Fall 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 104
INST 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 104
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 226-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ECON 226. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ECON 226.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
ALTHSE 207
INST 240-01 International Development
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 240-01 and INBM 300-09. This course examines the challenges and strategies of economic development, with a detailed focus on how households behave. The goal is to provide an understanding of what life for poor households in developing countries is like, what can be done about it, and an idea of how valuable insights can be gained using standard economic tools and thinking. In addition to learning about theoretical models and real-life examples, we will spend significant time understanding recent research on development problems. Issues examined include: poverty measures, health issues such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and undernutrition, economic growth, agriculture, land use, technology adoption, foreign aid, credits, child labor, child education, migration, and measures of inequality. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112. This course is cross-listed as ECON 240.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
ALTHSE 207
INST 260-01 History of International Relations
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
This course is designed to give students an opportunity to apply theories of international relations to major events and issues in world history. Concepts such as balance of power, appeasement and imperialism will be studied against the backdrop of world historical events such as the Congress of Vienna, World War II, and the Algerian War. Prerequisite: INST 170 or POSC 170.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 204
INST 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 271. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 271.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 103
INST 277-01 International Politics of the Middle East
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 266-01 and POSC 277-01. This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics.Prerequisite: one course in any of International Studies, Middle East Studies, or Political Science. This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and MEST 266. This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics.Prerequisite: one course in any of International Studies, Middle East Studies, or Political Science. This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and MEST 266.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 303
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 203
INST 281-01 American National Security Policy
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 281-01. Analysis of formulation and implementation of American national security policy within the context of American society and the international system. National security will not be considered simply in a military/strategic sense but as connoting the preservation of the core values of a society. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or 120 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 281. Analysis of formulation and implementation of American national security policy within the context of American society and the international system. National security will not be considered simply in a military/strategic sense but as connoting the preservation of the core values of a society. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or 120 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 281.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 110
INST 290-02 Trade, Globalization, and Open-Economy Macroeconomics
Instructor: Paul Ko
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 314-02.This course analyzes the causes and consequences of international trade in the United States and global economy. In this course, we will ask questions such as: Why do nations trade and what do they trade? How beneficial or costly is trade to our lives? How is trade recorded in history and how did it reshape the world? We will also touch upon contemporary theories of international trade and how economists build international trade models. We will further explore and analyze trade policies and contemporary trade disputes, tariffs and protectionism, effects of economic integration, effects of trade on economic growth and inequality, and the rise of multinational firms. Concepts and methodologies from diverse areas, including macroeconomics, microeconomics, and political science will be relevant. This course puts emphasis on quantitative (theoretical and empirical) skills to understand various international trade and macroeconomic models and to analyze different types of macroeconomic and trade data.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 110
INST 290-03 Francophone African and Caribbean Cultures
Instructor: Benjamin Ngong
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04 and FREN 304-01.This course is an introduction to the cultures, literature and films of some French-speaking countries and regions, notably the French Caribbean and Francophone sub-Saharan Africa. In the U.S. dominant intellectual and cultural traditions derive primarily from Europe and post-colonial North America, commonly referred to as "Western traditions". Subsequently, this global diversity course is designed to encourage students to examine societies and cultures that have been shaped predominantly by other historical traditions to think critically about dominant Western traditions, so to engage the world more effectively. Students will learn to place each work into its cultural and historical context, and develop intelligent and informed understanding of concepts such as Negritude, Colonialism, Imperialism, Nationalism, Postcolonialism, etc. Students will watch films and read a series of original texts by French-speaking authors outside France. Emphasis will be on the initiation to analysis and close reading of texts and films during class discussions and at the end of which student will write an organized reflecting essay.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
BOSLER 307
INST 351-01 Gender and Development
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 351-01 and WGSS 302-01. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as ECON 351 & WGSS 302. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as ECON 351 & WGSS 302.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 204
INST 401-01 Empire
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Empires may seem to belong to history, but they have shaped todays political order and globalizing economy. Few parts of the world have been untouched by empire. Some argue that the United States is or should be an empire, whether they see it as benign or malign. What does empire mean today? Participants will critically assess diverse materials to come to their own conclusions about the analytical utility of the concept of empire, and how they can best apply it to understand issues that matter in world politics today. Students will produce research papers examining how empire affects their areas of specialization, in preparation for discussion at the oral examination in the spring.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 110
INST 401-02 Great Power War
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
It has been more than 75 years since the last great power war, and optimistic observers have suggested that this long peace among the great powers is likely to persist. Realist scholars, however, have never accepted the permanence of the long peace, and recent developments in world politics have led many to suggest great power war, and, perhaps, a third world war, is becoming increasingly possible, if not inevitable. This seminar will begin by looking at the general causes of war and peace among great powers as reflected in both international relations theory and international relations history. On that foundation we will then look at the current world situation and examine some of the possible causes, catalysts, and scenarios of great power war in the mid-21st century. The seminar will be designed to reinforce and deepen your understanding of each of the core areas of the IS major-- IR theory, US foreign policy, the global economy, and diplomatic history with applicability to all the concentrations pursued by IS majors. The course also serves as a capstone seminar for the Security Studies certificate
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
DENNY 315
INST 560-01 Research on multiple social aspects affecting the welfare of households in developing countries
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description: