Spring 2016

Friday, February 12th
Jonathan Jones, Financial Adviser, McAdam Financial
"The Power of Thinking - How to Make it in Finance"

Navigating and deciding the best employment opportunity based on your skill set and goals is a difficult process. This process becomes more challenging when you believe a certain major can only get you certain jobs. Mathematics and computer science majors should never feel blinded by this idea because we have the most important skill of all - the ability to think effectively. And this skill is necessary everywhere, especially in finance.

12:30 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, February 23rd
Prof. Grant Braught, Computer Science (Rush Hour Talk)
"Computing Algorithms Inspired by Nature"

When some computer scientists squint hard and tilt their heads just right, they see computation everywhere. Come to this Rush Hour for a glimpse into how computational algorithms inspired by brains, evolution and even ants are able to solve an amazing variety of challenging problems.

12:00 p.m.
Rector, Stafford Lecture Room
Lunch provided

Tuesday, March 8th
Janet Fierson, Ph.D, La Salle University
"When Math Hands You Rainbows"

Rainbow connection is a relatively new concept in the mathematical field of graph theory, having first been introduced less than ten years ago. Participants in this chat will develop an understanding of the topic by working together to discover some early results themselves. Then, the focus will shift to recent variations and applications. Over the course of the talk, it should become evident that this is a fun and accessible area of mathematics with great potential for further research.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, March 22nd
Prof. Holley Friedlander, Dickinson College, Mathematics
"What is an Elliptic Curve?"

Elliptic curves are highly esteemed objects in mathematics that play an important role in number theory and cryptography. In this chat, we will learn about elliptic curves and their history. Spoiler: an elliptic curve is *not* an ellipse! Then we will discuss some applications and open questions.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, March 29th
Kira Hamman, Penn State University, Mont Alto
"Mathematics and Social Justice"

Recently, a number of high-profile events have refocused national attention on the realities of social injustice in the United States. Even as globalization and technological innovation continue to accelerate, our society struggles to truly provide equal rights for all citizens. Educational equity and quantitative literacy are critical pieces of this; as civil rights activist Robert Moses said, "the ongoing struggle for citizenship and equality for minority people is now linked to an issue of math and science literacy...people who don't have access to it are like the people who couldn't read and write in the industrial age." We will consider this link in both its historical context and its modern incarnation.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, April 12th
Vonn Walter, Penn State Hershey
"An Introduction to Hierarchical Clustering with Application to Gene Expression Profiling"

Clustering is exploratory data analysis technique that can be used in a variety of applications, including pattern recognition, image analysis, and bioinformatics. We will introduce basic concepts of hierarchical clustering - distance functions and linkage - and will explore how different approaches can affect the resulting clustering solution. In addition, we will illustrate how clustering techniques can be applied to gene expression data in a biomedical setting to identify molecular subtypes of a given disease that may have biological or clincial relevance.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Thursday, April 14th
31st Annual Science Student Research Symposium
Poster Session & Refreshments

Abstract Deadline: Thursday, April 7th - email wissj@dickinson.edu

4:30-6:00 p.m.
HUB Social Hall

Tuesday, April 19th
Jennifer Jacobs, NSA
"A Mathematician's Role at NSA and a Peek at Public Key Cryptography"

Mathematics can be more than just a subject in school, it can be a career. The government is the number one single employer of mathematicians in the country. Many of those mathematicians end up at the National Security Agency, where they find careers in research, information assurance, and cryptanalysis. This talk will be an introduction to the roles of mathematicians at NSA, as well as basics of cryptography.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided


Tuesday, April 26th
Honors Presentation - Hieu Lu '16
"Applying Novelty Search to the Construction of Ensemble Systems"

Ensemble methods are widely applied in classification problems. Ensemble methods combine results from multiple classifiers to overcome the possible deficiency of any single classifier. One important question is how to construct an ensemble system so that it can utilize all individuals most efficiently to provide better results. The ensemble systems thus need some level of diversity in terms of error among individuals to avoid group mistakes. Novelty Search is a recently published approach in evolution of computation in which individuals evolve based on a novelty metric that evaluates how different their behavoir is, in addition to an objective metric that shows how correct their behavior is. This presentation will apply the novelty search approach to generating classifiers for use in ensemble systems and compare this result with other approaches.

12:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, April 26th
Mathematics & Computer Science Majors Dinner
Professor Dave Richeson - "How to Trisect an Angle"

In 1837, Pierre Wantzel famously proved that it is impossible to trisect an angle. Or did he? We will discuss the history of this famous problem, explain what Wantzel proved, and present a variety of ways to trisect an angle.

Upsilon Pi Epsilon (Computer Science Honor Society inductions)
Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics Honor Society inductions)
Awards & Prizes

6:00 p.m.
Social Hall
(Proper dress attire requested - business casual)

Monday, May 2nd
Honors Presentation - Wode (Nimo) Ni '16
"Whiteboard Scanning using Super-Resolution"

We present a project on the application of Super-Resolution(SR) in a distance whiteboard scenario.  To motivate the project, imagine a person taking a video or an image sequence of a whiteboard from a distance. Due to the limitation of camera capacity and the distance, the words in the whiteboard images are sometimes illegible. Though there exist applications to enhance the image quality, the resolution limit caused by the distance is difficult to overcome. Super-resolution, a class of techniques in the field of Computer Vision, enables us to enhance the quality of the images by utilizing the information of multiple low quality images and fuse them to obtain a higher quality image. In this project, we studied spatial domain SR algorithms described in [1] and [2], experimented on an implementation of it in OpenCV, and tried to apply it on our distance whiteboard data set. Due to the complexity of the OpenCV implementation, we first did black-box analysis on the performance of the algorithm. Quantitative analysis on the quality of the resulting images were then conducted to understand the effect of different parameter values for the algorithm. Finally, we attempted to improve the quality of the output by adjusting the algorithm to fit the whiteboard scenario by experimenting on different types of optical flow algorithms.  We will display results and describe details of the experiments in the presentation.

References:

[1] Farsiu, Sina, et al. "Fast and robust multiframe super resolution." Image processing, IEEE Transactions on 13.10 (2004): 1327-1344.

[2] Mitzel, Dennis, et al. "Video super resolution using duality based tv-l 1 optical flow." Pattern Recognition. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2009. 432-441.

3:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Refreshments provided

Monday, May 2nd
Abstract Algebra Poster Session

Students currently enrolled in Math 351 will present posters on a variety of topics from abstract algebra. Presentations will feature applications of algebra to card tricks, peg solitaire, Rubik's cube, music, linguistics, cryptography, and more!

4:00 p.m.
Rector Atrium
Refreshments provided

Friday, May 6th
Honors Presentation - My (Caroline) Nguyen Tra '16
"A Case Study on Modeling Social Network Privacy Policies Using Event-B"

With the expansion of social media like Facebook and our presence in the cyber world, the privacy and security of our content online have become a great concern. Any Facebook user can set their content visibility. But does it completely restrict unwanted access to our data? We created a formally verified social network Event-B model, which shows consistency between the visibility of the user's content and the privacy setting of that content. We then used the EventB2SQL tool to translate the model and generate PHP code for our social network web application. We will discuss Event-B modeling of privacy policies, EventB2SQL code generation, and challenges of the project.

3:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Refreshments provided

Tuesday, May 10th
Honors Presentation - Graham Williams '16
"Pain Management: Formal Verification of an Android Application Using Event B2SQL"

This project is a case study on formal verification of an Android application used for pain management. When it comes to healthcare applications, the consistency of the application is crucial, as it may affect the wellbeing of the user. The application will check for trends in the user reports of pain, stress, etc. and notify the user accordingly. The model that specifies these trends is defined in Event-B using an Eclipse based IDE called Rodin. We used the automated and interactive theorem provers built in to Rodin to verify that the model always gives the user consistent information. The Event-B model is translated from Event-B to Java using the EventB2SQL tool. The Java class generated from the model forms the core of our Android application. We have recently extended the EventB2SQL tool to generate Android user interface components, further facilitating the development of our application. Since the model is based on a formally verfied Event-B model, we can say with confidence that the application will not output any harmful or misleading information to the user. This talk will further elaborate on the research we are doing in Event-B and EventB2SQL, and the advantages of formal verfication for a healthcare application.

12:30pm
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Wednesday, May 11th
Computer Science Symposium

9:30 a.m.
Tome 115
Refreshments provided

Wednesday, May 11th
Mathematics & Computer Science BBQ

Professors will grill hot dogs, hamburgers, veggie burgers and provide side dishes. Everyone welcome to attend!

12:00 p.m.
Rector Courtyard
Rain Location: Rector Atrium