Spring 2024

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HEST 201-01 Introduction to Health Studies
Instructor: David Sarcone
Course Description:
Introduction to Health Studies is a multi-disciplinary course that explores various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of health. In addition to providing the overall framework for the materials covered, the faculty-convener of the course will draw on speakers from Dickinson faculty who will present health studies materials relevant to their respective areas of special expertise. Faculty speakers will be drawn from a range of disciplines at the college, including American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, History, International Business and Management, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Psychology, and Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies.Normally offered spring semester.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
ALTHSE 110
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 220-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 256-01. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 212
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 216-01 Medical Anthropology
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
Comparative analysis of health, illness, and nutrition within environmental and socio-cultural contexts. Evolution and geographical distribution of disease, how different societies have learned to cope with illness, and the ways traditional and modern medical systems interact. Offered every other year.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
BOSLER 314
ANTH 256-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 212
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 132-01 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
JAMESR 2218
BIOL 132-02 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
JAMESR 2218
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor. Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 1316
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 115
BIOL 433-01 Molecular Pathophysiology w/Lab
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
Human diseases often result from disordered physiology (pathophysiology) and therefore the abilities to understand disease and design specific and effective treatments are dependent on understanding normal physiological processes and the ways in which these can become disordered. This course will review the normal structure and function of select systems in the human body and subsequently examine the cellular, molecular, and systemic pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie common diseases related to that system with an emphasis on critical analysis of current biomedical literature. The laboratory portion of the course will involve original research projects using cell culture and animal models of human disease. Six hours of classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: at least one upper-level physiology or cellular & molecular biology course: 216, 313, 318, 326, 327, 330 ,333, 334, 335, 342, 380 or permission of instructor. Human diseases often result from disordered physiology (pathophysiology) and therefore the abilities to understand disease and design specific and effective treatments are dependent on understanding normal physiological processes and the ways in which these can become disordered. This course will review the normal structure and function of select systems in the human body and subsequently examine the cellular, molecular, and systemic pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie common diseases related to that system with an emphasis on critical analysis of current biomedical literature. The laboratory portion of the course will involve original research projects using cell culture and animal models of human disease. Six hours of classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: at least one upper-level physiology or cellular & molecular biology course: 216, 313, 318, 326, 327, 330 ,333, 334, 335, 342, 380 or permission of instructor.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2206
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 185
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 206-01 History of Medicine and the Body in East Asia
Instructor: Evan Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 217-01. This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 103
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 215-01 History of Madness
Instructor: Kendall Thompson
Course Description:
This course will explore the history of madness and the scientific disciplines of psychology and psychiatry. We will explore madness chronologically, beginning in the eighteenth century and ending in the present. But we will also take time to examine madness thematically, examining how race, gender, sexuality, and other factors impacted who was deemed mad and sane. How has the treatment of the mad changed in history? Who defined psychiatric illnesses and how were these definitions shaped? How have social and scientific approaches to the study of madness shaped the treatment and perception of the mad?
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
LIBRY E. ASIAN
HIST 217-01 History of Medicine and the Body in East Asia
Instructor: Evan Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 103
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 260-01 Problem-Solving Courts
Instructor: Albert Masland
Course Description:
Through a hands-on, experiential examination of traditional courts, treatment courts, and addiction issues, this course will introduce the students to the use of problem-solving courts to address drug, DUI, and mental health concerns. A major course component will involve community-based learning. Students will be required to interact with court participants and members of the various problem-solving court teams (e.g., judges, attorneys, probation officers, treatment providers as well as other support specialists, depending on the courts focus). As the students become familiar with one component of the war on drugs, they will be challenged to examine and debate the war as a whole. Through a hands-on, experiential examination of traditional courts, treatment courts, and addiction issues, this course will introduce the students to the use of problem-solving courts to address drug, DUI, and mental health concerns. A major course component will involve community-based learning. Students will be required to interact with court participants and members of the various problem-solving court teams (e.g., judges, attorneys, probation officers, treatment providers as well as other support specialists, depending on the courts focus). As the students become familiar with one component of the war on drugs, they will be challenged to examine and debate the war as a whole.
