Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Lisa Dorrill
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
1030:TR   DIST
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.
0930:MW   GDYRST UPST
ARTH 123-01 Fundamentals of Sculpture
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
A studio course covering basic elements of three-dimensional composition and sculpture. Students will construct sculptures examining a range of media and fabrication techniques.
0930:MW   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 123-02 Fundamentals of Sculpture
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
A studio course covering basic elements of three-dimensional composition and sculpture. Students will construct sculptures examining a range of media and fabrication techniques.
1530:MW   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 130-01 Art and Sustainability
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
This course promotes themes of sustainability and social engagement as the catalyst for artmaking. Primarily investigated through the design and construction of sculptures, installation art or other creative acts, students will explore creative practices exemplified by land art, social practice art, collaborative art, and social sculpture, among others.
1330:TR   GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 130-02 Art and Sustainability
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
This course promotes themes of sustainability and social engagement as the catalyst for artmaking. Primarily investigated through the design and construction of sculptures, installation art or other creative acts, students will explore creative practices exemplified by land art, social practice art, collaborative art, and social sculpture, among others.
0930:TR   GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 202-01 Reality, Idealism, Beauty, and Power: Topics in the Art & Architecture of Ancient Greece and Rome
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 202-01. How can we understand the representation of reality, idealism, beauty, and power in the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome through studying their art and architecture? How can these issues in ancient art illuminate our understanding of the visual and structural expression of human experience? In this course, we will examine major monuments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in both cultures from a variety of interpretive perspectives through which they have been addressed in primary sources and scholarly literature. Students will study and analyze textual, art-historical, and archaeological readings of these monuments and compare the strengths and weaknesses of the authors' arguments in terms of methodological approach and evidence. In addition, the authors' cultural assumptions, interpretive premises, and ideological goals (if any) will also be addressed in attempting to understand how these works of art have acquired a particular meaning over time and what constitutes that meaning. Students will also acquire competency in recognizing and analyzing diverse stylistic initiatives and their aesthetic significance. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 202.Offered every year.
1030:MWF   WEISS 235
ARTH 204-01 American Art: Power, Place, Identity
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course begins with the earliest depictions of indigenous people by European explorers and expands to consider how artists responded to the colonization and domestication of North American land. It considers how tensions around slavery in nineteenth-century American imagery played out differently across audience, medium and context and how slaves resisted narratives of white dominance and oppression. It also examines the impact of urbanization, immigration and the rise of consumer culture on the content and circulation of art, concluding with the social dislocation of the 1930s Depression and the onset of WW2. Students can expect to leave the course with a more complex understanding of American identity and cultural politics, while also developing crucial skills in critical reading, writing and visual analysis across a range of artifacts and media. Prerequisite: 101 or 102, AMST majors, or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   WEISS 235
ARTH 205-01 Japanese Architecture
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 205-02. This course is intended to introduce students to the scholarly study of Japanese architecture and urbanism, covering both the premodern and modern eras. Each session will be devoted to the examination of one significant Japanese architectural site, coupled with an important concept or methodological concern in the study of the Japanese built environment. The sites and issues chosen for study are intended to provide students with a broad knowledge base with which to pursue further studies in architectural history, design history, environmental history, and East Asian history. Participants will be introduced to each of the major typologies of Japanese architecture: shrines, temples, imperial villas, castles, tea houses, merchant houses (machiya), and farm houses (minka), as well as the two of the most historically significant city forms in the archipelago, the imperial grid city and the castle town. In addition, the nature and culture of advanced timber-frame architecture will be studied from the vantage point of design, engineering, source materials and process, as well as the sustainability issues inherent to the materials. More general themes that inform the course throughout include the relationship of architecture to the natural landscape, historical and contemporary issues of sustainability, the concept and design of the city, and the significance of the body.
1030:TR   DIST
ARTH 205-02 Introduction to Renaissance & Early Baroque Art of Italy and Bologna
Instructor: Elisabetta Cunsolo
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Please contact Kristine Barrick: barrickr@dickinson.eduThis class is only for students who are participating in the Globally Integrated Semester in Italy.This course will offer an introduction to the major visual traditions in Italy from the 15th to the early 17th century, with a specific focus on Bolognese art. It will examine the development of art and architecture in Italy, and the effects that the Italian society, economy, and politics had on the production of art during those centuries. Works of art will be the primary sources of this course and will be studied through basic methods that will show their intellectual, religious, and social connections to a larger historical context.
1030:T   DIST
ARTH 216-01 Goddesses, Prostitutes, Wives, Saints, and Rulers: Women and European Art 1200-1680
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-01. How has the representation of women been constructed, idealized, vilified, manipulated, sexualized, and gendered during what could be broadly called the Renaissance in Europe? How have female artists, such as Sofanisba Anguissola (1532-1625) or Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653), among others, represented themselves, men, and other familiar subjects differently from their male counterparts? How have female rulers, like Queen Elizabeth I of England, controlled their own political and cultural self-fashioning through portraiture? What role do the lives and writings of female mystics, like Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) or Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) play in depictions of their physical and spiritual identity? How was beauty and sexuality conceived through the imagery of mythological women, like Venus, or culturally ambivalent women, like courtesans and prostitutes? What kind of art did wealthy, aristocratic women or nuns pay for and use? Through studying primary texts, scholarly literature, and relevant theoretical sources, we will address these and other issues in art produced in Italy, France, Spain, Northern Europe, and England from 1200-1680. The course will be grounded in an understanding of historical and cultural contexts, and students will develop paper topics based on their own interests in consultation with the professor. A screening of the documentary film, A Woman Like That (2009), on the life of Artemisia Gentileschi and a trip to the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. will take place during the second half of the semester. Offered every year.
1330:TF   WEISS 235
ARTH 219-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-04. Gender roles and sexual identity are central to the transformations that define what it means to be modern in America between the late nineteenth- and mid-twentieth centuries. Artists across a range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography and printmaking, have engaged the ever-changing boundaries of male and female, straight and gay. They have taken up these boundaries in profound and ordinary ways, both in conscious and unintentional ways. Drawing upon recent scholarship in American art, this course analyzes the shifts in the work of artists from the lesser-known nineteenth-century gender-bending printmaker Ellen Day Hale to the visual culture surrounding the notorious Oscar Wilde and, in the twentieth century, the sexual politics of such famous artist couples as Georgia OKeeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. Prerequisites: 102 or WGSS 100 or AMST 201 or permission of instructor.
1330:MR   WEISS 221
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-01. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
0930:TR   DIST
ARTH 223-01 Digital Studio 1: Image Manipulation and Experimental Processes
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-04. This course will focus on 2-dimensional studio processes in the digital environment. It will also explore how digital processes can be used in conjunction with traditional processes like drawing, painting, and printmaking. The initial goal of this class will be to gain a thorough understanding of Adobe Photoshop for image manipulation. As the semester progresses, the class will explore uses of digital technology in contemporary art practice, including experimental processes. *Please note: this is not a photography course, some photo related processes will be part of the class, but those students looking for a more traditional approach to photography should consider the 221 Intro to Photography class. Prerequisite: 122, 221, or permission of the instructor.
1530:MW   DIST
ARTH 300-01 Artists, Audience, Patrons: Art & Architecture of the Italian Renaissance
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
This course examines painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from 1250 to 1570. The work of Giotto, Lorenzetti, Donatello, Masaccio, Brunelleschi, Ghiberti, Botticelli, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian, and Michelangelo, among others will be addressed. Students will study the significance of style, subject-matter, function, patronage, and artistic practice within historical and cultural contexts, and will also address Renaissance interpretations and responses to works of art. Discussion of art-historical theory and criticism as well as Renaissance theory and criticism based in primary texts will be an intrinsic part of the course. Students will acquire the ability to analyze and interpret works of art from the period within the framework outlined above, and will gain a working knowledge of the most significant works and the meaning(s) they have acquired over time. Analysis of primary and secondary sources will be a central focus of the research project, and students will be expected to construct a clear and well-supported interpretive argument over the course of the semester. The course includes a field trip to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., which has the largest collection of Italian Renaissance painting outside of Europe. Prerequisite: 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. Offered every year.
0900:TR   WEISS 221
ARTH 305-01 Modern Design in East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 305-01.Traditional Chinese and Japanese art and design served as an important source of inspiration for European modernism. But what happened to art and design within China and Japan during the modern period? Despite Chinas traditional stronghold in modular design and Japans current prestige in design culture, the two countries faced incredible challenges during the late 19th and early 20th century as they struggled with their own cultures pasts and the modern concept of art and design. This class offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of modern East Asian art and examines how the concept of design emerged and developed in Japan and China in relation to both fine arts and industry in a broad cross-cultural nexus. While design connected modern China and Japan in ways unprecedented, the two cultures also adopted different design strategies defined by their respective cultural and historical conditions. Traditional Chinese and Japanese art and design served as an important source of inspiration for European modernism. But what happened to art and design within China and Japan during the modern period? Despite Chinas traditional stronghold in modular design and Japans current prestige in design culture, the two countries faced incredible challenges during the late 19th and early 20th century as they struggled with their own cultures pasts and the modern concept of art and design. This class offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of modern East Asian art and examines how the concept of design emerged and developed in Japan and China in relation to both fine arts and industry in a broad cross-cultural nexus. While design connected modern China and Japan in ways unprecedented, the two cultures also adopted different design strategies defined by their respective cultural and historical conditions. The class is discussion based and is supplemented by a fieldtrip to Washington D.C. Prerequisite: ARTH 108 or ARTH 209 or two art history or two non-language EASN courses.
1330:W   DIST
ARTH 314-01 Contemporary Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course addresses a period of artistic production from the late 1960s to the present. It showcases key artists and artistic movements within a broad historical framework, highlighting major issues and important debates. Some of the themes discussed in the course include the changing nature of artistic practice in recent decades; the intersection of the body in contemporary art with issues of gender, sexuality, ethnicity and race; the role of art in public spaces; the rise of new media; the place of art within galleries, museums and other art-world institutions; the global nature of contemporary art; and art as an agent of protest and social change. Assigned readings include a variety of art historical analyses, artist interviews and writings, essays by art critics and other writers with backgrounds in such areas as philosophy, gender studies and critical race theory. Prerequisite: 102 or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   WEISS 235
ARTH 360-01 Digital Storytelling
Instructor: Andy Bale
Course Description:
This course will explore Digital Storytelling and the use of Digital technologies to do so. Experienced photographers will be introduced to and learn how to incorporate Still Photographs, Videos and Audio into their work. Students will use different types of technology to reinforce subject matter, share a personal experience and use these multimedia tools to bring a narrative to life.
1330:TR   DIST
ARTH 411-01 Senior Studio, Part 2
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
Second half of the required, yearlong capstone for senior studio art majors. This course will continue with the critique-based model of independent studio practice as established in the first semester. The main focus of this course will be completing a fully developed body of thesis work for exhibition in the Trout Gallery, and the production of a supporting catalog. Prerequisite: 410
1330:W   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 500-01 Intermediate Metalwork
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-02 Advanced Metal Casting
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-03 Topics in Oil Painting
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-04 Title to be determined
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-05 Installation Art
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-06 Advanced Painting Techniques
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description: