Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 Letters and Literature
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-02. From personal messages sent by post to emails and texts today, correspondence has been an importance source of connection and self-expression. But are personal letters literature? How has the letter form influenced literary texts? And how do letters clarify literary questions of time, material, privacy, and power (among other issues)? This class will read letters and letter-indebted work from the last two and a half centuriesincluding fiction, nonfiction, and poemsto think about what letters are and what letters do.
1500:TF   ALTHSE 201
ENGL 101-02 Arab American Literature and Culture
Instructor: Stacey Suver
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-04. In his 1926 poem, To Young Americans of Syrian Origin, Gibran Khalil Gibran wrote, I believe that you can say to the founders of this great nation, Here I am, a youth, a young tree whose roots were plucked from the hills of Lebanon, yet I am deeply rooted here, and I would be fruitful. This class takes inspiration from Gibrans arboreal metaphor and studies how contemporary works of Arab-American literature address concepts of rootedness, replanting, and hybridity. We will read examples from various genres including war narratives, immigrant narratives, and speculative fiction to explore how immigration and other border crossings reshape personal, ethnic, and cultural identities. Readings include work by Rabih Alameddine, Rawi Hage, Alicia Erian, Joseph Geha, Amal El-Mohtar, Sara Saab, Omar El Akkad, and Saladin Ahmed.
1330:TF   EASTC 314
ENGL 101-03 Storytelling Across Media
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-03. As human beings, we encounter stories everywhere: not only in literature, comic books, and film; but also in our myths and religions, our personal and national histories, our career plans, and our politicseven our everyday conversations. Almost all aspects of social life, in fact, depend upon storytelling, a fact that has led some theorists to suggest that the ability to create and understand stories is one of the defining features of human beings as a species. But how does storytelling work? What are its underlying rules and structures? And how do stories differ across different media? This course will introduce students to the study of storytelling (sometimes called narratology) through the examination of stories in multiple media, including literature, film, and video games.
1500:MR   DIST
ENGL 101-04 U.S. Women Writers
Instructor: Donna Bickford
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01.Prior to Spring Break: For on-campus students: Class will be held in person on Tuesdays, with asynchronous activities on Thursdays. For remote students: There will be asynchronous activities on Tuesdays and class will be held synchronously on Zoom on Thursdays. After Spring Break: students will continue to have one synchronous session each week on the same day of the week as before Break (for on-campus students: There will be asynchronous activities on Tuesdays and class will be held in person on Thursdays. For remote students: Class will be held synchronously on Zoom on Tuesdays and there will be asynchronous activities on Thursdays). It starts when you care to act, Marge Piercy writes in her poem The Low Road. What kinds of actions are of interest to contemporary US women writers? Well read and analyze novels, short stories, and poetry, with particular attention to thematic issues and socio-historical context. Topics we might explore include the construction of the female body, sexuality and desire, motherhood, exile and immigration, work, creative production, social activism, etc. In addition, well be thinking about multiple and intersecting identities.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 204
ENGL 101-05 In the Shadows: Global Contemporary Literary Horror
Instructor: Elise Levine
Course Description:
From depictions of supernatural dread to the ills that humans wreak upon each other and the environment, contemporary horror fiction offers ways of looking without flinching. In thinking about how wrong things can go, horror can offer explorations of control, power, manipulation, and mental illness, serving as psychological study and social critique while delivering the thrills and chills. In this course we will read works of fiction by global contemporary writers including Mariana Enriquez (Argentina), Yoko Ogawa (Japan), Helen Oyeyemi (Britain), Samanta Schweblin (Argentina), Ahmed Sadaawi (Iraq), Stephen Graham Jones (US), Ben Okri (Nigeria), Daisy Johnson (Britain), Brian Evenson (US).
1330:MR   DIST
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1030:TR   STERN 102
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 08
ENGL 221-01 Writing, Identity, & Queer Studies: In & Out, Either/Or, and Everything in Between
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-03 and WRPG 211-01. Kate Bornstein writes: "I know I'm not a man...and I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not a woman either. The trouble is, we're living in a world that insists we be one or the other." In this reading and writing intensive course, students will investigate how we approach the space outside of one or the other through literature, film, and narrative more generally. Throughout the semester we will explore and engage critically with established and emerging arguments in queer theory, as well as read and watch texts dealing with issues of identity and identification. Although queer is a contested term, it describesat least potentiallysexualities and genders that fall outside of normative constellations. Students will learn how to summarize and engage with arguments, and to craft and insert their own voice into the ongoing debates about the efficacy of queer theory and queer studies. Moreover, well take on questions that relate word to world in order to ask: How might our theory productively intervene in LGBTQ civil rights discourse outside our classroom? How do we define queer and is it necessarily attached to sexual orientation? How do our own histories and narratives intersect with the works we analyze? Our course texts will pull from a range of genres including graphic novels, film, poetry, memoir, and fiction. Some texts may include Alison Bechdels Fun Home, Audre Lordes Zami, Jackie Kay's Trumpet, David Sedaris _Me Talk Pretty One Day_, and films such as _Paris is Burning_ and _Boys Dont Cry_.
1330:MR   STERN 102
ENGL 222-01 Women of the Middle East: Stories of Resistance
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-02, MEST 200-03 and WGSS 201-02.Monday -- synchronous in person instructions; Thursday -- online synchronous instruction. The condition of women writers in post-colonial, predominantly Arab countries is heavily marked by the dual legacy of the region's Muslim heritage and the cultural imprint of former colonizers, which are intertwined with ethnic, religious, linguistic and other differences that in varying ways traverse the region as a whole. The tensions associated with these differences erupted in wars in some countries and violence and discrimination against women in some others. Several women writers stood up against injustice and sexism by writing to defend women's rights and render justice. Their writing served to bear witness and preserve the victim's memory. This class focuses on narratives (texts and films) from the following countries: Algeria, Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon.
1330:R   DIST
1330:M   ALTHSE 201
ENGL 222-03 Women of the Middle East: Stories of Resistance
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-03, MEST 200-06 and WGSS 201-05.Monday -- synchronous in person instructions; Thursday -- online synchronous instruction. The condition of women writers in post-colonial, predominantly Arab countries is heavily marked by the dual legacy of the region's Muslim heritage and the cultural imprint of former colonizers, which are intertwined with ethnic, religious, linguistic and other differences that in varying ways traverse the region as a whole. The tensions associated with these differences erupted in wars in some countries and violence and discrimination against women in some others. Several women writers stood up against injustice and sexism by writing to defend women's rights and render justice. Their writing served to bear witness and preserve the victim's memory. This class focuses on narratives (texts and films) from the following countries: Algeria, Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon.
1500:R   DIST
1500:M   ALTHSE 201
ENGL 300-01 Literary Studies Research Lab
Instructor: Chris Bombaro
Course Description:
This P/F non-credit research course introduces students to research methodology for advanced literary studies. ENGL 300 is a co-requisite with a student's first 300-level literature course taught by English department faculty.
  DIST
ENGL 321-01 LGBTQ Literature
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-01. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) literature and culture in the United States. The course moves among literary, historical, and theoretical texts to address questions of sex, gender, and sexuality as they shape queer American identities, communities, and cultures. Drawing from queer theory, feminist and queer historicism, and feminist and queer literary analysis, students will consider the impact of sexuality and gender on literature and culture. We will pay particular attention to how sex and gender intersect with other forms of difference, including race, class, geography, and nationality. Primary readings will be drawn from a range of literary genres and archival sources.
1500:MR   STERN 102
ENGL 321-02 James Baldwin Studies Renaissance: Reflections of a Radical
Instructor: Nadia Alahmed
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01. This is an interdisciplinary seminar that seeks to explore the different sides of James Baldwin: a writer, an intellectual, a cosmopolitan, a radical, and an activist. The seminar will focus on James Baldwin's essays, in addition to his major novels and works of fiction. We will watch the recent, highly acclaimed film based on his writings, "I am not your Negro" as well as his speeches and debates with prolific figures like Malcolm X. Finally, we will explore Baldwin's invaluable contributions to the discourses on Queer Studies, critical race theory, class, philosophy, and above all, his visions of Black liberation and the meaning of freedom.
1330:TF   DIST
ENGL 331-01 Shakespeare and Tragedy
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
An exploration of tragedy through primary texts (Sophocles, Euripides, above all Shakespeare), canonical theories (Aristotle, Hegel, Frye) and recent critical discussions (Rowan Williams, Blair Hoxby, Joshua Billings)
0900:TR   DIST
ENGL 331-02 The Russian Novel
Instructor: Alyssa DeBlasio
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RUSS 260-01. Russian literature is known for its novels. More specifically, Russian literature is known for its long, philosophical novels: those structurally and existentially dense works in the thousands of pages, which Henry James described as large, loose, baggy monsters. And yet, 19th century Russian novels by Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Gogol, and Tolstoy regularly appear on lists of the best literary works of all times. In this course, we will delve into a selection of Russian novels that have shaped both Russian culture and world literature. We will ask questions like: Where does the Russian novelistic tradition come from, how does it differ from other European longform traditions, and what exactly is a novel anyway? We will consider why the philosophical novel has become synonymous with Russian writing, trace the development of the novel over the course of the 19th century, and examine the ways the novel might be especially well suited to reflect the complexity of human conscious experience. No knowledge of Russian required. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH
1330:TF   BOSLER 314
ENGL 341-01 The Bloomsbury Group
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
"The Bloomsbury Group" is the title literary critics have assigned a group of friends--writers, artists, and activists--who forged British modernism in a variety of genres at the turn of the 20th century. The name comes from an area in London, near the University of London, where they moved as young adults to live independently and communally; some of the members of the group repudiated the label, but not the concept of an artistic "circle" of friends. We will read fiction and non-fiction by Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, Lytton Strachey, and J.M. Keynes; and look at art by Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and Roger Fry.
1030:TR   DIST
ENGL 341-02 Dante's Divine Comedy
Instructor: James McMenamin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ITAL 322-01. This topics course is on Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy. Although a special focus will be placed on the Inferno, which will be read in its entirety, various cantos from Purgatorio and Paradiso will also be studied. Aiding the students along their journey through Hell and beyond will be critical readings that consider the historical, social, cultural and literary context of the period. The poem will be read in English translation. Italian Studies majors, Italian minors and INBM majors using this course to satisfy major/minor requirements will attend a discussion group in Italian and will write their papers in Italian. Upon successful completion of the work in Italian, students will receive a FLIC: Italian notation on their transcript. Prerequisites: 231 if taken as Italian FLIC; none, if taking the English only portion. . Does not count toward pre- or post-1800 English courses.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 207
ENGL 341-03 Words and Worlds: Imagining Science in the French Enlightenment
Instructor: Hanna Roman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-01.Tuesday -- online/synchronous; Friday -- on campus/synchronous. The French Enlightenment has long been thought of as an age of science and reason, when literature split off from more technical-minded, objective disciplines. However, many important ideas and events in the history of science were invented, developed, and criticized through the imaginative and poetic voices of literature. This course takes a long perspective on the French Enlightenment, tracing how a period of scientific revolution, discovery, colonization, secularization, and industrialization (roughly 1650-1850) was imagined, described, and criticized in works of literature and philosophy. These works include not only expected and recognizable forms of literature such as science fiction but also other forms of world-building and creativity such as philosophical treatises, thought experiments, imaginary and real accounts of voyages, books of natural and earth history, and encyclopedic endeavors. This course will explore the inseparability of science and literature through themes such as race and colonization, anthropology, natural history, climate, voyages, and technology. Readings, assignments, and discussions for this class are in English. However, as this is a FLIC course, there is an option for students with the ability to read advanced French/French majors to complete readings and assignments in French. Does not count toward pre- or post-1800 English courses.
1330:F   HUB SOC HALL E
1330:T   DIST
ENGL 404-01 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:R   DIST
ENGL 404-02 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:W   EASTC 411