Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HEST 201-01 Introduction to Health Studies
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.
1030:TR   DENNY 112
HEST 250-01 Health and Aging in Cross Cultural Perspectives
Instructor: David Sarcone, Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Contact the Center for Global Study and Engagement to apply for this course.Permission of Instructor Required.This course is designed for undergraduates from all disciplinary backgrounds. It is an introduction to and prerequisite for students participating in Health and Wellness in Later Life: Comparative Research on American and Japanese Practices, a summer field-study course offered in 2015 by Global Education in collaboration with Akita International University. In the course, students initially explore the meanings and relationships between health and aging across cultures, with an emphasis on Japanese and American perspectives. Students then examine how culture, economy, and social organization influence national aging policies and practices. They explore further how these policies and practices have been taken up in the local community, and interact in-class with practicing professionals serving this community. In anticipation of the field-study portion of the summer course, students also study qualitative and quantitative research methods, including structured interview techniques, survey design and implementation, data analysis, and reporting.
1330:MR   STERN 7
HEST 560-01 Community Health Research
Instructor: James Skelton
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Ashley Bales
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills the DIV III lab-science distribution requirement. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:T   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 313
ANTH 100-02 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Ashley Bales
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills the DIV III lab-science distribution requirement. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:W   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 313
ANTH 225-01 Human Osteology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of human biological diversity as revealed through the study of human skeletal remains. We will focus on techniques used to identify skeletal remains in archaeological, paleontological, and forensic contexts, as well as examining human skeletal responses to environmental stress and human growth and development throughout the life cycle. Prerequisite: 100 or 229 or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement. Offered every other year.
1030:MWF   DENNY 115
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 126-01 Infectious Disease versus Immune Defense
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
Given the variety and virulence of the hundreds of pathogens we are exposed to every day, it seems miraculous that any of us survives into adulthood. This course will consider the biology of pathogens and the immunological defense systems which help counteract them. Both a human-based and comparative approach will be employed. Lecture, discussion and lab segments will emphasize the application of knowledge, the interpretation of scientific and popular information, and the demystification of disease and immunity. Students finishing this course should have a new found appreciation of the molecular, genetic and cellular mechanisms underlying disease and defense. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.
0830:MWF   DANA 101
1330:T   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 127-01 This Is Your Life w/Lab
Instructor: Mary Niblock
Course Description:
This course provides an overview of the human life cycle. Topics of discussion include the molecular and cellular building blocks of which humans and every other living organism are constructed, human development from a single cell through birth of a multi-cellular individual, with specialized tissues and organs, and birth defects and disease. Recent molecular advances that have the potential to improve human health will also be introduced. In the laboratory portion of the course, we will perform experiments with model organisms that use the techniques and approaches that are utilized to investigate human development and health. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 204
1330:W   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 216-01 Genetics
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two BIOL courses numbered between 120 and 129. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 124 and PSYC 125.
0930:MWF   DANA 202
1330:F   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 335-01 Microanatomy
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
An integrated study of the functional microanatomy of vertebrates. This course will examine the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, organ, and organ systems and their interrelationships. The laboratory portion of the course will cover methods of contemporary histologic technique and will include independent experimental projects. Prerequisites: two BIOL courses numbered between 120 and 129. Offered every other year. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 124 and PSYC 125.
1030:R   DANA 102
1030:T   DANA 201
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   DANA 101
1330:M   RNORTH 1316
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 496-04 Political Economy of Health
Instructor: Mesude Kongar
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is 41 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to health care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? What are the relationships between health and macroeconomic ills such as poverty, unemployment, recession, foreign debt, environmental degradation, and socio-economic inequalities between nations, genders, and races? How does globalization affect women and men in different parts of the world? In this course, we will try to answer these and other questions as we analyze the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. We will also discuss alternative national and international policies that aim at promoting health in a globalized world.
1330:W   ALTHSE 206
Courses Offered in INBM
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INBM 300-02 Applied Empirical Analysis of Middle School Obesity
Instructor: Stephen Erfle
Course Description:
Obesity and chronic diseases associated with obesity have reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Fully one-third of School-aged children in Pennsylvania are overweight or obese. PA Department of Health instituted the Active Schools Program during the 2009-10 school year with middle schools to require daily physical activity and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded a control school analysis of this program in the 2010-11 school year. This course will analyze the date obtained from this program. Pre- and post- activity and stature measures on 10,000 middle school students will be available for analysis as well as data sets that allow the analysis of spatial variation in obesity and academic performance. Students will learn how to use SPSS and Arc-GIS throughout the course of the semester. The class culminates in presenting your own findings in a poster presentation that is open to the public.
1230:W   ALTHSE 204
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 290-02 Demography: Population Issues in Developing Countries
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
This course will introduce the primary population issues in the context of developing countries. This course will focus on these particular issues: population growth, theory of demographic transition, mortality, fertility, family planning, reproductive health, family coping strategies, migration, urbanization, low fertility in industrialized nations, household economics, interactions between population issues and development, child survival and mortality, child labor and schooling, impacts of HIV/AIDS on population structure, and policies that are used to tackle the afore-mentioned issues.
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 207
Courses Offered in MUPS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUPS 111-02 Vocal Technique Class
Instructor: Lynn Helding
Course Description:
Personal Audition and Permission of Instructor Required No Additional Fee / May Not be Audited An introduction to vocal technique in a group setting. Note: this course is the prerequisite course for Voice (2nd semester) - MUPS 114 - 30 (Private lessons). Course content includes voice physiology, IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet), one private lesson, required in class performances, student critiques, and voice concert attendance. Interested students should email Prof. Helding to set up an audition.
1600:MW   WEISS 12
1600:MW   WEISS 235
Courses Offered in NRSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
NRSC 400-01 Neuroscience Seminar
Instructor: Meredith Rauhut
Course Description:
Advanced seminar in which students will read and review primary literature related to selected topics in the field of neuroscience. Examples of selected topics may include neuroendocrinology, neurobiology of drug addiction, neurobiology of learning and memory or clinical neuroscience. A discussion-style approach will be adopted. Prerequisites: BIOL 124, NRSC 200 and PSYC 125.
0900:TR   KAUF 187
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 125-01 Brain and Behavior w/Lab
Instructor: Teresa Barber
Course Description:
This course will introduce the structure and function of the brain as it influences human behavior. The level of study will be from a molar viewpoint, and findings from such fields as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and endocrinology will be considered in their relation to a number of behavioral processes. In the laboratory, students will engage in hand-on activities to explore brain anatomy, behavioral analysis and brain-behavior relationships. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills the DIV III lab science distribution requirement.
1330:W   JAMESR 1206
1130:MWF   TOME 115
PSYC 125-02 Brain and Behavior w/Lab
Instructor: Katherine Landis, Teresa Barber
Course Description:
This course will introduce the structure and function of the brain as it influences human behavior. The level of study will be from a molar viewpoint, and findings from such fields as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and endocrinology will be considered in their relation to a number of behavioral processes. In the laboratory, students will engage in hand-on activities to explore brain anatomy, behavioral analysis and brain-behavior relationships. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills the DIV III lab science distribution requirement.
1330:R   JAMESR 1206
1130:MWF   TOME 115
PSYC 145-01 Psychology of Human Sexuality
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
This course is a study of human sexuality emphasizing psychological aspects. We will cover sexual development from childhood to adulthood, sexual orientations, biological influences, sexual attitudes and behavior, gender, sex therapy, sexual coercion and abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and sexual health, and the development of sexual relationships. The study of human sexuality is inherently interdisciplinary in nature (drawing from such varied disciplines as sociology, women's studies, biology, anthropology, history, and others). Although we will cover some material from these disciplines, we will take an explicitly social psychological perspective, focusing on individual, personal, and social aspects of sexual behaviors, attitudes and beliefs.
0900:TR   KAUF 179
PSYC 165-01 Psychopathology
Instructor: Michele Ford
Course Description:
An introduction to various psychological disorders and techniques of diagnosis and treatment. Relevant for students who anticipate careers in medicine, law, and the social or psychological services.
1030:TR   DANA 110
PSYC 365-01 Research Methods in Clinical Psychology
Instructor: Suman Ambwani
Course Description:
This course will introduce various strategies used in empirical research of clinical phenomena. Practice in behavioral observation systems, structured clinical interviews, and assessment techniques will be gained as students conduct research and write research reports in the area of clinical psychology. Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 165, 201 and 202.
1330:MR   KAUF 185
1500:MR   KAUF 185
PSYC 475-01 Seminar in Community Psychology
Instructor: Sharon Kingston
Course Description:
The practice of community psychology is typically directed toward the design and evaluation of strategies aimed at facilitating empowerment, preventing psychological disorders, and promoting social justice and change. The goal is to optimize the well-being of individuals and communities with innovative and alternative interventions designed in collaboration with affected community members and with other related disciplines inside and outside of psychology. This course is an advanced seminar that focuses in depth on special topics in the field of community psychology. Topics may include substance abuse and addiction, delinquency, stress and coping, prevention vs. intervention, social support, and program consultation and evaluation. Students will develop their understanding of topical issues by reading primary and secondary sources and participating in class discussions and applied exercises. Prerequisites: 201 and 202.
1330:T   KAUF 187
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 260-02 Comparative BioMedical Ethics
Instructor: Eric Cytryn
Course Description:
Advances in medical research have opened a new world of ethical questions dealing with the boundaries of life, reproduction, the allocation of scarce health care resources, and the right to refuse medical care for religious or cultural reasons. How does religion inform and respond to questions of bioethical concerns? In this course, which is comparative in perspective, we will explore how a variety of religious traditions approach the most critical issues in bioethics today.
1330:MR   DENNY 110
Courses Offered in WGST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGST 202-01 Reproductive Justice
Instructor: Jennifer Musial
Course Description:
Hobby Lobby, Debra Harrell, Remote-Control Contraception Chip, Marissa Alexander, Staten Island Hospital Forced C-Section These represent a sliver of reproductive justice cases making news in 2014. Reproductive justice refers to the possibility for people to have economic, social, and political power to determine what happens in their intimate and procreative lives. Beyond an individualistic framework, reproductive justice recognizes the need to sustain families and communities too. In this course, you will learn about the three principles of reproductive justice: 1/ support to terminate or prevent pregnancies; 2/ support to be pregnant and give birth in self-determined ways; and, 3/ support to keep families together and to parent without fear of child removal. You will learn why the pro-choice paradigm is too limiting for scholars and activists as well as why a reproductive justice movement must centralize racism, poverty, and colonialism in its agenda. This course asks you to pay attention to cases of reproductive injustice, particularly as they are reported via social media through use of hashtags like #reprojustice, #reprorights, #reprohealth.
1330:MR   DENNY 211