Major

11 courses

1. Four 100-level courses
One course from each group and one elective from any group or PSYC 185. Group 1: 110, 120, 125, 130. Group 2: 155, 160, 165, 175. Group 3: 135, 140, 145, 150. Psychology 180 courses are designated by the chair as an elective or as belonging in Group 1, 2 or 3.

2. 210 and 211

3. Two 300-level courses

4. Two 400-level courses

5. An additional 300-level course, OR
An additional 400-level course, OR
500 independent study in psychology, OR
550 independent research in psychology, OR
560 student/faculty collaboration research

Students are eligible to declare the psychology major after successful completion of 210.

When transferring credits to Dickinson, students may count no more than one 300-level PSYC course and one 400-level PSYC course toward their major requirements. There are no limits regarding 100-level PSYC courses. Exceptions to this rule may be granted to students by petition to the department chair.

Minor

Six courses, including 210 and 211 and a course from the 300-level group of research methods classes. Normally, four of the six courses (including the 210, 211 sequence and the 300-level course) must be completed in the department.

Suggested curricular flow through the major

First-Year students are encouraged to take at least one 100-level Psychology course during their first year. Once a student completes at least one 100-level Psychology course, then the student is eligible for entrance into Psychology 210 (Analysis of Psychological Data), a “gateway” course for the major. Generally speaking, Psychology 210 is taken during a student’s second year and the student can declare the major after the successful completion of Psychology 210.  Next, the student should complete Psychology 211 (Design of Psychological Research). Thus, students interested in majoring in Psychology should focus on taking 100- and 200-level Psychology courses during their first and second years.

Students must complete PSYC 210 and PSYC 211 before they will be eligible to take any upper-level courses in psychology.

Generally speaking, students complete 300- and 400-level Psychology courses during their third and fourth years. Below is an example of Psychology courses taken during a student’s four years at Dickinson College:

First Year
At least one 100-level courses
PSYC 210 (if possible)

Sophomore Year
At least two 100-level courses
PSYC 210 and PSYC 211 

Junior Year
At least one 100-level and one 300-level course
400-level seminar (if appropriate)
Semester abroad

Senior Year
Complete all remaining requirements

For specific information regarding requirements for majoring in Psychology, please consult the Psychology Department’s website. Students also are encouraged to speak with the Department Chair or any faculty member within the department to discuss navigating the major.

Independent study and independent research

Exceptional students may participate in traditional internships, independent study, and independent research projects (see Bulletin section entitled Special Approaches to Study).

Honors

Honors are granted to graduating seniors who write a paper which psychology faculty believe fit the criteria for excellence. The paper is based on a long-term empirical research project in psychology. To be awarded honors, the student must have, at graduation, a GPA of at least 3.7 in all of the Psychology courses taken (including courses taken abroad), an overall GPA of 3.5, and a majority faculty vote. Students interested in honors should consult the document "Advanced Psychological Research Projects," which is available from the department and at the department's web site.

Opportunities for off-campus study

Students who are interested in study abroad are urged to plan their programs carefully and begin the major early. An advising session is offered each semester that addresses this topic.

Co-curricular activities/programs

The Psychology Club and Psi Chi (the national honor society for psychology undergraduates) collaborate to sponsor events throughout the academic session. We host guest speakers, regular meetings, social events, and advising panels on careers, internships, and graduate school opportunities. Any student is eligible to join the Psychology Club.

Check out the Psychology Club Facebook page for additional details: https://www.facebook.com/DsonPsychClub

 

Courses

110 Animal Learning and Cognition
In this introductory course, we examine how fundamental principles, derived from the field of animal learning, govern simple and complex human behavior. Topics such as classical and operant conditioning, stimulus control, extinction and avoidance are discussed.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, PSYC 100-level Group 1, Social Sciences

120 Introduction to Health Psychology
This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the interdisciplinary field of health psychology, which uses scientific research methods to study the bi-directional relationship between psychology and health. We will discuss psychological states such as stress and how they affect the body, and mental processes such as finding meaning that are associated with effective coping and positive health outcomes. We will also study health behaviors such as exercise, sleep, eating, and substance use. Finally, we will explore how psychological concepts and research can be applied to health promotion and illness prevention. Course content will be especially relevant to students considering careers in health care or public health.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, Health Studies Elective, PSYC 100-level Group 1, Social Sciences

125 Brain and Behavior w/Lab
This course will introduce the structure and function of the brain as it influences human behavior. The level of study will be from a molar viewpoint, and findings from such fields as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and endocrinology will be considered in their relation to a number of behavioral processes. In the laboratory, students will engage in hand-on activities to explore brain anatomy, behavioral analysis and brain-behavior relationships. This course is a Health Studies elective.
Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, Health Studies Elective, Lab Sciences, PSYC 100-level Group 1

130 Perception, Memory & Thought
This introduction to cognitive psychology will cover such topics as: How do you recognize your grandmother? Can you do more than one thing at a time? Why can't you remember the names of people you just met? More formally, we will examine the processes of perception, attention, representation, and retrieval in children, adults, and machines.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, ENST Discip Spec (ESDS), PSYC 100-level Group 1, Social Sciences

135 Psychology of Women and Gender
Using a feminist social psychological framework, we will examine theory and research related to the psychology of women and the psychology of gender. We will analyze gender as a system that influences men's and women's lives, and consider the ongoing significance of gender role socialization across the lifespan. Throughout the semester, we will consider the social and political implications of putting women at the center of psychological analysis. In addition, we will develop tools to critically analyze traditional psychological theory and research to expose sexist bias, and we will examine alternative research methodologies that provide ways to study the richness of women's lives in context.
This course is cross-listed as WGSS 136.
Attributes: AMST Struct & Instit Elective, Appropriate for First-Year, PSYC 100-level Group 3, Social Sciences, US Diversity, WGSS Sexual & Gendered Plural

140 Social Psychology
In this introduction to psychological aspects of human social behavior, we discuss such topics as the relationship between attitudes and behavior, how people judge one another, interpersonal and group influence processes, and relations between individuals and groups, with strong emphasis on real-world applications. We also introduce scientific methods and formal theories for studying social behavior.
Attributes: AMST Struct & Instit Elective, Appropriate for First-Year, ENST Discip Spec (ESDS), PSYC 100-level Group 3, Social Sciences

145 Psychology of Human Sexuality
This course is a study of human sexuality emphasizing psychological aspects. We will cover sexual development from childhood to adulthood, sexual orientations, biological influences, sexual attitudes and behavior, gender, sex therapy, sexual coercion and abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and sexual health, and the development of sexual relationships. The study of human sexuality is inherently interdisciplinary in nature (drawing from such varied disciplines as sociology, women's studies, biology, anthropology, history, and others). Although we will cover some material from these disciplines, we will take an explicitly social psychological perspective, focusing on individual, personal, and social aspects of sexual behaviors, attitudes and beliefs.
Attributes: PSYC 100-level Group 3, Social Sciences, WGSS Sexual & Gendered Plural

150 Culture and Psychology
The vast amount of what we know in psychology is based on observations from a thin sliver of the humanity pie, an unreliable foundation for generalizing knowledge across time and place. This course starts with the position that a psychological science of Homo sapiens requires examining the various cultural and historical contexts that shape human behavior. Throughout this survey course, we will consider human universals and cultural diversity across a wide array of content areas including self, cognition, motivation, emotion, interpersonal and social behaviors, and health, with emphasis on the implications of such a cultural perspective for understanding what unites and divides us in the contemporary world.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, ENST Discip Spec (ESDS), Global Diversity, PSYC 100-level Group 3, Social Sciences

155 Human Development: Conception through Adolescence
This course will provide an introduction to the principles, theories, and research methods of lifespan developmental psychology from prenatal development and birth through adolescence (0 - 18 years old). It will focus on how individuals develop physically, cognitively, socially, and emotionally at each stage of the early part of the lifespan — infancy, childhood, adolescence – and the role of context (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, culture, family, peers, schools, neighborhoods) in shaping development. Finally, we will explore how developmental psychology can contribute toward improving lives and inform solutions to social problems.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, PSYC 100-level Group 2, Social Sciences

160 Human Development: Emerging Adulthood through Death
This course provides an introduction to the principles, theories, and research methods of lifespan developmental psychology from emerging adulthood (ages 18 – 25) through the end of life. The course focuses on how individuals develop physically, cognitively, socially, and emotionally at each stage of adult life — emerging, early, middle, and late adulthood. While we will take a chronological approach to studying human development, we will also focus on integrating and reinforcing connections within and across ages and areas of development. By the end of the course, you will have gained exposure to the psychological study of human development and the ways in which gender, race, ethnicity, culture, and socioeconomic factors influence development. The course will also expose you to the role of context (e.g., marriage, work, leisure, neighborhoods) in supporting or undermining adult development and aging. Finally, we will explore the various ways knowledge gained from studying developmental processes in adulthood have been used to improve lives and inform solutions to social problems facing adults.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, PSYC 100-level Group 2, Social Sciences

165 Psychopathology
An introduction to various psychological disorders and techniques of diagnosis and treatment. Relevant for students who anticipate careers in medicine, law, and the social or psychological services. This course is a Health Studies elective.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, Health Studies Elective, PSYC 100-level Group 2, Social Sciences

175 Introduction to Community Psychology
This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology--a field that focuses on persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals' mental health and wellbeing. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore the field's application to a range of clinical and social issues; and (d) emulate the field's commitment to the promotion of social change through research and action. This course is a Health Studies elective.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, ENST Discip Spec (ESDS), Health Studies Elective, PSYC 100-level Group 2, Social Sciences

180 Topics in Psychology
Students gain an appreciation of psychological principles by reading about and discussing a topic of interest. Course topics range from contemporary issues and historic controversies to broad themes. Recent topics courses have included Health Psychology, Unconscious Processes, and Molecules and Mental Illness.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, Social Sciences

185 Survey of Psychology
A survey of areas of contemporary psychological study to acquaint students with viewpoints, findings, and techniques of investigation of the discipline.
Attributes: Appropriate for First-Year, Social Sciences

210 Analysis of Psychological Data
In this course, one of the core requirements for the major, our focus is how to make sense of numerical information. Students learn to describe and analyze data. Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: any 100-level course. NOTE: Completion of both 210 and 211 fulfills the WID requirement.
Attributes: LPPM Empirical Social Analysis, Quantitative Reasoning

211 Design of Psychological Research
Readings and laboratory exercises introduce students to bibliographic resources in psychology, rules of valid scientific inference, and techniques for conducting psychology experiments.
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 210. NOTE: Completion of both 210 and 211 fulfills the WID graduation requirement.

310 Research Methods in Animal Learning
The field of animal learning is a subfield within psychology that attempts to understand human behaviors (e.g., eating) using animal models. Experimental methodologies have been the primary means by which researchers have studied such models. Topics such as the assessment of animal behavior, the ethics of animal use, and research ethics will be discussed. In this intensive lab course, students will conduct original, hands-on animal experiments utilizing classical and operant conditioning paradigms throughout the semester..
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: PSYC 110, 210 & 211; OR PSYC 125, BIOL 132 and NRSC 200.
Attributes: Division III non-Lab, NRSC Course

315 Research Methods in Behavioral Pharmacology
Behavioral pharmacology is a subdiscipline of pharmacology interested in the physiological and behavioral mechanisms by which drugs operate, encompassing how drugs influence behavior as well as how behavioral factors influence the actions of drugs. Standard experimental methodologies employed by behavioral pharmacologists to study the effects of drugs on behavior will be reviewed. Topics such as the behavioral analysis of drug effects, basic principles of pharmacology, and research ethics will be discussed. In this intensive lab course, students will conduct original, hands-on animal experiments throughout the semester.
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: PSYC 110, 125, 130 or 165, PSYC 210 & 211; OR BIOL 132, PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
Attributes: Division III non-Lab, NRSC Course

320 Research Methods in Health Psychology
Health psychology is the study of psychological issues in health, illness and health care. In this course, students will learn about various research methods used in health psychology. Health psychologists use many different methodologies including experimental methods in lab and field, quasi-experimental methods, and observational methods. We will discuss the application of these methods to health psychology research, as well as related topics of validity, measurement, and research ethics. This intensive lab course will culminate in the design and implementation of an original research project in the area of health psychology. .
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 & 211.
Attributes: Health Studies Elective

325 Research Methods in Behavioral Neuroscience
Behavioral Neuroscience, also known as Biological Psychology, is the study of the anatomical, chemical, and physiological mechanisms of behavior in humans and other animals. The underlying premise of Biological psychology is that no external behavioral event can take place unless there is a corresponding set of internal events involving the biochemical and electrochemical activity of the nervous system. In this course, students will learn about various research methods used in behavioral neuroscience, such as experimental methods in lab and field, quasi-experimental methods, and observational methods. We will discuss the application of these methods to research in behavioral neuroscience, as well as related topics of validity, measurement, and research ethics. This intensive lab course will culminate in the design and implementation of an original research project in the area of behavioral neuroscience.
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 110, 125, or 130, 210 & 211; OR BIOL 132, PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
Attributes: Division III non-Lab, NRSC Course, Writing in the Discipline

330 Autobiographical Memory Research Methods
Cognitive psychology is the study of how the mind processes information, including vision, attention, memory, and decision making, among others. In this course, students will learn about autobiographical memory, or memory for events in a person’s life that are considered relevant to understanding a sense of self. Although cognitive psychologists use many different methodologies (including experimental methods, reaction time tasks, and even brain imaging), this course focuses on analyzing personal memory narratives to draw conclusions about memory and selfhood. In doing so, methods covered include reliability and validity, experimenter control when studying memory, correlational and quasi-experimental approaches to data, ethics, and real-world applications of research. This intensive lab course will include the design and implementation of an original research project in the area of autobiographical memory.
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 130, 210 & 211; OR 125, BIOL 132 and NRSC 200.
Attributes: Division III non-Lab, NRSC Course

335 Qualitative Research Methods in Gender and Sexuality
The psychology of gender and sexuality is the study of psychological issues relating to gender identity, gender expression, sexual identity, and sexual practices. In this course, students will learn about one of the primary research methods used in the psychology of gender and sexuality – qualitative research methods. Although gender and sexuality psychologists use many methods (including experimental and quasi-experimental methods in lab and field, surveys, and observation), we will focus on interview methodology because it is particularly well-suited to studying people’s lived experience of gender and sex. Because the study of these topics has been strongly guided by feminist theory, this course will draw heavily on feminist critical perspectives on social science research. We will consider methodological topics of sampling, analysis, transferability of findings, researcher reflexivity, and research ethics. This intensive lab course will include the design and implementation of an original, community-based (on campus) research project.
This course is cross-listed as WGSS 336. Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: PSYC 210 & 211, and PSYC 135, 140, 145, 150, 155 or 175; OR, WGSS 200 and one additional WGSS course.
Attributes: WGSS Sexual & Gendered Plural

340 Research Methods in Social Psychology
Social psychology is the scientific study of how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of others. This intensive course will provide students with an overview of research methods used in social psychology. Students will learn about major concepts in research planning, design, and analysis when working with social psychological data. Students will also learn about best practices and challenges in social psychological research such as issues of sampling, survey research, correlational research, observational methods, experimental methods, ethics, and replication. In lab students will learn hands-on how to search and review scientific literature, how to design and conduct research projects, collect, analyze and interpret data, and communicate their findings in scientific reports. They will also learn how to use online methods for data collection and survey administration and strengthen their skills in SPSS data analysis.
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 140, 210 & 211.

350 Research Methods in Cultural Psychology
Cultural psychology is the study of psychological processes shaped by cultural context. In this course, students will learn about various research methods used in cultural psychology. To compare cultures and subcultures, cultural psychologists have employed a wide array of methodological tools; we will focus on survey, quasi-experimental, and experimental methods. We will discuss the application of these methods to cultural psychology research, especially in relation to topics of validity, bias/equivalence, causal inference, and replication. This intensive lab course will culminate in the design and implementation of a research project in the area of cultural psychology.
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 135, 140, 145 or 150; 210 & 211.

355 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology
Human development is progression through age-related changes that occur from conception until death and developmental psychology is the science that seeks to understand how and why people change and stay the same over time. This intensive course will provide students with an overview of research methods used in developmental psychology. It will focus on major concepts in research planning, design, analysis, and interpretation when seeking to answer questions about development. We will learn best practices and challenges in developmental research including topics on cross-sectional and longitudinal research, experimental methods, ethics, and applied developmental research. In lab, you will engage in hands-on activities, learning how to search and review scientific literature, design, and conduct research, collect, analyze, and interpret data, and communicate your findings to a scientific audience.
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 155 or 160, & 210 & 211.
Attributes: NRSC Course

365 Research Methods in Clinical Psychology
Clinical psychology focuses on the study of psychopathology and involves defining, measuring, preventing, and treating mental illness. In this course, students will learn about various research methods used in clinical psychology ranging from surveys, to behavior observation, to single-case studies, to randomized controlled trials. We will discuss the application of these methods to clinical psychology research, particularly in the context of revising psychiatric nosology, assessing psychopathology, and developing and testing interventions for prevention and treatment. This intensive lab course will culminate in the design and implementation of a research project in the area of clinical psychology.
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 165, 210 & 211.
Attributes: Health Studies Elective

370 Research Methods in Counseling Psychology: Psychological Testing
Many individuals complete brief magazine or online surveys about their personality, relationships, or psychological symptoms to better understand themselves or others. Comprehensive psychological testing, however, is much more in-depth and occurs only after significant research and development have taken place. Counseling psychologists take an empirical approach to understand many aspects of people’s functioning; one of the ways is through assessment. This course will address research methods in counseling psychology, with a specific focus on test development. This course will examine how psychological assessment tools, including structured and unstructured clinical interviews, objective and projective personality tests, measures of intellectual functioning and learning aptitudes, and vocational instruments, are developed and tested. Students will critically evaluate issues such as test validation, norming and standardization, reliability and validity, and test bias. This intensive lab course will include an original research project in test development. Students will also gain practical experience in the administration of assessment tools commonly employed in counseling psychology.
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 165, 210 & 211.

375 Research Methods in Community Psychology Research: Program Evaluation
Community Psychology is an applied subdiscipline of psychology that uses social and behavioral science to enhance the well-being of people and their communities and to prevent harmful outcomes. In this course, students will learn how to conduct a program evaluation, one of the primary research methods used in community psychology. Program evaluation uses social science research methods to systematically collect information that can be used to improve social, educational and health services. Although community psychologists use many different methodologies (including field experiments, quasi-experimental methods, correlational research and qualitative research), this intensive class will focus on program evaluation because it is one of the most commonly used methods in community psychology and is considered a core competency for community psychologists. This is a community-based research class and we will be partnering with a community agency to evaluate their services.
Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 210 & 211.
Attributes: Health Studies Elective, Service Learning

380 Research Methods in Psychology: Special Topics
Students conduct empirical research in an area of psychological science, analyze data, and report findings and conclusions.
Three hours classroom plus three hours lab per week. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 & 211.

410 Seminar in Learning
Elementary principles govern simple and complex human behavior. This seminar examines how such principles help us understand both typical, everyday behaviors (e.g., eating) and atypical or maladaptive behaviors (e.g., drug abuse). Formal theories of learning also are discussed.
Prerequisites: 210 & 211.
Attributes: Social Sciences

420 Seminar in Health Psychology
This advanced seminar will focus on psychological and behavioral processes in health and illness. The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of a current topic in health psychology, such as the psychology of women’s health, stress and health, or health behaviors. Through readings and class discussions, students will be exposed to psychological theories and research methodologies used in health psychology, and to current literature in the field. We will also explore the application of psychological science in improving health.
Pre-requisite: 211.
Attributes: Health Studies Elective

425 Seminar in Biological Psychology
An advanced seminar into the relationship between physiological systems and behavior. This course will include coverage of mammalian brain organization and function in terms of transmitter systems which are correlated with the interactions between anatomy, physiology, and behavior.
Prerequisites: 210 & 211; OR PSYC 125, BIOL 132 and NRSC 200.
Attributes: Division III non-Lab, NRSC Course

430 Seminar in Cognitive Psychology
This advanced seminar will focus on human cognition. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, intelligence and creativity, the development of physical and mental skills, learning and memory across the lifespan, and thought in humans and machines. Students will be exposed to psychological theories and research methodologies used in cognitive psychology and to current literature in the field.
Prerequisites: 210 & 211; or PSYC 125, BIOL 132 and NRSC 200.
Attributes: NRSC Course

435 Seminar in Gender and Sexuality
This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender and sexuality, focusing largely on social psychological and feminist research and theory. This is an advanced seminar that focuses in depth on special topics within these fields. Topics may include sexual identities, gender identities, romantic and sexual relationships, gender and violence, among others. Students will develop their understanding of these topical issues by reading and writing about primary sources and by participating in and leading class discussions.
Cross-listed with WGSS 306. Prerequisite: 211 or WGSS 200.
Attributes: WGSS Sexual & Gendered Plural

440 Seminar in Social Psychology
In this seminar, we read and discuss primary sources in theoretical or applied social psychology. Previous seminars have looked at applications of social psychology principles in law, medicine, mental health, consumer behavior, conservation, and education, and theories of social construal, social influence, and social systems. Students are responsible for leading class sessions and contributing to a group document, such as an annotated bibliography or literature review.
Prerequisites: PSYC 210 & 211.

450 Cultural Processes and Human Behavior
This seminar covers advanced research as it pertains to culture and psychology. To fully appreciate how culture is intertwined with human behavior, it is necessary to go beyond a survey of research that merely describes cultural variation. By cultural processes, we mean why, how, and when culture comes to shape psychological functioning for group differences to arise. As a result, we will pay close attention to different ways of accounting for cultural influence as well as the specific ways in which cultures vary. We will conclude this course by discussing some recent applications of this emerging science of cultural processes.
Prerequisite: 210 & 211.

460 Seminar in Developmental Psychology
This advanced seminar will develop students’ understanding of how social and contextual forces can shape human development. It will focus on how physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development might be similar or dissimilar based on different life experiences. This course will consider development at all stages of life - childhood, adolescence, emerging adulthood and adulthood. When appropriate, this course will draw on perspectives from related disciplines (e.g., history, sociology, public health). Additionally, this course will consider how social categories (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity) influence development. Finally, we will explore how knowledge gained from studying developmental processes in adulthood have been used to improve lives and inform solutions to social problems.Prerequisite: 211

465 Seminar in Clinical Psychology
An advanced seminar in which students read and discuss primary sources in theoretical and applied clinical psychology. The purpose of this course is to help students gain a deeper understanding of the processes of clinical assessment, treatment, and prevention of psychopathology.
Prerequisites: 210 & 211.
Attributes: Health Studies Elective

470 Seminar in Counseling Psychology
The major goal of this advanced seminar course is to develop students’ understanding of the major counseling theories. Students will be introduced to various counseling techniques and the underlying scientific research, including the conditions that facilitate an effective counseling relationship. We will also review and critically evaluate professional ethics and standards for care in counseling psychology. This is largely a theoretical course; while some skills may be introduced and practiced in class, skills-building is not a main goal of the course. Students will engage in presentation of differing research topics within the field, while also applying relevant course information to case studies. Course requirements include, but are not limited to, class participation, reflection papers, research papers and oral presentations.
Prerequisite: 211.

475 Seminar in Community Psychology
The practice of community psychology is typically directed toward the design and evaluation of strategies aimed at facilitating empowerment, preventing psychological disorders, and promoting social justice and change. The goal is to optimize the well-being of individuals and communities with innovative and alternative interventions designed in collaboration with affected community members and with other related disciplines inside and outside of psychology. This course is an advanced seminar that focuses in depth on special topics in the field of community psychology. Topics may include substance abuse and addiction, delinquency, stress and coping, prevention vs. intervention, social support, and program consultation and evaluation. Students will develop their understanding of topical issues by reading primary and secondary sources and participating in class discussions and applied exercises.
Prerequisites: 210 & 211.
Attributes: Health Studies Elective, Service Learning

480 Seminar in Advanced Topics
Advanced seminar in which students become actively engaged in reading about, reviewing, and discussing selected topics of importance in the discipline. Recent advanced topics courses have included The Psychology of Law and Medicine, Psychopharmacology, The Psychology of Groups, and Psychology of Identification.
Prerequisites: 210 & 211.
Attributes: Social Sciences