Schedule of Events

Fall 2020

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Fall 2020 Faculty Research Lunches
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Join us and learn about exciting research by Dickinson faculty and staff, followed by time for Q&A. Cosponsored by the WGRC and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies.

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Compensatory Collecting: Charles Lang Freer, Art and Disability  
Prof. Elizabeth Lee, Art and Art History
Tuesday, September 22
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Zoom Meeting
 
The Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. stands as a memorial to the industrialist Charles Lang Freer, who died in 1919 from complications associated with syphilis. Scholars have been reluctant to consider how living with a debilitating illness might have affected his collecting practices and tastes, yet as his own body was ravaged by a disfiguring disease, Freer found refuge in the breathy, vaporous hazes of Whistler’s paintings and the translucent glazes of ancient Islamic ceramics, through which he constructed a sense of corporeal harmony and an alternate body (of art). Please register. The Zoom link will be sent to registrants the morning of the event). Cosponsored by the Women’s and Gender Resource Center and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies.

  • Tuesday, September 22, Prof. Elizabeth Lee, Art and Art History
    Please register and you will be sent the Zoom link the morning of the event.

Future Faculty Research Lunches include:

  • Thursday, October 22, Prof. Rachel Jacobs, Political Science and International Studies
    Please register and you will be sent the Zoom link the morning of the event.
  • Thursday, November 19, Prof. Amalia Pesantes Villa, Anthropology
    Please register and you will be sent the Zoom link the morning of the event.

Who Was A Suffragist: A More Diverse View
Professor Cathleen Cahill, Penn State University
Wednesday, September 2
Virtual program on YouTube live, 7 p.m.

This lecture reveals the hidden histories of the Native American, Chinese American, African American, and Hispanic suffragists who not only challenged women’s inequality but also fought against the racial prejudices of the age. They marched in parades, debated with national suffrage leaders, and met with presidents and other politicians. They insisted that women in their communities also deserved the vote. This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Women’s & Gender Resource Center and the department of women's, gender and sexuality studies.

bciw

Building Campus Inclusion Week September 14-18
Intersectionality as concept & practice: presentation and discussion
Donna M. Bickford, Director, Women’s & Gender Resource Center and Adjunct
Faculty, Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies (WGSS)
Tuesday, September 15
12-1:00 p.m.
A Building Campus Inclusion Week event

This interactive session will share information about the historical development of the term “intersectionality,” which originated in Black feminist thought. We will then think together about the ways in which the term is useful (or not!) in understanding personal experiences and current events, and consider how we might use an intersectional approach as a tool for our own activism and intellectual development. Zoom link: https://dickinson.zoom.us/j/94914201207

Race and Policing
Tuesday, September 15
Virtual program on YouTube live, 7 p.m.

Raff Donelson, Penn State Dickinson School of Law
Matthew Guariglia, UC Berkeley
Stephanie Jirard, Shippensburg University
Vincent Stephens (moderator), Dickinson College

The murder of George Floyd catalyzed great social upheaval in the U.S. and prompted protests across the world. In addition to Floyd, numerous high profile cases of unarmed Black Americans killed by police, including Breonna Taylor and Elijah McClain, have garnered national and international attention already this year. The names of victims of police violence and brutality have become a rallying cry to “defund the police.” However, detractors of the protests insist that law enforcement officers serve as the “thin blue line,” preventing society from unhinging and degrading into criminality and chaos. This panel will explore the relationships between race and policing in the United States, including discussion of the history of the police and their response (at local, state, and federal levels) to protests since Memorial Day weekend. This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Program in Policy Studies, the Women’s & Gender Resource Center, and the department of Latin American, Latino and Caribbean Studies.

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Graduate School in STEM: Perspectives from Dickinson Alumni
Wednesday, September 16
5:00-6:00 p.m.
Via Zoom

Are you interested in applying to graduate school? Curious about what it’s like once you get there? Join us and hear from these Dickinson alums about their experiences. The panel will be moderated by Prof. Jen Schaefer (Math) and include opportunity for Q&A and discussion.

  • Taylor Bednar ‘19
  • Kendra Bonsey ‘19
  • Eryn Nelson ’19
  • Moyi Tian ‘19 

Please register by Tuesday, September 15. The Zoom link will be sent to you the morning of the panel. If you have questions for the panelists, please submit them by Friday, September 11. Cosponsored by the Women’s and Gender Resource Center and the Inclusivity in STEM Planning Committee.

LHM

Para La Cultura: Dismantling Stereotypes and Building Up Our Latinx Community
Monday, September 28
7:00-8:15 p.m.

Join the Popel Shaw Center and Women’s Gender & Resource Center as they host Talisa Ramos to discuss how to dismantle the stereotypes within the Latinx community and ways to build up the community. Zoom Info available on EngageD. A Latinx Heritage Month event.

The Path to Reparations: No Yellow Brick Road
Wednesday, October 7
Virtual program on YouTube live, 7 p.m.

The co-authors of From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century, William Darity and A. Kirsten  Mullen, will discuss the promise of and the obstacles to achieving reparations for descendants of U.S. slavery. They also will examine the benefits of mobilizing a reparations project to eliminate the black-white wealth differences in the United States. In addition, they will examine the flaws in existing legislation to promote black reparations. The event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Women’s & Gender Resource Center and the departments of sociology and history.

Inclusivity in STEM

Rebooting the SySTEM: Educational Updates for a New Age
Thursday, October 22
5:00-6:00 p.m.
Zoom meeting

Although STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) has become one of the most recognizable educational paradigms in the world, have we really explored its full potential? In this talk, Dr. Jamie Teeple will survey some of the most intriguing, yet anomalous, innovations in STEM education of late, including ecojustice, anti-discrimination, and social reconstructionist orientations. Cosponsored by the Women’s and Gender Resource Center and the Inclusivity in STEM planning committee. Please register. A Zoom link will be sent to all registrants the morning of October 22.

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Breaking the Silence: Destigmatizing Mental Health in the LatinX Community
Wednesday, October 14
7:00-8:15 p.m.

The Popel Shaw Center and the Women’s Gender & Resource Center host Talisa Ramos to discuss mental health in the LatinX community. Zoom Info available on EngageD. A Latinx Heritage Month event.

See our Spring 2020 Event schedule here.