Fall 2014

Tuesday, September 2nd
Mathematics & Computer Science Welcome Back BBQ
The Mathematics & Computer Science professors will be grilling hot dogs, hamburgers and veggie burgers. They will also provide side dishes and desserts. Come out & enjoy the fun!

12:00 p.m.
Rector Courtyard (Rain Location: Rector Atrium)
Lunch provided

Tuesday, September 23rd
Professor Tim Wahls
"Formal Methods, Social Networking and Code Generation"

Event-B is a formal notation for modeling software systems. Event-B tools (notably the Rodin platform) provide strong support for proving correctness and safety properties of models, producing a level of assurance that no amount of testing can achieve.  In this talk, we give a tutorial introduction to Event-B by developing a simple model of a social networking application and using Rodin to prove a few correctness properties of that model.  We then demonstrate using the EventB2SQL tool to automatically generate a database application from the Event-B model, yielding an implementation that maintains those same correctness properties.  EventB2SQL is joint work with Qi Wang '13 and Mia Shang '16.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, September 30th
Maurice Royce '16, Hieu Le '16 - "Farmdata Web Application Project"

This project was a continuation of previous years of work on the Dickinson College Farm Database Web Application. The application is a fully functional web based application that replaced the old paper-based system in which farmhands recorded field data with pencil and paper in order to keep records of past harvest, seeding, sales, etc. The system also generates reports, graphs, and other analytical information based on input data to allow for better managing and planning in the future to maximize production. The application allows farmers to use their mobile device to immediately input data into the database so that information cannot be lost as it could be in the previous paper based system.  Recent additions to the application include the creation of a mobile-friendly interface, analysis of data using graphs, backdating functionality, and generality to support multiple farms that use the application.  We hope to open source the project in the future so that it could be used by any farm interested in digitalizing their data.

Asir Saeed '16 - "Mining the Shale"

Hydraulic fracturing or "fracking," the extraction of natural gas from under the Earth's surface, is under much debate and scrutiny due to its potential hazard to the environment. The purpose of this project was to shed some light into the concerns through the use of data mining. 

This project entailed organizing and analyzing large quantities of Pennsylvania water quality data from a variety of publicy available databases and Dickinson's own ALLARM.  The objective of the analysis was to see trends or changes in water quality due to the fracking, particularly comparing areas with more intensities of fracking than areas with lower intensity.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, October 14th
Michael Belfatti
"Survey of Mathematical Modeling in Finance and Insurance"

In the last 50 years, the use of mathematical models in the Finance, Economics and Insurance sectors has increased dramatically. Whether you're a bank on Main Street, a hedge fund on Wall Street, or a reinsurance company in Bermuda, you're likely to encounter mathematics and models at the heart of the firm's operations.  Mr. Belfatti will discuss some of the historical background underlying this rise, the current state of model usage, some of the pitfalls to this increased quantitative dependence, and what it means for future professionals in these spaces.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, October 28th

Professor Shannon Talbott, Moravian College
"A Game of Crowns"

This talk will explore ideas in graph theory. Namely, we will discuss generalized crowns, hypergraphs of the crowns, and skeletons of the hypergraphs of crowns.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, November 11th
Marc Besson and Katherine Roy - Dickinson College students
"Hungary 4π?" 

This talk will serve as a general overview of the Budapest Semesters in Mathematics program.  It will be geared towards prospective applicants interested in attending a rigorous study abroad program in mathematics. We, as former participants in the BSM program, will discuss our experiences, both academic and cultural, in the host city of Budapest. We will also bring some of our favorite problems from our courses and will share some of the unique opportunities available for travel and cultural immersion. BSM a legjobb a világon! 

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Pizza provided

Tuesday, November 18th
Professor Dick Forrester, Associate Professor of Mathematics, Dickinson College
and
Amity Fox, Associate Director of the Career Center, Dickinson College
"Where Do I Go From Here?"

In this chat we will discuss a wide variety of careers and opportunities for students majoring in mathematics and computer science. In addition, we will talk about graduate school options, internships, and REUs (Research Experience for Undergraduates). Specific information about our recent graduates will be provided.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, December 9th
Professor Holley Friedlander, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Dickinson College
"We Can Count on Polynomials"

Every calculus student knows that polynomials are especially nice functions. In this talk, we discuss house number theorists use polynomials to study problems in arithmetic. Our focus will be on the many similarities between the integers and polynomials. Once we have built a framework for this analogy, we will explore a polynomial version of a very famous theorem in number theory -- Fermat's Last Theorem. If time permits, we will describe additional applications.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided