Spring 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Lisa Dorrill
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
WEISS 235
ARTH 108-01 Arts of East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 108-01. This course introduces students to a selection of objects and sites that elicit new modes of cultural perception and insight into the artistic cultures of China, Korea, and Japan. Loosely arranged in a chronological order, each week is devoted to in-depth examination of a different type of object, medium, and format. The diverse mediums (sculpture, ceramics, metalwork, lacquer, prints, painting, calligraphy, photography, performance, and architecture) and the long historical span covered in class will chart how culture traveled within East Asia, and later, globally, as well as each cultures distinctive methods of adaptation over time. Major themes include the relationship between artistic production and sociopolitical and socioeconomic development, cultural exchange, aesthetics, impact of religion, power and authority, gender, and issues of modernity. Lectures are supplemented by viewing sessions in the Trout Gallery.This course is cross-listed as EASN 108.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
WEISS 235
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Eleanor Conover
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.
01:30 PM-03:29 PM, MW
WEISS 343
ARTH 123-01 Fundamentals of Sculpture
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
A studio course covering basic elements of three-dimensional composition and sculpture. Students will construct sculptures examining a range of media and fabrication techniques.
09:30 AM-11:29 AM, MW
GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 202-01 Reality, Idealism, Beauty, and Power: Topics in the Art & Architecture of Ancient Greece and Rome
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 202-01. How can we understand the representation of reality, idealism, beauty, and power in the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome through studying their art and architecture? How can these issues in ancient art illuminate our understanding of the visual and structural expression of human experience? In this course, we will examine major monuments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in both cultures from a variety of interpretive perspectives through which they have been addressed in primary sources and scholarly literature. Students will study and analyze textual, art-historical, and archaeological readings of these monuments and compare the strengths and weaknesses of the authors' arguments in terms of methodological approach and evidence. In addition, the authors' cultural assumptions, interpretive premises, and ideological goals (if any) will also be addressed in attempting to understand how these works of art have acquired a particular meaning over time and what constitutes that meaning. Students will also acquire competency in recognizing and analyzing diverse stylistic initiatives and their aesthetic significance. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 202.Offered every year.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
WEISS 221
ARTH 204-01 American Art: Power, Place, Identity
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course begins with the earliest depictions of indigenous people by European explorers and expands to consider how artists responded to the colonization and domestication of North American land. It considers how tensions around slavery in nineteenth-century American imagery played out differently across audience, medium and context and how slaves resisted narratives of white dominance and oppression. It also examines the impact of urbanization, immigration and the rise of consumer culture on the content and circulation of art, concluding with the social dislocation of the 1930s Depression and the onset of WW2. Students can expect to leave the course with a more complex understanding of American identity and cultural politics, while also developing crucial skills in critical reading, writing and visual analysis across a range of artifacts and media. Prerequisite: 101 or 102, AMST majors, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
WEISS 221
ARTH 205-01 Buddhist Art in East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 205-02. This course introduces students to the study of the history of the visual culture of Buddhism in East Asia, and to the study of pre-modern visual culture more generally. Each week will be devoted to the discussion of a particular keyword in Buddhist art, beginning with the basics such as "Buddha," and "Bodhisattva," toward more specialized topics, including "transformation tableau," and "pagoda." In conjunction with the investigation of keywords in Buddhist art, we will also address theories of iconography/iconology, space, spectatorship, etc.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
ALTHSE 110
ARTH 209-01 The Japanese Woodblock Print
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 209-01. This course provides a thorough introduction to the woodblock print Japans most celebrated artistic mediumfrom its emergence in the mid-17th century to the modern era. Technical developments, major genres, and master designers are explored within the context of the prints relationship to the urban culture of early modern and modern Japan. Topics including censorship, theatricality, the representation of war, nationalism, and Japonisme. Special emphasis is placed on an examination of habits of pictorial representation and protocols of viewing unique to the Japanese print medium. Lectures are supplemented by viewing sessions in the Trout Gallery.This course is cross-listed as EASN 209.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
ALTHSE 106
ARTH 213-01 Gothic Pilgrimage
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-01. This course considers the visual arts of the late Gothic era in the major European cities, courts, and religious centers as seen through the eyes of a pilgrim c. 1400 en route from Hereford to Rome (along the via Francigena), Rome to Jerusalem, and back to Hereford (along the banking trade routes via Cologne). The sites selected trace well-known routes that pilgrims followed to the Holy Land and the objects and monuments they encountered: e.g. the city itself, principal sacred and civic structures, altarpieces, reliquaries, and tombs of saints and rulers. Readings and discussions will examine medieval notions of pilgrimage and its role in late medieval society, with a focus on the rituals and objects associated with death, burial, afterlife, and commemoration. Each object will be considered within the broader fabric of its surroundings, paying particular attention to the rituals and physical context associated with the object and how it would have been experienced by a pilgrim.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
TOME 227
ARTH 216-01 Goddesses, Prostitutes, Wives, Saints, and Rulers: Women and European Art 1200-1680
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-01. How has the representation of women been constructed, idealized, vilified, manipulated, sexualized, and gendered during what could be broadly called the Renaissance in Europe? How have female artists, such as Sofanisba Anguissola (1532-1625) or Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653), among others, represented themselves, men, and other familiar subjects differently from their male counterparts? How have female rulers, like Queen Elizabeth I of England, controlled their own political and cultural self-fashioning through portraiture? What role do the lives and writings of female mystics, like Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) or Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) play in depictions of their physical and spiritual identity? How was beauty and sexuality conceived through the imagery of mythological women, like Venus, or culturally ambivalent women, like courtesans and prostitutes? What kind of art did wealthy, aristocratic women or nuns pay for and use? Through studying primary texts, scholarly literature, and relevant theoretical sources, we will address these and other issues in art produced in Italy, France, Spain, Northern Europe, and England from 1200-1680. The course will be grounded in an understanding of historical and cultural contexts, and students will develop paper topics based on their own interests in consultation with the professor. A screening of the documentary film, A Woman Like That (2009), on the life of Artemisia Gentileschi and a trip to the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. will take place during the second half of the semester. Offered every year.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
WEISS 221
ARTH 219-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-02. Gender roles and sexual identity are central to the transformations that define what it means to be modern in America between the late nineteenth- and mid-twentieth centuries. Artists across a range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography and printmaking, have engaged the ever-changing boundaries of male and female, straight and gay. They have taken up these boundaries in profound and ordinary ways, both in conscious and unintentional ways. Drawing upon recent scholarship in American art, this course analyzes the shifts in the work of artists from the lesser-known nineteenth-century gender-bending printmaker Ellen Day Hale to the visual culture surrounding the notorious Oscar Wilde and, in the twentieth century, the sexual politics of such famous artist couples as Georgia OKeeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. Prerequisites: 102 or WGSS 100 or AMST 201 or permission of instructor.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
WEISS 221
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-03. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
09:30 AM-11:30 AM, TR
GDYRST 101
ARTH 223-01 Digital Studio 1: Image Manipulation and Experimental Processes
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-01. This course will focus on 2-dimensional studio processes in the digital environment. It will also explore how digital processes can be used in conjunction with traditional processes like drawing, painting, and printmaking. The initial goal of this class will be to gain a thorough understanding of Adobe Photoshop for image manipulation. As the semester progresses, the class will explore uses of digital technology in contemporary art practice, including experimental processes. *Please note: this is not a photography course, some photo related processes will be part of the class, but those students looking for a more traditional approach to photography should consider the 221 Intro to Photography class. Prerequisite: 122, 221, or permission of the instructor.
09:30 AM-11:29 AM, MW
GDYRST 101
ARTH 224-01 Wheelwork Ceramics
Instructor: Mitch Shiles
Course Description:
A studio course exploring expressive possibilities offered by the potters wheel. Students will examine both utilitarian and sculptural aspects of the medium. A variety of clays, glazes and firing approaches will be examined.
03:30 PM-05:30 PM, MW
GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 226-01 Ceramic Sculpture
Instructor: Mitch Shiles
Course Description:
This introductory course examines the principal attributes of sculpture with a focus on clay as the primary fabrication material. Students will examine a range of firing, glazing, and construction techniques. Satisfies 3D requirement for the studio art major.
01:30 PM-03:29 PM, MW
GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 230-01 Life Drawing
Instructor: Eleanor Conover
Course Description:
The course will be devoted to working from the human form during which the students will be expected to develop a sense of two-dimensional line and three-dimensional illusionistic form through the use of such graphic media as pen and ink, pencil, charcoal, Cont crayon, etc. Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-03:29 PM, TR
GDYRST UPST
ARTH 252-01 Philosophy of Art
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 252-01. The discipline of aesthetics is primarily concerned with philosophical questions about art and beauty. This course will examine classic and contemporary Western discussions of such questions as, What is art? How can we determine what a work of art means? Are beauty and other aesthetic qualities subjective or objective? How should the quality of a work of art be assessed? Is there a general way to describe the creative process? What are the driving forces in the unfolding of art history? We will encounter such giants of the Western intellectual tradition as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Hegel, and also such contemporary figures as Arthur Danto, Richard Wollheim, and Kendall Walton. Prerequisites: one previous course in art history or philosophy, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 252.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 411
ARTH 260-01 Sustainable Printmaking
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
This course will explore approaches to printmaking that make the practice environmentally sustainable in regard to materials. Conceptually, the course will utilize the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals as a starting point for making art that addresses issues related to the social, economic, and environmental aspects of sustainability. With this in mind, we will examine the challenges related to developing works of art that respond to challenging subject matter. The course will explore the fundamental areas of printmaking through the processes of engraving, screenprinting, woodcut, collagraph, and monotype among others. Digital process and computer manipulation will also be utilized.
03:30 PM-05:30 PM, MW
WEISS 340
ARTH 314-01 Contemporary Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course addresses a period of artistic production from the late 1960s to the present. It showcases key artists and artistic movements within a broad historical framework, highlighting major issues and important debates. Some of the themes discussed in the course include the changing nature of artistic practice in recent decades; the intersection of the body in contemporary art with issues of gender, sexuality, ethnicity and race; the role of art in public spaces; the rise of new media; the place of art within galleries, museums and other art-world institutions; the global nature of contemporary art; and art as an agent of protest and social change. Assigned readings include a variety of art historical analyses, artist interviews and writings, essays by art critics and other writers with backgrounds in such areas as philosophy, gender studies and critical race theory. Prerequisite: 102 or permission of the instructor.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
WEISS 219
ARTH 327-01 Advanced Painting
Instructor: Eleanor Conover
Course Description:
A second-level studio painting course concentrating on the figure, and covering advanced techniques, alternative materials, and aspects of contemporary and historical practice. Prerequisite: 227.
09:30 AM-11:30 AM, TR
WEISS 342
ARTH 330-01 Advanced Life Drawing
Instructor: Eleanor Conover
Course Description:
Advanced problems and issues in drawing the human form. Prerequisite: 230 or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-03:29 PM, TR
GDYRST UPST
ARTH 360-01 Out of the Darkness: Reinventing the Darkroom in a Digital Age
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
This course will focus on the use of Analog Photography, from capturing an image, to the final print. Students will be introduced to photographic materials dating back to 1850 and cameras ranging from Pinholes to Large Format. Throughout the semester students will experiment with B&W film, which will include, 35mm, 120mm and even 4x5 film formats. At the end of the semester each student will create a portfolio of images based on a process and format of their choosing.
01:30 PM-03:29 PM, TR
WEISS 327
ARTH 411-01 Senior Studio, Part 2
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
Second half of the required, yearlong capstone for senior studio art majors. This course will continue with the critique-based model of independent studio practice as established in the first semester. The main focus of this course will be completing a fully developed body of thesis work for exhibition in the Trout Gallery, and the production of a supporting catalog. Prerequisite: 410
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 500-01 Activated Space: Form and Function in Sculpture
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:

ARTH 550-01 Race, Memory, Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description: