Fall 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01Course content will be delivered via weekly asynchronous, recorded PowerPoint videos to which I will add my narration. We will have one live, synchronous Zoom class session each week during the scheduled class time to discuss readings and to help clarify points from the PowerPoint videos. The second scheduled weekly class time will be for one-on-one Zoom consultations. You should complete each weeks assigned readings (~50 pages per week) and view the weeks PowerPoint videos (~1 hour per week) prior to each live meeting. Other details about course requirements will be provided during the first week of the semester. Note: I will record the live sessions for those who occasionally miss them and for others to review. However, if time zone issues or other considerations mean you will generally not be able to participate live, you should consider another course that works better in your schedule. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
0900:TR   DIST
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02.Lectures will be posted asynchronously, as well as some other online activities; we will meet on zoom as a large group during the regular course time An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1330:MR   DIST
INST 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-03.Asynchronous presentations of content, chunked for digestibility, will be delivered via Moodle. Discussion sessions will meet twice weekly in smaller groups. I will divide the scheduled class time (TF 130P - 245P) among three groups. Students and I will meet via Zoom (video optional for students), for around 20 minutes, then the next group will switch in. Sessions will be recorded so students can review their own group discussion as well as others, ensuring equity. Students abroad or who are for any other reason unable to participate in synchronous sessions can review the recordings of those group discussions and then schedule one-on-one conversations with me. Assessment will be a combination of weekly low-stakes quizzes, participation points for contributions to synchronous and asynchronous (forum) discussions, and essay-based exams. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1330:TF   DIST
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1500:TF   DIST
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-02.The Professor will use Zoom and meet with students for all 42 sessions. Each session will be recorded, with transcripts added, and will be posted in Moodle folder for the day. Depending on the material for the day, the pedagogy will range from lectures, to informal cooperative learning, to breakout rooms for student conversations. The Professor will NOT administer exams. Nor will he assign a class preparation and participation grade. Instead, each week, the professor will appoint students to a new team of 3 students. The professor will post a problem set: It will be due 10 days later. Each team of will submit one set of answers and each student on the team will receive the same grade. In total, each student will work with others on 12 problem sets. Since each will be worth 100 points, there will be 1200 possible points to earn during the semester. With respect to intangible outcomes, the course will stress the ability to collaborate with others, one of the most important skill in addressing the complex problems of the 21st Century. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1030:MWF   DIST
INST 240-01 International Development
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 240-01 and INBM 300-08. This course examines the challenges and strategies of economic development, with a detailed focus on how households behave. The goal is to provide an understanding of what life for poor households in developing countries is like, what can be done about it, and an idea of how valuable insights can be gained using standard economic tools and thinking. In addition to learning about theoretical models and real-life examples, we will spend significant time understanding recent research on development problems. Issues examined include: poverty measures, health issues such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and undernutrition, economic growth, agriculture, land use, technology adoption, foreign aid, credits, child labor, child education, migration, and measures of inequality.This course is cross-listed as ECON 240.
1330:TF   DIST
INST 270-01 European Union
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 270-01. The European Union (EU) remains a work-in-progress, and this course will help students to contextualize the EU's development since the mid-1950s, understand the way that it currently functions, and think about how it is likely to evolve in the future. Substantively, the course covers the theory and history of European integration; the EU's unusual ( and evolving) institutional structure and political processes; the major policy areas of the EU; and the power dynamics between the EU and its member states. This course is cross-listed as POSC 270.
1330:F   DIST
INST 273-01 International Political Economy
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 273-01.Course content will be delivered via weekly asynchronous, recorded PowerPoint videos to which I will add my narration. We will have one live, synchronous Zoom class session each week during the scheduled class time to discuss readings and to help clarify points from the PowerPoint videos. The second scheduled weekly class time will be for one-on-one Zoom consultations. You should complete each weeks assigned readings (~75 pages per week) and view the weeks PowerPoint videos (~1 hour per week) prior to each live meeting. Other details about course requirements will be provided during the first week of the semester. Note: I will record the live sessions for those who occasionally miss them and for others to review. However, if time zone issues or other considerations mean you will generally not be able to participate live, you should consider another course that works better in your schedule. This course examines the politics of global economic relations. Specific topics discussed include: trade and protectionism, international monetary relations, foreign direct investment, global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and World Trade Organization (WTO), regional economic integration (e.g. the European Union [EU] and North American Free Trade Agreement [NAFTA], economic development, and the economic emergence of China and India. The larger issue serving as the backdrop to all of this is economic globalization -- its significance, sources, and consequences. Prerequisite: POSC 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 273.
1330:MR   DIST
INST 277-01 International Politics of the Middle East
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 266-01 and POSC 277-01.Most content will be delivered via asynchronous/recorded presentations posted to Moodle. Synchronous class meetings via Zoom will focus on discussion and explanation and will be recorded. Assessment will be based on an essay-based midterm, a final research paper, student blogs, and a few quizzes, including at least one map quiz, as well as active participation. This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as POSC 277 and MEST 266.
1500:MR   DIST
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01.Zoom instruction with class materials and reading online. Special sessions provided for students who cannot tune in at scheduled class times (in other countries, time zones, special circumstances, etc.) Thorough description of procedures will be sent directly to students with syllabus. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
1330:TF   DIST
INST 282-01 Diplomatic History of the United States
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 282-01. Description and analysis of the nation's role in world affairs, from the earliest definitions of a national interest in the 18th century, through continental expansion, acquisition of empire, and world power, to the Cold War. This course is cross-listed as HIST 282.
1030:TR   DIST
INST 290-01 U.S. - Middle East Relations
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02 and MEST 200-01.The coursework will consist of synchronous meetings for discussion and clarification of course material, asynchronous lessons consisting of brief videos and PowerPoint presentations, and asynchronous discussion of course material. Synchronous meetings will be recorded. Students will be graded on the basis of short essays and contributions to discussion. The synchronous meetings will take place TF 1:30 2:45pm. This course examines the history of US-Middle East relations from the Barbary Wars to the present. Topics will include American travel and missionary activity in the Holy Land during the 1800s; the American role in post-World War I diplomacy affecting the Middle East; rivalry with the Soviet Union; Arab-Israeli diplomacy; petroleum policy; anti-American terrorism; and military interventions.
1330:TF   DIST
INST 290-03 Global Environmental Politics
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03.The class will combine synchronous discussions and activities during scheduled class time along with asynchronous readings, lectures and assignments. Global environmental politics seeks to understand how the global environment is being changed by humanity and how states, organizations, individuals, communities, societies, movements and corporations are responding to planetary environmental issues. In this course, we discuss the causes of global environmental problems and how solutions have been conceptualized and put into practice over the last several decades. We examine trends in global environmental governance, and focus on the role of the sovereign state and global organizations in designing, implementing and enforcing effective international environmental agreements and regimes. We study the growing role in global environmental politics of global civil society and multinational corporations. Finally, we consider the major tensions and controversies that characterize global environmental politics such as the impact of economics and trade, sustainable development, and the role of knowledge, power and science. This course engages with a broad range of materials from the global environmental politics literature and endeavors to represent different methodological and conceptual approaches. The course is not organized around environmental issue areas but rather focuses on the underlying dynamics of power, authority, interests, legitimacy and ideas that ultimately shape environmental debates. We focus on how theory informs policy making and learn to recognize the constraints and opportunities available for addressing environmental challenges in a changing world. The course will incorporate lectures and seminar discussions as well as possible field trip and guest speakers.
1330:MR   DIST
INST 401-01 Political Violence
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
We will meet on zoom during our normal course time, although some in-class activities will be shifted to asynchronous activitiesSince the end of the Cold War there has been a turn toward conflicts within states and violence perpetrated by non-state actors. This course is intended to explore the theories about the emergence of civil wars and violence by non-state actors, the nature of these conflicts, and the rebuilding of peace. The class will focus around three central questions: what is political violence? Why and how does one participate in violence? How do conflicts end? In answering each of these questions, the class will examine theoretical arguments for violence and non-violence in conflict, as well as critically engage with local and international responses. We will discuss civil war, revolution, terrorism, and other strategies of political violence, as well as how internal conflicts end.
1330:T   DIST
INST 401-02 International Migration in Historical Context
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Students will be assigned to a synchronous session 1 day/week during the slots listed or at another time TBD with individual students.Sometimes international (im)migration is depicted as a novel feature of our globalized era, an unprecedented feature of contemporary life. In fact, the movement and resettlement of people across borders and seas is a recurring dynamic of global history. This seminar therefore serves as a corrective to the historical amnesia that dominates much of contemporary discourse on all sides of the migration debates. Exploring a number of historical cases (drawn from around the world and from the past several hundred years), students will learn about a range of migration eventsranging from voluntary to coerced, exploitative to empowering. Our examination of dynamics of contemporary migration will be informed by this historical context. Moreover, we will explore links between migration and other global dynamics (i.e. imperialism, decolonization, nationalism, capitalism, democratization) and ways that past migration events continue, around the world, to shape politics and economics in the present day.
  DIST