Major

10 courses

Core Courses:
120 or 130
140
250
260
470
Internship for transcript notation -- Extensive field work in a setting related to education such as schools, child care centers, museums and policy centers.

Concentration in Teaching and Learning:
300
Two electives from the following: 320, 330, 340, 350, 360, 370
Two courses in one other department related to the concentration and approved by the Educational Studies advisor.

Concentration in Education and Society:
310
Two electives from the following: 320, 330, 340, 350, 360, 370
Two courses in one other department related to the concentration and approved by the Educational Studies advisor.

Minor

5 courses

120 or 130
140
250
260 (if not a Social Science major)
One other EDST course (two if EDST 260 is not taken) 

Student Organizations

Kappa Delta Pi, an International Honor Society in Education, was founded in 1911 and is one of the oldest discipline-specific honor societies in the United States. Dickinson received a charter to establish the Alpha Beta Rho chapter of KDP in 2004 and has maintained an active presence on the Dickinson campus and in the Carlisle community ever since. In addition to hosting lectures and panel discussions on important educational issues, the Dickinson KDP chapter supports education in the local community by sponsoring an annual Literacy Alive program and women's history essay contest as well as providing tutoring in an after-school homework program.

Educational Studies majors and minors are eligible for membership in Kappa Delta Pi after they have completed at least eight Dickinson courses and have declared their education major or minor. Admission to Kappa Delta Pi will be based on academic grade point average and service to the education profession. 

Suggested curricular flow through the major

First Year:
120 or 130 and 140

Second Year:
250 and 260 plus Two Non-Departmental Electives

Third Year:
300 or 310

Fourth Year:
Two EDST 300-level electives and 470

Opportunities for off-campus study

Educational Studies majors will be encouraged to study abroad, taking coursework that informs them of the education systems in the countries in which they are studying and to seek out internships in education that might include both school and non-school settings (such as museums). The department is working with the Center for Global Study and Engagement to identify sites for our students as well as coursework that will be appropriate to transfer toward the elective requirements.

Courses

120 Contemporary Issues in American Education
An examination of current policies, practices, and problems in the landscape of American education with particular attention to the perspectives of various stakeholders (e.g. teachers, students, families, community leaders, employers, and elected officials). U.S. diversity with respect to race, class, gender, language, and exceptionality is considered within a variety of educational contexts. The course also examines the ways in which educational issues and reform efforts intersect with social, economic, political, and cultural forces.
This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and the U.S. Diversity requirement.

130 History of American Education
An examination of the evolution in the purposes, structures, and methodologies of formal and informal education in the United States from the colonial period to the present with particular attention to how marginalized groups have been educated. The course situates educational history within the broader context of social, political, and economic developments in the U.S. and considers ways in which education has been used to meet societal goals.
This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and U.S. Diversity graduation requirement.

140 Educational Psychology
An examination of physical, cognitive, and psychological developmental theories and research as well as theories of learning. The course includes theoretical perspectives on: age-stage characteristics, exceptionality, achievement versus aptitude, as well as how developmental, sociocultural, and motivational factors influence student learning in classroom contexts.
This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

250 Curriculum Thoery
An examination of how the curriculum of educational institutions is shaped as well as how curriculum serves as a shaping force for educational institutions. This includes an examination of various conceptions of curriculum and of knowledge as well as curriculum ideologies and structures. Finally, the course examines how diverse student populations may experience the curriculum.
Prerequisites: 120 or 130, and 140. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

260 Introduction to Educational Research
An introduction to the purposes and methodologies of research in education including how various stakeholders in the educational community use and access research findings as well as how studies in education are designed, implemented, and disseminated. Quantitative, qualitative, and historical methodologies are addressed. Research processes are introduced around the topic of literacy. Students will develop a review of the research literature on a topic related to literacy using online catalogs, databases, and other open access resources to find and gather sources and digital publications formats to disseminate their reviews.
Prerequisite: 140. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences and the WR graduation requirement.

300 Models of Instruction and Assessment
An introduction to instructional planning and assessment with a particular emphasis on meeting the needs of diverse learners. Primary activities of the course include designing and implementing lesson plans, designing assessment instruments, and designing an integrated unit of instruction. Students will learn to effectively use presentation technologies as well as instructional software and new media to enhance their instruction.
Prerequisites: 140, and 260 or Social Science Research Methods (AFST 200, AMST 202, ANTH 240, ANTH 241, EASN 310, ECON 228, LAWP 228, PMGT 228, POSC 239, PSYC 201, SOCI 240, SOCI 244, or WGST 250), or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

310 Policies Shaping American Education
An examination of the policies that have shaped and continue to shape American Education within the broader context of American educational reform movements. Particular policy(ies) of focus each semester will be selected by the instructor. The course might include an in-depth examination of a particular policy such as school funding. Or, it might examine several policies around a broader concept such as inclusion which could include desegregation, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Title IX, and policies related to English Language Learners.
Prerequisites: 120 or 130, and 260 or Social Science Research Methods (AFST 200, AMST 202, ANTH 240, ANTH 241, EASN 310, ECON 228, LAWP 228, PMGT 228, POSC 239, PSYC 201, SOCI 240, SOCI 244, or WGST 250), or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

320 Race and Education
An examination of the historical, sociological, political, and legal issues related to race and education in the United States. Particular issues of focus each semester will be selected by the instructor and might include theoretical perspectives on race in education, school segregation, representation of racial groups in curriculum, the roles and experiences of teachers of color, connections between policy initiatives and race, student achievement and college access, and the educational experiences of specific racial groups.
Prerequisite: 260 or Social Science Research Methods (AFST 200, AMST 202, ANTH 240, ANTH 241, EASN 310, ECON 228, LAWP 228, PMGT 228, POSC 239, PSYC 201, SOCI 240, SOCI 244, or WGST 250), or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement

330 Gender and Education
An examination of the historical, sociological, political, and legal issues related to gender and education in the United States. Particular issues of focus each semester will be selected by the instructor and might include theoretical perspectives on gender in education, single-sex vs. coeducational schooling, representation of gender in curriculum, the feminization of the teaching profession, gender equity and policy initiatives such as Title IX, and student achievement and college access.
Prerequisite: 260 or Social Science Research Methods (AFST 200, AMST 202, ANTH 240, ANTH 241, EASN 310, ECON 228, LAWP 228, PMGT 228, POSC 239, PSYC 201, SOCI 240, SOCI 244, or WGST 250), or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

340 Immigration and Education
An examination of the historical, sociological, political, and legal issues related to immigration and education in the United States. Particular issues of focus each semester will be selected by the instructor and might include patterns of immigration, theories on immigrant assimilation, the relationship between culture and education, perspectives on citizenship and their impact on immigrant education, and related legislation, funding, and policy.
Prerequisite: 360 or Social Science Research Methods (AFST 200, AMST 202, ANTH 240, ANTH 241, EASN 310, ECON 228, LAWP 228, PMGT 228, POSC 239, PSYC 201, SOCI 240, SOCI 244, or WGST 250), or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

350 Urban Education
An examination of critical issues in educating students in an urban setting. Particular issues of focus each semester will be selected by the instructor and might include race, poverty, student motivation and teacher practice, the community as a source of curriculum, school-to-work programs, educating language minority students, restructuring large urban schools, educational funding and educational policy.
Prerequisite: EDUC 260 or Social Science Research Methods (AFST 200, AMST 202, ANTH 240, ANTH 241, EASN 310, ECON 228, LAWP 228, PMGT 228, POSC 239, PSYC 201, SOCI 240, SOCI 244, or WGST 250), or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

360 Rural Education
An examination of critical issues in educating students in a rural setting. Particular issues of focus each semester will be selected by the instructor and might include race, poverty, the centrality of schools in rural communities, place-based learning, farm to college initiatives, educating indigenous populations, educational funding and educational policy.
Prerequisite: 260 or Social Science Research (AFST 200, AMST 202, ANTH 240, ANTH 241, EASN 310, ECON 228, LAWP 228, PMGT 228, POSC 239, PSYC 201, SOCI 240, SOCI 244, or WGST 250), or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

370 Education and Emerging Technologies
An examination of the role of emerging technologies in American education. Particular issues of focus each semester will be selected by the instructor and might include the capabilities and limitations of contemporary technological tools, how technological tools, particularly new media, can be used to enhance teaching and learning in diverse educational settings, trends in and variations of e-learning, and perspectives on digital etiquette, ethical reasoning, legal guidelines, and institutional policies related to technology use in educational settings.
Prerequisite: 260 or Social Science Research Methods (AFST 200, AMST 202, ANTH 240, ANTH 241, EASN 310, ECON 228, LAWP 228, PMGT 228, POSC 239, PSYC 201, SOCI 240, SOCI 244, or WGST 250), or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

391 Topics in Education
An examination of topics related to education but not addressed in depth in other courses within the Educational Studies program. Topics will vary based on the expertise of the instructor and may include those offered by faculty from other disciplines that intersect with education.

470 Senior Seminar
The design and implementation of a study in an individual area of interest within the major concentration culminating in the writing of a conference paper or publishable article. Students will develop a review of the related research literature on their chosen topic using on-line catalogs, databases and other open access resources to access sources, gather data related to their topic employing quantitative, qualitative, and/or historiographic methodologies enhanced by electronic devices as appropriate, analyze their data using digital software as appropriate, write a conference paper or publishable article, electronically submit their conference proposals/articles, and disseminate their work via conference, digital, or paper publication formats.
Prerequisites: 120 or 130, and 140, 250, 260, 300 or 310. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.