Spring 2020

Tuesday, January 28, 2020
Kathryn Beck '20 will present "Chorded Pancyclic Properties in Claw-Free Graphs"
In Graph Theory, an important and well-known problem is that of finding a Hamiltonian cycle, or a cycle containing every vertex in a graph. The Hamiltonian problem has applications to many real-world problems, such as finding the shortest path for a school bus to travel in order to pick up students in the most efficient manner. A generalization of Hamiltonicity is pancyclicity, the property that a graph contains a cycle of every possible length from 3 up to the order of the graph. Also, a cycle in a graph is said to be chorded if it contains an edge between 2 nonadjacent vertices on the cycle. In 2018, Cream, Gould, and Larsen introduced chords to the property of pancyclicity. A graph G is chorded pancyclic if G contains a chorded cycle of every possible length from 4 up to the order of the graph. We extend their work to doubly chorded cycles and consider the research question of, “what conditions are sufficient to imply doubly chorded pancyclicity?”

and

Noah Hunt-Isaak '20 will present "Educational Data Mining: Predicting in-Class Performance"
In his REU project they used data mining techniques to develop a predictive model for student in-class performance in an introductory CS course. Using data from the class (such as HW grades and usage of the online textbook), they applied and compared a variety of machine learning algorithms such as linear regression and support vector machines to make predictions about how the student would perform. Such a model could theoretically be used as an automated early warning system for detecting struggling students in a class.

Noon
Tome 115
Pizza provided

Tuesday, April 14, 2020
Professor Darren Glass, Gettysburg College
Talk Title TBD

Noon
Tome 115
Pizza provided

Tuesday, April 21, 2020
Mathematics & Computer Science Majors Dinner

6:00pm
HUB Social Hall Center/West
Catered meal by Dining Services