Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ASTR 109-01 Mysteries of the Solar System
Instructor: Windsor Morgan
Course Description:
This course explores questions that are as old as humanity; you will step into the shoes of ancient astronomers to ponder the workings of the night sky and Solar System. Why do the stars move the way they do? Why do some bright objects wander the night sky? Can we know what these objects are and where they came from? We will develop practical and critical thinking skills that are crucial to the art of discovery, focusing on the historical use of naked eye and telescopic observations, as well as the use of present day space probes and the electromagnetic spectrum. Our journey will take us to the planets and some fascinating moons. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course counts toward the astronomy minor. This course explores questions that are as old as humanity; you will step into the shoes of ancient astronomers to ponder the workings of the night sky and Solar System. Why do the stars move the way they do? Why do some bright objects wander the night sky? Can we know what these objects are and where they came from? We will develop practical and critical thinking skills that are crucial to the art of discovery, focusing on the historical use of naked eye and telescopic observations, as well as the use of present day space probes and the electromagnetic spectrum. Our journey will take us to the planets and some fascinating moons. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course counts toward the astronomy minor.
 
ASTR 110-01 Stars, Galaxies, and Beyond!
Instructor: Robert Boyle
Course Description:
Modern astronomy encompasses a wide range of fascinating topics, from cutting-edge techniques used to detect and survey exosolar planets, to advances in astrophysics that reveal tantalizing glimpses into the nature of space and the beginning and possible end of our universe as a whole. This course will look at the tools and physics that astronomers utilize, as well as the electromagnetic spectrum to explore and expand our understanding of the Universe. Students will apply fundamental ideas from physics to the Sun, as well as distant objects, both within and outside our own Galaxy. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course may count toward the astronomy minor. Modern astronomy encompasses a wide range of fascinating topics, from cutting-edge techniques used to detect and survey exosolar planets, to advances in astrophysics that reveal tantalizing glimpses into the nature of space and the beginning and possible end of our universe as a whole. This course will look at the tools and physics that astronomers utilize, as well as the electromagnetic spectrum to explore and expand our understanding of the Universe. Students will apply fundamental ideas from physics to the Sun, as well as distant objects, both within and outside our own Galaxy. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course may count toward the astronomy minor.
1900:W   TOME 105
1130:MWF   TOME 124
ASTR 110-02 Stars, Galaxies, and Beyond!
Instructor: Robert Boyle, Windsor Morgan
Course Description:
Modern astronomy encompasses a wide range of fascinating topics, from cutting-edge techniques used to detect and survey exosolar planets, to advances in astrophysics that reveal tantalizing glimpses into the nature of space and the beginning and possible end of our universe as a whole. This course will look at the tools and physics that astronomers utilize, as well as the electromagnetic spectrum to explore and expand our understanding of the Universe. Students will apply fundamental ideas from physics to the Sun, as well as distant objects, both within and outside our own Galaxy. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course may count toward the astronomy minor. Modern astronomy encompasses a wide range of fascinating topics, from cutting-edge techniques used to detect and survey exosolar planets, to advances in astrophysics that reveal tantalizing glimpses into the nature of space and the beginning and possible end of our universe as a whole. This course will look at the tools and physics that astronomers utilize, as well as the electromagnetic spectrum to explore and expand our understanding of the Universe. Students will apply fundamental ideas from physics to the Sun, as well as distant objects, both within and outside our own Galaxy. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course may count toward the astronomy minor.
1330:T   TOME 105
1130:MWF   TOME 124
Courses Offered in PHYS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHYS 132-01 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
0930:MWF   TOME 101
PHYS 132-02 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Windsor Morgan
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170. An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Topics in thermodynamics, electricity, electronics and magnetism are covered. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. (Students enrolled in Physics 132 who have completed Mathematics 170 are encouraged to continue their mathematics preparation while taking physics by enrolling in Mathematics 171.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 131 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 170.
1330:MWF   TOME 101
PHYS 142-01 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
1330:F   TOME 105
1030:MWF   TOME 115
PHYS 142-02 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 132 and 142. Prerequisite: 141 or 131.
1330:R   TOME 105
1030:MWF   TOME 115
PHYS 212-01 Introduction to Relativistic and Quantum Physics
Instructor: David Jackson
Course Description:
Completion of both PHYS 211 and PHYS 212 fulfills the WID Requirement. A project-based course focusing on special relativity and quantum physics. Projects, such as the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation, relativistic mass increase, or the investigation of delayed choice experiments, are used to understand the concepts of the atom, nuclear structure, relativity, and quantum mechanics. Prerequisite: 132 or 142, and Math 171 or permission of instructor. NOTE: Completion of both 211 and 212 fulfills the WID graduation requirement.
1330:W   TOME 103
0900:TR   TOME 213
PHYS 215-01 Medical Imaging
Instructor: Lars English
Course Description:
This course will examine the physical principles that allow physicians to look inside the human body and will investigate how these principles are implemented in practice. This course will cover the following topics: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), medical ultrasound, Positron Emission Tomography (PET), lasers in medicine, and medical X-rays. For each imaging technique, practical medical considerations such as contrast, resolution, cost, scope, and possible health risks will be discussed.Prerequisite: 141 and 142 (or 131 and 132) and MATH 170 This course will examine the physical principles that allow physicians to look inside the human body and will investigate how these principles are implemented in practice. This course will cover the following topics: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), medical ultrasound, Positron Emission Tomography (PET), lasers in medicine, and medical X-rays. For each imaging technique, practical medical considerations such as contrast, resolution, cost, scope, and possible health risks will be discussed.Prerequisite: 141 and 142 (or 131 and 132) and MATH 170
1130:MWF   TOME 213
PHYS 282-01 Introduction to Theoretical Physics
Instructor: Robert Boyle
Course Description:
A rigorous survey of mathematical topics and techniques that are commonly used in theoretical physics. Topics include vector analysis, differential equations, power series, linear algebra, tensors, and vector calculus (gradient, divergence, curl, line integrals, and so on). The primary focus of this course is on solving problems as a means to improve students confidence and understanding of mathematics within the context of physical systems. Prerequisite: 211 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: MATH 171 or permission of the instructor. A rigorous survey of mathematical topics and techniques that are commonly used in theoretical physics. Topics include vector analysis, differential equations, power series, linear algebra, tensors, and vector calculus (gradient, divergence, curl, line integrals, and so on). The primary focus of this course is on solving problems as a means to improve students confidence and understanding of mathematics within the context of physical systems. Prerequisite: 211 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: MATH 171 or permission of the instructor.
1330:TF   TOME 103
PHYS 306-01 Stars
Instructor: Windsor Morgan
Course Description:
This course covers in greater detail one area of astrophysics. The areas include stellar atmospheres and stellar magnetic fields, nuclear reactions, energy generation and nucleosynthesis in stars; the structure and content of galaxies; practical investigation and analysis of astrophysical phenomena using spectroscopy and the 24-inch Britton telescope, the programming language Python, and other data reduction tools; the structure and evolution of planetary surfaces and atmospheres. Prerequisite: 212 or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as ASTR 306.
 
PHYS 314-01 Energy & Environmental Physics
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
A project-oriented approach to the study of the thermodynamics of fossil fuel engines and devices, the physics of solar and other alternative energy sources, energy conservation principles, the physics of nuclear fission reactors and nuclear fusion research, the physics of the atmosphere, air pollution, global climate change, and ozone depletion. Examples of projects include: energy conservation analysis, and the design, construction and testing of modern wind turbines or solar energy sources. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 141 and 142, and 211 or permission of instructor. Offered every two years. A project-oriented approach to the study of the thermodynamics of fossil fuel engines and devices, the physics of solar and other alternative energy sources, energy conservation principles, the physics of nuclear fission reactors and nuclear fusion research, the physics of the atmosphere, air pollution, global climate change, and ozone depletion. Examples of projects include: energy conservation analysis, and the design, construction and testing of modern wind turbines or solar energy sources. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 141 and 142, and 211 or permission of instructor. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   TOME 103
PHYS 412-01 Advanced Electrodynamics and Plasmas
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
A continuation of the topics covered in Physics 312 with an emphasis on electromagnetic waves in air, in conductors, and in space plasmas. Possible projects include the reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves at an interface, waveguides, plasma waves in space, electromagnetic radiation from antennas, and the equilibrium and stability of plasmas. Prerequisite: 312 or permission of instructor. Offered only occasionally.
1030:TR   TOME 213
PHYS 431-01 Quantum Mechanics
Instructor: David Jackson
Course Description:
Basic postulates are used to develop the theoretical framework for quantum mechanics. The course deals with measurements on quantum systems, the uncertainty principle, the Schrdinger wave equation and the probability interpretation, Heisenberg's matrix mechanics, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, finite and infinite dimensional vector spaces, operator methods, and enables students to use the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanical manipulations for a variety of situations and systems. Prerequisites: 212 and 282 and at least one 300-level physics course, or permission of instructor. Normally offered every other year Basic postulates are used to develop the theoretical framework for quantum mechanics. The course deals with measurements on quantum systems, the uncertainty principle, the Schrdinger wave equation and the probability interpretation, Heisenberg's matrix mechanics, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, finite and infinite dimensional vector spaces, operator methods, and enables students to use the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanical manipulations for a variety of situations and systems. Prerequisites: 212 and 282 and at least one 300-level physics course, or permission of instructor. Normally offered every other year
0930:MWF   TOME 213
PHYS 492-01 Advanced Laboratory Capstone II
Instructor: Lars English
Course Description:
In this capstone experience, students will work in groups to study several advanced physics topics in detail. Potential topics include muon decay, microwave diffraction, the speed of light, pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance, and the Hall effect. The course emphasizes collaborative research, investigative techniques, oral and written communication.Prerequisite: Physics major senior status. The physics major requires either the two-semester sequence of 491 & 492 OR two semesters of PHYS 550. In this capstone experience, students will work in groups to study several advanced physics topics in detail. Potential topics include muon decay, microwave diffraction, the speed of light, pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance, and the Hall effect. The course emphasizes collaborative research, investigative techniques, oral and written communication.Prerequisite: Physics major senior status. The physics major requires either the two-semester sequence of 491 & 492 OR two semesters of PHYS 550.
1330:TF   TOME 213
PHYS 500-01 Design, Construction and Testing of the RD-SAH
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
 
PHYS 550-01 Symmetry Breaking and Iterated-Map Networks
Instructor: Lars English
Course Description:
 
PHYS 550-02 Symmetry Breaking and Iterated-Map Networks II
Instructor: Lars English
Course Description:
 
PHYS 550-03 Nonlinear modes in 2D Magnetic Lattices II
Instructor: Lars English
Course Description:
 
PHYS 550-04 Design, Fabrication and Analysis of Topological Circuits
Instructor: Lars English
Course Description:
 
PHYS 550-05 Constructing a Compact Grism Spectrometer for the Britton Telescope
Instructor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager
Course Description:
 
PHYS 550-06 Design, Construction and Performance Testing of the RD-SAH
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
 
PHYS 550-07 To Be Determined
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
 
PHYS 550-08 Modeling the Light Curve of the WUMa VZ Psc
Instructor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager
Course Description: