Spring 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 Women Write War
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01. This course studies American womens war writing from the Civil War through the war on terror. Our guiding questions include: what literary forms have women writers adapted or developed to represent war, as well as the social, political, bodily, and emotional effects of armed conflict? How has womens war writing participated in debates about feminism, citizenship, civil and human rights, and the American project? How have women's intersectional experiences and changing social roles impacted the genre of war writing, and vice versa? Primary texts include works of poetry, fiction, and autobiography by Gwendolyn Brooks, Willa Cather, Emily Dickinson, Elyse Fenton, Frances E.W. Harper, Naomi Shihab Nye, Leslie Marmon Silko, Toyo Suyemoto, and Natasha Trethewey.
1330:TF   EASTC 411
ENGL 101-03 Asian American Literature and Popular Culture
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
What happens if we place Asian American writers and cultural produces at the center of American history and culture? This question will guide our examination of 20th and 21st century Asian American poetry, short stories, and novels. Through the work of writers including Ocean Vuong, Carlos Bulosan, Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, John Okada, Nam Le, and l thi diem thy, we will analyze how literary texts articulate diverse experiences of life in America. We will also engage with a selection of cultural texts including films, OpEds, podcasts, and blogs to unpack how Asian American popular culture reimagines American identity. In learning how to close read these texts and situate them in their historical and literary contexts, we will simultaneously examine how systems of power tied to race, gender, class, citizenship, and religion have shaped communities throughout the United States.
1330:MR   EASTC 411
ENGL 101-04 The American Sitcom
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-01. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American televisions most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcoms popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genres strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of public sphere in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.
1500:MR   EASTC 411
ENGL 101-05 Arab American Literature and Culture
Instructor: Stacey Suver
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-05. In his 1926 poem, To Young Americans of Syrian Origin, Gibran Khalil Gibran wrote, I believe that you can say to the founders of this great nation, Here I am, a youth, a young tree whose roots were plucked from the hills of Lebanon, yet I am deeply rooted here, and I would be fruitful. This class takes inspiration from Gibrans arboreal metaphor and studies how contemporary works of Arab-American literature address concepts of rootedness, replanting, and hybridity. We will read examples from various genres including war narratives, immigrant narratives, and speculative fiction to explore how immigration and other border crossings reshape personal, ethnic, and cultural identities. Readings include work by Rabih Alameddine, Rawi Hage, Alicia Erian, Joseph Geha, Amal El-Mohtar, Sara Saab, Omar El Akkad, and Saladin Ahmed.
1130:MWF   EASTC 301
ENGL 101-06 Letters and Literature
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-04.From personal messages sent by post to emails and texts today, correspondence has been an importance source of connection and self-expression. But are personal letters literature? How has the letter form influenced literary texts? And how do letters clarify literary questions of time, material, privacy, and power (among other issues)? This class will read letters and letter-indebted work from the last two and a half centuriesincluding fiction, nonfiction, and poemsto think about what letters are and what letters do.
0900:TR   EASTC 411
ENGL 214-01 Working with Writers: Theory and Practice
Instructor: Noreen Lape
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 214-01.Permission of Instructor Required. Designed primarily for students who serve as tutors in the Norman M. Eberly Writing Center as well as for future teachers, this course examines how people learn to write from both a theoretical and a hands-on perspective. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of the Writing Program. This course is cross-listed as WRPG 214.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1030:TR   EASTC 410
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1500:TF   EASTC 410
ENGL 221-01 Visual Poetry
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-01 and CRWR 219-03. Poetry began as verse recited by bards and scops going from town to town entertaining crowds with history, myths of origin, hymns, and genealogy. Rhythmic and repeating language made poetry an important aid to memory before writing existed. When the German goldsmith Johannes Gutenberg introduced moveable type in 1440 Europe, the printing press could produce around 3500 pages per day, as opposed to the page or two produced by the scribe copying by hand. Mass printing of poetry transformed the focus of the genre. We will discover the myriad ways that poetry and print interact, including through typography, illustration, and design, by looking at artifacts such as broadsides, emblem books, and artists books; by reading scholars and theorists discussing the evolution of poetry and print; by writing and designing our own visual poetry. Prior experience writing poetry will be useful for students taking the class.
1330:W   EASTC 108
ENGL 222-02 The Literature of Money
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-01. The 2007 crisis is thought to have laid to rest widespread assumptions about the ceaseless abundance of financial markets. This faith, it has been argued, is built on fantasies of infinitely compounding abstractions that wager on hypothetical futures and turbulent risk. Fantasies, futures, and abstractions also describe the cultural function of literary texts. This course will examine not only how American literature represents practices like speculation and efforts to monetize risk, but also investigate literature and finance's common practice of producing fictions through an analysis of narrative: novels, film, and other forms of storytelling. Class will begin by examining 19th century novels about land and commodity speculation, but the majority of class will be devoted to literature composed in or about the 1980s and 90s, when financial capitalism is thought to have hit its apex. Fulfills AMST Representation or AMST Structures and Institutions. Cannot fulfill both.
1500:MR   DENNY 304
ENGL 222-03 Of A Beautiful Mind: Literature and Philosophy at Crossroads
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Karegeye
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 261-04 and FREN 362-01. A 2012 New York Times article entitled Is Philosophy Literature? raised the following question: Do people read philosophy for pleasure? The question clearly suggests that the articles author links pleasure to literature. Indeed, in a general manner, literature is understood as a work of aesthetic language and, above all, imagination through its narrative, spatiotemporal, mythical, and symbolic manifestations. There are those who would assert that philosophy is reflection on the whole of reality- the study of ideas about knowledge. In other words, literature refers to the beauty and philosophy suggest reason; however, these distinctions about pleasure and knowledge/rationality are neither radical nor absolute. Conversely, we may explore how literature makes you think and how philosophy delves into interpretation of Literature. While distinct, the two disciplines have always been in dialogue. This course will scrutinize the encounter or dialogue between literary and philosophical texts in light of critical theory, as well as through the examination of case-topics (e.g. moral choices, human freedom, existence, commitment). Readings will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Grard Genette, Paul Ricoeur, Simone de Beauvoir, Aim Csaire, Mudimbe. We will follow three axes: - The discovery of literature as a vehicle for philosophical ideas - A discussion of philosophical content posed by the literature in view - A discussion of critical theories that blend literature and philosophy, including Narratology, (Post-)Structuralism, Phenomenology, Deconstruction, Post colonial and Feminist studies. This course is taught in English. Students from the French department are required to write their papers in French and to meet every three weeks, for an hour, for a Caf philo-littraire that will consist of discussing in French students papers written in French and of revisiting French Theory.
1330:T   ALTHSE 207
ENGL 300-01 Literary Studies Research Lab
Instructor: Chris Bombaro, Bryan McGeary
Course Description:
This P/F non-credit research course introduces students to research methodology for advanced literary studies. ENGL 300 is a co-requisite with a student's first 300-level literature course taught by English department faculty.
 
ENGL 321-01 Literature of Migration & Displacement
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
This course examines contemporary literature that has emerged from complex histories of displacement, migration, war, and exile, and analyzes how these histories continue to shape texts and communities around the world. We will focus on 20th and 21st century literature that spans countries including: Palestine, Syria, Central America, Vietnam, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Our readings may include: Susan Muaddi Darrajs, The Inheritance of Exile (2007); selections from Syria Speaks: Art and Culture from the Frontline (2014), edited by Malu Halasa, Zaher Omareen, and Nawara Mahfoud; Valeri Luisellis Tell Me How it Ends (2017), and Viet Thanh Nguyens The Sympathizer (2016). Guided by Postcolonial and Cultural Studies methodologies, we will examine how race, class, gender, and politics influence the movements of people across the globe.
1500:TF   EASTC 301
ENGL 331-01 Where Do Novels Come From
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Unlike age-old genres such as the lyric, epic, or drama, the novel describes itself as something, well, novel. In this course we will focus on what is new about the novel by reading founding texts of the British novel tradition, with some attention to earlier sources and Continental analogues. Authors will likely include Haywood, Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Equiano, Austen, and Goethe.
1330:TF   BOSLER 314
ENGL 331-02 The Horror Film
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 310-02. In this course, we will examine the genre of the horror film, with particular emphasis placed on post-1960s slasher films. We will ask what thematic structures, formal features, and industrial conventions characterize horror as a cinematic genre. And we will trace the way scholars have studied the genre. Students will gain familiarity in a variety of critical methods, including feminism, queer theory, psychoanalysis, and the sociology of cinema/literature. Primary texts will include Night of the Living Dead, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Sleepaway Camp, Silence of the Lambs, Scream, V/H/S, and American Horror Story.
1030:TR   BOSLER 313
ENGL 341-01 War, Race, and US Literature Since 1945
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
This course studies the inextricable literatures of race and war in the United States since 1945. We will attend equally to how literary forms and critical theories of race and the racial break bear on writing about World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the post-9/11 war on terror. Writers will include Hersey, Inada, Komunyakaa, Morrison, Okada, Phillips, and Silko.
1500:MR   DENNY 315
ENGL 341-02 Shakespeare: Politics/Culture
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
We will read seven plays representing Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories: Much Ado About Nothing, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Measure for Measure, MacBeth, Lear, and The Tempest. We will also view and discuss films of several of these plays by such directors as Branaugh, Casson, Greenaway, Kurosawa, and Noble. The secondary - theoretical - reading for the course will primarily draw upon New Historicist and Cultural Materialist criticism, first practiced in the US by Stephen Greenblatt in his Renaissance Self-Fashioning (1980). Where appropriate, we will also consider contextual and feminist issues. Assignments will include an in-class performance of a scene from one of the plays, a mid-term, a brief close reading essay, and a final research paper.
0900:TR   EASTC 314
ENGL 341-03 Entanglements in the Colonial Americas
Instructor: Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-02.NOTE: Taught in English. This course will encourage students to rethink the traditional nation-centric narratives of British and Spanish American history, according to which the histories and literatures of the two regions developed separately and rarely overlapped. Instead, we will learn just how entangled these histories really were. Students will read both historical and literary texts as we explore how peoples of the Early Americas navigated fluid environments in which multilingual and multicultural experiences were not unusual and helped constitute complex intersectional personal and regional identities. This course ultimately asks students to consider what it meant to be American in such dynamic zones of exchange. The course will be taught in English. Readings will be in both English and Spanish; English translations of Spanish texts will be provided for students enrolling in English 341, who will submit written work in English. Students registering for Spanish 380 are expected to read the Spanish originals and required to submit written work in Spanish.
1500:MR   BOSLER 314
ENGL 404-01 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:M   EASTC 303
ENGL 404-02 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:T   EASTC 303
ENGL 500-01 Journalism and Social Media
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description: