Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 110.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ARCH 221-01 Ancient Greek Architecture
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 205-01 and CLST 200-01. A survey of ancient Greek architecture from the 11th century BC to the 1st century BC, on mainland Greece and the Greek colonies. Temple architecture, altars and sanctuaries; secular architecture (houses, villas, and palaces); public architecture (agoras, stoas, prytaneia, propyla, theaters, gymnasia, stadiums, fountains and aqueducts, fortifications, roads, bridges); poleodomy or city-planning; funerary architecture (tombs, heroa, mausoleums and other funerary buildings). Building materials and techniques; orders and principles of ancient Greek architecture; ancient theory and techniques, typological developments and technological advances, architectural masterpieces; ancient Greek masters. Consideration of epigraphical and ancient literary sources (including readings from Vitruvius, Pliny the Elder, Pausanias). Offered every third year.
1030:MWF   DENNY 317
ARCH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.
0900:TR   DENNY 311
ARCH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:M   ARCH LAB
ARCH 390-01 Cultural Heritage Protection: International Law, Ethics, Politics, Policy and Practice
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Who owns the past individuals, groups, nations, or humanity? What is cultural property? Why do modern states historically claim ownership of cultural heritage? Can illicit trade of antiquities be stopped? Do museums and private collectors contribute to the looting of antiquities? What are the UNESCO conventions for the protection and return of cultural property? These are some of the questions and issues that we will be wrestling with in this course. We will read, write and debate about archaeology ethics, museum acquisition policies and practice, the thriving illicit trade of antiquities worldwide, the international law protecting cultural heritage, the global dynamics and national politics involved in constructing and legitimizing their own versions of the past through manipulation of history and appropriation of cultural heritage. In the course of our research, we will examine several case studies of looted, disputed, and repatriated antiquities, focusing on the most notorious and controversial case of looted cultural property, the Parthenon Marbles (the so-called Elgin Marbles). A field trip to the Metropolitan Museum in NYC will complement student activities, while guest lecturers will enrich classroom learning experience.
1030:TR   DEAL 1
ARCH 500-01 Independent Study
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
 
ARCH 500-02 Camp Michaux Artifacts
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
 
ARCH 500-03 Archaeology of Charcoal Hearths
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description: