Spring 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 104
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ECON 226.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-02. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ECON 226.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
INST 273-01 International Political Economy
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 273-01. This course examines the politics of global economic relations. Specific topics discussed include: trade and protectionism, international monetary relations, foreign direct investment, global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and World Trade Organization (WTO), regional economic integration (e.g. the European Union [EU] and North American Free Trade Agreement [NAFTA], economic development, and the economic emergence of China and India. The larger issue serving as the backdrop to all of this is economic globalization -- its significance, sources, and consequences. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 273.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 103
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 204
INST 282-01 Diplomatic History of the United States
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 282-01. Description and analysis of the nation's role in world affairs, from the earliest definitions of a national interest in the 18th century, through continental expansion, acquisition of empire, and world power, to the Cold War. This course is cross-listed as HIST 282.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 211
INST 290-02 The Politics of High-Speed Growth in Asia
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01 and POSC 290-02. The rise of Asia as an economic force since the late 19th century has been one of the most important developments in the history of the world. Beginning with Japan in the 1880s but later encompassing South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore in the 1950s and 1960s and then China in the late 1990s, the Asia-Pacific region has been a dynamo of economic growth: billions of people have been lifted out of poverty, Asian states have grown rich and more vocal on the world stage, millionaires have been minted and new middle classes have emerged. In this class we will explore the historical, political, economic and cultural factors that help explain this development. Among the questions we will focus are whether there is a distinctly Asian model of development that stands in contrast to Western patterns, the role of wars, authoritarianism, colonialism, and cultural factors such as Confucianism.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
STERN 103
INST 290-03 Human Rights
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 258-01. The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights embodies a global consensus on the fundamental importance of human rights as a political value. But the idea and its practical applications have provoked intense controversy around the world on issues such as freedom of expression, capital punishment and torture, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, social and economic justice, and cultural and minority rights. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of the instructor.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 109
INST 290-04 Trade, Globalization, and Open-Economy Macroeconomics
Instructor: Paul Ko
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 314-03.This course analyzes the causes and consequences of international trade in the United States and global economy. In this course, we will ask questions such as: Why do nations trade and what do they trade? How beneficial or costly is trade to our lives? How is trade recorded in history and how did it reshape the world? We will also touch upon contemporary theories of international trade and how economists build international trade models. We will further explore and analyze trade policies and contemporary trade disputes, tariffs and protectionism, effects of economic integration, effects of trade on economic growth and inequality, and the rise of multinational firms. Concepts and methodologies from diverse areas, including macroeconomics, microeconomics, and political science will be relevant. This course puts emphasis on quantitative (theoretical and empirical) skills to understand various international trade and macroeconomic models and to analyze different types of macroeconomic and trade data.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 206
INST 290-05 U.S. Public Diplomacy in the Arab World
Instructor: Magda Siekert
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 233-01.
12:30 PM-01:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 104
INST 351-01 Gender and Development
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 351-01 and WGSS 302-01.Permission of Instructor Required. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as ECON 351 & WGSS 302.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 201
INST 401-01 Understanding Poverty and Globalization
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Two kinds of economic phenomena have dominated the world over the last few decades: Increasing globalization and increasing efforts to fight poverty. In this course, we will try to understand the results of both these phenomena. Thus, the class will be divided into two segments: one segment will focus on poverty and the other segment on globalization. The segment on poverty will try to understand the answers to the following questions: Why do we have still have poverty? Why did some of the approaches by international organizations and different governments to fight poverty fail miserably? And looking ahead, how can we solve this problem and how are we trying to solve the problem now? The segment on globalization will try to understand the following issues: Is globalization good for us? Why are many people unhappy with globalization? With globalization why are we seeing growing inequality in the developed world? Does globalization make it more difficult to fight international terrorism? Is the developed world moving in the right direction to fight global terrorism?
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
ALTHSE 110
INST 404-01 Integrated Study
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
The purpose of the course is to help students review and integrate the diverse components of the International Studies major. Prerequisites: senior standing in the INST major and prior completion of INST 401.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, F
ALTHSE 08
INST 500-01 Explaining Variation in European Mass Media Coverage of Climate Change
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:

INST 560-01 Research of Covid-19 Pandemic Impact on Six Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:

INST 560-02 Understanding the Impact of Covid-19 Pandemic on Food Security in Developing Countries
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description: