Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Evolution and Ecology
Instructor: Tony Pires
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required.Labs will have some asynchronous components. Students will be assigned to a 2-hr time block within the lab time window. This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1230:W   JAMESR 1228
1130:MWF   DIST
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Evolution and Ecology
Instructor: Tony Pires
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required.Labs will have some asynchronous components. Students will be assigned to a 2-hr time block within the lab time window. This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:R   JAMESR 1228
1130:MWF   DIST
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Mike Potthoff
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required.Labs will have some asynchronous components. Students will be assigned to a 2-hr time block within the lab time window.
0900:TR   DIST
1330:T   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 132-01 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Topics in the Molecular Basis of Disease
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
Labs will have some asynchronous components. This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and reading from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. This course includes 6 hours of lecture and laboratory per week and is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Population, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1030:TR   JAMESR 2218
1330:W   JAMESR 2228
1330:W   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 132-02 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Topics in Germs, Genes, and Genomes
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
Labs will have some asynchronous components. This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and reading from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. This course includes 6 hours of lecture and laboratory per week and is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Population, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:M   JAMESR 2218
0830:MWF   DIST
1330:M   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 132-03 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Topics in Germs, Genes, and Genomes
Instructor: Dana Somers
Course Description:
Labs will have some asynchronous components. This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:T   JAMESR 2228
1330:T   JAMESR 2218
0830:MWF   DIST
BIOL 215-01 Evolution w/Lab
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
A study of the mechanics of evolutionary change and its role within populations. Topics typically covered include macroevolution vs microevolution, natural selection, adaptation, neutral theory, population genetics, speciation, extinction, and sex and sexuality. Interactive lectures, readings from the primary literature, laboratory and field investigations, and simulation exercises will be used to actively explore the principles of evolutionary change and its consequences. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131 and 132; for Neuroscience majors only, 132 and PSYC 125.
1330:R   RNORTH 1317
1030:MWF   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
Lecture and lab material will be delivered both asynchronously (recorded lectures/activities) and synchronously (Zoom meetings). Students should reserve lecture and lab times for synchronous Zoom meetings. In person instruction for some laboratory sessions may occur. A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
0930:MWF   DIST
1330:F   DIST
BIOL 301-01 Wildlife Ecology
Instructor: Gene Wingert
Course Description:
Wildlife Ecology is designed for majors in both Environmental Science and Biology. This course approaches ecology from the aspect of focusing on individual organisms and the role they play in their environment. Students will visit various habitats in Pennsylvania and view wildlife first hand. The texts are both place based focusing on Northeastern forests and Northeastern vernal ponds. These two ecosystems are intimately linked and the health of one influences the other. Students will have hands on labs with living organisms and investigate the roles each of these organisms play in the forest and vernal pool environment. A focus of the course will be how we must manage these ecosystems if they are to be enjoyed by our grandchildren. Both of these ecosystems are being changed by human ignorance and global climate change. We are at a squeak point in our ability to sustain these ecosystems. Only a complete understanding of their ecology and rapid action will sustain them for future generations.
1330:T   RNORTH 2319
0900:TR   KAUF 179
BIOL 313-01 Cell Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Missy Niblock
Course Description:
An introduction to the structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. The course will involve discussion-oriented lectures and readings from the current literature. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying state of the art techniques to cell biological experiments. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
1130:MWF   DIST
1330:W   JAMESR 1218
BIOL 322-01 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
1230:M   RNORTH 2319
0830:MW   ALTHSE 201
BIOL 322-02 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0830:MW   ALTHSE 201
1230:W   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 326-01 Microbiology w/Lab
Instructor: David Kushner
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry (structure and function) of bacteria, archaea, and viruses. Includes an introduction to the immune system and mechanisms of medical control of microbes. Molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis are addressed via readings from the recent primary literature. Laboratory exercises include the isolation and characterization of unknown bacteria using traditional and molecular methods, and modern genomic approaches to characterizing host response to infection. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
1330:W   DIST
1130:MWF   DIST
BIOL 334-01 Vertebrate Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory study of the anatomy, embryology, physiology, and evolution of vertebrates. Representative live and dissection specimens are studied from the perspective of structure and function. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
1030:TR   DIST
0900:TR   DIST
BIOL 335-01 Microanatomy
Instructor: Chuck Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory course focused on the functional microanatomy/histology of mammals. This course will examine the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, organ, and organ systems and the crucial relationship between form and function. The laboratory portion of the course will emphasize the process of microscopic examination and cover methods of contemporary histologic technique. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
0930:MWF   DIST
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01.The lecture will be hybrid with both synchronous and asynchronous components. Will consider remote only students on case-by-case as situation evolves. Labs will alternate in person and remote, with students being in person every other week. Off-week labs will involve online laboratory activities. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
1030:TR   STUART 1113
1315:R   STUART 2112
BIOL 343-01 Metabolism
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 343-01. A survey of the metabolic processes in animals and plants, including signal transduction, aerobic and anaerobic respiration, and photosynthesis, as well as the biosynthesis of the major types of biomolecules. For each metabolic pathway, we will examine the regulation of enzymes and related genes, their energetic requirements, and the function of pathway end products. Both the normal functioning of metabolic pathways and common metabolic malfunctions, e.g., human inborn errors of metabolism, will be considered. Selected readings from the primary literature and the popular press are required. Students will complete detailed case studies focusing on human metabolism and metabolic disorders. Three hours classroom a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 343.
0830:MWF   DIST
BIOL 412-01 The Cell & Molecular Biology of COVID-19
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
COVID-19 is the most serious pandemic in the last 100 years and has been the focus of an unprecedented global biomedical research effort. In this literature-based research seminar students will lead the discussion and critical analysis of a series of major published articles involving the mechanisms associated with the SARS CoV2 virus infection, replication, transmission, and immunogenicity as well as experimental therapies and vaccines. Students will also generate a review paper that concentrates on a critical aspect of COVID-19 . This course satisfies the research requirement for the Biology major.
1330:F   DIST
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
1330:M   RNORTH 1316
0900:TR   STUART 1104
BIOL 500-01 Quantifying Thermoregulatory Behavior of Prairie Rattlesnakes at a Hibernaculum in Northern Colorado
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 550-01 Collaborative Reproductive Behavior in Pregnant Rattlesnakes in Northern Colorado
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-01 Genetic Reprogramming of Human Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-02 Movements and Thermal Ecology of Prairie Rattlesnakes at a High-Elevation Site II
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-03 Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Research
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-04 Calcium Fluorescent Labeling for Analysis of Growth and Development of Marine Animals
Instructor: Tony Pires
Course Description: