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Student Snapshot: Will Giguere ’23

Will Giguere,

Meet Will Giguere ’23, a student-athlete and double major in international business & management and Italian studies who taught basic economics principles to Italian high-schoolers while studying abroad in Bologna.

Hometown:

Providence, Rhode Island.

Majors: 

International business & management and Italian studies with a minor in economics.

Clubs and organizations:  

International Business & Management Majors Committee, Italian Club, Men’s Varsity Golf and Student Athletic Advisory Committee (SAAC).

Favorite book:

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.

Favorite movie:

Either Office Space, The Other Guys or Caddyshack.

Best thing about my Dickinson experience:

The best thing about my Dickinson experience is learning from others. The ability to learn from other cultures and meeting people from all around the world has been wonderful. I have had the opportunity to meet people from Nepal, Russia, Egypt, Austria, Vietnam, Bulgaria, South Korea, China, Pakistan, Italy, and many others. Through meeting all these students, I have not only grown as a student but, more important, as a person.

Best thing about my major:

The best thing about my major is applying what I am learning to real-life scenarios. I have been able to take what I have learned in the classroom and think about the COVID-19 economic effect. I am able to apply basic economic principles in my daily life and have a better understanding of what real impact the economy has on everyone’s daily decisions.

On choosing Dickinson:

I wanted to attend Dickinson because of its homey feeling. From the moment I stepped foot in Carlisle, I felt like it was my new home. I also chose it because I wanted to get a high-level education while pursing golf at the collegiate Division III level. I felt that Dickinson was the right spot for me to meet intellectually bright and curious people who would enhance my learning environment. I also wanted to take advantage of being able to study abroad in Bologna, Italy.

Favorite place on campus:

The Academic Quad or the quiet study rooms in the library.

Favorite professor:

It is hard to choose a favorite professor because in doing so, I would exclude many. I think my favorite professors are ones who are so enthusiastic about their material that class times seem that they are not really class. These professors are the ones who embrace their material with heart and a deep love for their research. Those types of professors are the people who change students.

Little-known hobby/talent:

The ability to move my right eyebrow up and down without my left moving at all.

On studying abroad:

I studied abroad in Bologna, Italy, this past semester. The highlight of the experience was the ability to meet people from all walks of life and backgrounds. I have been able to meet locals and people from all around the world, which enhanced my view on world events. I have been able to develop my Italian skills to new levels. After leaving Bologna, I will reminisce about the opportunity I had to travel to Ferrara, Milan, Venice and Florence at a moment’s notice. The freedom to do so is something I will remember forever. I have really enjoyed being able to make my own path abroad while embracing a new culture. I hope to complete and join the Globally Integrated Semester in Bremen, Germany, this coming summer.

If I could have dinner with anyone, living or dead, it would be …

… Steve Jobs.

Proudest accomplishment so far:

I am most proud of navigating on my own while abroad in Bologna, Italy. The start of my experience abroad was a rough road, but later on, through hard work and determination, I found my way. Being over 4,000 miles away from Rhode Island, I created relationships with people I never knew I could. I had a number of dinners with a host family, volunteered at a local soup kitchen, helped out in teaching a basic-level economics class in English to native Italian high-school students and made my own way exploring my new world by traveling to cities alone. Going alone on a path toward making new friends or creating new experiences in a foreign land is nerve-wracking and scary at times, but in the end, it is life-changing. I now know I can achieve any goal.

Most important thing I’ve learned so far:

To keep going and keep working hard at what you love. Whatever the obstacle it may be, it’s only temporary.

About my internship:

I have interned at the Garrubbo Guide remotely and learned how to use WordPress in a professional environment. This past summer, I interned at the Italian Trade Agency (ITA), working remotely with their New York City office. My experience at the ITA allowed me to improve my communication skills while gaining real-world experience. The ITA gave me the chance to explore the area of TweetDeck and KPIs in the hope of growing an account through impressions.

While abroad in Bologna, Italy, I completed an internship with a local high school. Twice a week I would help out native Italian high school students learn basic-level economics. In doing so, I created PowerPoint presentations on the economic effects of unemployment and the U.S. government shutdown. I established a simple but personal connection with the students, and I improved each class’s communicative effectiveness and allowed for many to achieve more fluid speech in a language which is not their mother tongue. Incorporated into the classes were games like Kahoot and others, which were created to engage and enlighten the everyday classroom atmosphere.

Post-Dickinson plans:

I am currently not sure what my post-Dickinson plans will look like, but as a double major in international business & management and Italian studies, I hope to get a job in some intriguing business sector to gain corporate experience. Then I hope to start my own companies and create some new product or category in the business world using my creativity and linguistic capabilities to impact billions of people daily as well as giving back to the local communities in need.

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Published February 16, 2022