Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HEST 201-01 Introduction to Health Studies
Instructor: Margaret Winchester
Course Description:
Introduction to Health Studies is a multi-disciplinary course that explores various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of health. In addition to providing the overall framework for the materials covered, the faculty-convener of the course will draw on speakers from Dickinson faculty who will present health studies materials relevant to their respective areas of special expertise. Faculty speakers will be drawn from a range of disciplines at the college, including American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, History, International Business and Management, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Psychology, and Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies.Normally offered spring semester. Introduction to Health Studies is a multi-disciplinary course that explores various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of health. In addition to providing the overall framework for the materials covered, the faculty-convener of the course will draw on speakers from Dickinson faculty who will present health studies materials relevant to their respective areas of special expertise. Faculty speakers will be drawn from a range of disciplines at the college, including American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, History, International Business and Management, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Psychology, and Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies.Normally offered spring semester.
1330:T   ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 229-01 Principles of Human Variation and Adaptation
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course explores anthropological perspectives on modern human biological diversity. We examine genetic variation, biological and cultural responses to environmental stressors, including climate, altitude, nutrition, infectious and chronic diseases, and population growth and demography. We use our understanding of human biological diversity to examine the notion that race is a social phenomenon with no true biological meaning. Offered every other year.
0930:MWF   DENNY 211
Courses Offered in BIOL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 132-01 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells Topics: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: Dana Somers, David Kushner
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:M   JAMESR 2206
0830:MWF   WEISS 235
BIOL 132-02 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells Topics: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: Dana Somers, David Kushner
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:T   JAMESR 2206
0830:MWF   WEISS 235
BIOL 132-03 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells Topics: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:F   JAMESR 2218
0900:TR   TOME 117
BIOL 333-01 Physiology w/Lab
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
A study of physiological mechanisms in the animal kingdom, stressing the structural and functional bases of biological activities. Emphasis is on vertebrate organs and organ systems. Laboratory includes experimental physiological studies of selected organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 08
1330:R   JAMESR 2206
BIOL 427-01 Virology
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
An introduction to the molecular and cellular biology of viruses. Topics of study include the life cycle of viruses in general and their relationships with their hosts, including the processes of attachment to, entry into, genomic replication within, and exit from, cells. Aspects of pathogenesis, disease, the immune response to viruses, and vaccines, also will be studied. Related topics (such as prions, RNA interference, and public health issues) may be discussed. Regular reading and discussion of primary literature will complement the lectures. Three hours classroom a week. Prerequisite: 213, 216, 313, 316, 318, 326 or 327.
0930:MWF   WEISS 235
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 206-02 Medicine and The Body in East Asia
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-01. This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state
1500:TF   DENNY 212
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 496-02 Political Economy of Health
Instructor: Mesude Kongar
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is as low as 49 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to nutrition, care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? In this course, students will examine the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. The emphasis throughout the course will be on how socioeconomic inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality and other social categories affect health and well-being outcomes.
1330:W   ALTHSE 206
Courses Offered in FMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FMST 320-03 Suicide and Transnational Violence
Instructor: Beenash Jafri
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-04. Popular representations of suicide often fixate on the question of why individuals commit suicide, reflecting narrow and pathologizing approaches. By contrast, through lectures, readings, discussions and film screenings, this course situates suicide in the context of transnational violence. This means that we will consider suicide as an effect of processes of colonization, slavery, nationalism, and capitalist globalization. Centering issues of gender and sexuality, the course will explore critical perspectives on suicide emerging from transnational, Indigenous, and postcolonial studies. Topics for discussion include Black/Indigenous suicide/murder in custody, South Asian women's suicides during the 1947 Partition of India, mass suicides and transatlantic slavery, and decolonial healing.
1030:MWF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 215-01 Medicine and The Body in East Asia
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02. This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state
1500:TF   DENNY 212
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 260-01 Problem-Solving Courts
Instructor: Albert Masland
Course Description:
Pending Faculty Approval Through a hands-on, experiential examination of traditional courts, treatment courts, and addiction issues, this course will introduce the students to the use of problem-solving courts to address drug, DUI, and mental health concerns. A major course component will involve community-based learning. Students will be required to interact with court participants and members of the various problem-solving court teams (e.g., judges, attorneys, probation officers, treatment providers as well as other support specialists, depending on the courts focus). As the students become familiar with one component of the war on drugs, they will be challenged to examine and debate the war as a whole.
0900:R   DENNY 112
1630:T   DENNY 212
Courses Offered in MUPS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUPS 111-02 Vocal Technique Class
Instructor: Amy Wlodarski, Elizabeth Shoenfelt
Course Description:
Personal Audition and Permission of Instructor Required No Additional Fee / May Not be Audited An introduction to vocal technique in a group setting. Course content includes voice physiology, IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet), one private lesson, required in class performances, student critiques, and voice concert attendance. Interested students should email Prof. James Martin to set up an audition.
1600:MW   WEISS 12
1600:M   WEISS 212
1600:W   WEISS 235
Courses Offered in NRSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
NRSC 400-01 Neuroscience Seminar
Instructor: Meredith Rauhut
Course Description:
Advanced seminar in which students will read and review primary literature related to selected topics in the field of neuroscience. Examples of selected topics may include neuroendocrinology, neurobiology of drug addiction, neurobiology of learning and memory or clinical neuroscience. A discussion-style approach will be adopted. Prerequisites: BIOL 132, NRSC 200 and PSYC 125.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 110
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 120-01 Introduction to Health Psychology
Instructor: Christine Guardino
Course Description:
This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the interdisciplinary field of health psychology, which uses scientific research methods to study the bi-directional relationship between psychology and health. We will discuss psychological states such as stress and how they affect the body, and mental processes such as finding meaning that are associated with effective coping and positive health outcomes. We will also study health behaviors such as exercise, sleep, eating, and substance use. Finally, we will explore how psychological concepts and research can be applied to health promotion and illness prevention. Course content will be especially relevant to students considering careers in health care or public health.
1030:MWF   KAUF 179
PSYC 125-01 Brain and Behavior w/Lab
Instructor: Teresa Barber
Course Description:
This course will introduce the structure and function of the brain as it influences human behavior. The level of study will be from a molar viewpoint, and findings from such fields as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and endocrinology will be considered in their relation to a number of behavioral processes. In the laboratory, students will engage in hand-on activities to explore brain anatomy, behavioral analysis and brain-behavior relationships. This course is a Health Studies elective. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1330:W   JAMESR 1206
0830:MWF   KAUF 179
PSYC 125-02 Brain and Behavior w/Lab
Instructor: Katherine Landis, Teresa Barber
Course Description:
This course will introduce the structure and function of the brain as it influences human behavior. The level of study will be from a molar viewpoint, and findings from such fields as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and endocrinology will be considered in their relation to a number of behavioral processes. In the laboratory, students will engage in hand-on activities to explore brain anatomy, behavioral analysis and brain-behavior relationships. This course is a Health Studies elective. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1330:R   JAMESR 1206
0830:MWF   KAUF 179
PSYC 375-01 Research Methods in Community Psychology
Instructor: Sharon Kingston
Course Description:
This course will emphasize gaining advanced knowledge and skills in the research methodologies of community psychology, answering the question: How does community psychology seek to scientifically understand relationships between environmental conditions and the development of health and well-being of all members of a community? Students will gain and practice skills in consultation and evaluation of programs to facilitate psychological competence and empowerment, and prevent disorder. Specifically, students will: (a) consider ways to assess and be responsive to the needs of people from marginalized populations with diverse socio-cultural, educational, and ethnic backgrounds; (b) become familiar with innovative programs and practices geared towards prevention and empowerment of disenfranchised groups; (c) apply learning (of theory and research strategies) to a problem in the community; and (d) develop skills in collaborating with Carlisle-area community members in identifying, designing, implementing, and interpreting community-based research. Prerequisites: 201 & 202 OR 210 & 211.
1330:TF   KAUF 185
1500:TF   KAUF 185
PSYC 420-01 Psychology of Women’s Health
Instructor: Christine Guardino
Course Description:
This seminar will examine theoretical and empirical advances in the psychology of womens health. Using a biopsychosocial perspective, we will explore the influences of the health care system, the workplace, and relationships on womens health; stress, depression and health in women; womens reproductive health across the lifespan; gender differences and similarities in disease morbidity and mortality; and womens health-related behaviors. Through readings and class discussions, students will be exposed to psychological theories and research methodologies used in studying womens health from a biopsychosocial perspective. We will also explore how psychological science can enrich biomedical approaches to understanding and improving womens health. This advanced seminar will focus on psychological and behavioral processes in health and illness. The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of a current topic in health psychology, such as the psychology of womens health, stress and health, or health behaviors. Through readings and class discussions, students will be exposed to psychological theories and research methodologies used in health psychology, and to current literature in the field. We will also explore the application of psychological science in improving health. Pre-requisite: 202 or 211.
1330:TF   KAUF 187
Courses Offered in WGSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 301-04 Suicide and Transnational Violence
Instructor: Beenash Jafri
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 320-03. Popular representations of suicide often fixate on the question of why individuals commit suicide, reflecting narrow and pathologizing approaches. By contrast, through lectures, readings, discussions and film screenings, this course situates suicide in the context of transnational violence. This means that we will consider suicide as an effect of processes of colonization, slavery, nationalism, and capitalist globalization. Centering issues of gender and sexuality, the course will explore critical perspectives on suicide emerging from transnational, Indigenous, and postcolonial studies. Topics for discussion include Black/Indigenous suicide/murder in custody, South Asian women's suicides during the 1947 Partition of India, mass suicides and transatlantic slavery, and decolonial healing.
1030:MWF   DENNY 303