Fall 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 Medievalism from J.R.R. Tolkien to Game of Thrones
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
The novels of J.R.R. Tolkien popularized a new era of medievalism in the arts, inspiring an incredible output of novels, art, movies and television, and video and role-playing games. Yet medievalism is also often hurled as an insult, indicating outmoded or backwards-looking modes of thought. In this class, we will consider the ramifications of the resurgence of medievalism in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including questions of genre, politics, history, and the individual in society. Authors include J.R.R. Tolkien, Ursula Le Guin, and G.R.R. Martin.
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
ENGL 101-02 Doomsday Books: Apocalypse and Revolution in English Literature
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Global warming is changing our world, quickly and violently. In this class we will explore how a millennium of English authors responded to prior moments of traumatic change. We will look at invasions, plagues, religious struggles, wars, and economic and environmental transformations. Authors may include the poets of Beowulf and the mystery plays, Langland, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Defoe, Goldsmith, Blake, Shelley, Scott, and Marx. We will learn from how others have faced catastrophe.
1500:TF   EASTC 411
ENGL 101-03 Southern Women Writers
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01. A course in prose written by women of the American South. We will begin with the diary of Mary Chesnut written during the Civil War and continue with notable writers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, which may include Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, Zora Neale Hurston, Ellen Gilchrist, Ellen Douglas, Kaye Gibbons. Some critical and theoretical texts will also be required. Writing assignments will include short explications,longer essays, and an exam. Attendance and participation in class discussion are required.
1330:TF   EASTC 411
ENGL 101-05 Sex, Drugs, and the American Dream: Literature and Culture of the Long Beat Generation
Instructor: Stacey Suver
Course Description:
Amiri Baraka described the Beat Generation as a whole bunch of people, of all different nationalities, who came to the conclusion that society sucked. Allen Ginsberg said it was about obedience to human nature. At its simplest, the Beat Generation was a youth movement in the 1950s centered around poetry, jazz, and personal liberty. This course studies Beat literature and culture and analyzes the work of several Beat writers, including Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, Amiri Baraka, Joyce Johnson, Gregory Corso, and Diane di Prima. We will consider how this movement informed counterculture movements that flourished in subsequent decades, as well as how Beat culture became mainstream. The writers, poets, and playwrights we will study represent diverse viewpoints of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and educational background.
1500:MR   EASTC 411
ENGL 101-06 Narratives of the Long War
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 101-03.Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been defined by a feeling of endlessness. In spite of the drawing down of troops from both nations, the war on terror would seem to hurtle on into the future. Considering the difficulty of public reckoning with a war whose conclusion may be unimaginable we will examine three wars characterized by overextension. In the Vietnam War, Central America's counterinsurgency wars, and the War on Terror, the American public shared an overextended experience of war either in terms of the duration of war and also as an effect of the commitment required to fight them. As a class, we will access the felt experiences of prolonged war through narrativenovels, films, testimonies, and other media forms. More specifically, we will look to works like Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket, Joe Rodriguez's The Oddsplayer, George Cosmatos Rambo: First Blood Part II, Horacio Castellanos-Moya's Senselessness, Tom Junod's "The Falling Man," and Roy Scranton's War Porn. Of these sources, we will ask, what does it mean to live with a war that has no limits or boundaries? How do storytellers manage the difficulty of capturing all-encompassing destruction, an enemy who is largely invisible, or experiences that do not match the national narrative about the war? How do the experiences non-normative sexuality and ethnic / racial disenfranchisement affect the mythology that surrounds American wars?
1500:TF   DENNY 103
ENGL 214-01 Working with Writers: Theory and Practice
Instructor: John Katunich, Noreen Lape
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 214-01.Permissions of Instructor Required. Designed primarily for students who serve as tutors in the Norman M. Eberly Writing Center as well as for future teachers, this course examines how people learn to write from both a theoretical and a hands-on perspective. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of the Writing Program. Designed primarily for students who serve as tutors in the Norman M. Eberly Writing Center as well as for future teachers, this course examines how people learn to write from both a theoretical and a hands-on perspective. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of the Writing Program. This course is cross-listed as WRPG 214.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 08
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 410
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1030:TR   EASTC 301
ENGL 221-01 The Politics of Literacy
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-01. In his autobiographical Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave (1845), Frederick Douglass describes learning to read as the pathway from slavery to freedom. In her memoir of Japanese internment during World War II (2007), Toyo Suyemoto describes running a library and teaching English as efforts of civic education and acts of resistance. In her recent book look (2016), poet Solmaz Sharif protests the war on terror in part by rewriting the United States Department of Defenses Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. Drawing on these and other works across genres, disciplines, and media, this writing-intensive seminar explores how literacy has historically enabled and delimited political agency in the United States. We will study and write about literacy in relation to struggles for human and civil rights, debates about public education, and the emergence of new communications technologies, among other contexts.
0900:TR   EASTC 303
ENGL 222-01 Cookbooks: Craft and Culture
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
This course will consider the cookbook as a literary form and a cultural artifact. Focusing mostly on US texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, we will consider how they reflect issues of temporality, labor, and identity, among other questions. Readings may include work from Bracken, Chao, Jaffrey, Smart-Grosvenor, and Toklas, along with a range of historical and theoretical work from Federici, Shapiro, Tipton-Martin, and others.
1500:MR   EASTC 301
ENGL 222-02 Native American/Indigenous Futurisms and Futurities
Instructor: Nikki Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-02. This course introduces students to the study of Native American literary arts by focusing on Indigenous futurisms and futurities in a select group of related texts from novels and short fiction. To a lesser extent, we will briefly explore Indigenous futurisms as represented in visual arts and film, music and games. We will study manifestations of Indigenous futurisms to explore the ways Native and Indigenous peoples are (re)visioning Indigenous futures that challenge settler colonial futurities. We will discuss the ways Native writers and artists draw on ancestral stories, sacred histories, land-based practices and knowledges to reshape notions of science, of time, of place, and of possibility. And, we will carefully consider the ways gender matters in the visons from Indigenous pasts and futures. This course examines Native theorists and authors, filmmakers and visual/multimedia artists in order to develop an understanding Indigenous futurities and futurisms, and why and how Indigenous futurism operates as a critical strategic negotiation site for the representation of Native and Indigenous peoples.
1230:MWF   DENNY 104
ENGL 300-01 Literary Studies Research Lab
Instructor: Bryan McGeary, Chris Bombaro
Course Description:
This P/F non-credit research course introduces students to research methodology for advanced literary studies. ENGL 300 is a co-requisite with a student's first 300-level literature course taught by English department faculty.
 
ENGL 321-01 The Generational
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
It has long been clich to call a writer the voice of a generation. But this was not always the case, nor is the generational designation as neutral as it might seem in comparison to other markers or claims of identity. This course investigates the emergence of the category of the generation in modern and contemporary transatlantic literatures and cultures. Beginning with poetry of the First World War and concluding with Millennial TV, we will ask: how and why have writers in various forms (essay, novel, poetry) and contexts (national, cultural, historical, social, familial, and political) forged or resisted generational identities? What kinds of belonging do generational projects produce or complicate? For whom? What inclusions and exclusions are licensed by generational thinking? Primary readings will likely include works by: Willa Cather, Jennifer Egan, Ernest Hemingway, Kazuo Ishiguro, John Okada, Wilfred Owen, Ann Petry, Sylvia Plath, and Zadie Smith.
1030:TR   EASTC 314
ENGL 321-02 African American Women Writers
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and WGSS 301-01. This course examines a range of the literary productions written by African American women. Specifically, we will span the African-American literary tradition in order to discover the historical, political, and social forces that facilitated the evolution of Black women's voices as well as their roles inside and outside the Black community. Additionally, we will discuss such issues as self-definition, womanhood, sexuality, activism, race, class, and community.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
ENGL 331-01 Science Fiction: Past, Present, and Future
Instructor: Greg Steirer, Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
How have writers imagined alternative pasts and futures? More specifically, how have writers from around the world imagined these alternatives through science fiction? This course examines the genre of science fiction, focusing on work by a diverse range of authors, which may include Nnedi Okorafor, Robert Heinlein, Robert Sullivan, Zenna Henderson, Priya Sharma, Nick Harkaway, Gerald Vizenor, Dan Simmons, Sofia Samatar, Pauline Hopkins, Nalo Hopkinson, H. P. Lovecraft, and Chang Rae-Lee. We will consider how science fiction has developed as a genre and a writing community, and how these writers have reinforced, challenged, or reframed its evolving norms. Students will engage a range of scholarship on speculative fiction, as well as theories drawn from Genre, Postcolonial, Native American, Critical Race, and Gender and Sexuality Studies, as well as History of the Book. In using these theories as lenses through which to read science fiction, we will analyze how the genre reimagines systems of power tied to race, gender, class, sexuality, technology, business enterprise, and political organization. Given this focus, this course requires especially thoughtful engagement with diverse and difficult points of view. Our classroom will be a space in which you should feel challenged to reexamine your own thinking, while also helping to shape a vibrant and respectful dialogue.
1030:TR   EASTC 411
ENGL 331-02 Angels and Demons on the Early English Stage
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
From the soaring orations of God and the admonitions of angels to the blasphemies and deceptions of devils, the denizens of heaven and hell occupied considerable time and space on the medieval and early modern stage. In the mouths of supernatural beings, playwrights could ask challenging questions about subjects such as religion, government, free will, gendered relationships, personal identity, and the nature of literature. This class will explore these issues through the lens of early English drama, from amateur medieval guilds to the rise of professional public theaters, and will conclude with the study of these early works in performance today. Texts will include medieval cycle and morality plays, Marlowes Doctor Faustus, Shakespeares Othello, and Ben Jonsons The Devil is an Ass.
1330:MR   DENNY 211
ENGL 341-01 Four Early Modern Poets: Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Herbert
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Three of the most admired poets in the English language, Shakespeare, Donne, and Herbert, have been often read, memorized, and mimicked since their publication in the seventeenth century. Mary Wroth, however, remained largely unpublished until the twentieth century and only recently has she been admired and studied. Poetry, and to a great extent literacy, were male-dominated in the seventeenth century, when only women of wealthy families had the chance to learn to read and write. We will examine the cultural context in which these poets wrote and ask to what extent art and our reception of art are governed by cultural forces such as gender, religious controversy, wealth, sexual practice, and biographical circumstance. We will ask: How can we discern whether arguments based upon culture and biography are legitimate? If great art is driven by cultural concerns, then how do we know where these outside issues enter into the texts? Our goal throughout our investigation of the art/culture debate will be to learn techniques of describing and analyzing poems as works of art.
0900:TR   EASTC 301
ENGL 341-02 Jane Austen in Her Time
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-03.This course may count as either a pre-1800 or post-1800 300-level literature class, depending on the student's research. Those students who wish to earn pre-1800 credit must inform me before add/drop is over, and I will inform the registrar and supplement and guide research accordingly. Students must satisfactorily complete the final research paper as a pre-1800 course to receive pre-1800 credit. Here is a rare opportunity to study the whole of a great writer's oeuvre in a single term. We will read all six of Austen's major novels, biographical material, and selected social history with the aim of understanding the cultural conditions described by the novels, and the novels in their cultural context. Students will lead one class discussion, write one research paper, and present an "accomplishment" befitting Austen's milieu: e. g. performing a musical composition, completing a piece of needlework, learning a card game and teaching it to the class, composing a verbal "charade," and the like. In addition, each week, each student will be expected to write and mail one letter (not e mail) to a correspondent of his/her choosing. (The letters may remain private.)
1500:MR   EASTC 314
ENGL 403-01 Keywords for Literary Study
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.We will read literary criticism and theory, grouped around approximately ten key words (examples include "author," "literature," "form," "metaphor," "imagination," "text"). Readings will include both canonical literary criticism from Britain and the Continent (such as Sidney, Burke, Kant, Coleridge, Schiller, Arnold, Woolf) as well as a range of twentieth- and twenty-first century academic approaches (feminist, deconstructionist, critical race, queer, cognitive, material culture.) In the final weeks of class, students will name the key terms and choose the readings.
1330:M   EASTC 303
ENGL 403-02 Literary Studies and the Scholarly Habitus
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.In preparation for the writing of the senior thesis, this course aims to help students develop an advanced understanding of the practice of research in literary studies and related disciplines. Over the course of the semester we will explore how research has been conceptualized at different periods in history, by practitioners of different institutional affiliation, and at different junctures in the evolution of literary studies as a discipline. In exploring these issues, we will also query the concepts of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity themselves, in part by applying them to students own research ideas. By the end of the course, students will have developed an advanced understanding of what scholarly research is, how to practice it, and what it ultimately is for. Primary texts will be determined based upon students interests and prospective thesis topics.
1330:T   EASTC 303