Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 120-01 Greek Art & Archaeology
Instructor: Marie Cummings
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 205-02 and CLST 221-01. A general introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from Prehistoric to Hellenistic times: Bronze Age civilizations (Cycladic, NE Aegean and Trojan, Minoan, Helladic/Mycenaean); Protogeometric, Geometric, Archaeic, Classical, and Hellenistic Greece. A survey of architecture (temple, secular, funerary), sculpture, vase-painting, monumental painting, metalwork, and minor arts of these periods, both on mainland Greece and in the Greek colonies (Asia Minor, Pontus, Syria, Phoenice, Egypt, S. Italy and Sicily); comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments; styles and schools, regional trends. Historical contextualization of ancient Greek art and brief consideration of socio-economic patterns, political organization, religion, and writing. Evaluation of the ancient Greek artistic legacy and contribution to civilization. Field trips to archaeological collections and Museums. This course is cross-listed as CLST 221. Offered every fall.
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ARCH 200-01 Death in the Ancient World
Instructor: Marie Cummings
Course Description:
Each culture has a variety of ways of dealing with its dead, ranging from cremation to mummification, from exposure to burial. This course will grapple with the variety of ways in which ancient people conceived of and treated their dead. The class will begin with the mummies of Egypt and will include Minoan ossuaries, Roman catacombs, Viking ship burials and burial at sea, the Bog Bodies of northern Europe, Inca mummies, burial mounds at Cahokia, the rmchi Mummies of China, and the suspended burials of the Bo people. Armed with a basic understanding of the culture in question, both the funerary goods and architecture will be closely studied. The class includes a mandatory field trip to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The writing component of the course will be fulfilled by several short assignments that help the student to create a strong argument, and the term culminates with a 5-minute presentation and 10-page final paper
1030:TR   DENNY 317
ARCH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ANTH 290. Prerequisites: Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:W   DEAL 1
ARCH 318-01 Advanced Applications in GIS
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 318-01 and ERSC 318-01. The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: 218 or ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ENST 318 and ERSC 318. Offered every two years.
0900:TR   KAUF 109
1330:F   KAUF 109
ARCH 390-01 Advanced Studies in Archaeology: The Archaeology of Food and Drink
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
This course undertakes special topics, issues, and problems in Old World and New World Archaeology ranging from prehistory and classical antiquity (e.g., Problems in Aegean Prehistory, In Search of the Trojan War, Great Cities) to modern era archaeology (19th/20th century AD) and modern applications of the discipline. Prerequisite: 300. Offered occasionally.
1330:R   DEAL 1