Spring 2024

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
JAMESR 2228
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Field Natural History
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2228
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Mike Potthoff
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2228
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
JAMESR 1206
BIOL 132-01 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
JAMESR 2218
BIOL 132-02 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
JAMESR 2218
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 132-03 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells Topics: Topics in Developmental Biology
Instructor: Missy Niblock
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 187
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2218
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2206
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
JAMESR 2206
BIOL 224-01 Plant Geography & Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Analysis of factors determining the distribution and abundance of plant species, including study of plant migration patterns today and in the distant past. Lecture includes examples and readings from classic and recent research. Field, laboratory, and greenhouse studies focus on plant demography, plant-animal interactions, plant community structure, competition, soil and water relations, and other topics. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132 OR ENST 161 and 162.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MW
ALTHSE 201
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 2319
BIOL 224-02 Plant Geography & Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Analysis of factors determining the distribution and abundance of plant species, including study of plant migration patterns today and in the distant past. Lecture includes examples and readings from classic and recent research. Field, laboratory, and greenhouse studies focus on plant demography, plant-animal interactions, plant community structure, competition, soil and water relations, and other topics. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132 OR ENST 161 and 162.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MW
ALTHSE 201
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
RNORTH 2319
BIOL 301-01 Biomechanics
Instructor: Crystal Reynaga
Course Description:
Biomechanics is an interdisciplinary field that integrates anatomy, physiology, neuromechanics, classical physics, and engineering to understand the principles that govern animal and human movement. Concepts will take a comparative approach across various organisms to investigate different forms of terrestrial movement such as running, walking, and jumping. We will investigate these concepts through multiple levels of biological organization, beginning from muscle cellular mechanics to whole body joint mechanics and whole-body energy exchange. This course will utilize quantitative tools such as basic algebra and trigonometry to characterize varying forms of movement.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
JAMESR 1228
BIOL 301-02 Human Anatomy w/Lab
Instructor: Tiffany Frey, David Diaz
Course Description:
Comprehensive examination of the gross structure, organization, and function of the human body with an emphasis on clinical case studies. The laboratory includes regional examination of human gross anatomy, histology, and dissection of select organs. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
JAMESR 2206
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
STUART 1113
BIOL 313-01 Cell Biology w/Lab
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
An introduction to the structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. The course will involve discussion-oriented lectures and readings from the current literature. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying state of the art techniques to cell biological experiments. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
JAMESR 1218
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
KAUF 179
BIOL 316-01 Genomics, Proteomics & Bioinformatics
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
The genome contains all the information required for the construction and operation of an organism. Selective utilization of the genome determines the transcriptome, which directs the creation of a proteome that is cell-type and condition specific. Today, molecular biologists are able to study whole genomes, transcriptomes, and proteomes allowing for an integrative analysis of living systems. This course will explore these genomic and proteomic techniques and their many applications. Central to these molecular methods are computational tools that facilitate the analysis of the large data sets generated. A variety of bioinformatics approaches will be explored through implementation of student designed, hypothesis-driven, research projects employing existing datasets. Three hours classroom per week. Prerequisites: 216 or permission of instructor.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
RNORTH 1316
BIOL 334-01 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy w/lab
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory course exploring the functional morphology and evolution of vertebrates. Students will apply foundational content from lecture and intensive techniques of manual tissue dissection in the laboratory to fully evaluate the structure & function integrative design of selected, preserved specimens. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
RNORTH 1317
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
RNORTH 1317
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
01:15 PM-05:15 PM, R
STUART 2112
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
BIOL 342-02 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Colin Rathbun, Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Cross-listed with CHEM 342-02. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1104
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 2112
BIOL 412-01 Precision Medicine
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Students who took BIOL 401 "Precision Medicine" in Fall 2023 cannot take this BIOL 412 class. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), precision medicine is "an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person." This departure from the "one-size-fits-all" approach to patient care has been made possible by advances in molecular medicine that have created an "-omics" era of large-scale data-rich biology. We will explore these new -omics methods and their applications in preventing, diagnosing, and treating human disease. As precision medicine is being implemented, there is also a call for the transformation of medicine from "sickcare" to "wellcare" where medical care is not only personalized but patient participatory, predictive, and preventative. The course will explore the primary literature to discover the most recent advances in precision medicine and discuss the social implications of a new era of scientific wellness. The course prerequisite is BIOL 216: Genetics. This course will fulfill the Biology major research requirement.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 187
BIOL 423-01 Plant Physiological Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
A study of how plants function and respond to their environment. Topics include mineral nutrition, cellular and whole plant water relations, photosynthesis and sugar metabolism, hormonal regulation, sensing, induced defense responses, and reproduction. The course focuses the interactions between plants and a rapidly changing environment, including climate warming, accelerating CO2 rise, drought, flooding, and pollution. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
KAUF 178
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
KAUF 178
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 115
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 1316
BIOL 433-01 Molecular Pathophysiology w/Lab
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
Human diseases often result from disordered physiology (pathophysiology) and therefore the abilities to understand disease and design specific and effective treatments are dependent on understanding normal physiological processes and the ways in which these can become disordered. This course will review the normal structure and function of select systems in the human body and subsequently examine the cellular, molecular, and systemic pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie common diseases related to that system with an emphasis on critical analysis of current biomedical literature. The laboratory portion of the course will involve original research projects using cell culture and animal models of human disease. Six hours of classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: at least one upper-level physiology or cellular & molecular biology course: 216, 313, 318, 326, 327, 330 ,333, 334, 335, 342, 380 or permission of instructor.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2206
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
KAUF 185
BIOL 500-02 Impacts of the Charcoal Industry on Forest Birds of Cumberland County
Instructor: Kim Van Fleet
Course Description:

BIOL 550-01 Designing a Method to Evaluate Real-Time Metabolic Costs of Women's Lacrosse Players by Position
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:

BIOL 560-01 Designing a Method to Evaluate Real-Time Metabolic Costs of Women's Lacrosse Games by Player Positio
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:

BIOL 560-02 Determining VO2 and VCO2 from Women's Lax Players Using Heart Rate
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:

BIOL 560-03 Reprogramming Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:

BIOL 560-04 Reprogramming Human Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:

BIOL 560-05 Investigating trade-offs in locomotion: comparing hoppers and jumpers in variable environments
Instructor: Crystal Reynaga
Course Description:

BIOL 560-06 Hemlock Growth Research
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:

BIOL 560-07 Kinematics of Saltatory Feeding in American Toads
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:

BIOL 560-08 Metabolic Demands of NCAA Women's Lacrosse Players
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:

BIOL 560-09 Assessment of Current flower blooming times compared to the same flowers 80 years ago
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:

BIOL 560-10 Reprogramming of Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:

BIOL 560-11 Mevalonate Pathway Regulation of MicroRNAs that Finetune Innate Immunity
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:

BIOL 560-12 Plant Natural Products in Ecology and Medicine
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:

BIOL 560-13 Plant Epigenetic Weapons: Computational Analysis Reveals the Impact on Insects
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:

BIOL 560-14 Computational Analysis of the Effect of Plant Defense Chemicals on Epigenetic Systems in Insects
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:

BIOL 560-15 Developmental Cell Biology and Cell Imaging
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:

BIOL 560-16 Biomechanics of Locomotor Specialization
Instructor: Crystal Reynaga
Course Description:

BIOL 560-17 Impact of Climate Change on First Budding Flowers in Spring
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:

BIOL 560-18 Determining movement patterns of Spotted Turtles (Clemmys guttata) at Fort Hunter Park Harrisburg Pa
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:

BIOL 560-19 Investigating the Architecture and Regulation of the Cytokinetic Contractile Ring
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:

BIOL 560-20 Investigating the effects of landing performance from variable substrates
Instructor: Crystal Reynaga
Course Description: