Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RUSS 100-01 Russia and the West
Instructor: Elena Duzs
Course Description:
An introductory and multi-disciplinary survey intended to explore the relationship between Russian culture and Western civilization. In the process, students will be exposed to aspects of Russia's history, literature, religion, philosophical traditions, music and art, politics, and economics. Suitable for those interested in a one semester introduction to Russia, and required for those who choose a major or minor in Russian.
1500:MR   BOSLER 313
RUSS 101-01 Elementary Russian
Instructor: Iza Savenkova, Irina Filippova
Course Description:
An intensive study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, with an emphasis on the development of reading, writing, speaking, and understanding skills. Short stories and songs will supplement the text.
0930:TF   DIST
0930:MWR   BOSLER 222
RUSS 102-02 Elementary Russian
Instructor: Iza Savenkova, Alyssa DeBlasio
Course Description:
An intensive study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, with an emphasis on the development of reading, writing, speaking, and understanding skills. Short stories and songs will supplement the text.Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent
0930:MWF   BOSLER 213
0930:TR   DIST
RUSS 202-01 Intermediate Russian II
Instructor: Iza Savenkova, Irina Filippova
Course Description:
Emphasis on the development of reading, speaking, and writing skills. Reading of simple texts to acquaint the student with a variety of styles of the Russian language, concentration on some of the more difficult problems in the Russian grammar, translation, written composition, vocabulary building, and intonation. Prerequisite: 201 or equivalent.
1030:MTWR   BOSLER 213
RUSS 253-01 Autocracy, Uprisings, and Daily Life in Medieval and Imperial Russia
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 253-01. Most class meeting times will be held in person, for those on campus. An examination of the early formation of multi-ethnic clans into a large multinational empire. The course explores state formation, the role of women, church power, the arts, nationality conflict and figures such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great.
1130:MWF   DENNY 204
RUSS 260-01 The Russian Novel
Instructor: Alyssa DeBlasio
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 331-02. Russian literature is known for its novels. More specifically, Russian literature is known for its long, philosophical novels: those structurally and existentially dense works in the thousands of pages, which Henry James described as large, loose, baggy monsters. And yet, 19th century Russian novels by Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Gogol, and Tolstoy regularly appear on lists of the best literary works of all times. In this course, we will delve into a selection of Russian novels that have shaped both Russian culture and world literature. We will ask questions like: Where does the Russian novelistic tradition come from, how does it differ from other European longform traditions, and what exactly is a novel anyway? We will consider why the philosophical novel has become synonymous with Russian writing, trace the development of the novel over the course of the 19th century, and examine the ways the novel might be especially well suited to reflect the complexity of human conscious experience. No knowledge of Russian required. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH
1330:TF   BOSLER 314
RUSS 265-01 Politics in Russia
Instructor: Iza Savenkova, Irina Filippova
Course Description:
Democracy literally means "People Power." As an ideal, it is seemingly simple and straightforward, but in application and practice, it is complicated and confusing. Who, exactly, are the People? And what, exactly, is the nature of their power? Statesmen and philosophers have wrestled with these questions ever since the ancient Greeks invented democracy 2,500 years ago. As difficult as the problems are, Democracy has become a cherished value, the knowledge of which has become a necessary component in any educational system worldwide. This course serves two purposes: 1) to contribute to democratic education; and 2) to advance Russian language skills. It covers basic principles, theories, and concepts of democracy and democratization. In the course, students learn to describe and analyze in Russian, in oral and written form, the historical development of democratic institutions, and to discuss critical issues related to democracy in today's world.
1030:F   BOSLER 213
1030:MW   DIST
RUSS 334-01 Workshop in Translation
Instructor: Alyssa DeBlasio
Course Description:
This course focuses on specific techniques for translating various kinds of texts (business, journalistic, scholarly, epistolary, and literary) from Russian into English, and from English into Russian. Concentrating on the practical matter of reading and writing, the course will also include special grammatical topics which present particular difficulties in translation, discussion of theories of translation, and introduction to technological tools of translation. The goal of the course is to further students' language ability and provide them with useful linguistic skills. Prerequisite: 231, 232 or equivalent. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   DIST