Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 106
1330:W   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 106
1330:R   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Michael Potthoff
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0900:TR   JAMESR 2218
1330:W   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 132-01 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells Topics: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: Dana Somers, David Kushner
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:M   JAMESR 2206
0830:MWF   WEISS 235
BIOL 132-02 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells Topics: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: Dana Somers, David Kushner
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:T   JAMESR 2206
0830:MWF   WEISS 235
BIOL 132-03 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells Topics: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:F   JAMESR 2218
0900:TR   TOME 117
BIOL 215-01 Evolution w/Lab
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
A study of the mechanics of evolutionary change and its role within populations. Topics typically covered include macroevolution vs microevolution, natural selection, adaptation, neutral theory, population genetics, speciation, extinction, and sex and sexuality. Interactive lectures, readings from the primary literature, laboratory and field investigations, and simulation exercises will be used to actively explore the principles of evolutionary change and its consequences. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; for Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125. A study of the mechanics of evolutionary change and its role within populations. Topics typically covered include macroevolution vs microevolution, natural selection, adaptation, neutral theory, population genetics, speciation, extinction, and sex and sexuality. Interactive lectures, readings from the primary literature, laboratory and field investigations, and simulation exercises will be used to actively explore the principles of evolutionary change and its consequences. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; for Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 109
1330:R   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Irene Hawkins
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
1130:MF   ALTHSE 204
1330:F   RNORTH 1316
BIOL 322-01 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0830:MW   ALTHSE 201
1230:M   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 322-02 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0830:MW   ALTHSE 201
1300:T   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 322-03 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0830:MW   ALTHSE 201
1230:W   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 325-01 Plant Physiology w/Lab
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
A study of plant structure and function, with emphasis on the flowering plants. Includes plant cells and organelles, mineral nutrition, translocation processes, and hormonal regulation of growth, development, and reproduction. Biochemical and environmental aspects of photosynthesis are emphasized. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0930:MWF   KAUF 178
1330:W   KAUF 178
BIOL 333-01 Physiology w/Lab
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
A study of physiological mechanisms in the animal kingdom, stressing the structural and functional bases of biological activities. Emphasis is on vertebrate organs and organ systems. Laboratory includes experimental physiological studies of selected organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 08
1330:R   JAMESR 2206
BIOL 334-01 Vertebrate Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory study of the anatomy, embryology, physiology, and evolution of vertebrates. Representative live and dissection specimens are studied from the perspective of structure and function. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
0900:TR   RNORTH 1317
1030:TR   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
0830:MWF   STUART 1113
1315:T   STUART 2112
BIOL 401-01 Fermentation Microbiology
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
This course will focus on the physiology of fermentation and the use of microorganisms for the production of fermented foods and beverages. In this course, students will explore microbial taxonomy, biochemistry, and genetics, examine new research into the evolution of brewing yeasts, and learn how genome analysis can be used as a tool to aid in selection and development of new strains. Students will investigate primary literature, produce a research grant proposal, and conduct an independent research project. The course prerequisite is BIOL 216: Genetics. This course will fulfill the Biology major research requirement.
1330:W   JAMESR 2206
BIOL 412-01 Coastal Biology
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
Through detailed study of the primary biological literature, students acquire an understanding of the methodology and philosophy of scientific research. Includes study of the formulation of hypotheses, the design of experiments or observations to test these hypotheses, and the interpretation of results. This course will normally require a major research-based presentation and/or paper and may also involve the conduct of research by students. This course satisfies the requirement for a research experience for the biology major. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129, and one upper-level biology course.
1330:F   TOME 227
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor. Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
1330:M   RNORTH 1316
BIOL 427-01 Virology
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
An introduction to the molecular and cellular biology of viruses. Topics of study include the life cycle of viruses in general and their relationships with their hosts, including the processes of attachment to, entry into, genomic replication within, and exit from, cells. Aspects of pathogenesis, disease, the immune response to viruses, and vaccines, also will be studied. Related topics (such as prions, RNA interference, and public health issues) may be discussed. Regular reading and discussion of primary literature will complement the lectures. Three hours classroom a week. Prerequisite: 213, 216, 313, 316, 318, 326 or 327. An introduction to the molecular and cellular biology of viruses. Topics of study include the life cycle of viruses in general and their relationships with their hosts, including the processes of attachment to, entry into, genomic replication within, and exit from, cells. Aspects of pathogenesis, disease, the immune response to viruses, and vaccines, also will be studied. Related topics (such as prions, RNA interference, and public health issues) may be discussed. Regular reading and discussion of primary literature will complement the lectures. Three hours classroom a week. Prerequisite: 213, 216, 313, 316, 318, 326 or 327.
0930:MWF   WEISS 235
BIOL 550-01 Bioinformatics
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-01 Baird's Birds Then and Now
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-02 Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Research
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-03 Comparing Contemporary Bird Count Data with Baird's 1940 Work
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-04 Bairds Birds Past and Present
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-05 Evaluation of MicroRNA Gene Expression in Autoinflammatory Disease
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-06 Physiology of Hypometabolism in Mice
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-07 Laboratory Evolution of Yeast
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-08 Kinematics of Saltatory Feeding Behavior in American Toads
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-09 Hemlock Density and Fungal Diversity
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-10 Reprogramming Human Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-11 Evaluation MicroRNA Gene Expression in Autoinflammatory Disease
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-12 Relationship of Pollinators to Native Wildflowers
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-13 Physiological Demands of Lacrosse
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-14 Comparing Bloom Times of the Same Spring Wildflowers Between 1940 and 2018
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-15 Biochemistry of Natural Products
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description: