Fall 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 The Epic: Gods, Devils, Monsters, and Men
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-01.Main course format will be synchronous zoom discussion during regular course meeting time. I will supplement with small group discussion/office hours at other times as possible and needed.An introduction to the epic as a genre and to the mythic stories that have shaped Western culture. We will read works by Homer, Virgil, the Beowulf poet, Milton, and Alexander Pope.
0930:MWF   DIST
ENGL 101-02 British Literature in the Industrial Revolution
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Two short (4-6 pp) papers and a cumulative exam. Please await the Professor's email to you before purchasing books.We will study British society in the Romantic and Victorian eras through literature, historical accounts, and visual materials, including paintings and film. Substantial volume of reading; two papers and a final exam.
1030:TR   DIST
ENGL 101-03 Storytelling Across Media
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-07.As human beings, we encounter stories everywhere: not only in literature, comic books, and film; but also in our myths and religions, our personal and national histories, our career plans, and our politicseven our everyday conversations. Almost all aspects of social life, in fact, depend upon storytelling, a fact that has led some theorists to suggest that the ability to create and understand stories is one of the defining features of human beings as a species. But how does storytelling work? What are its underlying rules and structures? And how do stories differ across different media? This course will introduce students to the study of storytelling (sometimes called narratology) through the examination of stories in multiple media, including literature, film, and video games.
1500:TF   DIST
ENGL 101-04 Sex, Drugs, and the American Dream: Literature and Culture of the Long Beat Generation
Instructor: Stacey Suver
Course Description:
Parts of this course will be taught in a classroom if classroom if conditions at the start of the semester and during the semester allow. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. Students who are working remotely will be at no disadvantage. If a student is working remotely in a time zone that does not allow them to participate at the assigned course meeting time, the professor will make arrangements for alternate participation.Amiri Baraka described the Beat Generation as a whole bunch of people, of all different nationalities, who came to the conclusion that society sucked. Allen Ginsberg said it was about obedience to human nature. At its simplest, the Beat Generation was a youth movement in the 1950s centered around poetry, jazz, and personal liberty. This course studies Beat literature and culture and analyzes the work of several Beat writers, including Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, Amiri Baraka, Joyce Johnson, Gregory Corso, and Diane di Prima. We will consider how this movement informed counterculture movements that flourished in subsequent decades, as well as how Beat culture became mainstream. The writers, poets, and playwrights we will study represent diverse viewpoints of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and educational background.
1330:MR   DIST
ENGL 101-05 Storytelling Across Media
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-08.As human beings, we encounter stories everywhere: not only in literature, comic books, and film; but also in our myths and religions, our personal and national histories, our career plans, and our politicseven our everyday conversations. Almost all aspects of social life, in fact, depend upon storytelling, a fact that has led some theorists to suggest that the ability to create and understand stories is one of the defining features of human beings as a species. But how does storytelling work? What are its underlying rules and structures? And how do stories differ across different media? This course will introduce students to the study of storytelling (sometimes called narratology) through the examination of stories in multiple media, including literature, film, and video games.
1500:MR   DIST
ENGL 101-06 Sex, Drugs, and the American Dream: Literature and Culture of the Long Beat Generation
Instructor: Stacey Suver
Course Description:
Parts of this course will be taught in a classroom if conditions at the start of the semester and during the semester allow. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. Students who are working remotely will be at no disadvantage. If a student is working remotely in a time zone that does not allow them to participate at the assigned course meeting time, the professor will make arrangements for alternate participation.Amiri Baraka described the Beat Generation as a whole bunch of people, of all different nationalities, who came to the conclusion that society sucked. Allen Ginsberg said it was about obedience to human nature. At its simplest, the Beat Generation was a youth movement in the 1950s centered around poetry, jazz, and personal liberty. This course studies Beat literature and culture and analyzes the work of several Beat writers, including Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, Amiri Baraka, Joyce Johnson, Gregory Corso, and Diane di Prima. We will consider how this movement informed counterculture movements that flourished in subsequent decades, as well as how Beat culture became mainstream. The writers, poets, and playwrights we will study represent diverse viewpoints of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and educational background.
1330:TF   DIST
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Parts of this course will be taught in a classroom if conditions at the start of the semester and during the semester allow. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. Students who are working remotely will be at no disadvantage. If a student is working remotely in a time zone that does not allow them to participate at the assigned course meeting time, the professor will make arrangements for alternate participation. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1330:MR   DIST
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
This course will be taught remotely with synchronous components. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1330:TF   DIST
ENGL 300-01 Literary Studies Research Lab
Instructor: Chris Bombaro
Course Description:
This P/F non-credit research course introduces students to research methodology for advanced literary studies. ENGL 300 is a co-requisite with a student's first 300-level literature course taught by English department faculty.
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ENGL 311-01 The American Auteur
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 310-01.This course will be taught completely remotely with a synchronous component. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. Students who are working remotely will be at no disadvantage. If a student is working remotely in a time zone that does not allow them to participate at the assigned course meeting time, the professor will make arrangements for alternate participation.Auteurs are usually defined as filmmakers whose individual styles and extraordinary control over the elements of production allow them to create unique films that reflect their own personalities and artistic preoccupations. In this class we will examine the work of four contemporary American directors who are usually identified as auteurs: David Lynch, Spike Lee, Sofia Coppola, and Gregg Araki. Through examinations of their films and through discussions of film authorship and culture in the United States, we will interrogate the concept of auteurism as it functions in America today.
1330:TF   DIST
ENGL 321-01 James Joyce's Ulysses
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
This course will be taught completely remotely with a synchronous component. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. If a student is working remotely in a time zone that does not allow them to participate at the assigned course meeting time, the professor will make arrangements for alternate participation. Please consult with the professor before purchasing books. She will be in touch by email by early August.Now you can tell your grandchildren that you have read, finished, and (partially) understood the Great Modern Novel almost every serious reader has picked up and attempted. The text of Ulysses (1922) is the linchpin for intertextual explorations; we will read Ulysses slowly, throughout the whole term. In addition, we will read around the novel, considering alternative contexts for understanding this complex, yet wonderful work. Other readings will include versions of Joyce's autobiography (A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Stephen Hero), biography (Richard Ellman and Edna O'Brien on Joyce and Brenda Maddox on Nora Barnacle, Joyce's lover and wife), Joyce's fiction (The Dubliners), the mythic context (The Odyssey, The Bible, Celtic myth), and Irish social history.
0900:TR   DIST
ENGL 321-02 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02 and WGSS 301-01. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
1030:TR   DIST
ENGL 331-02 The 19th Century Novel
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Parts of this course will be taught in a classroom if conditions at the start of the semester and during the semester allow. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. Students who are working remotely will be at no disadvantage. If a student is working remotely in a time zone that does not allow them to participate at the assigned course meeting time, the professor will make arrangements for alternate participation.The American writer Henry James notoriously referred to novels of the nineteenth century as large, loose, baggy monsters. This course focuses on the genre of the novel to study its form, and its function within the nineteenth-century imagination. Specifically, we will consider the nineteenth-century novel as an attempt to reflect and imagine society as a sprawling network through which individuals move and develop. Our focus will be on serialization and narrative structure as indicative of genre (sensation novel/ detective novel/ marriage plot), and our texts will include works by both British and American and authors. Writers may include, among others, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, and Wilkie Collins, as well as Henry James, James Fennimore Cooper, Washington Irving, and E.D.E.N. Southworth.
1500:MR   DIST
ENGL 341-01 Sex in the City of Light: Early 20th-Century Women of Paris
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-01 and WGSS 301-02. This course in comparative literature and visual culture investigates the city of Paris as a site of sexual and artistic exploration, liberation and confrontation for women of the early 20th-Century. Students will study a variety of literature, visual art, performance art, and haute couture created and produced by women from diverse backgrounds who came to Paris in search of free self-expression. Most of these writers, journalists, artists, dancers, and designers knew each other; many collaborated professionally and mingled socially; and some became involved romantically. We will discuss of the implications of their social and intimate relationships and consider to what extent these networks may have fostered artistic creation as well as political activism. To facilitate these investigations, students will read feminist, queer and geocritical theory to deepen and strengthen our analyses.
1330:TF   DIST
ENGL 341-02 The Fairy Way of Writing: Romance, Epic, Fantasy, and Myth in Early Modern England
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Main course format will be synchronous zoom discussion during regular course meeting time. I will supplement with small group discussion/office hours at other times as possible and needed.In this course we will read texts that imagine fantastical worlds, beginning in ancient times but focusing primarily on England between 1590 and 1800. Authors may include Homer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Scudry, Cavendish, Wortley Montagu, Swift, Gray, Walpole, Blake, as well as popular and children's texts. We will also encounter early modern readers and critics who explore the power of fantasy, such as Dryden, Addison, Boswell, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Lamb, as well as contemporary scholars of myth and fantasy.
1230:MWF   DIST
ENGL 341-03 The Fairy Way of Writing: Romance, Epic, Fantasy, and Myth in Early Modern England
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Main course format will be synchronous zoom discussion during regular course meeting time. I will supplement with small group discussion/office hours at other times as possible and needed.In this course we will read texts that imagine fantastical worlds, beginning in ancient times but focusing primarily on England between 1590 and 1800. Authors may include Homer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Scudry, Cavendish, Wortley Montagu, Swift, Gray, Walpole, Blake, as well as popular and children's texts. We will also encounter early modern readers and critics who explore the power of fantasy, such as Dryden, Addison, Boswell, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Lamb, as well as contemporary scholars of myth and fantasy.
1130:MWF   DIST
ENGL 403-01 The Subject of Biography
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
This course will be taught completely remotely with a synchronous component. Students should reserve the assigned course meeting time. If a student is working remotely in a time zone that does not allow them to participate at the assigned course meeting time, the professor will make arrangements for alternate participation. The professor will be in touch by early August concerning required books. Please hold off on buying books until then.Life writing--especially critical biography-- is at the forefront of several pressing and central questions in literary study right now: how culture frames and shapes meaning; the relation of the critic to the text; the coherence and stability of subjectivity itself. Well read some biographies that probe these problems (including --a partial list) Taylor Branchs Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-1963 , my own A Great Unrecorded History: A New Life of E. M. Forster, and Sarah Bakewells How to Live: A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer). Well also explore questions of subjectivity in literary theory and biographical criticism, in work by Richard Holmes, Lauren Berlant, Ralph Rader, Claire Tomalin, Hermione Lee, and Eve Sedgwick. The course will focus on developing skills for 403 and innovative forms of analysis and writing, including a research paper in the form of a biographical sketch.
1330:R   DIST
ENGL 403-02 Questions and Methods of Literary Scholarship
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
This course will be taught remotely with synchronous components. Students should reserve Wednesday 1:30-3 and one of the 90-minute meeting times; expect additional, individual meeting times to be arranged according to students individual schedules. This class will prepare students for writing a senior thesis by exploring some central questions of literary scholarship. Our class will begin with common work on James Baldwins fiction and nonfiction from the 1960s, using a focus on Baldwins writing to exemplify the process of framing and researching a scholarly question. Meanwhile, students will pursue a series of independent projects that tests different parts of the same process for primary texts of their own choosing.
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