Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 110-01.This course will consist of both asynchronous lectures and synchronous class meetings and discussions. There will also be in-person office hours and other in person opportunities to meet in smaller groups, space and social-distancing permitting. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
0830:MWF   DIST
ARCH 202-01 Reality, Idealism, Beauty, and Power: Topics in the Art & Architecture of Ancient Greece and Rome
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 202-01. How can we understand the representation of reality, idealism, beauty, and power in the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome through studying their art and architecture? How can these issues in ancient art illuminate our understanding of the visual and structural expression of human experience? In this course, we will examine major monuments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in both cultures from a variety of interpretive perspectives through which they have been addressed in primary sources and scholarly literature. Students will study and analyze textual, art-historical, and archaeological readings of these monuments and compare the strengths and weaknesses of the authors' arguments in terms of methodological approach and evidence. In addition, the authors' cultural assumptions, interpretive premises, and ideological goals (if any) will also be addressed in attempting to understand how these works of art have acquired a particular meaning over time and what constitutes that meaning. Students will also acquire competency in recognizing and analyzing diverse stylistic initiatives and their aesthetic significance. This course is cross-listed as ARTH 202. Offered every year.
1030:MWF   WEISS 235
ARCH 210-01 Prehistoric Aegean Art and Archaeology
Instructor: Nikki Cummings
Course Description:
A general introduction to the art and archaeology of the Prehistoric Aegean, including the Neolithic, Cycladic, NE Aegean and Trojan, Minoan, Helladic and Mycenaean civilizations, with consideration of both the Aegean sites and the Minoan/Mycenaean trade posts and colonies in Asia Minor, Cyprus, Syropalestine and Egypt. A survey of architecture (palatial, secular, temple and funerary), pottery, sculpture, frescoes, seal stones, metalwork (metallic vases, weapons, jewelry), stone- and ivory-carving; comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments. Cultural contextualization and brief consideration of the historical framework, socio-economic, political and administrative context, writing and religion. Major interpretative issues and problems in Aegean Prehistory, including relative and absolute chronology, emergence and formation process, collapse and fall of the Minoan palaces and the Mycenaean citadels, spatial definition and multiple function of the palatial networks, military power and expansionism, international dynamics and contacts. Evaluation of the Prehistoric Aegean legacy and contribution to ancient Greek and Western Civilization. Visits to archaeological collections and Museums. Offered every fall.
0900:TR   DIST
ARCH 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Deb Sinha
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-01 and ERSC 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
1330:F   DIST
0930:MWF   DIST
ARCH 250-01 Ancient Greek Religion and Sanctuaries
Instructor: Nikki Cummings
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CLST 200-01. A survey of the origins, history, structure, and evolution of ancient Greek religion and sanctuaries from Mycenaean to Hellenistic times. A comparative study of official religion vs. folk religion, pantheon of gods and heroes vs. daemonic cults and magic (ritual binding, cursing, charming), myths, oracles, festivals and games vs. house cult; an insight into mysteries and chthonic cults, burial customs and eschatology, soul and the Homeric underworld, the mnemoscape of death and reincarnation. A review of loci of worship (caves, shrines, temples, sanctuaries); analysis and meaning of the worship ritual, offerings, dedications, animal and human(?) sacrifices; interpretation of sacred symbols, ritual implements and paraphernalia: idols and figurines, large-scale anthropomorphic concretions, cult statues. A comparative study of the history and development, organization and lay-out, architecture, portable finds and dedications of the most prominent Mycenaean and ancient Greek sanctuaries (Mycenae Cult Center, Tiryns shrines, Aghia Irene temple; Olympia, Delphi, Eleusis, Delos, Nemea, Dodone, Kos, Samos, Priene, Pergamon) involving a synthesis of archaeological and iconographical evidence, Linear B documents, epigraphic evidence, and ancient literary sources. Additional issues to be addressed include: Greek anthropomorphism and polytheism; the power of religion as collective memory; the sociopolitical role of organized religion; priesthood and the gradual appropriation of religion by the ruling hierarchy and the state (polis); chronological development of ritual vs. unchanging core of beliefs; patterns of uniformity and regional variation; survival of ancient Greek religious elements in Christianity. Offered every third year.
1030:TR   DIST
ARCH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:R   DEAL 1
ARCH 318-01 Advanced Applications in GIS
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ERSC 318-01 and ENST 318-01. The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318 and ERSC 318. Offered every two years.
1330:F   DIST
1130:MWF   DIST
ARCH 390-01 Advanced Studies in Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
The Archaeology of Death: this is a regional and cross-cultural survey of burial customs, funerary ritual, and eschatology in Europe (Paleolithic and Neolithic), the Mediterranean (Prehistoric Aegean, Classical Greece and Rome), Egypt and the Near East, Africa, and America (Aztecs, Maya, North American Indians). This course involves a comparative study of ancient burial customs, funerary ritual and architecture based on the archaeological record, ancient literary sources, anthropological and iconographical evidence. We will trace patterns of uniformity and of spatial/chronological variation and development in different regions, historical and cultural contexts. We will assess variables of mortuary evidence and the potential of mortuary analysis, including: symbolisms and meaning of burial customs and rituals, tomb types, funerary gifts and offerings, libations, sacrifices, feasts, ceremonies and games; the cemetery as a formal disposal ground, territorial marker, arena for socio-economic and political domination, and extension of the living city; social ranking in burial contexts, social dimensions of a biological phenomenon; the heterotopy and mnemoscape of death; analysis of the relation between public/private life and death through both personal and social prism; the dialectic symbiosis of life and death.
1330:M   DEAL 1
ARCH 500-01 Satyr Iconography on Greek Wine Vessels as Symbolic Message of Moderation
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
 
ARCH 500-02 Catering to Clientele: A Frontier Tavern in Western New York
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
 
ARCH 500-03 Archeology of Scottish Brochs
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description: