Fall 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 LGBTQ Literature in the US
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01.This course will explore how sex and gender intersect with other forms of difference including race and classin literature by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer-identified (LGBTQ) authors, and authors who present LGBTQ characters and themes in their texts. Students will consider the impact of sexuality and gender on literature and experience. Our readings will include a rage of literary genres, such as essay, poetry, novel, drama, and film and we will focus on the interpretation of texts particularly through the lens of queer theory. Authors may include, among others: Gloria Anzalda, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Rich, Leslie Feinberg, Dorothy Allison, and Audre Lorde.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 08
ENGL 101-04 Southern Women Writers
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-03.A course in prose written by women of the American South. We will begin with the diary of Mary Chesnut written during the Civil War and continue with notable writers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, which may include Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, Zora Neale Hurston, Ellen Gilchrist, Ellen Douglas, Kaye Gibbons. Some critical and theoretical texts will also be required. Writing assignments will include short explications, longer essays, and an exam. Attendance and participation in class discussion are required.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 411
ENGL 101-05 American Television
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-01 and AMST 101-03.Permission of Instructor required.For most of the twentieth centuryand arguably still todayAmerican television has functioned as a form of public sphere, in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality were represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine television from institutional, aesthetic, social, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change and identity. Attention will be given to traditional broadcast television and cable as well as more recent streaming television platforms, such as Netflix, HBO Max, and Disney+.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
EASTC 411
ENGL 101-06 American Television
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-02 and AMST 101-04.Permission of Instructor required.For most of the twentieth centuryand arguably still todayAmerican television has functioned as a form of public sphere, in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality were represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine television from institutional, aesthetic, social, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change and identity. Attention will be given to traditional broadcast television and cable as well as more recent streaming television platforms, such as Netflix, HBO Max, and Disney+.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 411
ENGL 101-07 Women Write War
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-04.This course studies American womens war writing from the US Civil War through the war on terror. We will ask: what literary forms have women writers adapted or developed to represent war, as well as the social, political, bodily, and emotional effects of armed conflict? How has womens war writing participated in debates about feminism, gender identity, citizenship, civil and human rights, and the American project? How have womens lived experiences and changing social roles impacted the diverse genre of war writingand vice versa? Primary texts include works of poetry, fiction, and autobiography by writers including Gwendolyn Brooks, Willa Cather, Emily Dickinson, Elyse Fenton, Frances E.W. Harper, Toni Morrison, Toyo Suyemoto, and Natasha Trethewey.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
EASTC 411
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 411
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 303
ENGL 220-03 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 303
ENGL 221-01 Writing, Identity, & Queer Studies: In & Out, Either/Or, and Everything in Between
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 351-02 and WRPG 211-01.Kate Bornstein writes: "I know I'm not a man...and I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not a woman either. The trouble is, we're living in a world that insists we be one or the other." In this reading and writing intensive course, students will investigate how we approach the space outside of one or the other through literature, film, and narrative more generally. Throughout the semester we will explore and engage critically with established and emerging arguments in queer theory, as well as read and watch texts dealing with issues of identity and identification. Although queer is a contested term, it describesat least potentiallysexualities and genders that fall outside of normative constellations. Students will learn how to summarize and engage with arguments, and to craft and insert their own voice into the ongoing debates about the efficacy of queer theory and queer studies. Moreover, well take on questions that relate word to world in order to ask: How might our theory productively intervene in LGBTQ civil rights discourse outside our classroom? How do we define queer and is it necessarily attached to sexual orientation? How do our own histories and narratives intersect with the works we analyze? Our course texts will pull from a range of genres including graphic novels, film, poetry, memoir, and fiction. Some texts may include Alison Bechdels Fun Home, Audre Lordes Zami, Jackie Kay's Trumpet, David Sedaris _Me Talk Pretty One Day_, and films such as _Paris is Burning_ and _Boys Dont Cry_.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
EASTC 410
ENGL 222-01 English Literary Histories
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
This class has two major components: first, it is a survey of the history of British literature. We will read representative major works from the Anglo-Saxon period to the twentieth century: authors may include the Gawain poet, Shakespeare, Milton, Austen, Conan Doyle, Woolf, and Ishiguro. Second, this class is a critical exploration of the idea of literary history. What does it mean to divide literature into periods? What is gained--and what is lost or left out--when we use concepts like "tradition" or "canon" to think about writing? Critics and theorists may include Wordsworth, Eliot, Bourdieu, Guillory, and Underwood.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 301
ENGL 321-01 The Generational
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
It is clich to call a writer the voice of a generation. But this was not always the case, nor is the generational designation ever as neutral as it might seem in comparison to other markers and claims of identity. This course investigates the emergence of the category of the generation in modern and contemporary fiction and poetry, mostly of the US. Beginning with poetry of the First World War and concluding with students generational selections, we will ask: how and why have writers in various forms (novel, poetry, essay) and contexts (national, cultural, historical, social, familial, and political) forged or resisted generational identities? What kinds of belonging do generational projects produce or complicate? For whom? What inclusions and exclusions are licensed by generational thinking? Primary readings will likely include works by Willa Cather, Zora Neale Hurston, John Okada, Wilfred Owen, Colson Whitehead, and Zadie Smith, among others.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 110
ENGL 331-01 The 19th Century Novel
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
The American writer Henry James notoriously referred to novels of the nineteenth century as large, loose, baggy monsters. This course focuses on the genre of the novel to study its form, and its function within the nineteenth-century imagination. Specifically, we will consider the nineteenth-century novel as an attempt to reflect and imagine society as a sprawling network through which individuals move and develop. Our focus will be on serialization and narrative structure as indicative of genre (sensation novel/ detective novel/ marriage plot), and our texts will include works by both British and American and authors. Writers may include, among others, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, and Wilkie Collins, as well as Henry James, James Fennimore Cooper, Washington Irving, and E.D.E.N. Southworth.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 301
ENGL 331-02 Medieval Romance
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
In the Middle Ages, "romance" became the name for stories written in the vernacular that chronicled the adventures of an aristocratic hero. Romance as a genre evolved to both romanticize and critique the lives of the aristocracy, symbolized in the heroic knight (or princess in disguise), the quest, and the search for the Holy Grail. It also became the medium through which authors and readers explored and subverted issues of class, gender, sexuality, and national identity. In this class, we will explore these complex issues through the lens of this most popular of medieval genres.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 311
ENGL 341-01 Early Modern Lyric
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in England generally are recognized as the Golden Age of the lyricthe shortpoem. We will begin our reading of the sixteenth-century poem with adaptations of Petrarchan sonnets by Wyatt and Surrey, and move to the mastery of the form by Sidney and Spencer. The seventeenth century begins with the revival of the sonnet by Shakespeare, and includes brilliant passionate poems declaiming the love of God and the love of women and men by Herbert, Donne, Wroth, Marvell, and others. In addition to learning the techniques of describing and analyzing these poems aesthetically, we will also discuss the cultural contexts in which our poets lived. Our objective will be to interrogate T.S. Eliots assertion, early in the twentieth century, that a lyric poem is the voice of the poet speaking to himself or nobody. As we read and discuss we will ask ourselves, both consciously and unconsciously, how private or how porous brief poems might be. Can artists write in a vacuum, as Eliot implies, alienated from political and financial directives, keeping their work pure and unsullied? Instead, if great art is to some extent driven by cultural concerns, such as religious controversy, struggles to define and defend the monarchy, and incipient women's rights, then how do we know where these outside issues enter into the art?
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 301
ENGL 403-01 Eudora Welty: Fiction, Photography, and the Southern Experience
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
The liveliness of Eudora Welty scholarship at her 2009 centennial shows Welty to be among the pantheon of American writers, one of the masters of the short story. Known from the beginning of her career in the late 1930s for its humorous and poignant depictions of life in rural Mississippi during the depression, Welty's work recently has been examined under the lenses of political and cultural criticism, and has been read compellingly as a part of the feminist canon. We will consider Welty's formal mastery as a writer of fiction, as well as reading her from post-structuralist critical points of view. We will also become familiar with the culture of the rural south, using as our starting point the fabulous photographs that Welty took during the depression.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
EASTC 303
ENGL 403-02 Questions and Methods of Literary Studies
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. In preparation for the Senior Thesis Workshop, this course will examine several important methods of writing, research, and analysis in literary studies. We will explore how critical conversations have developed and evolved within the discipline, and how they can help you shape your own research and writing. Our course will be anchored in a primary textChinua Achebes classic novel of African and world literature, Things Fall Apart (1958)through which we will engage, among others, postcolonial, critical race, and cultural studies approaches to literary studies. Students will begin to formulate ideas about their own research interests while also building vital writing and analytical skills grounded in the diverse methodologies of our discipline.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, M
EASTC 303
ENGL 500-01 Advanced Seminar in American Television
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:

ENGL 500-02 The Methodology of Fan Studies
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description: