Major

Law and Policy

Thirteen course credits, plus the transcript notation internship:

The following seven courses are required of all majors:
POSC 120: American Government
ECON 111: Microeconomics
LAWP/PHIL 255: Philosophy of Law
LAWP/POSC 248: The Judiciary
LPPM 200: Foundations
LAWP 300: Gateway
LAWP 400: Senior Seminar

In addition, the major has the following requirements:

ELECTIVES (6):
1 empirical social analysis elective
2 law-related electives
1 policy-related elective
1 additional law- or policy-related elective
1 Foundations of Economic Policy elective (normally satisfied by ECON 228)

TRANSCRIPT NOTATION INTERNSHIP
Must focus on policy and law

Honors

To graduate with honors as a Policy Management (PMGT) or Law and Policy (LAWP) major you will need to conduct some original research and produce a thesis that meets the standards set by the Policy Studies faculty. PMGT projects should relate to an ongoing, real-world policy issue and be directed at an identified real-world client. LAWP projects must be a defense or a critique of a policy outcome that is legally related. You must have an overall Grade Point Average of 3.4 or better to proceed with an honors proposal.

Honors guidelines can also be referenced online by visiting the Policy Studies home page.

Internships

Excellent quality internships are available in the local area. Carlisle is the county seat and the state capital, Harrisburg, is only 17 miles away. Dickinson alums willing to serve as mentors and internship site supervisors are well placed in both locations. Students are also urged to consider the internship-based Dickinson Semester in Washington program.

NOTE: Students who successfully complete The Washington Center program in Washington, DC, and students who complete a for-credit internship while studying abroad would satisfy their internship requirement and would not have to complete the internship notation process.

Opportunities for off-campus study

Students are encouraged to study off-campus for at least part of their junior year. Students may be able to study off-campus for the entire academic year with careful planning and close consultation with their policy studies advisor.

Courses

200 Foundations in Policy Studies
This course will provide a foundational experience for majors in both Law and Policy and Policy Management. It will introduce key policy studies principles, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes.
Prerequisites: POSC 120 and ECON 111. This course is cross-listed as PMGT 200.

210 Legal Ethics
This course examines the moral responsibilities and ethical duties of a lawyer. While the focus is on the rules governing professional conduct, the course will examine all areas of the law governing the conduct of lawyers.
Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.

228 Economic Analysis of Policy
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection.
Prerequisites: 111 or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and QR graduation requirement.

230 Negotiation and Advocacy
This course will focus on the role of the advocate in the law and policy-making process. It will consider various types of advocacy (public debate, litigation, public relations, etc.) and various methods of negotiation as well as compare and contrast the advocate's role in different forums (legislatures, courts, administrative agencies, the press, etc.).
Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.

240 Criminal Procedure
This course will examine the constitutional rights that suspects and defendants have in the criminal justice system. Special attention will be given to the right against unreasonable searches and seizures, the right against self- incrimination, and the right to an attorney.
Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.

248 The Judiciary
A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court.
Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 248. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

250 Juvenile Justice
This course will examine the nature and character of the American juvenile justice system, including its history, changing emphasis, and current trends. The system will be viewed from the point of entry into the system until final disposition. Various treatment alternatives, including rehabilitation, will also be examined.
Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.

255 Philosophy of Law
Fundamental problems of legal philosophy are considered, including the nature of law, the justification of legal authority, the relationship between legality and morality, the nature of judicial decision-making, theories of punishment, and/or issues involved in civil disobedience.
Prerequisites: a previous course in philosophy or major standing in Law and Policy or Political Science. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 255. This course fulfills the DIV 1.a. distribution requirement.

259 Law, Politics, and Society in Asia
This course examines the interaction between law, legal institutions and citizens in China, Japan and India. Covering history and the contemporary scene, course focuses on how law works in practice and is understood and used by ordinary people in Asia. It covers areas such as marriage and divorce, the legal profession, lost property, civil rights, the environment, sexuality, mediation, land development and property, among others. Comparisons between the United States and Asia, as well as between Asian countries, will be emphasized.
This course is cross-listed as EASN 259 and POSC 259.

290 Selected Topics
Courses in the area of Policy Studies. The content of the course will reflect the interests and expertise of faculty and the needs of students.
Prerequisite dependent upon topic.

300 Gateway Course
This course explores the diverse public-service roles that lawyers and administrators play at the local, state, national, and international levels. Emphasis will be given to the professional rights and duties attached to public-service positions and the ethical dilemmas that arise in fulfilling these responsibilities. Public-service professionals will play an integral role in the course as visiting speakers.
Prerequisite: LPPM 200.

400 Law and Policy Seminar
This course will serve as a capstone experience for Law and Policy majors. It will echo the key principles covered in the Foundations class, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes. Emphasis will be placed on helping students refine their interdisciplinary approach to the topics of law and policy in a liberal arts framework. The seminar will give students one last comprehensive look at a series of policies to see how a legal regime limits policy choices and how the policy process informs and limits laws.
Prerequisites: LPPM 200.

Policy Management

Major

Thirteen course credits, plus the transcript notation internship:

The following five courses are required of all majors:
POSC 120: American Government
ECON 111: Microeconomics
LPPM 200: Foundations 
PMGT 301: Policy and Leadership
PMGT 401: Senior Seminar

In addition, the major has the following requirements:

ELECTIVES (3): 
1 ethics elective
1 empirical social analysis elective
1 Foundations of Economic Policy elective (normally satisfied by ECON 228)

POLICY MANAGEMENT COURSES (5)
1 public sector policy elective
1 private sector policy elective
1 international policy elective
2 unrestricted policy electives

TRANSCRIPT NOTATION INTERNSHIP
Must relate to policy management

Honors

Honors guidelines can be referenced online by visiting the Policy Studies home page.

Internships

Excellent quality internships are available in the local area. Carlisle is the county seat and the state capital, Harrisburg, is only 17 miles away. Dickinson alums willing to serve as mentors and internship site supervisors are well placed in both locations. Students are also urged to consider the internship-based Dickinson Semester in Washington program.

NOTE: Students who successfully complete The Washington Center program in Washington, DC, and students who complete a for-credit internship while studying abroad would satisfy their internship requirement and would not have to complete the internship notation process.

Opportunities for off-campus study

Students are encouraged to study off campus for at least part of the their junior year. Students may be able to study off campus for the entire academic year with careful planning and close consultation with their policy studies adviser.

Courses

200 Foundations in Policy Studies
This course will provide a foundational experience for majors in both Law and Policy and Policy Management. It will introduce key policy studies principles, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes.
Prerequisites: POSC 120 and ECON 111. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 200.

220 Biomedical Ethics
A study of ethical issues arising in the context of medical practice, biomedical research, and health related policy making, with focus on the ethical concepts, theories and reasoning methods developed to clarify and resolve these issues.
Prerequisite: One previous course in philosophy, or LPPM 200, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 220. This course fulfills the DIV 1.a. distribution requirement.

228 Economic Analysis of Policy
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection.
Prerequisites: 111 or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and QR graduation requirement.

290 Selected Topics
Courses in the area of Policy Management. The content of the course will reflect the interests and expertise of faculty and the needs of students.
Prerequisite dependent upon topic.

301 Policy and Leadership
This course will focus both on traditional (top-down)and other less traditional models of leadership (bottom-up, e.g., grass roots advocacy, consensus building, and other less hierarchical models of shared leadership). Leadership in a variety of organizational contexts (e.g., public, private, and non-profit sectors) will be covered, and ethics will be an important theme woven throughout the course.
Prerequisite: LPPM 200.

401 Policy Management Seminar
This course will serve as a capstone experience for Policy Management majors. It will echo the key principles covered in the Foundations class, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes. Emphasis will be placed on acclimating students to the processes of complex problem solving that exist in a variety of contexts, including the public, non-profit, and private sectors, as well as in various comparative cross-cultural settings. "Policy Management" majors conclude their academic study of the various frameworks, orientations, stakeholders, and value sets that exist in different policy contexts by completing a comprehensive, hands-on policy management exercise.
Prerequisites: LPPM 200.