Major

Art History option: Eleven courses including 101, 102; one course in studio, either 122 or 123; one course in Ancient Art, either 202 OR either ARCH 120, 130, 210, 221, 222, or 223; one course in Renaissance Art, either 300 or 301; 313 or 314; 407; 207; and three electives in art history. Art history majors are also encouraged to consider internships or independent studies, as well as student/faculty collaborative research, directed to future interests in the discipline; and to take German, French or Italian if they are considering graduate work in art history.

Studio Art option: Eleven courses including 101, 102; one course in Renaissance Art, either 300 or 301; 313 or 314; 122; either 222 or 230; 410 (including submission of position paper and portfolio for graduation); and four additional studio courses, including one at the advanced level, and at least one three-dimensional course. Seniors concentrating in studio are required to present a slide portfolio of their work in their final semester. Students electing this option are encouraged to take more studio courses than the required six. Self-developed options, including conservation and architecture programs, can be arranged.

Minor

101 and 102 plus four additional courses in the appropriate discipline (art history or studio), subject to the minor advisor's approval, that suit the particular interests of the student.

Suggested curricular flow through the major

The A&AH major was designed with the hope that all of our students would spend a year or semester studying abroad during their junior year. As a result, we developed the curriculum so that a student who did spend a year abroad could complete all the requirements for the major, as long as she or he followed a few guidelines.

The guidelines are written for the entering student who knows he or she wants to major in A&AH. Rather than specify the courses that you “must” have in a given semester, the following are general guidelines regarding courses that we suggest you take during each year. You should think of these guidelines as giving you a fast track into the major – this provides maximum flexibility in your junior and senior year. To study abroad in art history for a full year, the Department requires students to have had at least four art history courses consisting of two intros and two courses at the upper level (one must be a 300-level course). One intro and three courses at the upper level are also acceptable. For one semester, a minimum of three classes, including one intro and two at the upper level. To study abroad in studio art for a full year, three studio and one art history courses are required; for a semester, two studio courses and one art history.

For information regarding the suggested guidelines, please feel free to contact an A&AH faculty member. Students not following these guidelines may still be able to study for a year abroad and still complete the major, but might face a more demanding senior year.

Courses

Introductory level courses should be taken first for both art history and studio tracks. 101, 102, 122, 123. 200-level courses without pre-requisites may also be taken at the initial stages of the major.

200 level courses normally follow, with 207 in art history being offered only during the spring semesters. Ideally, 207 should be taken prior to 407 (senior seminar). 300-level courses, however, may also follow directly from 100-level introductory courses.

407 and 410 (art history and studio senior seminars), are taken in the fall semester of the senior year.

Senior Seminars

One especially challenging part of the major are the senior seminars in art history and studio art. They involve an integrated, professionally-oriented experience wherein students in art history curate a formal exhibition in The Trout Gallery accompanied by a published, scholarly catalogue containing original research and essays. Studio majors undertake an analogous exhibition in The Trout Gallery wherein the works are curated from their own art produced during the seminar. They also write artist-statements for a published catalogue. For further information, see the A&AH web site.

For more explicit advising guidelines, contact an A&AH faculty member or see “Advising Guidelines” on the A&AH web site.

Independent study and independent research

Independent study courses are to be set up through consultation with an Art and Art History department advisor and instructor of the course. A proposal of the topic, and program of work must be submitted to the instructor for approval.

Honors

Department of Art & Art History majors may seek Honors, the highest academic award a department can bestow. Honors in the major are by the invitation of Department of Art and Art History faculty following self-nomination by February of the junior year. Students undertake a year-long independent study with an advisor, and will be expected to present their work to a Dickinson audience at the end of the senior year.

Internships

Through The Trout Gallery and other regional museums, galleries, art associations, commercial galleries, and architectural firms, the Department of Art & Art History offers internships to advanced students. In the past, art history majors have undertaken museum internships at The Metropolitan Museum, the Springfield (MA) Museum of Fine Arts, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, while studio and art history majors have interned at commercial galleries in Philadelphia, Harrisburg, and New York City; these internships have included conservation and restoration work. Consult the departmental internship adviser and the college internship coordinator.

Opportunities for off-campus study

Students in Art and Art History can pursue study on Dickinson programs in Toulouse, Norwich, Bremen, and Bologna, and can also undertake semester and full-year options at Dickinson-approved programs in Florence (Syracuse University, SACI) and Rome (Temple University).

Courses

The following course is offered in the Summer Semester in the England Program:

105 Art in England
Offered in England. A topics course in the history and practice of art, using the galleries, museums and architecture of London and its environs as its focus.

The following course is offered in Bologna:

132 The Arts of Italy
Offered in Bologna, Italy. An introduction to the major visual traditions of the Italian peninsula from antiquity to the end of the 18th century, combined with the basic art historical methodologies necessary to their understanding. Focus will be on the relationship of visual materials to their intellectual, social, and religious underpinnings, with special emphasis on the artistic traditions and monuments of Bologna. Lectures, discussion, and site visits provide the opportunity to understand artistic production in its larger cultural context. In addition to regular class meetings for lecture and discussion, required group excursions in and around Bologna will be scheduled occasionally on Fridays or Saturdays.

The following courses are offered in Toulouse:

115 French Art from the Romanesque through the Baroque
This course will examine the development of medieval art, architecture and sculpture in the romanesque and gothic styles, drawing principally on regional examples. The wealth of Roman remains in southwestern France will help clarify connections between medieval art and its ancient predecessors. Classroom lecture and discussion will be augmented by on-site study of churches, cloisters and museums in the Toulouse area. Outstanding examples of private dwellings in Toulouse dating from the Renaissance will illustrate the passage between the end of the Middle Ages and the following periods. Issues of style, patronage and function will be considered with the political and cultural contexts of the 11th through the 18th centuries.
Offered only at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse.

116 French Art of the 19th and 20th Centuries
A survey of the major movements in French art from Romanticism to the present, including realism, impressionism, cubism, Dada, surrealism and abstract art. Contemporary museum collections in France, particularly those in the Toulouse region and in Paris, will furnish examples of important works. This course will pay special attention to the links between change in French society and the evolution of artistic production.
Offered only at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse.

The following courses are offered in Toulouse Summer Session:

261 Architecture and the Figure
Offered in the Toulouse, France Summer Session. Drawing from the architecture of southwestern France with an emphasis on the figure and its role in establishing scale, movement and narrative.
Prerequisite: 122 or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

262 Painting 'en plein air'
Offered in the Toulouse, France Summer Session. A second-level painting course concentrating on the concepts and practice of painting in the landscape. We will deal with the use of color, space, light and interpretive problems of working on site.
Prerequisite: 122 and 227 or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Art History Courses

101 An Introduction to the History of Art
This course is a critical survey of western art beginning with the Ancient Near East (approximately 4000 B.C.) through the Gothic period in Europe (early 1300s). Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of style, subject-matter, and function within an historical context, and especially on the student's ability to develop skills in visual analysis. Developing appropriate vocabularies with which to discuss and analyze works of art and imagery will also be stressed, along with learning to evaluate scholarly interpretations of them.

102 An Introduction to the History of Art
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.

201 History and Art of the Film or the Photograph
A study of the history of the film or the photograph as an art form involving mechanical reproduction. Issues of criticism and theory are also addressed.

202 Art History & Ancient Art
This course will examine major monuments in the history of ancient Greek and Roman art and architecture from the variety of interpretive perspectives with which they have been addressed in the scholarly literature. Students will study and analyze art-historical "readings" of these monuments and compare the strengths and weaknesses of the authors' arguments in terms of methodological approach and use of both textual and archaeological evidence. In addition, the authors' cultural assumptions, interpretive premises, and ideological goals (if any) will also be addressed in attempting to understand how these works of art have acquired meaning over time and what constitutes that meaning.
Offered every other year.

203 Medieval Art
European art and architecture of the Middle Ages, from the decline of Rome to the first decades of the 15th century. Particular emphasis is placed on Romanesque and Gothic cathedral architecture.
Prerequisite: 101 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

204 American Art
This course takes a chronological approach to the history of art in the United States from the late eighteenth century through the early twentieth century. At the start of the semester, we consider questions of how the newly-formed nation and its citizens were represented in art. We will examine how, during the heyday of Western expansion, the American landscape was variously depicted through photography and painting with the ideology of Manifest Destiny and a growing tourist industry in mind. We also discuss the challenges artists faced in the later nineteenth century in creating commemorative public statuary for the nation following a highly divisive Civil War. By the end of the nineteenth century, during America's "Gilded Age," dramatic shifts in race, class and gender relations account for an unprecedented level of activity in the arts. Finally, we examine the issues at stake in a thoroughly diverse and modern version of America, where homosexuality, race relations and debates about gender take center stage, alongside questions of the nation's place in an increasingly global environment. Students can expect to leave the course with a more complex understanding of what America is and how it has been represented across history, by various artists and in a range of media, while also developing crucial skills in critical reading, writing and visual analysis.
Prerequisite: 101 or 102, AMST majors, or permission of the instructor.

205 Topics in Art History
An intermediate-level study of selected topics in the history of art and architecture.
Prerequisites: prerequisites as appropriate to topic.

206 Museum Studies
Introduces students to the history, role, nature, and administration of museums. It examines the emergence and development of museums and the political, social, and ethical issues that they face. Case studies include: government funding of the arts, the lure and trap of the blockbuster, T-Rex "Sue", the Nazi Entartete Kunst exhibition, the Enola Gay exhibition, war memorials, the Holocaust Museum, public sculpture, conservation, museum architecture, auction houses, and the repatriation of cultural property. This course is open to all students and is especially relevant to those studying the fine arts, anthropology, archaeology, history, American studies, and public policy.
This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement. Offered every two years.

207 Criticism and Theory in the Arts
An introduction to critical strategies in and theoretical approaches to the visual arts from Plato through Postmodernism. Particular emphasis is placed on close analysis and discussion of texts. The course addresses issues of historiography, critical theory, and contemporary art criticism.
Prerequisite: 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor.

 

208 Japanese Art
This course is an introduction to Japanese art and aesthetics throughout the history of this culture. The study of this art occurs in the context of the civilization as a whole, as it has both changed and resisted change over time due to both internal and external forces. Students are expected to look carefully at their own preferences and prejudices with the intention of seeing them from an additional perspective.
Offered alternate years. This course fulfills the DIV I.c. and Comparative Civilizations distribution requirement.

210 Chinese Art
This course is an introduction to the history and aesthetic of Chinese art. The art is studied as a primary part of the larger culture. Other elements of the culture are introduced as they are relevant to seeing the civilization as a whole. The subject matter is those arts most typical of the major dynasties, but painting is the primary overall focus.
Offered alternate years.

252 Philosophy of Art
The discipline of aesthetics is primarily concerned with philosophical questions about art and beauty. This course will examine classic and contemporary Western discussions of such questions as, What is art? How can we determine what a work of art means? Are beauty and other aesthetic qualities subjective or objective? How should the quality of a work of art be assessed? Is there a general way to describe the creative process? What are the driving forces in the unfolding of art history? We will encounter such giants of the Western intellectual tradition as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Hegel, and also such contemporary figures as Arthur Danto, Richard Wollheim, and Kendall Walton.
Prerequisites: one previous course in art history or philosophy, or permission of the instructor. This course satisfies either DIV 1.a. or 1.c. distribution requirement. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 252.

265 Non-Western Aesthetics
As the arts of non-Western cultures (roughly, non-European and European-American cultures) are distinct from those of the West, so are the reflections on that art. Philosophy of art courses often focus exclusively on Western philosophy. This course seeks to broaden the conversation. It concerns reflections on the arts in Japanese, Indian, Native American, and African (including diasporic) cultures. It is a question, with regard to several of these cultures, whether they conceive of a distinct sphere of art at all; the arts (as is true of the West until perhaps 1750) are often not distinguished from the crafts, religious ceremony and objects, festival, medicine, and so on. This provides an interesting challenge to the Western concept of art.
Prerequisites: one previous course in art history or philosophy, or permission of the instructor. This course satisfies either DIV 1.a. or 1.c. distribution requirement. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 265.

300 Italian Renaissance Art 1250-1450
A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from approximately 1250 to 1450. The works of Giotto, Pisano, Donatello, Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, and Massacio, among others, will be addressed. Issues of style, patronage, and function will be considered within the political and cultural contexts of the 13th through 15th centuries. Critical and theoretical writings of the period will also be discussed.
Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement and WR graduation requirement.

301 Italian Renaissance Art 1450-1563
A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from 1450 through 1580. The works of Botticelli, Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, Bramente, and Titian, among others, will be addressed. Issues of style, patronage, and function will be considered within the political and cultural contexts of the 15th and the 16th centuries. Critical and theoretical writings of the period will also be discussed.
Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the DIV I.c. graduation requirement and WR graduation requirement.

302 Roman Painting
This course will address the antecedents of Roman wall painting in ancient Greek sources, as well as issues related to classification, genre, style, function, and artistic practice. The traditional "four styles" of Roman painting first outlined by Vitruvius and more recent proposals for reconstructing these traditional stylistic categories will be addressed, as well as questions surrounding the many purposes and effects of painting in Roman culture and society. The relationship of pictorial imagery to specific literary structures and styles during the Imperial period will also be considered along with more theoretical artistic principles such as optics, illusionism, and visual imagination in the Roman world. A variety of ancient literary sources as well as scholarly studies and critiques will form the textual basis for the course, while digital reconstructions and "virtual" movement through ancient pictorial spaces will augment the visual sources we use.
Prerequisite: Archaeology Core or 101 and 102 or 202.

303 Roman Portraiture
Of all visual and literary genres, portraiture is undoubtedly the most specific and elusive in western culture. Its history is as old as the ancient Greek myths about the origins of painting itself, and as recent as the current pseudo-journalistic television program entitled "Intimate Portraits." This course will examine the tradition and evolution of ancient roman portraiture as the most prolific and enduring source of the genre from its Etruscan and Hellenistic foundations through the dissolution of the Empire in the mid-fourth century AD. Republican and Imperial iconographies, funerary genres, and contextual considerations such as the public, private, and political realms will be considered. The notion of constructing a visual identity and historical legacy through portraiture as part of Roman culture, and more specific conceptual qualities such as "realism" and "idealism," "youth" and "age" will be discussed together with more technical issues such as dating, identifying physiognomic types, sculpting techniques. At least one trip to a regional museum or gallery will be required.
Prerequisite: Archaeology core, or 101 and 102 or 202.

304 Southern Baroque Art
Painting, sculpture, and architecture of the 17th-century in Italy, France, and Spain will be considered. Artists included in this course are: Caravaggio, the Carracci, Reni, Artemesia Gentileschi, Bernini, Borromini, Velsquez, and Poussin. Issues of theory and criticism will also be addressed.
Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

306 Northern Baroque Art
A study of 17th-century Northern European Art with particular emphasis on Flemish and Dutch painting. Artists included in this course are Rubens, Van Dyck, Rembrandt, Hals, and Vermeer. Issues of theory and criticism will also be addressed.
Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

313 Modern Art
This course surveys key artistic movements and styles in a period of roughly one hundred years, beginning with Realism in the 1840s France and ending with Abstract Express-ionism in 1950s America. Much of the course focuses on painting, though discussions of architecture, design, sculpture and photography also play an important role. We begin with the question of what modernism is: When did it begin? What makes a work of art "modern"? How is modernism different from what preceded it? Students learn to recognize, understand and discuss the defining features of modernism in its major manifestations, while also developing an understanding of themes such as the role of African art in modernism, the changing dynamics between the fine arts and popular culture, the role of technology as an influence on art, and the place of particular critics, galleries, and museums in shaping the discourses of modernism. Individual research projects give students the chance to explore a specific artist, style or theme in depth, while a field trip to National Gallery of Art and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C. provide an opportunity to see significant works of modern art firsthand. Assigned reading incorporate both secondary sources as well as artist's manifestos and aesthetic philosophies as primary source text.
Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.

314 Contemporary Art
A survey of major artists and movements from post-World War II to the present, beginning with Pop art through Postmodernism and global art today. The course will also incorporate key critical and theoretical writings from the period for discussion.
Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.

315 Topics in Contemporary Art
This course will address recent developments in art from 1945 to the present; focus on particular artists, works, and movements will vary. Critical and theoretical issues of the period will be discussed.
Prerequisite: 102 or permission of the instructor.

375 Beauty
Perhaps no term is as variously interpreted or as hard to define as "beauty." At one time, beauty was treated as among the ultimate values, along with goodness, truth, and justice. But in the last century or so it has been devalued, equated with prettiness or meaningless ornamentation. It has been quite out of fashion in art since the late nineteenth century. But one cannot understand much of the art of the Western tradition without understanding it as the attempt to make beautiful things, and without understanding what that goal meant in the cultures in which it had currency. And of course even now most people would not want to be without dimensions of beauty in their lives. We will look both at classic and contemporary attempts to answer such questions, and try to heighten our own appreciation for the beauty in the arts and in the world.
Prerequisites: one previous course in art history or philosophy, or permission of the instructor. This course satisfies either DIV 1.a. or 1.c. distribution requirement. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 275.

391 Studies in Art History
Studies in selected topics of the history of art and architecture. The content of each course will be altered periodically.
Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.

404 Seminar: Topics in the History of Art
Advanced investigation of a particular artist, work, movement, or problem in the history of art.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

407 Art Historical Methods
Study of the research tools and methodologies of art historical analysis, a study of the use of primary and secondary sources, and documents in art history. In addition, the major schools of art historical writing and theory since the Renaissance will be considered. The course has as its final project a public exhibition in The Trout Gallery curated by the seminar students.
Prerequisite: Senior Art & Art History majors only.

Studio Art Courses

122 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.

123 Fundamentals of Sculpture and Three-Dimensional Design
A studio course covering basic elements of three-dimensional composition and sculpture. Students will construct sculptures examining a range of media and fabrication techniques.

160 Special Topics in Studio
Selected techniques and concepts in studio, taught at the introductory level. The content of each course will be altered periodically.

221 Introduction to Photography
An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.

222 Drawing
A studio course to explore further, those issues covered in 122, but focusing on the creation of light and space. Landscape, architecture, still-life and the model will serve as subject matter. A large variety of media will be used, including pastel, monotype, ink, acrylic paint and charcoal.
Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.

223 Digital Studio 1: Image Manipulation and Experimental Processes
This course will focus on 2-dimensional studio processes in the digital environment. It will also explore how digital processes can be used in conjunction with traditional processes like drawing, painting, and printmaking. The initial goal of this class will be to gain a thorough understanding of Adobe Photoshop for image manipulation. As the semester progresses, the class will explore uses of digital technology in contemporary art practice, including experimental processes.
*Please note: this is not a photography course, some photo related processes will be part of the class, but those students looking for a more traditional approach to photography should consider the 221 Intro to Photography class. Prerequisite: 122, 221, or permission of the instructor.

224 Wheelwork Ceramics
A studio course exploring expressive possibilities offered by the potters wheel. Students will examine both utilitarian and sculptural aspects of the medium. A variety of clays, glazes and firing approaches will be examined.

226 Sculpture Ceramics
A sculpture course further examining three-dimensional problems covered in the basic three-dimensional design course. The course will focus on clay as the primary (but not exclusive) fabrication material. Students will examine a range of firing, glazing, and construction techniques.
Prerequisite: 123, 224 or permission of the instructor.

227 Fundamentals of Painting
A basic studio course exploring the techniques, practices and history of painting and theories of color. Working from observation, subject matter will range from still-life and landscape to architecture and the figure.
Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.

228 Printmaking Survey
A studio course in which students will gain a working knowledge in each of the four major areas of printmaking woodcut, etching, lithography, and screen-printing.
Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.

230 Life Drawing
The course will be devoted to working from the human form during which the students will be expected to develop a sense of two-dimensional line and three-dimensional illusionistic form through the use of such graphic media as pen and ink, pencil, charcoal, Conté crayon, etc.
Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.

260 Special Topics in Studio Art
Selected techniques and concepts in studio, taught at the introductory to intermediate level. The content of each course will be altered periodically.
Prerequisites: depending on topic or permission of the instructor.. This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement.

320 Advanced Photography & Imaging
An advanced course enabling students to explore advanced photo-based techniques, experimental problems, and aspects of contemporary and historical practice in photographic-based image making.
Prerequisite: 221, or permission of the instructor.

323 Sculpture
Various sculpture media will be explored including clay, plaster, wood, stone, and metals. An emphasis will be placed on carving, casting, and metal welding.
Prerequisite: 123.

324 Advanced Three-Dimensional Design and Sculpture
A second level three-dimensional design and sculpture course concentrating on advanced fabrication techniques, alternative building materials, and aspects of contemporary and historical practice.
Prerequisite: 123, 224, 226 or permission of the instructor.

326 Intaglio Printmaking
An in-depth exploration of etching, engraving, aquatint and other techniques of drawing on, and printing from metal plates. Photo-etching and working in color will also be covered.
Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.

327 Advanced Painting
A second-level studio painting course concentrating on the figure, and covering advanced techniques, alternative materials, and aspects of contemporary and historical practice.
Prerequisite: 227.

330 Advanced Life Drawing
Advanced problems and issues in drawing the human form.
Prerequisite: 230 or permission of the instructor.

 

335 Lithography
A studio course exploring the art, techniques, and history of drawing and printing from the stone. Metal plate, color, and photo-lithography will also be explored.
Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.

360 Special Advanced Topics in Studio Art
Selected advanced studio techniques and concepts. The content of each course will be altered periodically.
Prerequisites: two studio art courses at the 100- or 200-level, or permission of the instructor.

410 Senior Studio Seminar
A required course for senior studio students. Critiques of students' work will include examination of timely topics in the visual arts and the relationship of the artist to society. Critiques, selected critical readings, museum visits and visiting artists will provide the basis for discussion.
Co-requisite: One studio course. Prerequisite: One studio course.

 

322 Digital Studio 2: Time-Based Process
This course will allow students to explore time-based approaches to making art with a focus on the moving image and sound. Topics will include short film, animation, experimental film, and installation art. This course will be beneficial to students working at an advanced level and are interested in the possibilities time-based mediums can bring to their process. The work of artists and media specific art trends, from the 20th century to the present, will provide a working model for the course. Process and making will be the main focus, and students will be encouraged to consider the relationship between digital processes and traditional mediums such as drawing and sculpture. Students will gain a thorough understanding of editing in Apple’s Final Cut Pro.
Prerequisites: ARTH 122 and one studio course at the 200-level or higher, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement.