Fall 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
0830:MWF   DENNY 104
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 08
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1330:MR   DIST
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-02. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1500:MR   DIST
INST 200-03 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-03. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 201
INST 270-01 European Union
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 270-01. The European Union (EU) remains a work-in-progress, and this course will help students to contextualize the EU's development since the mid-1950s, understand the way that it currently functions, and think about how it is likely to evolve in the future. Substantively, the course covers the theory and history of European integration; the EU's unusual ( and evolving) institutional structure and political processes; the major policy areas of the EU; and the power dynamics between the EU and its member states. This course is cross-listed as POSC 270.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 207
INST 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 271.
0900:TR   DENNY 103
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
1500:MR   STERN 103
INST 290-02 Civil Wars and Political Violence
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-01. Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, there has been a shift toward civil wars and other forms of political violence. This course surveys theories about the causes of civil wars, violence by non-state actors, why people participate in violence, and the rebuilding of peace around the world. The class will focus on several central questions: What is political violence? What are the types of conflicts that take place within a state? Why do people participate in violence? How do internal conflicts end? And how can peace be restored after conflict? In answering each of these questions, the class will examine theoretical arguments for violence and non-violence in conflict, as well as critically engage with local and international responses. The course will discuss civil war, revolution, terrorism, and other strategies of political violence, as well as transitional justice and peacekeeping.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
INST 290-03 Global Security
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-02. The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
1330:TF   STERN 103
INST 358-01 19th-20th Century European Diplomacy
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 358-01. European diplomatic history from the Congress of Vienna through World War II. This course is cross-listed as HIST 358. Offered occasionally.
0830:MWF   DENNY 311
INST 401-01 Global Futures
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Early post-Cold War era optimism about a future of increasing democracy, prosperity, and peace has given way in recent years to concerns about resurgent authoritarianism, global economic instability, and even the prospect of major power war. This seminar will examine and debate various images of the global future through reading and discussion of a series of provocative books and articles that attempt to assess the trajectory of current global trends. Those readings will be selected with an eye toward reinforcing and deepening your understanding of each of the core areas of the IS major-- IR theory, US foreign policy, international economics, and even diplomatic history ("what's past is prologue"), with applicability to all of the concentrations pursued by IS majors.
1330:W   ALTHSE 201
INST 401-02 International Migration in Historical Context
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Sometimes international (im)migration is depicted as a novel feature of our globalized era, an unprecedented feature of contemporary life. In fact, the movement and resettlement of people across borders and seas is a recurring dynamic of global history. This seminar therefore serves as a corrective to the historical amnesia that dominates much of contemporary discourse on all sides of the migration debates. Exploring a number of historical cases (drawn from around the world and from the past several hundred years), students will learn about a range of migration eventsranging from voluntary to coerced, exploitative to empowering. Our examination of dynamics of contemporary migration will be informed by this historical context. Moreover, we will explore links between migration and other global dynamics (i.e. imperialism, decolonization, nationalism, capitalism, democratization) and ways that past migration events continue, around the world, to shape politics and economics in the present day.
1330:T   ALTHSE 07