Spring 2017

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 130-01 Roman Archaeology
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CLST 224-01. A general introduction to the art and archaeology of the Roman world from the Late Republic to the 4th century AD. A survey of architecture (temple, public, domestic, palatial, funerary), monumental painting, sculpture, metalwork, and minor arts of these periods in Italy and the rest of the Roman world; particular emphasis on Rome, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Ostia, Greece/Asia Minor, and North Africa. Comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments; regional trends and foreign influences. Historical and cultural contextualization of Roman art and architecture with consideration of socio-economic patterns, political developments, religion, and writing. This course is cross-listed as CLST 224. Offered occasionally.
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ARCH 200-01 The Olympic Games
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CLST 200-02. A survey of the origins, birth, and historical development of the Olympic Games in antiquity. This course examines the principles and organization of the games, the types of games and their rules, their natural and architectural setting in Olympia, and their religious context through an interdisciplinary and comparative study of archaeological, historical and iconographical evidence: famous athletes, interaction with the spectators, prizes and honors to Olympic victors, Olympic incidents. The bonding role of the panhellenic Olympic games for the Greeks as a people and the contribution of the Games in the emergence of ancient democracy. Comparisons will be made with the modern Olympics and assessment of the lasting impact of the Olympic Games upon on our modern world.
1030:TR   DENNY 317
ARCH 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 218-01 and ERSC 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output, and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 218 and ERSC 218.
0900:TR   KAUF 185
1330:R   STERN 11
ARCH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:W   DEAL 1
ARCH 320-01 Ancient Greek Democracy: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Born in ancient Greece, democracy is the most important original contribution to humanity, literally shaping public life, personal freedom, civil rights, education and intellectual advancement ever since, therefore forming the cornerstone of our modern western civilization. This seminar ventures an interdisciplinary investigation of ancient democracy (with special emphasis on the ancient Athenian democracy), its origins, history and evolution, rise and fall, and its diachronic legacy. This interdisciplinary survey will involve a complex multivariate approach and a challenging synthesis of diverse evidence, including ancient literary sources and testimonia; historical accounts and epigraphic evidence on the laws, principles, structure, organization and function of various democratic institutions, offices, and procedures; the archaeological record (monuments and finds); iconographical evidence in contemporary sculpture and vase-painting. Discussions will then focus on the pathology of democracy, an analysis of its diagnostic features and diachronic values, and an evaluation of the legacy and influence of ancient democracy on the earliest modern democratic systems, and an assessment of the variant forms of modern revivals.
1330:MR   ARCH LAB
ARCH 390-01 Advanced Studies in Archaeology: The Archaeology of Food and Drink
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
This course undertakes special topics, issues, and problems in Old World and New World Archaeology ranging from prehistory and classical antiquity (e.g., Problems in Aegean Prehistory, In Search of the Trojan War, Great Cities) to modern era archaeology (19th/20th century AD) and modern applications of the discipline. Prerequisite: 300. Offered occasionally.
1330:M   DEAL 1
ARCH 500-01 Egyptian Burial Customs: Animal Mummies
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
 
ARCH 500-02 The Baroque Style in Hellenistic Sculpture
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description: