Spring 2024

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 234-01 Gender and Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required. Cross-listed with PHIL 261-04 and POSC 234-01, SOCI 230-04 and WGSS 302-02. This course analyzes how legal theorists have drawn upon notions of gender, sex, and sexuality in order to understand and critique the American legal system and its norms. It considers questions like: How might a feminist perspective on the law illuminate instances of systematized inequality or legalized discrimination? Can queer theorists engage with the law in order to alter it, or does the very act of engagement hinder the possibility of future socio-legal change? How can the law better represent women of color, working women, queer women, stay-at-home mothers, transgender or non-binary individuals, women seeking surrogate or abortion services, and more, without reinforcing traditional understandings of what it means to be a woman? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis. Prerequisites: One POSC, LAWP or WGSS course or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 234 and WGSS 302.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 317
LAWP 259-01 Law, Politics, and Society in Asia
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 259-01 and POSC 259-01. This course examines the interaction between law, legal institutions and citizens in China, Japan, and India. Covering history and the contemporary scene, course focuses on how law works in practice and is understood and used by ordinary people in Asia. It covers areas such as marriage and divorce, the legal profession, lost property, civil rights, the environment, sexuality, mediation, land development and property, among others. Comparisons between the United States and Asia, as well as between Asian countries, will be emphasized. This course is cross-listed as POSC 259 and LAWP 259. This course is cross-listed as EASN 259 and POSC 259.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
STERN 103
LAWP 260-01 Problem-Solving Courts
Instructor: Albert Masland
Course Description:
Through a hands-on, experiential examination of traditional courts, treatment courts, and addiction issues, this course will introduce the students to the use of problem-solving courts to address drug, DUI, and mental health concerns. A major course component will involve community-based learning. Students will be required to interact with court participants and members of the various problem-solving court teams (e.g., judges, attorneys, probation officers, treatment providers as well as other support specialists, depending on the courts focus). As the students become familiar with one component of the war on drugs, they will be challenged to examine and debate the war as a whole.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, R
DENNY 317
04:30 PM-05:45 PM, T
DENNY 317
LAWP 290-01 Race and the Rights of Citizenship
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required. Cross-listed with POSC 290-04 and SOCI 230-05. In the United States, citizenship is often described in idealistic terms. Not only are all American citizens meant to have equal standing before the law, but so too should those who desire to become American citizens have equal access to the procedures, protections, and promises of citizenship. Cast in this light, citizenship is meant to signal a sense of recognition and belonging free from differential treatment on the basis of one's identity or status. Yet despite these narratives, the history of American citizenship is one that is marked by the colonization, domination, and disenfranchisement of groups defined as racially "other" - and therefore outside the bounds of citizenship. In this course, we will ask: How do we understand the coexistence of claims to equal citizenship in the United States given the historical realities of enslavement and race-based exclusion? What does it mean to be an American citizen and how has that meaning been shaped by the construction of racial identities across space and time? How might considerations of race in matters of citizenship also be shaped by other factors like sex, gender, national origin, religion, and class? Is citizenship actually a universal concept - that is, a concept that is open, in principle, to anyone at any time? Or is it an exclusive concept - reserved for a select few? And if racial injustice is not separable from citizenship, then is it possible to remake American citizenship along more egalitarian lines? To answer these questions, we will draw from a rich array of legal texts, political philosophy, history, sociology, first-person narratives, and Black, Asian, and Indigenous literature.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
ALTHSE 206
LAWP 560-01 Legal Archival Research: Dred Scott
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description: