Fall 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HEST 400-01 Senior Seminar in Health Studies
Instructor: Marie Helweg-Larsen
Course Description:
The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding smoking and smoking cessation. We will examine the interaction of multiples causes of smoking such as economic, sociological, psychological, public health, economic, and biological perspectives on why people smoke and why they struggle to quit. We will also focus on the experiences of smokers of lower socio-economic status and the role of smoking in disparity in health. In this community-based research course students will work with our partner agency, Sadler Health, on surveying two groups of people in their clinic: people currently in a smoking cessation program and patients who smoke but are not currently interested in quitting. The students will work with Sadler Health to develop the specific questions and survey instruments, will assist in data collection, and enter and analyze the data. Students will use the results of these surveys to write a report which will include academic background information, the survey methodology used, the findings, and specific recommendations. The reports will inform decision making at Sadler Health. Learning goals: effective team building and collaboration professional conduct in communication and collaboration with a community partner high quality oral and written final reports suitable for a community partner interdisciplinary examination of smoking cessation attitudes (e.g., economic, sociological, psychological, public health, economic, and biological perspectives) skills associated with research including the development of hypotheses, selection of survey questions, data entry and analysis, and reporting of descriptive and inferential results The Senior Seminar in Health Studies is an interdisciplinary, topics driven course, with specific foci dependent upon the specialization(s) of the instructor. Students will survey the relevant literatures of at least two disciplines; identify specific problems or topics; complete a research project based on secondary and/or primary sources; and offer a final presentation of interdisciplinary work (in the forms of academic papers, oral presentations, or some other creative project (including film, narrative, performance, etc.). Prerequisite: 201 and at least two other courses in Health Studies (as accepted by Health Studies Coordinator), or permission of instructor.Normally offered fall semester.
1030:TR   KAUF 185
HEST 400-02 Senior Seminar in Health Studies
Instructor: Sharon Kingston
Course Description:
The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding childhood obesity and nutritional status among children in the U.S. We will examine the interaction of multiple causes of child obesity including sociological, psychological, economic, business, public health and medical perspectives in order to understand how to prevent childhood obesity and improve childrens nutritional status. We will also examine structural inequality as a social determinant of poor health. In this community-based research course, students will work with our partner agency, Partnership for Better Health, on an evaluation of the availability of healthy options in childrens menus in non-chain restaurants in the Carlisle area. The class will use a variety of social science research methods to assess the quality of the current offerings, the barriers and facilitators faced by restaurant owners and chefs in offering healthy options and parents willingness and ability to get their children to eat healthy meals. Students will use the results of this evaluation to develop a set of recommendations to area restaurants. The Partnership for Better Health will then disseminate these recommendations and support local restaurants in adopting them. Learning goals: effective team building and collaboration professional conduct in communication and collaboration with a community partner high quality oral and written final reports suitable for a community partner interdisciplinary examination of childhood obesity (sociological, psychological, economic, business, public health, and medical perspectives) skills associated with research including content analysis, interview and survey research The Senior Seminar in Health Studies is an interdisciplinary, topics driven course, with specific foci dependent upon the specialization(s) of the instructor. Students will survey the relevant literatures of at least two disciplines; identify specific problems or topics; complete a research project based on secondary and/or primary sources; and offer a final presentation of interdisciplinary work (in the forms of academic papers, oral presentations, or some other creative project (including film, narrative, performance, etc.). Prerequisite: 201 and at least two other courses in Health Studies (as accepted by Health Studies Coordinator), or permission of instructor.Normally offered fall semester.
1500:TF   KAUF 185
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-03 Health, Illness and Disabilities
Instructor: Sharon O'Brien
Course Description:
What is it like to experience illness or disability in America? This course will focus on narratives of illness and disability in contemporary American culture, exploring the ways in which both have been stigmatized as well as the ways in which writers and activists have challenged and changed attitudes and laws. How has the American cult of positive thinking and self-mastery affected the lives of people experiencing illness or disability? What role do forms of creative expressionfiction, memoir, graphic novel, poetry, essay, film play in resisting silence and stigma? How do the variables of race, class, gender, sexuality and age impact the experience of illness and disability? How can the phenomenon of passing be applied to people with disabilities? How is the experience of illness and disability narrated differently by patients and by medical professionals? By writers who publish and those who contribute to blogs and newsletters? By those who experience chronic conditions and those who face death? Our reading will include books such as Audre Lorde, The Cancer Journals; Susan Sontag, Illness as Metaphor and AIDS and Its Metaphors, Miriam Engelberg, Cancer Made Me a Shallower Person; Atul Gawande, Being Mortal; Nancy Mairs, Waist-High in the World; Simi Linton, My Body Politic; Lennard Davis, Enabling Acts. Films will include Wit and Murderball.
1500:MR   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 245-02 Babies and Boomers: Asian Societies in Transition
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02. The rapid economic growth of Asia in the past several decades has led to equally rapid social transformation. This course takes the family as a lens through which to understand this social change. It explores shifts and continuities in both conceptions of family life and the composition of families themselves. The causes and effects of lowered fertility and increased longevity in Asia, particularly in China and Japan, receive special emphasis. Course materials draw from social scientific and historical accounts. In addition to normal coursework, students will be required to write a research paper on a topic related to course themes.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
ANTH 310-01 Nutritional Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
Food is a biological necessity, yet food preferences and dietary practices are culturally determined and highly variable across time and space. This course examines nutrition and dietary variation from an anthropological perspective. We will first study the basics of food and nutrition, including the nutritional composition of food, nutritional requirements across the human life cycle, and standards for assessing dietary quality in individuals and populations. We will then examine the evolution of human dietary practices and we will explore how dietary variation is at the interface of biology, health, culture, and the environment. We will also learn about the effects of globalization and the commoditization of food on dietary choices, the health consequences of under- and over-nutrition, and the social and historical constraints on food production and consumption in different societies. Prerequisite: At least one course in anthropology or health studies, or permission of instructor.
1030:MWF   DENNY 115
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 326-01 Microbiology w/Lab
Instructor: Jennifer Wanat
Course Description:
Molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry (structure and function) of bacteria, archaea, and viruses. Includes an introduction to the immune system and mechanisms of medical control of microbes. Molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis are addressed via readings from the recent primary literature. Laboratory exercises include the isolation and characterization of unknown bacteria using traditional and molecular methods, and modern genomic approaches to characterizing host response to infection. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two BIOL courses numbered between 120 and 129 or ENST 131 and 132 (or 130). For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is 124 and PSYC 125. Offered every other year.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 08
1330:T   RNORTH 1316
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 206-02 Babies and Boomers: Asian Societies in Transition
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 245-02. The rapid economic growth of Asia in the past several decades has led to equally rapid social transformation. This course takes the family as a lens through which to understand this social change. It explores shifts and continuities in both conceptions of family life and the composition of families themselves. The causes and effects of lowered fertility and increased longevity in Asia, particularly in China and Japan, receive special emphasis. Course materials draw from social scientific and historical accounts. In addition to normal coursework, students will be required to write a research paper on a topic related to course themes.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
EASN 206-04 Medicine and The Body in East Asia
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-03.This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 214-02 Health Policy Challenges in Developing Countries
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-01.The course will focus on the current major health problems with a particular emphasis on developing countries. HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and diarrheal disease are the four biggest contributors to the global burden of disease, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and represent a serious constraint on economic growth. They kill nearly 4 million African adults and children annually. Through readings and lectures from the public health, economics and medical literature, we will focus on the causes behind the prevalence of the diseases in certain regions and the debates surrounding effectiveness of policy interventions to combat these diseases. More specifically, we will try to understand some of the key policy challenges to fight the diseases in the developing world. Additionally, the course will also look into historical cases of major diseases and epidemics around the world.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 08
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 215-03 Medicine and The Body in East Asia
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-04.This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 290-01 Health Policy Challenges in Developing Countries
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 214-02.The course will focus on the current major health problems with a particular emphasis on developing countries. HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and diarrheal disease are the four biggest contributors to the global burden of disease, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and represent a serious constraint on economic growth. They kill nearly 4 million African adults and children annually. Through readings and lectures from the public health, economics and medical literature, we will focus on the causes behind the prevalence of the diseases in certain regions and the debates surrounding effectiveness of policy interventions to combat these diseases. More specifically, we will try to understand some of the key policy challenges to fight the diseases in the developing world. Additionally, the course will also look into historical cases of major diseases and epidemics around the world.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 08
Courses Offered in MUPS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUPS 111-02 Vocal Technique Class
Instructor: Jennifer Blyth, Jonathan Hays
Course Description:
Personal Audition and Permission of Instructor Required No Additional Fee / May Not be Audited An introduction to vocal technique in a group setting. Note: this course is the prerequisite course for Voice (2nd semester) - MUPS 114 - 30 (Private lessons). Course content includes voice physiology, IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet), one private lesson, required in class performances, student critiques, and voice concert attendance. Interested students should email Prof. Hays to set up an audition.
1600:MW   WEISS 12
1600:MW   WEISS 235
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 165-01 Psychopathology
Instructor: Michele Ford
Course Description:
An introduction to various psychological disorders and techniques of diagnosis and treatment. Relevant for students who anticipate careers in medicine, law, and the social or psychological services. This course is a Health Studies elective.
1330:TF   KAUF 186
PSYC 375-01 Research Methods in Community Psychology
Instructor: Sharon Kingston
Course Description:
This course will emphasize gaining advanced knowledge and skills in the research methodologies of community psychology, answering the question: How does community psychology seek to scientifically understand relationships between environmental conditions and the development of health and well-being of all members of a community? Students will gain and practice skills in consultation and evaluation of programs to facilitate psychological competence and empowerment, and prevent disorder. Specifically, students will: (a) consider ways to assess and be responsive to the needs of people from marginalized populations with diverse socio-cultural, educational, and ethnic backgrounds; (b) become familiar with innovative programs and practices geared towards prevention and empowerment of disenfranchised groups; (c) apply learning (of theory and research strategies) to a problem in the community; and (d) develop skills in collaborating with Carlisle-area community members in identifying, designing, implementing, and interpreting community-based research. Prerequisites: 201 and 202.
1330:MR   KAUF 185
1500:MR   KAUF 185
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 239-01 Spanish for the Health Professions
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
Course Description:
This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: 202 or above, or permission of instructor.
1230:MWF   BOSLER 313