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Biology Current Courses

Fall 2024

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: The Physiology of Life
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
JAMESR 2228
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: The Physiology of Life
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2228
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 106
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Mike Potthoff
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
JAMESR 1206
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2228
BIOL 132-01 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Developmental Biology
Instructor: Missy Niblock, Zoe Irons
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 115
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
JAMESR 2218
BIOL 132-02 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Developmental Biology
Instructor: Missy Niblock, Zoe Irons
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
JAMESR 2218
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
TOME 115
BIOL 132-03 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells Topics: Microbiology and Immunology
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
JAMESR 2218
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
TOME 115
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
JAMESR 2206
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
JAMESR 2206
BIOL 216-02 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
JAMESR 2206
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
JAMESR 2206
BIOL 224-01 Plant Geography & Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Analysis of factors determining the distribution and abundance of plant species, including study of plant migration patterns today and in the distant past. Lecture includes examples and readings from classic and recent research. Field, laboratory, and greenhouse studies focus on plant demography, plant-animal interactions, plant community structure, competition, soil and water relations, and other topics. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132 OR ENST 161 and 162.
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
RNORTH 2319
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MW
ALTHSE 201
BIOL 224-02 Plant Geography & Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Analysis of factors determining the distribution and abundance of plant species, including study of plant migration patterns today and in the distant past. Lecture includes examples and readings from classic and recent research. Field, laboratory, and greenhouse studies focus on plant demography, plant-animal interactions, plant community structure, competition, soil and water relations, and other topics. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132 OR ENST 161 and 162.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MW
ALTHSE 201
12:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
RNORTH 2319
BIOL 313-01 Cell Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Missy Niblock
Course Description:
An introduction to the structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. The course will involve discussion-oriented lectures and readings from the current literature. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying state of the art techniques to cell biological experiments. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
JAMESR 1228
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
JAMESR 1218
BIOL 318-01 Animal Development w/Lab
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
This course offers an introduction to the development of multicellular animals. The study of development addresses the following question: how does a single cellthe fertilized egggive rise to a complex organism, containing many cells of many types? Three essential processes must occur for development to proceed: an increase in cell number through division; an increase in types of cells through differentiation; and the arrangement of cells into organs, tissues, appendages and other complex structures. In this course, we will examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes, with a focus on the current understanding of, and approaches used to investigate, the genetic basis of development of model organisms. Six classroom hours a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level biology course. For Neuroscience majors only, the prerequisite is NRSC 200.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
JAMESR 1218
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
KAUF 187
BIOL 326-01 Microbiology w/Lab
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required Molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry (structure and function) of bacteria, archaea, and viruses. Includes an introduction to the immune system and mechanisms of medical control of microbes. Molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis are addressed via readings from the recent primary literature. Laboratory exercises include the isolation and characterization of unknown bacteria using traditional and molecular methods, and modern genomic approaches to characterizing host response to infection. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
RNORTH 1316
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
STUART 1113
BIOL 335-01 Microanatomy
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory course focused on the functional microanatomy/histology of mammals. This course will examine the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, organ, and organ systems and the crucial relationship between form and function. The laboratory portion of the course will emphasize the process of microscopic examination and cover methods of contemporary histologic technique. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
JAMESR 1218
BIOL 343-01 Metabolism
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
A survey of the metabolic processes in animals and plants, including signal transduction, aerobic and anaerobic respiration, and photosynthesis, as well as the biosynthesis of the major types of biomolecules. For each metabolic pathway, we will examine the regulation of enzymes and related genes, their energetic requirements, and the function of pathway end products. Both the normal functioning of metabolic pathways and common metabolic malfunctions, e.g., human inborn errors of metabolism, will be considered. Selected readings from the primary literature and the popular press are required. Students will complete detailed case studies focusing on human metabolism and metabolic disorders. Three hours classroom a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
TOME 115
BIOL 401-01 Drugs from Nature: Assessing the Medicinal Properties of Natural Products
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
This lab-based course will explore natural products with putative medicinal properties. In the classroom we will survey substances by their distributions in nature as well as by their molecular structures and chemical properties. We will consider the roles of natural products in nature, which often provides clues about their potential medical use. In addition, we will critically evaluate the benefits of common drugs, supplements, and cosmetics derived from plants, animals, bacteria, and fungi - to separate the sound scientific evidence from pseudo-science and social media hype. In the laboratory we will work in research teams to extract, fractionate, and isolate molecules from plants, and to test their activities in a variety of bioassays. Students will complete and present small-scale research projects focusing on medicinal natural products.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
STUART 2112
BIOL 560-01 Reprogramming Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description: