Spring 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WRPG 211-01 The Future of Books: Writing About Archives, Mark-Up & the Digital Humanities
Instructor: Patrick Belk
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 212-01. This course is designed to improve your skills as a writer of academic prose by emphasizing essays written in, and about, the field of digital humanities. We will concentrate on a variety of scholarly projects, problems, and techniques, emphasizing specific skills necessary to a range of writing tasks: description, summary, narration, argumentation, analysis, and interpretation. In all cases, our focus will be on the digital humanities and some emerging topics and interesting issues paradigmatic to that field. Discussions of reading assignments will be supplemented by individual workshop sessions and tutorials. This course aims to concentrate your attention on the precise stylistic details that lead to effective writing, while students will have the opportunity to collaborate on digital humanities projects, critique work by classmates, and compare their own essays to works by digital humanities scholars of the past two decades.
0900:TR   LIBRY ICCR
WRPG 211-02 Writing, Identity, & Queer Studies: In & Out, Either/Or, and Everything in Between
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 212-02 and WGST 201-02. Kate Bornstein writes: "I know I'm not a man...and I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not a woman either. The trouble is, we're living in a world that insists we be one or the other." In this reading and writing intensive course, students will investigate how we approach the space outside of one or the other through literature, film, and narrative more generally. Throughout the semester we will explore and engage critically with established and emerging arguments in queer theory, as well as read and watch texts dealing with issues of identity and identification. Although queer is a contested term, it describesat least potentiallysexualities and genders that fall outside of normative constellations. Students will learn how to summarize and engage with arguments, and to craft and insert their own voice into the ongoing debates about the efficacy of queer theory and queer studies. Moreover, well take on questions that relate word to world in order to ask: How might our theory productively intervene in LGBTQ civil rights discourse outside our classroom? How do we define queer and is it necessarily attached to sexual orientation? How do our own histories and narratives intersect with the works we analyze? Our course texts will pull from a range of genres including graphic novels, film, poetry, memoir, and fiction. Some texts may include Alison Bechdels Fun Home, Audre Lordes Zami, Jackie Kay's Trumpet, David Sedaris _Me Talk Pretty One Day_, and films such as _Paris is Burning_ and _Boys Dont Cry_.
0830:MWF   EASTC 405
WRPG 214-01 Working with Writers: Theory and Practice
Instructor: Lisa Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 214-01.Permission of Instructor Required Designed primarily for students who serve as tutors in the Norman M. Eberly Writing Center as well as for future teachers, this course examines how people learn to write from both a theoretical and a hands-on perspective. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of the Writing Program. This course is cross-listed as ENGL 214.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 110
WRPG 214-02 Working with Writers: Theory and Practice
Instructor: Noreen Lape
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 214-02.Permission of Instructor Required Designed primarily for students who serve as tutors in the Norman M. Eberly Writing Center as well as for future teachers, this course examines how people learn to write from both a theoretical and a hands-on perspective. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of the Writing Program. This course is cross-listed as ENGL 214.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 207