Major

Twelve courses plus field experience

I. METHODOLOGICAL CORE (Six courses)
1. ARCH 110/ANTH 110: Archaeology and World Prehistory
2. Introduction to a regional ancient civilization, art and archaeology:

  • ARCH 120/CLST 221: Greek Art and Archaeology, or
  • ARCH 130/CLST 224: Roman Archaeology, or
  • ARCH 140: Egyptian Art and Archaeology, or
  • ARCH 150: Near Eastern Art and Archaeology, or
  • ARCH 210: Prehistoric Aegean Art and Archaeology, or
  • ARCH 261/ANTH 261: Archaeology of North American Indians, or
  • ARCH 262/ANTH 262/LALC 262: South American Archaeology

3. ARCH 300/ANTH 300: Archaeological Method and Theory 
4. ARCH 390: Advanced Studies in Archaeology 
5. ANTH 100: Introduction to Biological Anthropology
6. ERSC 141: Planet Earth, or ERSC 142: Earth History

II. SPECIALIZATION/CONCENTRATION (Six elective courses)
In consultation with your faculty advisor, choose an area of emphasis and select a coherent set of 6 courses based on your interests from one of the following two groups:

AREA A: Mediterranean Archaeology and Art
ANTH 241: Measurement and Quantification in the Social Sciences
ARCH 120/CLST 221: Greek Art and Archaeology (only counts if not 
already taken in the core)
ARCH 130/CLST 224: Roman Archaeology (only counts if not already taken in the core)
ARCH 140: Egyptian Art and Archaeology (only counts if not already taken in the core)
ARCH 150: Near Eastern Art and Archaeology (only counts if not already taken in the core)
ARCH 200: Selected Topics in Archaeology 
ARCH 210: Prehistoric Aegean Art and Archaeology (only counts if not already taken in the core)
ARCH 221: Ancient Greek Architecture 
ARCH 222: Ancient Greek Sculpture 
ARCH 223: Ancient Greek Painting 
ARCH 250: Ancient Greek Religion and Sanctuaries
ARCH 251/ANTH 251: Paleolithic Archaeology
ARCH 260/ANTH 260: Environmental Archaeology
ARCH 301: Summer Fieldwork in Classical Archaeology (counts after the Field Experience requirement has been fulfilled)
ARCH 390: Advanced Studies in Archaeology 
ARCH 500: Independent Study (only with permission of advisor and consent of instructor)
ARCH 560: Student/Faculty Collaborative Research
ARTH 202: Ancient Art and Art History
ARTH 302: Roman Painting 
ARTH 303: Roman Portraiture 
ARTH 391: Studies in Art History 
CLST 100: Greek and Roman Mythology
CLST 110: Introduction to Greek Civilization
CLST 120: Roman Private Life
CLST 200: Special Topics in Classical Civilization (dependent upon topic)
CLST 253: Roman History
ENST 313: Geographic Information Systems
ERSC 309: Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
MATH 121: Elementary Statistics
MATH 225: Probability and Statistics I

AREA B: Archaeology, Anthropology, and the Environment
ANTH 101: Anthropology for the 21st Century (Strongly recommended)
ANTH 214: Ecological Anthropology 
ANTH 217: Cross Cultural Perspectives on Gender
ANTH 223: Native Peoples of Eastern North America
ANTH 225: Human Osteology 
ANTH 230: Ethnography of Postcolonial Africa
ANTH 233: Anthropology of Religion 
ANTH 241: Measurement and Quantification in Social Sciences
ANTH 245: Selected Topics in Anthropology 
ARCH 251/ANTH 251: Paleolithic Archaeology
ANTH 255: Global Eastern Africa
ARCH 260/ANTH 260: Environmental Archaeology
ARCH 262/ANTH 262/LALC 262: South American Archaeology (only counts if not already taken in the core)
ANTH 331: Principles of Human Evolution
ANTH 336: Social Distinctions
ANTH 395/ARCH 395: Archaeological Field Studies (counts after the Field Experience requirement has been fulfilled
ARCH 200: Selected Topics in Archaeology
ARCH 500: Independent Study (only with permission of advisor and consent of instructor)
ARCH 560: Student/Faculty Collaborative Research
ERSC 201: Surface Processes
ERSC 204: Global Climate Change
ERSC 208: Environmental Hazards
ERSC 305: Earth Materials
ERSC 307: Paleontology
ERSC 309: Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
ENST 313: Geographic Information Systems
MATH 121: Elementary Statistics
MATH 225: Probability and Statistics I

III. FIELD EXPERIENCE
May be fulfilled by either: a) summer excavation fieldwork; or, b) museum/lab internship. The summer excavation fieldwork must be done for academic credit through the Archaeology Program. The museum/lab internship may be taken as part of an independent study for academic credit through the Archaeology Program OR for a transcript notation through the Career Center. The museum/lab internship must have the approval of the program chair.

Ancient & Foreign Languages 
Latin or Ancient Greek is strongly recommended for those specifically interested in Greek and Roman archaeology within the Mediterranean Archaeology and Art emphasis (Area A concentration) or double majoring or minoring in Classical Studies. Four semesters of a recommended ancient language may be counted collectively as two course credits towards the total of six for the area emphasis.

If it is appropriate to the location of the student's intended field experience (for either area), and with the faculty advisor's and chairperson's approval, two courses of a recommended modern language may count collectively as one course credit towards the total of six for the area emphasis (maximum one credit allowed). 

Minor

Seven courses plus field experience:

I. METHODOLOGICAL CORE (five courses):
1. ARCH 110/ANTH 110: Archaeology and World Prehistory
2. Introduction to a regional ancient civilization, art and archaeology:

  •  ARCH 120/CLST 221: Greek Art and Archaeology, or
  •  ARCH 130/CLST 224: Roman Archaeology, or
  •  ARCH 140: Egyptian Art and Archaeology, or
  •  ARCH 150: Near Eastern Art and Archaeology, or
  •  ARCH 210: Prehistoric Aegean Art and Archaeology, or
  •  ARCH 261/ANTH 261: Archaeology of North American Indians

3. ARCH 300/ANTH 300: Archaeological Method and Theory
4. ANTH 100: Introduction to Biological Anthropology
5. ERSC 141: Planet Earth, or ERSC 142: Earth History

II. AREA EMPHASIS (two courses): In consultation with your faculty advisor, choose an area of emphasis and select a coherent set of courses
based on your interests from one of the following two groups:

Area A: Mediterranean Archaeology and Art
At least two courses from among the following: ANTH 241, ARCH 120/CLST 221, ARCH 130/CLST 224, ARCH 140, 150, or 210 (120, 130, 140, 150 and 210 can only count if not already taken in the core), ARCH 221, 222, 223, 250, ARCH 251/ANTH 251, ARCH 260/ANTH 260, ARCH 200, ARCH 301 (after the Field Experience requirement has been fulfilled), ARCH 390, 500, 560; ARTH 202, 302, 303, 391; CLST 100, 110, 120, 200, 253; ENST 313; ERSC 309; MATH 121, 225

Area B: Archaeology, Anthropology, and the Environment
At least two courses from among the following: ANTH 101, 214, 217, 223, 225, 230, 233, 241, 245, ARCH 251/ANTH 251, ANTH 255, ARCH 260/ANTH 260, ARCH 261/ANTH 261 (can only count if not taken in the core), and ANTH 331, 336, ANTH/ARCH 395, (after the Field Experience requirement has been fulfilled); ARCH 200, 500, 560; ERSC 141, 142 (only counted if not taken in the core) 201, 204, 208, 305, 307, 309; ENST 313; MATH 121, 225

Suggested curricular flow through the major

The Archeology major is designed to introduce students to archeological methods and theories used by archeologists across the globe and to help students gain greater, more in-depth experience in one of two areas. Students who choose to pursue Area A of the major focus on the Mediterranean and Classical Archaeology. Students who choose to pursue Area B of the major focus on Anthropological Archaeology of the Americas and other world regions as well as Environmental Archaeology. Students are encouraged to explore both areas of study in coursework and in field experiences.

These guidelines suggest courses to take each year rather than specifying a required sequence. Students can tailor these guidelines to their circumstances in discussions with an Archaeology faculty member.

First Year
ARCH 110, Archaeology and World Prehistory
Any region-specific course in the Methodological Core (ARCH 120, 130, 140, 150, 210, 262)
ANTH 100, Introduction to Biological Anthropology, or ERSC 141, Planet Earth, or ERSC 142, Earth History

Sophomore Year
ARCH 110, Archaeology and World Prehistory (if not taken in First Year)
ARCH electives within Area A or Area B: refer to  the MAJORS - II. Specialization/Concentration section in the Academic Bulletin: Archaeology
Other courses in the Methodological Core
ARCH 300, Archaeological Method and Theory
Summer Field Experience

Junior Year
ARCH electives within Area A or Area B: refer to the MAJORS - II. Specialization/Concentration section in the Academic Bulletin: Archaeology
ARCH 300, Archaeological Method and Theory (if not taken in Sophomore Year)
Other courses in the Methodological Core: refer to the MAJORS - I. Methodological Core section in the Academic Bulletin: Archaeology
Study Abroad (one or two semesters) can fulfill electives for Area A or Area B, with departmental approval
ARCH 390, Advanced Studies in Archaeology

Senior Year
Finish requirements in the Methodological Core and electives
ARCH 390, Advanced Studies in Archaeology

Independent study and independent research

Independent studies are available. Any independent study must involve an interdisciplinary research topic in Archaeology. No more than two independent studies may be counted toward the major. Topic proposal and program of work must be approved by the instructor.

Independent research leading to Honors in the Major or student/faculty collaborative research may be undertaken with one of the contributing departments.

Honors

Honors may be granted in Archaeology for a two-semester project that results in a well-researched, sophisticated, finely crafted thesis within the range of sixty to one hundred pages. Students are self-selected but acceptance as an Honors candidate is based on the judgment of the department faculty and their assessment of the student's academic ability and potential for successfully completing the project. They will work closely with one advisor but will receive guidance and resources from other members of the department. Only the best projects will be granted Honors, but any student who completes the project will receive credit for the two semesters of independent study.

Opportunities for off-campus study

Field experience in archaeology is an important component of the Archaeology Major/Minor; students are trained in the techniques and methods of field archaeology and provided with invaluable hands-on experience. All students are encouraged to spend part of at least one summer at an excavation or survey, either in the United States or abroad. Students have the opportunity to participate every summer in the archaeological survey, excavation, and Museum research at Mycenae, Greece (D.E.P.A.S. project, headed by Prof. Maggidis, Assistant to the Director of Mycenae). The Department of Anthropology offers regularly a summer field course in Tanzania, Africa; students may also participate in other excavations in the region, such as the Cloisters, Ephrata, PA (State Museum of Harrisburg on City Island).

Students are also encouraged to pursue Museum internships offered at the Trout Gallery by the Department of Art & Art History, research internships and training (digital research projects) at the J. Roberts Dickinson Archaeology Lab, or Museum/lab summer research at Mycenae, Greece.

The Department of Classical Studies also offers four-week travel opportunities in Italy and Greece; other opportunities are also available, including Durham University (Department of Archaeology), the Intercollegiate Center in Rome and the College Year in Athens. Contact the department chairperson for further information.

Ancient & Modern Foreign Languages

At least two semesters of Latin or ancient Greek are required for those choosing the Classical Art and Archaeology area emphasis. Recommended modern foreign languages include any of the following: German, French, Modern Greek, or Italian. Four semester courses of a recommended ancient or modern foreign language may be counted collectively as one (maximum allowed) of the four elective courses toward the Archaeology Major.

Courses

110 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world.
This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110. This course fulfills the DIV I.c. or DIV II distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.

120 Greek Art & Archaeology
A general introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from Prehistoric to Hellenistic times: Bronze Age civilizations (Cycladic, NE Aegean and Trojan, Minoan, Helladic/Mycenaean); Protogeometric, Geometric, Archaeic, Classical, and Hellenistic Greece. A survey of architecture (temple, secular, funerary), sculpture, vase-painting, monumental painting, metalwork, and minor arts of these periods, both on mainland Greece and in the Greek colonies (Asia Minor, Pontus, Syria, Phoenice, Egypt, S. Italy and Sicily); comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments; styles and schools, regional trends. Historical contextualization of ancient Greek art and brief consideration of socio-economic patterns, political organization, religion, and writing. Evaluation of the ancient Greek artistic legacy and contribution to civilization. Field trips to archaeological collections and Museums.
This course is cross-listed as CLST 221. Offered every fall.

130 Roman Archaeology
A general introduction to the art and archaeology of the Roman world from the Late Republic to the 4th century AD. A survey of architecture (temple, public, domestic, palatial, funerary), monumental painting, sculpture, metalwork, and minor arts of these periods in Italy and the rest of the Roman world; particular emphasis on Rome, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Ostia, Greece/Asia Minor, and North Africa. Comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments; regional trends and foreign influences. Historical and cultural contextualization of Roman art and architecture with consideration of socio-economic patterns, political developments, religion, and writing.
This course is cross-listed as CLST 224. Offered occasionally.

140 Egyptian Art and Archaeology
A general introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt from the pre-dynastic period to the Hellenistic era, focusing mainly on the archaeological record of the Old, Middle, and New Kingdom. The course includes a survey of public architecture (temple, palatial, funerary) and domestic/secular architecture, sculpture, wall-paintings and reliefs, metalwork, seal-stones, faience/ivory-carving, and pottery, complemented with a comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments. Special emphasis is given to historical developments and the archaeological evidence for the complex political, socio-economic, and cultural evolution of ancient Egypt, including urbanization and centralization of government, administration and writing (hieroglyphics), social hierarchy and craft specialization, ancient environment and technology. Religion, mythology, and literature are also explored, as well as historical sources, relative and absolute chronology, military power and expansionism, diplomacy, international dynamics and trade contacts, and the legacy and impact of ancient Egypt on the modern world. Course content will also include visits to archaeological collections and/or museums and educational CD-ROMs and videos.
This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every two years.

150 Near Eastern Art and Archaeology
A general introduction to the art and archaeology of the ancient Near East from the time of the first settlements to the Hellenistic era. This course is a historically oriented survey of the archaeological record of the main cultures that emerged and flourished in the ancient Near East, including the Sumer, Akkadians, Babylonians, Hittites, Assyrians, and Persians. The course includes a survey of public, secular, and funerary architecture, sculpture, wall-paintings, metalwork, and pottery, complemented with a comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments. Special emphasis is given to the archaeological evidence for the complex political, socio-economic, and cultural evolution of the ancient Near East, including urbanization, complex systems of government, socio-economic organization, literacy, with careful consideration of the historical record. Religion, mythology, literature, and science are also explored, as well as military power and expansionism, diplomacy, international dynamics and trade contacts, and the legacy of the ancient Near East to world civilization. Course content includes visits to archaeological collections and/or museums and educational CD-ROMs and videos.
This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every two years.

200 Selected Topics in Archaeology
Courses offered on an occasional basis that cover special periods, methods or topics in archaeology not dealt with in the rest of the curriculum.
Prerequisite: course in DIV I or DIV II, depending upon topic.

210 Prehistoric Aegean Art and Archaeology
A general introduction to the art and archaeology of the Prehistoric Aegean, including the Neolithic, Cycladic, NE Aegean and Trojan, Minoan, Helladic and Mycenaean civilizations, with consideration of both the Aegean sites and the Minoan/Mycenaean trade posts and colonies in Asia Minor, Cyprus, Syropalestine and Egypt. A survey of architecture (palatial, secular, temple and funerary), pottery, sculpture, frescoes, seal stones, metalwork (metallic vases, weapons, jewelry), stone- and ivory-carving; comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments. Cultural contextualization and brief consideration of the historical framework, socio-economic, political and administrative context, writing and religion. Major interpretative issues and problems in Aegean Prehistory, including relative and absolute chronology, emergence and formation process, collapse and fall of the Minoan palaces and the Mycenaean citadels, spatial definition and multiple function of the palatial networks, military power and expansionism, international dynamics and contacts. Evaluation of the Prehistoric Aegean legacy and contribution to ancient Greek and Western Civilization. Visits to archaeological collections and Museums.
Offered every fall..

218 Geographic Information Systems
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing.
Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218. This course fulfills the QR distribution requirement.

221 Ancient Greek Architecture
A survey of ancient Greek architecture from the 11th century BC to the 1st century BC, on mainland Greece and the Greek colonies. Temple architecture, altars and sanctuaries; secular architecture (houses, villas, and palaces); public architecture (agoras, stoas, prytaneia, propyla, theaters, gymnasia, stadiums, fountains and aqueducts, fortifications, roads, bridges); poleodomy or city-planning; funerary architecture (tombs, heroa, mausoleums and other funerary buildings). Building materials and techniques; orders and principles of ancient Greek architecture; ancient theory and techniques, typological developments and technological advances, architectural masterpieces; ancient Greek masters. consideration of epigraphical and ancient literary sources (including readings from Vitruvius, Pliny the Elder, Pausanias).
Offered every third year.

222 Ancient Greek Sculpture
A thorough survey of ancient Greek sculpture from 1050 BC to 31 BC, with consideration of both mainland Greece and the Greek colonies (Asia Minor, Pontus, Syria, Phoenice, Egypt, S Italy and Sicily). Daedalic, Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods; sculpture in the round and architectural sculpture, monumental and small-scale sculpture. Materials, techniques, and principles; subject matter and iconography, stylistic and technical developments; styles and regional trends; ancient Greek masters and their schools, legendary contests; consideration of ancient literary sources (including readings from Pausanias and Pliny the Elder) and Roman copies of Greek originals. Visits to archaeological collections and Museums; hands-on examination of selected important sculptures (prospective cast collection on-campus).
Offered every third year.

223 Ancient Greek Painting
A survey of ancient Greek vase-painting (Protogeometric, Geometric, Archaeic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, from 1050 BC to 31BC) with consideration of both mainland Greece and the Greek colonies, and study of ancient Greek (with special emphasis on recently discovered large-scale frescoes in Macedonian tombs), Etruscan, and Roman monumental painting (including selective mosaics). Materials, techniques, and principles; iconography, stylistic and technical developments; styles and regional trends; ancient Greek and Roman masters and their schools; consideration of ancient literary sources (including readings from Pausanias, Pliny the Elder, Cicero). Visits to archaeological collections and Museums.
Offered every third year.

250 Ancient Greek Religion and Sanctuaries
A survey of the origins, history, structure, and evolution of ancient Greek religion and sanctuaries from Mycenaean to Hellenistic times. A comparative study of official religion vs. folk religion, pantheon of gods and heroes vs. daemonic cults and magic (ritual binding, cursing, charming), myths, oracles, festivals and games vs. house cult; an insight into mysteries and chthonic cults, burial customs and eschatology, soul and the Homeric underworld, the mnemoscape of death and reincarnation. A review of loci of worship (caves, shrines, temples, sanctuaries); analysis and meaning of the worship ritual, offerings, dedications, animal and human(?) sacrifices; interpretation of sacred symbols, ritual implements and paraphernalia: idols and figurines, large-scale anthropomorphic concretions, cult statues. A comparative study of the history and development, organization and lay-out, architecture, portable finds and dedications of the most prominent Mycenaean and ancient Greek sanctuaries (Mycenae Cult Center, Tiryns shrines, Aghia Irene temple; Olympia, Delphi, Eleusis, Delos, Nemea, Dodone, Kos, Samos, Priene, Pergamon) involving a synthesis of archaeological and iconographical evidence, Linear B documents, epigraphic evidence, and ancient literary sources. Additional issues to be addressed include: Greek anthropomorphism and polytheism; the power of religion as collective memory; the sociopolitical role of organized religion; priesthood and the gradual appropriation of religion by the ruling hierarchy and the state (polis); chronological development of ritual vs. unchanging core of beliefs; patterns of uniformity and regional variation; survival of ancient Greek religious elements in Christianity.
Offered every third year.

251 Paleolithic Archaeology
This course reviews the formative phases in the development of prehistoric cultures and societies during the Plio-Pleistocene in Africa, Europe, and Asia up to the Mesolithic. Archaeological evidence of ecology, subsistence systems, technology, and the evolution of cognitive behavior will be discussed in detail.
This course fulfills the DIV II distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every two years.

260 Environmental Archaeology
The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments.
This course fulfills the DIV II distribution requirement. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 260. Offered every two years.

261 Archaeology of North America
This course reviews Pre-Columbian landscapes north of Mesoamerica. We consider topics including the timing and process of the initial peopling of the continent, food production, regional systems of exchange, development of social hierarchies, environmental adaption and the nature of initial colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans. These questions are addressed primarily by culture area and region.
This course fulfills the DIV II distribution requirement and U.S. Diversity graduation requirement. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 261. Offered every two years.

262 South American Archaeology
This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments?
This course fulfills the DIV II distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.

300 Archaeological Method and Theory
Introduction to archaeology: a survey of the history, aims, methodology, theory and practice of archaeology. The evolution of archaeology from amateur treasure quest and collecting to a complicated science, dedicated to the discovery and study of material remains as well as the exploration and theoretical reconstruction of the past; great discoveries, persons and factors that shaped this transformation in the 19th and 20th century; theories, issues, and trends in archaeological interpretation; applications of archaeology towards a greater understanding of our past and present. An introduction to field of archaeology and practice: site location, topographical and survey techniques, archaeological excavation techniques for different types of sites; stratigraphy, spatial distribution, seriation; correlation, phasing, absolute and relative chronology; data recording, archaeological drawing (sections, plans, artifacts) and photography; computer applications (including artifact data-base, archaeological matrix, plans and maps, 3-D monument and site reconstructions); relationships between archaeology and related sciences, between material and non-material culture, evidence interpretation and theoretical reconstruction of material remains. Simulated Excavation Field (SEF) practical training; summer field training opportunity at Mycenae (excavation and Museum research) and Scotland.
Prerequisite: one ARCH course or ANTH 110, 250, 260, or 261, or CLST 221 or 224. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 300. This course fulfills the DIV I.c. or DIV II social sciences distribution requirement. Offered every spring.

301 Fieldwork in Classical Archaeology
Archaeological excavation and geoprospection survey for four to six weeks at the Citadel and the Lower Town of Mycenae in Greece (DEPAS Project). The dig provides training for students in the techniques and methods of field archaeology.
Admission by permission of the instructor; ARCH 201 recommended. May be repeated for credit. If taken as part of the archaeology major, the course satisfies either the Field Experience requirement or counts as an elective in the classical area emphasis. If taken more than once it both satisfies the Field Experience requirement and counts as an elective in the classical area emphasis.This course is cross-listed as CLST 301.

318 Advanced Applications in GIS
The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques.
Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318 and ERSC 318. Offered every two years.

390 Advanced Studies in Archaeology
This course undertakes special topics, issues, and problems in Old World and New World Archaeology ranging from prehistory and classical antiquity (e.g., Problems in Aegean Prehistory, In Search of the Trojan War, Great Cities) to modern era archaeology (19th/20th century AD) and modern applications of the discipline.
Prerequisite: 300. Offered occasionally. This course fulfills the WR graduation requirement.

395 Archaeological Field Studies
Application of the fundamentals of archaeological survey, excavation and the laboratory processing and cataloging of artifacts.
This course is cross-listed as ANTH 395.