Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CLST 110-01 Introduction to Greek Civilization
Instructor: Marc Mastrangelo
Course Description:
Reading and discussion of key literary, philosophical, and historical works of ancient Greece, including works by Homer, Thucydides, Plato, the Greek tragedians and comedians. Topics include Greek artistic and moral values, the conception of a good life, Athenian democracy and imperialism, slavery, homosexuality, and gender. The literature is read in English translation. This course fulfills the humanities distribution requirement. Offered every year
1330:TF   DENNY 317
CLST 140-01 Ancient Worlds on Film
Instructor: Scott Farrington
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 210-01. An introduction to ancient Greek and Roman history and civilization (excluding mythology) through viewing popular films about this period and reading the historical and literary sources on which those films are based. The course focuses on the stories of remarkable men and women from antiquity, what those stories reveal Greek and Roman values and ideas, and ways to apply those insights critically to our own time.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 08
CLST 140-02 Ancient Worlds on Film
Instructor: Scott Farrington
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 140-02. An introduction to ancient Greek and Roman history and civilization (excluding mythology) through viewing popular films about this period and reading the historical and literary sources on which those films are based. The course focuses on the stories of remarkable men and women from antiquity, what those stories reveal Greek and Roman values and ideas, and ways to apply those insights critically to our own time.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 08
CLST 200-01 Ancient Greek Religion and Sanctuaries
Instructor: Nikki Cummings
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 250-01. A survey of the origins, history, structure, and evolution of ancient Greek religion and sanctuaries from Mycenaean to Hellenistic times. A comparative study of official religion vs. folk religion, pantheon of gods and heroes vs. daemonic cults and magic (ritual binding, cursing, charming), myths, oracles, festivals and games vs. house cult; an insight into mysteries and chthonic cults, burial customs and eschatology, soul and the Homeric underworld, the mnemoscape of death and reincarnation. A review of loci of worship (caves, shrines, temples, sanctuaries); analysis and meaning of the worship ritual, offerings, dedications, animal and human(?) sacrifices; interpretation of sacred symbols, ritual implements and paraphernalia: idols and figurines, large-scale anthropomorphic concretions, cult statues. A comparative study of the history and development, organization and lay-out, architecture, portable finds and dedications of the most prominent Mycenaean and ancient Greek sanctuaries (Mycenae Cult Center, Tiryns shrines, Aghia Irene temple; Olympia, Delphi, Eleusis, Delos, Nemea, Dodone, Kos, Samos, Priene, Pergamon) involving a synthesis of archaeological and iconographical evidence, Linear B documents, epigraphic evidence, and ancient literary sources. Additional issues to be addressed include: Greek anthropomorphism and polytheism; the power of religion as collective memory; the sociopolitical role of organized religion; priesthood and the gradual appropriation of religion by the ruling hierarchy and the state (polis); chronological development of ritual vs. unchanging core of beliefs; patterns of uniformity and regional variation; survival of ancient Greek religious elements in Christianity.
1030:TR   DIST
CLST 390-01 Senior Research Colloquium
Instructor: Christopher Francese
Course Description:
This capstone course for the classical studies major includes an individually designed research project on an open question in Classical Studies based on a set of primary sources or data, and a reflective essay that applies one or more classical texts to a contemporary issue or problem of the students choosing. A syllabus of common readings is developed based on student interests as determined prior to the course. Class meetings include discussion of common readings, presentation of draft research and ideas for the reflective essay, field trips to museums and visiting lectures, and discussion of the value of the classical studies major to prospective employers and others. Results of the research and reflection will be published on Dickinson Scholar and publicized via the department blog.Prerequisite: Three LATN or GREK courses above 102 and CLST 251 or 253.
1330:F   EASTC 411
Courses Offered in GREK
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
GREK 102-01 Beginning Attic Greek
Instructor: Scott Farrington
Course Description:
All the fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax as well as the acquisition of vocabulary. By the conclusion of the second semester students will be prepared to read classical authors in the original.Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent.
0930:MTRF   EASTC 112
GREK 202-01 Introduction to Greek Poetry
Instructor: Christopher Francese
Course Description:
Selected readings from Homer with emphasis on poetic style and composition. Supplementary readings in English help stimulate discussion of literary, historical, and cultural topics regarding epic poetry. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
 
Courses Offered in LATN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LATN 102-01 First-Year Latin
Instructor: Ashley Roman
Course Description:
All the fundamentals of Latin grammar and the study of vocabulary. This course prepares students to read classical authors in the original.Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent.
0830:MWF   DIST
LATN 102-02 First-Year Latin
Instructor: Ashley Roman
Course Description:
All the fundamentals of Latin grammar and the study of vocabulary. This course prepares students to read classical authors in the original.Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent.
0930:MWF   DIST
LATN 202-01 Introduction to Roman Poetry
Instructor: Marc Mastrangelo
Course Description:
Selected readings from Catullus and Ovid, with focus on poetic technique, and discussion of supplementary readings in English. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
1030:MWF   STERN 102
LATN 234-01 Ovid
Instructor: Christopher Francese
Course Description:
Selections from the Metamorphoses with study of the more important Greek and Roman myths and their modern reception.Prerequisite: 202 or the equivalent.
1330:MR   STERN 11