understandings of the relationship between people’s lives and institutional forces like government, medicine and family? Part I surveys the evolution of queer theory’s key concepts and debates with an emphasis on their relationship to feminist understandings of experience, intersectionality, and gender flexibility. Part II explores the visions queer politics offer up for living in a world that is otherwise than it is – what I term queer dreams. Central to Part II’s investigation is how queerness - as a lived experience and a politics - engages with contemporary feminist discussions around racial justice, ability, coalition-building, structural inequality, identity, sexual freedom, globalization, and violence. Through their final research projects, students will explore how queer and feminist theories’ evolving debates apply to a given cultural or political phenomenon of their choice. Creative projects such as podcasts, Op-documentaries, zines and graphic stories are invited. Prerequisites as indicated or another course with permission of the instructor.
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