The Black Lives Matter and other protests against police brutality have galvanized the nation and heightened attention to the systemic injustices in our criminal justice and carceral systems. The Office of Equity and Inclusivity and its constituent units (the Center for Spirituality and Social Justice, the Office of LGBTQ Services, the Popel Shaw Center for Race and Ethnicity, and the Women’s and Gender Resource Center) have adopted a shared programming theme for the 2021-22 academic year: Criminal (In)Justice.

Check out the events below and watch for other programs throughout the year on this theme. We welcome campus departments and student organizations to work with us on organizing relevant programs, events, and conversations. Please contact Donna Bickford to discuss possibilities.

2021-2022 Criminal (In)Justice Events:

Policing the Second Amendment: Guns, Law Enforcement and the Politics of Race
Wednesday, September 29
7:00 p.m.
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS)

Professor Jennifer Carlson (University of Arizona) presents the troubling paradox of color-blind gun law and racialized gun criminalization. Based on interviews with close to eighty police chiefs she identifies two racialized frameworks—gun populism and gun militarism—that inform and justify how police understand and pursue public safety across different domains of gun violence. This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the departments of political science and sociology and the Women’s & Gender Resource Center. An OEI Criminal (In)Justice program.

Seeking Justice for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women
Tuesday, October 26
7:00 p.m.
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS)

As we near Native American History Month, join Professor Elizabeth Rule (Chickasaw Nation, George Washington University) for a discussion about contemporary Native American politics and pressing issues. In this talk, Rule will discuss the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women issue, legislation to empower and protect Native women, and what you can do to be an ally in the fight against gender-based violence. This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Women’s & Gender Resource Center. An OEI Criminal (In)Justice program.

Clarke Forum Mini-Themes:

The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues is sponsoring three “mini themes” for the coming semester. One is “Criminal Injustice,” also the annual programming theme for the Office of Equity and Inclusivity. Faculty are invited to participate in a one session seminar that will accompany each theme. Participation entails a commitment to attend the associated programs, do the seminar-specific reading, and participate in the seminar meeting. Please email clarkeforum@dickinson.edu to reserve your spot in the seminar. Each group will be limited to 11 people. Here is the relevant information:

September 29, 7:00 p.m.:  Jennifer Carlson, “Policing the Second Amendment: Guns, Law Enforcement and the Politics of Race”
October 25, 4:30 p.m.: Faculty seminar (Elizabeth Rule will attend; readings will be provided)
October 26, 7:00 p.m.: Elizabeth Rule, “Seeking Justice for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women”

Vice Patrol: Revisiting the Policing of Gay Life before Stonewall
Thursday, October 28
7:00 p.m.
Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium (ATS)

In the mid-twentieth century, gay life flourished in American cities even as the state repression of queer communities reached its peak. Professor Anna Lvovsky's (Harvard Law School) talk examines the tactics used to criminalize and suppress gay life from the 1930s through the 1960s, and the often-surprising debates those campaigns inspired in court—debates over not just the law’s treatment of queer people, but also the limits of ethical policing, the authority of experts, and the nature of sexual difference itself. Tracing those institutional and epistemic battles, this lecture offers a new look at the possibilities of resistance in the justice system, the role of the police in shaping public understandings of queerness, and the rich, unpredictable intersections between state repression and public knowledge about marginalized social groups. This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, and co-sponsored by the Office of LGBTQ Services and the departments of law & policy and American studies. An OEI Criminal (In)Justice program.