Schedule of Events

Fall 2018

It's the 10th anniversary of Dickinson's institutional Women's and Gender Resource Center, established in 2008. Check out programming on our anniversary theme of Gender and the Environment.

ldg

Latina Discussion Group
6:00-7:30 p.m.
Landis House Living Room
Tuesday September 11
Tuesday, October 16
Monday, November 12
Monday, December 10

Please join us for conversation and community. In partnership with student facilitators, the WGRC hosts a monthly Latina discussion group at Landis House. All Latina students are welcome to this space to share thoughts and experiences. Food will be provided. Please contact Donna Bickford or Jacqui Amezcua with any questions.

Fall 2018 Faculty Research Lunches
12:00-1:00 p.m.

Join us and learn about exciting research by Dickinson faculty and staff, followed by time for Q&A.. Lunch is provided; please RSVP to wgrc@dickinson.edu. Cosponsored by the Women’s and Gender Resource Center and the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Department.

frl

FRL: Social Epistemology on the Radio
Thursday, September 20
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Stern 102

Media scholars have said that Rush Limbaugh and his listeners inhabit a “Balkanized knowledge enclave” in that they have attitudes, resources, and practices for producing knowledge that differ from those in the broader population. Over the past two summers, we’ve been articulating these attitudes, resources, and practices using the methods and resources of feminist social epistemology. Prof. Jeff Engelhardt (Philosophy) and Sarah Campbell ’19 will talk about their presuppositions and methods, and why they think the Rush Limbaugh Show induces in its listeners (what they call) false double consciousness.

frl

FRL: The Inheritance of Survival
Tuesday, October 16
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Stern 102

In the wake of suicide, what does intergenerational futurity look like? This presentation by Beenash Jafri (Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies) contrasts tropes of ancestry and genetics within popular discourses of mental illness, to the narration of intergenerational survival postsuicide within feminist and queer of color texts.

frl

Faculty Research Lunch: Black Power and the Myth of White Ejection
Thursday, November 15
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Althouse 201
Professor Say Burgin, History

The Black Power movement has historically been understood as, in Peniel Joseph’s words, the “evil twin” of the civil rights movement. In this presentation, I discuss the myth of white ejection as one of the key ways in which historians, journalists, politicians and others demonized Black Power from its earliest days.

mask

Film Screening: The Mask You Live In
Thursday, September 20
7:00-9:00 p.m.
Althouse 106

This documentary premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival and explores how America’s narrow definition of masculinity is harming boys, men, and society at large, and what we can do about it. A post-film discussion will be facilitated by the Healthy Masculinities Initiative Coordinator Jason Brode. Sponsored by the Women’s and Gender Resource Center and cosponsored by the Healthy Masculinities Initiative, Title IX Coordinator, and the Popel Shaw Center for Race and Ethnicity.

movie

Hollywood on High: The Wife
Carlisle Theatre

After nearly forty years of marriage, Joan and Joe Castleman (Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce) are complements. Where Joe is casual, Joan is elegant. Where Joe is vain, Joan is self-effacing. And where Joe enjoys his very public role as Great American Novelist, Joan pours her considerable intellect, grace, charm, and diplomacy into the private role of Great Man's Wife. Joe is about to be awarded the Nobel Prize for his acclaimed and prolific body of work. Joe's literary star has blazed since he and Joan first met in the late 1950s. The Wife inter-weaves the story of the couple's youthful passion and ambition with a portrait of a marriage, thirty-plus years later — a lifetime's shared compromises, secrets, betrayals, and mutual love --Sony Pictures Classic. Sponsored by the Women's and Gender Resource Center and the Department of Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies.

Friday Sept. 21, 2018………..…….…........7:30pm
Saturday Sept. 22, 2018……...………......7:30pm
Sunday Sept. 23, 2018…………………......7:30pm
Wednesday Sept. 26, 2018………………..7:30pm
Thursday Sept. 27, 2018………………......7:30pm
Friday Sept. 28, 2018……………………...…7:30pm
Sat. Sept. 29, 2018………………...………….7:30pm
Sunday Sept. 30, 2018……………….……...2:00pm
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2018…………………...7:30pm
Thursday Oct. 4, 2018……………………....7:30pm

hokulea

Hōkūleʻa: Polynesian Voyaging & Global Sustainability   
Monday, September 24
7:30-9:00 p.m.
Althouse 106
 
In June 2017, the Polynesian canoe Hōkūleʻa completed a historic worldwide voyage, Mālama Honua. The canoe traveled over 60,000 nautical miles to 85 ports and 26 nations with no modern instruments. Instead, using the Polynesian voyaging method known as wayfinding – which relies on the sun, moon, stars, and wave patterns for navigation –  Hōkūleʻa’s crew sailed across the planet to spread the message of “Mālama Honua,” a Hawaiian phrase meaning “to care for our Island Earth.” This worldwide voyage, part of a wider renaissance in Native Hawaiian and Polynesian culture, was grounded in Indigenous practices and committed to environmental conservation; to the belief that “blending traditional and modern technologies will help us find our way to a healthier future.” Through an interactive engagement with a variety of short texts – crew interviews, photographs, maps, and poems – this Ripped from the Headlines session will examine how the Hōkūleʻa’s voyage charts routes for cultural revival, global sustainability, and inter-generational leadership. This event is a Dickinson Four program and hosted by the Office of Academic Advising, the Women’s and Gender Resource Center, Phi Beta Kappa, and Alpha Lambda Delta. Note: You may need your IDs to enter Althouse. A WGRC 10th anniversary Gender and the Environment program.

9/24-29: Campus Inclusion Week
12-3 p.m.
Britton Plaza
(Rain Location: HUB Basement)  

Campus Inclusion Week aims to inspire the entire Dickinson community to commit to making Dickinson more inclusive through seeking educational material, supporting campus programs, participating in training opportunities, and learning more about campus inclusion resources. Each day on Britton Plaza focuses on a spotlight theme. Drop by the Campus Inclusion table on Britton Plaza (12-3:00 pm Monday-Friday). You can also learn about our Inclusion pledge, pick up information on campus inclusion resources, participate in interactive activities and receive free giveaways!  (Co-sponsored with PSC, BERT, CGSE, HR, Institutional Effectiveness & Inclusivity, ODS, LGBTQ Services, President’s Commission on Inclusivity, WGRC, SAAC)

Inclusive Pedagogies: Implicit Bias, Microaggressions, and the Classroom
Wednesday, September 26, 2018
4:30-6:00 p.m.
Althouse 207
Please register in Totara; 35 seats available

In this interactive workshop, faculty members will have an opportunity to learn more about how important concepts like implicit bias and microaggressions appear in their classrooms and develop productive strategies for responding to them. The workshop will also provide each participant with additional resources for further exploration and to share with colleagues. Faculty from all disciplines are encouraged to attend. This workshop will be facilitated by Dr. Donna Bickford, Director, Women’s and Gender Resource Center and Dr. Vincent Stephens, Director, Popel Shaw Center on Race & Ethnicity. Co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Institutional Excellence and Inclusivity, Provost's Office, Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity, and the Women’s & Gender Resource Center.

sustain it

Sustain IT Workshop
Unpacking Sustainability: What’s in There?

Thursday, September 27, 2018
12:00-1:15 pm
Social Hall East
 
Sustainability is about more than the environment, but what exactly is social sustainability? What is Dickinson doing to connect social, economic and environmental realms of sustainability and how can they better work together? This creative, interactive workshop will allow participants to unpack what sustainability means at Dickinson, and more importantly, what it means to you!

The Sustain IT Workshop Series is designed to create action on an issue of concern through education, networking, and prioritization. Students, faculty and staff participate to learn, discuss current practices and ideas for improvement, and then identify action items that can create positive change towards a more sustainable campus. Eco-Reps are encouraged to attend, but all are welcome. No pre-registration is necessary and feel free to bring your own food. Sponsored by: The Center for Sustainability Education, Women’s & Gender Resource Center and Popel Shaw Center for Race and Ethnicity. A WGRC 10th anniversary Gender and the Environment program. For more information contact sustainability@dickinson.edu

clarke

Environmental Racism in the Age of Climate Change
Wednesday, October 10
7:00 p.m.
ATS auditorium
Jacqueline Patterson, NAACP

Environmental racism proliferates throughout the climate change continuum from who is most likely to be exposed to the co-pollutants from facilities that spew the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change, to who is most likely to be displaced or even killed from climate change induced disasters. The depth of the systemic inequities require a transformative response to ensure that civil, human, and earth rights are upheld. The program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity, the Churchill Fund, the departments of American studies, sociology, Africana studies, the program in policy studies, the Women’s & Gender Resource Center, and the Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring (ALLARM). This program was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s Student Project Managers and it is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series. A WGRC 10th anniversary Gender and the Environment program.

SS

Start Smart Salary Negotiation Workshop
Monday, October 15
4:30 p.m.--6:30 p.m.
Althouse 207

Negotiate your highest possible salary and help close the wage gap! The AAUW's Start Smart Salary workshop will help you to:

  • Learn what the wage gap means to you
  • Determine your target salary & benefits
  • Develop a personal budget to determine your minimum acceptable salary
  • Practice salary negotiation skill-building exercises

This workshop is open to all students. Registration in Handshake is required by October 8th for attendance, and attendees are expected to stay for the entire workshop. Hosted by the Women’s and Gender Resource Center and cosponsored by the Career Center, Office of Financial Aid, and the Dickinson College AAUW chapter.

Costumes and Cultural Appropriation: What Is Your Role?:
An Employee Workshop

Tuesday, October 16, 2018
4:30-6:00 p.m.
Althouse 207
Please register in Totara; 35 seats available

It seems that every year around Halloween, colleges across the country (including Dickinson) are negotiating incidents related to students’ costume choices. Landis House invites all members of the faculty, staff, and administration to attend this training to learn how to more proactively assist students in avoiding potentially offensive or insensitive costumes. We encourage offices and departments to send a few representatives from their respective areas. This workshop will be facilitated by the Landis House Directors. Cosponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness and Inclusivity; Provost's Office; Landis Collective (Center for Service, Spirituality and Social Justice; Office of LGBTQ Services; Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity;  Women’s & Gender Resource Center); and the Bias Education and Response Team.

masc

Healthy Masculinity Conference
Wednesday, October 17
5:30-6:00 Dinner
6:00-8:00 Conference
HUB Social Hall

We welcome all male-identified members of the Dickinson community to join us for a campus conversation about healthy masculinity. A panel of men from the Dickinson community will share what is called the counter-story of masculinity, experiences they have had that conflicted with the expectations of stereotypical manhood. Panelists will share personal stories of experiences, relationships, and ways they have been inspired by others--stories that have helped them break out of the confines of the dominant narrative of masculinity and expand the definition of what it means to be a man.

Panelists include:

George Stroud – VP for Student Life
Chris Cox ‘15 – Assistant Director of Advancement, Raven’s Claw
Christian Miller ’09 – Attorney in York, PA., Raven’s Claw
Jeff Thompson ’73 – Retired teacher, Harrisburg, Pa., Raven’s Claw
Dave Webster ’88 – Associate AD & Men’s Lacrosse Coach, Raven’s Claw
Luke Bernstein ‘01 – Political fundraiser & campaign manager, Harrisburg, Pa.,  Raven’s Claw

After the panel presentation, attendees will be asked to share their stories in small groups at their tables. It is our belief that the values shared in these stories helps other men connect to healthier versions of masculinity that are not often represented in their everyday lives. This event is sponsored by the office of Title IX, Women's and Gender Resource Center, Dickinson College men’s lacrosse team and Raven’s Claw. To help us with food planning, please RSVP by noon, Monday, at https://dickinson.campuslabs.com/engage/event/2849814. Please contact us directly at TitleIX@dickinson.edu with any dietary restrictions. For more information email Dorothy Andrews or Jason Brode.

Inclusive Pedagogies 2.0: Creating an Inclusive Syllabus
Monday, October 29, 2018
4:30-6:00 p.m.
Althouse 207
Prerequisite: Must have attended Inclusive Pedagogies: Implicit Bias, Microaggressions, and the Classroom
Please register in Totara; 35 seats available

This interactive workshop provides an opportunity for faculty members to discuss inclusive pedagogy at the syllabus and course design level, and to consider strategies and mechanisms for making syllabi and courses more inclusive. The workshop will also provide each participant with additional resources for further exploration and to share with colleagues. Faculty from all disciplines are encouraged to attend. This workshop will be facilitated by Dr. Donna Bickford, Director, Women’s and Gender Resource Center and Dr. Vincent Stephens, Director, Popel Shaw Center on Race & Ethnicity. Co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Institutional Excellence and Inclusivity, Provost's Office, Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity, and the Women’s & Gender Resource Center.

why

Why We Wear Purple
Tuesday, October 30
11:30 AM – 1PM
HUB
Wear purple to show your commitment to creating a safe and inclusive campus community. Stop by the HUB between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to be part of the photo campaign #whyiwearpurple. Sponsored by the Title IX office, Public Safety, Wellness Center, Women’s and Gender Resource Center, Athletics, YWCA and DVS.

wgrc

The Politics of Disruption: Consideration of Gender, Race, Space, and Place in Athletics
Monday, November 5
6:00-7:30 p.m.
Althouse 106

College campuses have been seen as idyllic spaces that encourage activism and unhindered self-expression, spaces where diverse thought is embedded into community and culture. Our current socio-political climate has raised questions regarding privilege, identity, and voice in forms of self-expression. Concerns about the scope of higher education institution’s responsibility to sustain safe and inclusive environments resonate with faculty, administrators, and students. In this presentation, Dr. Tomika Ferguson (Virginia Commonwealth University) argues that methods to address equity and inclusion within higher education can be identified by exploring the politics of disruption found within Black women student-athletes’ college experiences. This is the second fall event in the Popel Shaw Center’s yearlong series A Kaleidoscope of Excellence: Celebrating the art, activism, and scholarship of women of color, and is cosponsored by the WGRC.

mcbride

Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality
Thursday, November 15
7:00 p.m.
ATS auditorium

Sarah McBride is the national press secretary for the Human Rights Campaign and one of America’s leading public voices in the fight for LGBTQ equality. Her moving memoir, Tomorrow Will Be Different, chronicles her journey as a transgender woman, from coming out to her family and school community, to fighting for equality in her home state and nationally, to her heartbreaking romance with her late husband. This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Office of LGBTQ Services, the Women’s & Gender Resource Center, the department of women’s, gender & sexuality studies, the Churchill Fund, and the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Inclusivity. It is part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

ppp

Female NCAA Athletes and Career Futures: Play, Prepare, emPower
Thursday, November 29
12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium

How has your role as a female NCAA athlete prepared you for the future? What have you learned through sport that will benefit you beyond college? In this workshop, you will have the opportunity to reflect on the skills and characteristics that produce athletic success and connect them with those that will bring you success in the future. Can you tell your story effectively in a professional setting? We invite all female NCAA athletes to join us and learn how! Dessert and beverages provided; feel free to bring your lunch. Cosponsored by the Center for Advising, Internships & Lifelong Career Development, Athletics, the Women’s and Gender Resource Center, and the Student Athlete Advisory Committee. Register on EngageD.

panel

Feminist Sorority Girls: A Place for Intersectionality in Tradition?
Thursday, November 29
7:00 p.m.
ATS auditorium

Donna Bickford (moderator), Dickinson College
Brontè Burleigh-Jones, Dickinson College
Diana Turk, New York University
Deborah Whaley, University of Iowa

Sororities can be both a place for women’s empowerment and a site that produces elitism and constructs stereotypical gender roles. This panel of experts will address the history of sororities and the possibilities for activism within them. This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of English, American studies, philosophy, sociology, women’s, gender & sexuality studies, the First Year Seminar Program, the Popel Shaw Center for Race & Ethnicity, Kappa Delta Pi, and the Churchill Fund. This program was initiated by the Clarke Forum’s Student Project Managers and it is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Watch for Love Your Body Week (2/11-2/15) and Gender Week (3/4-3/8) programs, as well as the annual Women's Retreat (April 5-6) in Spring 2019.

 

See our Spring 2018 Event schedule here.