Spring 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ecology of Animals, Plants & Fungi
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 201
1330:M   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ecology of Animals, Plants & Fungi
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:T   RNORTH 2319
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 201
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Mike Potthoff
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
0900:TR   JAMESR 2228
1330:W   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 132-01 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Topics in the Molecular Basis of Disease
Instructor: Tiffany Frey, Dana Somers
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:M   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 132-02 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Topics in the Molecular Basis of Disease
Instructor: Tiffany Frey, Dana Somers
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:T   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 132-03 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: Hilary Truchan
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1130:WF   ALTHSE 08
1330:W   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
1330:F   JAMESR 2206
0930:MWF   STERN 103
BIOL 301-01 Wildlife Ecology
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
Wildlife Ecology is designed for majors in both Environmental Science and Biology. This course approaches ecology from the aspect of focusing on individual organisms and the role they play in their environment. Students will visit various habitats in Pennsylvania and view wildlife first hand. The texts are both place based focusing on Northeastern forests and Northeastern vernal ponds. These two ecosystems are intimately linked and the health of one influences the other. Students will have hands on labs with living organisms and investigate the roles each of these organisms play in the forest and vernal pool environment. A focus of the course will be how we must manage these ecosystems if they are to be enjoyed by our grandchildren. Both of these ecosystems are being changed by human ignorance and global climate change. We are at a squeak point in our ability to sustain these ecosystems. Only a complete understanding of their ecology and rapid action will sustain them for future generations.
1330:M   KAUF 109
0830:MWF   KAUF 109
BIOL 301-02 Research & Writing in Biology
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
In this course, students will spend part of the semester focusing on literature exploration, experimental design, data collection, and analysis of results using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. During the remainder of the semester, students will use their observations as the basis for presentations and writing in the scientific journal format. This course meets for 3 hours per week.
1330:R   JAMESR 1218
BIOL 313-01 Cell Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Missy Niblock
Course Description:
An introduction to the structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. The course will involve discussion-oriented lectures and readings from the current literature. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying state of the art techniques to cell biological experiments. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
1330:W   JAMESR 1218
1030:MWF   KAUF 187
BIOL 332-01 Natural History of Vertebrates w/Lab
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
An exploration into the lifestyles of vertebrates heavily focused on field biology. Natural history is strongly dependent on descriptive anatomy and systematics and therefore this course will cover the evolutionary relationships among vertebrates highlighting unique features that facilitated the success of the major groups. In field labs, students will develop observational skills such as how to identify a bird by its song, a frog by its call, a mammal by the color of its pelage, and a snake by its shed skin. Indoor labs will focus on identifying species from preserved specimens as well as providing students with the skills necessary to preserve vertebrates for future study. Preservation methods could include preparing museum-quality mammal and bird skins, formalin fixation of fish, and skeletal preparations. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: one 200-level biology course or ERSC 307. Offered every two years.
0930:MWF   RNORTH 1317
1330:W   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 334-01 Vertebrate Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory study of the anatomy, embryology, physiology, and evolution of vertebrates. Representative live and dissection specimens are studied from the perspective of structure and function. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
1030:TR   RNORTH 1317
0900:TR   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 335-01 Microanatomy
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory course focused on the functional microanatomy/histology of mammals. This course will examine the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, organ, and organ systems and the crucial relationship between form and function. The laboratory portion of the course will emphasize the process of microscopic examination and cover methods of contemporary histologic technique. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
1030:MWF   TOME 117
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor, Mary Jo Boylan
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
1315:R   STUART 2112
1030:TR   STUART 1113
BIOL 380-01 Immunology
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
An in-depth study of the field of immunobiology with an emphasis on the mammalian immune system. Topics include the innate and adaptive immune responses, immunochemistry, immunogenetics, and immunopathology. Emphasis in the class and the laboratory will be on the process and analysis of experimental investigation. Prerequisites: BIOL 213 or 216.
1330:T   JAMESR 2206
1030:MWF   EASTC 314
BIOL 401-01 Disturbance and Resilience in Marine Ecosystems
Instructor: Tony Pires
Course Description:
Climate change, pollution, resource extraction, invasive species transport, and coastal land use patterns impact marine ecosystems all over the globe. How do marine ecosystems resist alteration, recover from disturbance, or transition to different structural and functional states? We will draw on current research literature to study disturbance and resilience in polar, temperate and tropical marine ecosystems at system, community and organismal levels. Laboratory work will investigate effects of multiple interacting stressors on early developmental stages of marine organisms. Six hours of classroom/laboratory per week. Prerequisites: at least one upper-level biology course or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   TOME 227
1330:T   JAMESR 1228
BIOL 412-01 Bio-Imaging
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
The revolution that has taken place in microscopic imaging over the last two decades has driven significant advances in the fields of cell and molecular biology as well as biochemistry and neuroscience. In this research course students will first learn about the theory and practice of a number of forms of microscopy as well as some basic digital image processing techniques. They will then employ these methods in a number of research projects that will culminate with groups presenting research posters. During the course of the semester students will also read, analyze and present papers from the primary literature that reflect advances in microscopy. Note that knowledge of and experience with microscopy is a skill that often serves graduates well as they seek out research technician employment or graduate school opportunities. Questions? Contact Prof. Henson (henson@dickinson.edu).
1330:F   JAMESR 1218
BIOL 412-02 Fermentation Microbiology
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
This course will focus on the physiology of fermentation and the use of microorganisms for the production of fermented foods and beverages. In this course, students will explore microbial taxonomy, biochemistry, and genetics, examine new research into the evolution of brewing yeasts, and learn how genome analysis can be used as a tool to aid in selection and development of new strains. Students will investigate primary literature, produce a research grant proposal, and conduct an independent research project. This course will fulfill the Biology major research requirement.
1330:W   JAMESR 2206
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
1330:M   RNORTH 1316
0900:TR   TOME 115
BIOL 550-01 Basking Activity Patterns in Prairie Rattlesnakes Using Time Lapse Photograph
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 550-02 Quantifying Snake Behavior Research
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 550-03 Identification of Mammal Species in the Gastrointestinal Tracts of Rattlesnakes Using SEM
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 550-04 Kinematics of Striking Behavior in Boa Constrictors
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-01 In-Game Metabolic Demands of Lacrosse
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-02 Laboratory Evolution of Yeast
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-03 Plant Natural Product Chemistry: Epigenetic Changes from Secondary Metabolite Dosing
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-04 Symbiotic Relationships Between Legionelle and Amoebae
Instructor: Hilary Truchan
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-05 The Metabolic Demands of Division 3 Men's Varsity Lacrosse
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-06 Extracellular Vesicles in Autoinflammatory Disease
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-07 Metabolic Physiology of 5' AMP
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-08 Role of miRNAs in Autoinflammatory Disease
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-09 Yorkie Function During Drosophila Embryogenesis
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-10 Kinematics of Saltatory Feeding Behavior in American Toads II
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-11 Efficacy Comparison of Two Post-Exercise Hamstring Flexibility Techniques
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-12 Assessing Climate Change's Impact on Bloom Times of Pine Hill Arboretum Wildflowers
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-13 Fungal Abundance in Hemlock Communities with Wooly Adegid
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-14 Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Research
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-15 Kinematics of Saltatory Feeding Behavior in American Toads
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-16 Symbiotic Relationship Between Legionllae & Amoebae
Instructor: Hilary Truchan
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-17 Kinematics of Saltatory Feeding Behavior in American Toads
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-18 Reprogramming Human Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-19 Epigenetic in Moths and the Influence of Sulforaphane to Their Growth
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-20 The Natural Products as Epigenetic Cues
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description: