Conventiculum Dickinsoniense (2009–)
A six-day immersion seminar in active Latin led by Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova.

Dickinson Latin Summer Workshop (2006–)
A six-day reading seminar intended for teachers of Latin, as a way to refresh the mind through study of an extended Latin text, and to share experiences and ideas.

Dickinson Latin Workshop (2001–)
A full-day Saturday workshop with a visiting scholar.

2019 Conventiculum, July 5-11

The Conventiculum Dickinsoniense is an immersion seminar designed for those who want to acquire some ability at ex-tempore expression in Latin. A wide range of people can benefit from the seminar: professors in universities, teachers in secondary schools, graduate students, undergraduates, and other lovers of Latin, provided that anyone who considers applying has a solid understanding of the grammatical essentials of the Latin language. A minimum requirement for participation is knowledge of Latin grammar and the ability to read a Latin text of average complexity – even if this reading ability depends on frequent use of a dictionary.  But no previous experience in speaking Latin is necessary. Sessions will be aimed at helping participants to increase their ability to use Latin effectively in spoken discourse and to understand others speaking in Latin. After the first evening reception (in which any language may be spoken), Latin will be the language used throughout the seminar. Participants will be involved in intensive activity each day from morning until early evening (with breaks for lunch and mid-afternoon pauses). They will experience Latin conversations on topics ranging from themes in literature and art all the way to the routines and activities of daily life, and will enjoy the benefits of reading and discussing texts in the target language. Activities will involve both written and spoken discourse, both of which engage the active faculties of expression, and each of which is complementary to the other. The seminar will not merely illustrate how active Latin can be a useful tool for teachers, it will show how developing an active facility in Latin can directly and personally benefit any cultivator of Latin who wishes to acquire a more instinctive command of the language and a more intimate relationship with Latin writings.

Moderators:

Prof. Milena Minkova, University of Kentucky

Prof. Terence Tunberg, University of Kentucky

We can accept a maximum number of 40 participants. Deadline for applications is May 1, 2019. The participation fee for each participant will be $400. The fee includes lodging in a single room in campus housing (and please note that lodging will be in a student residence near the site of the sessions), two meals (breakfast and lunch) per day, as well as the opening dinner, and a cookout at the Dickinson farm. Included in this price is also the facilities fee, which allows access to the gym, fitness center, and the library, as well as internet access. The $400 fee does not include the cost of dinners (except for the opening dinner and the cookout at the Dickinson farm), and does not include the cost of travel to and from the seminar. Dinners can easily be had at restaurants within walking distance from campus.  Please keep in mind that the participation fee of $400, once it has been received by the seminar’s organizers, is not refundable.  This is an administrative necessity.

Registered participants should plan to arrive in Carlisle, PA on July 5, in time to attend the first event of the seminar. This first event is an opening buffet and welcoming reception for all participants, which will begin at about 6:00 p.m., in which all languages are acceptable. The actual workshop sessions (in which Latin will the exclusive language) will begin early the next morning on July 6.

For more information and application instructions write to: Professor Terence Tunberg:  terence.tunberg@gmail.com

2019 Dickinson Ancient Greek Workshop, July 12-18

Lucian, The Sale of Lives

The Dickinson Workshops are mainly intended for teachers of Latin and Greek, to refresh the mind through study of an extended text, and to share experiences and ideas. Sometimes those who are not currently engaged in teaching have participated as well, including students, retired teachers, and those working towards teacher certification.

The text for 2019 is Βίων πρᾶσις, literally “The Sale of Lives,” also known as Philosophies for Sale or Vitarum Auctio, by Lucian of Samosata (ca. 120–190 AD). It is a comic dialogue or script in which Zeus acts as owner-manager of a slave auction house, with Hermes as the auctioneer. Together they attempt to sell the various Greek philosophical schools to wary buyers, as if the philosophers were potential servants. Pythagoras, Heraclitus, and Socrates are all on the block, as are the famous Cynic Diogenes, and a fast-talking Stoic. What can they do for you? The work can serve as a humorous introduction to all the major schools of philosophy in the Roman empire, but no sect is unscathed as Lucian ruthlessly parodies their mannerisms and excesses.

Lucian’s Greek is generally straightforward, so this text would be good for those whose Greek might be a bit rusty. Comprehensive notes and vocabulary for the forthcoming Dickinson College Commentaries edition of this text by Dr. Casey will also prove helpful for those seeking to improve ancient Greek reading fluency.

Moderators:

Eric Casey (Teacher of Latin and Greek, Trinity School, New York City)

Christopher Francese (Asbury J. Clarke Professor of Classical Studies, Dickinson College)

The participation fee for each participant will $400. The fee covers lodging, breakfast, lunch and dinner in the Dickinson cafeteria, the facilities fee, which allows access to the gym, fitness center, and the library, as well as wireless and wired internet access while on campus. The fee does not cover the costs of books or travel, or of dinners, which are typically eaten in the various restaurants in Carlisle. Please keep in mind that the participation fee, once it has been received by the seminar’s organizers, is not refundable. This is an administrative necessity.

Lodging: accommodations will be in a student residence hall near the site of the sessions. The building features suite-style configurations of two double rooms sharing a private bathroom, or one double and one single room sharing a private bathroom.

The first event will be an introductory dinner at 6:00 p.m., July 12. The final session ends at noon on July 18, with lunch to follow. Sessions will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. each day, with the afternoons left free for preparation.

Application deadline: May 1, 2019. 

Fee deadline: June 1, 2019.

TO APPLY: please contact Mrs. Terri Blumenthal, blumentt@dickinson.edu by the application deadline. The fee is due in a check made out to Dickinson College, by the fee deadline.

For more information please contact Prof. Chris Francese (francese@dickinson.edu)

Dickinson Latin Workshop: Martial, Epigrams

July 12–18, 2019

The Dickinson Workshops are mainly intended for teachers of Latin, to refresh the mind through study of an extended text, and to share experiences and ideas. Sometimes those who are not currently engaged in teaching have participated as well, including students, retired teachers, and those working towards teacher certification.

Panini's Ancient Rome Italian Art, Metropolitan Museum. Source: Flickr user Mike Steele

Panini’s Ancient Rome
Italian Art, Metropolitan Museum. Source: Flickr user Mike Steele

The text for 2019 will be selections from Martial’s Epigrams. M. Valerius Martialis was born around AD 40 in Bilbilis, Spain. He came to Rome in his twenties and gained fame as a writer of epigrams, which are short poems on various topics with some kind of punch-line, ironic observation, or mocking insult at the end.  His collections of epigrams took shape gradually in the years 86 to around 102, and contain a varied mix of observations on daily life, the battle of the sexes, and the always fraught relationship between the rich and the not rich, between patrons and clients. In tone Martial’s epigrams range widely, from gentle humor to hair-raising obscenity, from rapturous praise to cruel mockery. He can also wax philosophical, or sentimentally commemorate the death of a six-year-old slave. 

Moderators:

Bret Mulligan, Associate Professor of Classics, Haverford College

Christopher Francese, Asbury J. Clarke Professor of Classical Studies, Dickinson College

The participation fee for each participant will $400. The fee covers lodging, breakfast, lunch and dinner in the Dickinson cafeteria, the facilities fee, which allows access to the gym, fitness center, and the library, as well as wireless and wired internet access while on campus. The fee does not cover the costs of books or travel, or of dinners, which are typically eaten in the various restaurants in Carlisle. Please keep in mind that the participation fee, once it has been received by the seminar’s organizers, is not refundable. This is an administrative necessity.

Lodging: accommodations will be in a student residence hall near the site of the sessions. The building features suite-style configurations of two double rooms sharing a private bathroom, or one double and one single room sharing a private bathroom.

The first event will be an introductory dinner at 6:00 p.m., July 12. The final session ends at 5:00 p.m. on July 18, with dinner to follow. Sessions will meet from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day, with the mornings left free for preparation.

Application deadline: May 1, 2019. 

Fee deadline: June 1, 2019.

TO APPLY: please contact Mrs. Terri Blumenthal, blumentt@dickinson.edu by the application deadline. The fee is due in a check made out to Dickinson College, by the fee deadline.

For more information please contact Prof. Chris Francese (francese@dickinson.edu)

Past events

2018

  • Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova, Conventiculum Dickinsoniense, July 2018
  • Chris Francese and Leni Rebeiro Leite, Historiae Indicae

2017

  • Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova, Conventiculum Dickinsoniense, July 2017
  • Chris France and Marc Mastrangelo, Psychomachia, July 2017

2016

2015

  • Caroline T. Schroeder (University of the Pacific), Children and Education in Late Antiquity, March 2015
  • Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova, Conventiculum Dickinsoniense, July 2015
  • Chris Francese and Andrew Fenton, Ilias Latina, July 2015

2014

  • Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova,  Conventiculum Dickinsoniense, July 2014
  • Chris Francese and Wells Hansen, Dickinson Latin Workshop, July 2014

2013 

  • Andrew Becker (Virginia Tech) “Sound (and Sometimes Sense) in Latin Verses: Accents, Rhythms, Meters, Poems,” March 23, 2013.
  • Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova, Conventiculum Dickinsoniense, July 5–11, 2013.
  • Christopher Francese and Meghan Reedy, Ovid’s Fasti, Book 4, July 11-16, 2013
  • David Gilman Romano (University of Arizona), and Nicholas Stapp (University of Arizona), “Ancient Corinth and Roman City Planning,” November 16, 2013.

2012

  • Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova, Conventiculum Dickinsoniense, July 6-12, 2012
  • Christopher Francese and Meghan Reedy, Propertius’ Elegies, July 13-17, 2012

2011

  • Hans-Friedrich Mueller (Union College) “Julius Caesar in his Time: The General as Historian” March 26, 2011
  • Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova, Conventiculum Dickinsoniense, July 5 -11, 2011
  • Christopher Francese and Meghan Reedy, Tacitus’ Germania, July 13-17, 2011
  • Carl J. Richard (University of Louisiana, Lafayette) “Greeks and Roman Bearing Gifts: How the Ancients Inspired the Founding Fathers,” November 11, 2011.

2010

  • Terence Tunberg and Milena Minkova, Conventiculum Dickinsoniense, July 5 -10, 2010.

2009

  • Stephen Heyworth (Wadham College, Oxford University), “Roman Myth and Ovid’s Fasti” Febraury 21, 2009.
  • Christopher Francese and Meghan Reedy, Cicero’s De Re Publica, July 12–17, 2009. 

2008

  • Christopher Francese and Meghan Reedy (Dickinson College), Catullus (entire), July 13-19, 2008.

2007

  • Christopher Francese and Meghan Reedy (Dickinson College), Seneca’s De brevitate vitae, July 15–21, 2007.

2006

  • Christopher Francese, Ovid's "little Aeneid" (Metamorphoses 13.623–14.582), July 23–28, 2006.

2005

  • John Donahue (William & Mary), “From Dining Table to Banquet Hall Workshop,” November 5, 2005.

2004

  • R. Scott Smith and Stephen Trzaskoma (University of New Hampshire) “How Did the Greeks Believe in their Myths?” November 6, 2004.

2003

  • Garrett Fagan (Pennsylvania State University) “Attractions of the Arena: Roman Gladiatorial Spectacles” March 8th, 2003.
  • Madeleine Henry (Iowa State University) “Ancient Roman Women,” November 8th, 2003.

2002

  • Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow (Brandeis University), “Pompeii and Herculaneum: Windows on Roman Life” February 23, 2002.

2001

  • John Traupman (St. Joseph’s University), November 10, 2001.