04:30 PM-05:45 PM, T
DENNY 317
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, R
DENNY 317
Courses Offered in NRSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
NRSC 400-01 Neuroscience Seminar
Instructor: Meredith Rauhut
Course Description:
Advanced seminar in which students will read and review primary literature related to selected topics in the field of neuroscience. Examples of selected topics may include neuroendocrinology, neurobiology of drug addiction, neurobiology of learning and memory or clinical neuroscience. A discussion-style approach will be adopted. Prerequisites: BIOL 132, NRSC 200 and PSYC 125.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 206
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 120-01 Introduction to Health Psychology
Instructor: Christine Guardino
Course Description:
This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the interdisciplinary field of health psychology, which uses scientific research methods to study the bi-directional relationship between psychology and health. We will discuss psychological states such as stress and how they affect the body, and mental processes such as finding meaning that are associated with effective coping and positive health outcomes. We will also study health behaviors such as exercise, sleep, eating, and substance use. Finally, we will explore how psychological concepts and research can be applied to health promotion and illness prevention. Course content will be especially relevant to students considering careers in health care or public health. This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the interdisciplinary field of health psychology, which uses scientific research methods to study the bi-directional relationship between psychology and health. We will discuss psychological states such as stress and how they affect the body, and mental processes such as finding meaning that are associated with effective coping and positive health outcomes. We will also study health behaviors such as exercise, sleep, eating, and substance use. Finally, we will explore how psychological concepts and research can be applied to health promotion and illness prevention. Course content will be especially relevant to students considering careers in health care or public health.
12:30 PM-01:20 PM, MWF
KAUF 179
PSYC 125-01 Brain and Behavior w/Lab
Instructor: Emily Brown
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. This course will introduce the structure and function of the brain as it influences human behavior. Findings from neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and endocrinology will be considered in their relation to a number of behavioral processes such as perception, memory, and social behavior. In the laboratory, students will engage in hands-on activities to explore brain anatomy and brain-behavior relationships. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 179
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
JAMESR 1206
PSYC 165-01 Psychopathology
Instructor: Nancy Farber
Course Description:
An introduction to various psychological disorders and techniques of diagnosis and treatment. Relevant for students who anticipate careers in medicine, law, and the social or psychological services. This course is a Health Studies elective.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 186
PSYC 165-02 Psychopathology
Instructor: Nancy Farber
Course Description:
An introduction to various psychological disorders and techniques of diagnosis and treatment. Relevant for students who anticipate careers in medicine, law, and the social or psychological services. This course is a Health Studies elective.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 186
PSYC 175-02 Introduction to Community Psychology
Instructor: Sharon Kingston
Course Description:
This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology. Community psychology focuses on promoting well-being and preventing negative mental health and social outcomes by understanding persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals, families and communities. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore he field's application to prevent negative mental health and social outcomes and promote well-being and social justice. This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology. Community psychology focuses on promoting well-being and preventing negative mental health and social outcomes by understanding persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals, families and communities. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore he field's application to prevent negative mental health and social outcomes and promote well-being and social justice.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
BOSLER 314
PSYC 480-01 Seminar in Music and Mental Health
Instructor: Nancy Farber
Course Description:
In the course, we will travel together through literature, our own experiences, and our own research questions about the impact of music on mental health. We will be learning together through multiple methods: reviewing professional literature on give topics, class discussion, experiential exercises, and developing informed research questions and proposals. As this class is a seminar, we will be learning from each other, and topics and exercises will evolve and develop as we go, much in the way that a song evolves through its development. There are many topics that could potentially be covered regarding music and mental health as the field is wide, varied and growing. While I will begin with my areas of expertise and interest regarding topics, it will be important that each of you come prepared with your own interests areas you wonder about and in which you would like to develop knowledge. . Together, we will generate topics for class exploration.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
KAUF 187