Spring 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 Asian American Literature and Popular Culture
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
What happens if we place Asian American writers and cultural produces at the center of American history and culture? This question will guide our examination of 20th and 21st century Asian American poetry, short stories, and novels. Through the work of writers including Ocean Vuong, Carlos Bulosan, Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, John Okada, Nam Le, and l thi diem thy, we will analyze how literary texts articulate diverse experiences of life in America. We will also engage with a selection of cultural texts including films, OpEds, podcasts, and blogs to unpack how Asian American popular culture reimagines American identity. In learning how to close read these texts and situate them in their historical and literary contexts, we will simultaneously examine how systems of power tied to race, gender, class, citizenship, and religion have shaped communities throughout the United States.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 314
ENGL 101-03 The American Comic Book
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-04. This course explores the history, aesthetics, and business aspects of the American comic book. Attention will also be given to the comic books relationship with other media, such as animation and live-action film.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
EASTC 411
ENGL 101-04 The American Comic Book
Instructor: Greg Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-05. This course explores the history, aesthetics, and business aspects of the American comic book. Attention will also be given to the comic books relationship with other media, such as animation and live-action film.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 411
ENGL 101-05 Arab American Literature and Culture
Instructor: Stacey Suver
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-01. In his 1926 poem, To Young Americans of Syrian Origin, Gibran Khalil Gibran wrote, I believe that you can say to the founders of this great nation, Here I am, a youth, a young tree whose roots were plucked from the hills of Lebanon, yet I am deeply rooted here, and I would be fruitful. This class takes inspiration from Gibrans arboreal metaphor and studies how contemporary works of Arab-American literature address concepts of rootedness, replanting, and hybridity. We will read examples from various genres including war narratives, immigrant narratives, and speculative fiction to explore how immigration and other border crossings reshape personal, ethnic, and cultural identities. Readings include work by Rabih Alameddine, Rawi Hage, Alicia Erian, Joseph Geha, Amal El-Mohtar, Sara Saab, Omar El Akkad, and Saladin Ahmed.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 411
ENGL 101-06 U.S. Women Writers
Instructor: Donna Bickford
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 121-01. It starts when you care to act, Marge Piercy writes in her poem The Low Road. What kinds of actions are of interest to contemporary US women writers? Well read and analyze novels, short stories, and poetry, with particular attention to thematic issues and socio-historical context. Topics we might explore include the construction of the female body, sexuality and desire, motherhood, exile and immigration, work, creative production, social activism, etc. In addition, well be thinking about multiple and intersecting identities.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 311
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 410
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 303
ENGL 220-03 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. Prerequisite: 101. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 410
ENGL 221-01 Visual Poetry
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CRWR 219-01 and WRPG 211-01. Poetry began as verse recited by bards and scops going from town to town entertaining crowds with history, myths of origin, hymns, and genealogy. Rhythmic and repeating language made poetry an important aid to memory before writing existed. When the German goldsmith Johannes Gutenberg introduced moveable type in 1440 Europe, the printing press could produce around 3500 pages per day, as opposed to the page or two produced by the scribe copying by hand. Mass printing of poetry transformed the focus of the genre. We will discover the myriad ways that poetry and print interact, including through typography, illustration, and design, by looking at artifacts such as broadsides, emblem books, and artists books; by reading scholars and theorists discussing the evolution of poetry and print; by writing and designing our own visual poetry. Prior experience writing poetry will be useful for students taking the class.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
EASTC 108
ENGL 222-01 Plague Years: Influenza, Polio, and American Memory
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-04.This course studies the literature and culture of two public health crises: the influenza pandemic of 1918-19 and the polio epidemics that began in the 1890s. How were the flu and polio represented in (mostly) US literary and popular culture? How did a range of textspopular novels, womens magazines, African American newspapers, filmsconsolidate or challenge the stories that the US preferred to tell itself about the influenza pandemic and its national vaccine victory over polio? How can the contested political and cultural legacies of the flu and polio help us to think about both public discourse around COVID-19 and the social inequities laid bare by the pandemic? As it pursues these questions, Plague Years introduces students to the interdisciplinary fields of the health humanities and disability studies. Its core literary texts include fiction by James Baldwin, Willa Cather, and Katherine Anne Porter, as well as 1960-70s anti-imperialist rewritings of the flu and polio by Buchi Emecheta and J.G. Farrell.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 314
ENGL 222-02 Life Writing
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-05.Life writing encompasses a range of forms from biography to obituary, from memoir to cultural history. Well read imaginative examples that pose and test the big questions of self, being, and identity. Who deserves a life? Is a life psychological, philosophical, cultural, singular? How stable is a personal identity, and who decides? What is the truth of a life in a memoir and in a biography? Well write and research creative non-fiction in a variety of forms. Our people will include Robert Caro and Richard Holmes, Claudia Rankine and Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster and M.L. King, Montaigne and Maggie OFarrell.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
EASTC 108
ENGL 300-01 Literary Studies Research Lab
Instructor: Chris Bombaro
Course Description:
This P/F non-credit research course introduces students to research methodology for advanced literary studies. ENGL 300 is a co-requisite with a student's first 300-level literature course taught by English department faculty.Pre-requisite: ENGL 220, may be taken concurrently.

ENGL 311-01 Revolutionary Milton
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-02.John Milton at times emerges in the popular imagination as the benign Christian poet of Paradise Lost. While Paradise Lost is a Biblical epic poem about the fall of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, Milton addresses in the poem polemical subjects such as the role and place of women in an ideal society; the relationship between God and Christ the Son; the question of personal responsibility; the role of monarchy and religion in the state; the idea of a republic. Paradise Lost, along with the Bible, was one of the most frequently read books in Colonial America, and we have in our archive Benjamin Rush's copy of Paradise Lost. In addition we also have first editions of Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, and other beautiful and significant Milton volumes. Our study of these editions will show Milton's understanding and manipulation of the press and censorship, and suggest how Milton the revolutionary came to be recognized as one of the greatest poets in the English language.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
EASTC 314
ENGL 321-01 Literature of Migration & Displacement
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
This course examines contemporary literature that has emerged from complex histories of displacement, migration, war, and exile, and analyzes how these histories continue to shape texts and communities around the world. We will focus on 20th and 21st century literature that spans countries including: Palestine, Syria, Central America, Vietnam, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Our readings may include: Susan Muaddi Darrajs, The Inheritance of Exile (2007); selections from Syria Speaks: Art and Culture from the Frontline (2014), edited by Malu Halasa, Zaher Omareen, and Nawara Mahfoud; Valeri Luisellis Tell Me How it Ends (2017), and Viet Thanh Nguyens The Sympathizer (2016). Guided by Postcolonial and Cultural Studies methodologies, we will examine how race, class, gender, and politics influence the movements of people across the globe.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 301
ENGL 321-03 James Baldwin Studies Renaissance: Reflections of a Radical
Instructor: Nadia Alahmed
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01. This is an interdisciplinary seminar that seeks to explore the different sides of James Baldwin: a writer, an intellectual, a cosmopolitan, a radical, and an activist. The seminar will focus on James Baldwin's essays, in addition to his major novels and works of fiction. We will watch the recent, highly acclaimed film based on his writings, "I am not your Negro" as well as his speeches and debates with prolific figures like Malcolm X. Finally, we will explore Baldwin's invaluable contributions to the discourses on Queer Studies, critical race theory, class, philosophy, and above all, his visions of Black liberation and the meaning of freedom.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 207
ENGL 321-04 Women of the Middle East: Stories of Resistance
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-02 and MEST 221-01 and WGSS 221-01. The condition of women writers in post-colonial, predominantly Arab countries is heavily marked by the dual legacy of the region's Muslim heritage and the cultural imprint of former colonizers, which are intertwined with ethnic, religious, linguistic and other differences that in varying ways traverse the region as a whole. The tensions associated with these differences erupted in wars in some countries and violence and discrimination against women in some others. Several women writers stood up against injustice and sexism by writing to defend women's rights and render justice. Their writing served to bear witness and preserve the victim's memory. This class focuses on narratives (texts and films) from the following countries: Algeria, Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
STUART 1104
ENGL 321-05 Mapping the Global Middle Ages
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-03.From England to Jerusalem, Morocco to Rome, Ireland to India, the medieval traveler encountered and came to terms with varieties of cultures, religions, and races. The maps and written records of these travelers, both imagined and real, inspired the imaginations of their contemporaries and helped shape larger cultural narratives about nationalism, religion, and personal identity. This course will examine medieval maps and travel narratives from 1000-1500 CE in order to better understand the diverse cultural work performed by reports of encounters with other cultures. How did these travel narratives strengthen or question faith, critique or support nationalism, and establish or sustain gendered and racial identities?
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
EASTC 301
ENGL 331-01 US Poetry of Modernist Era
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
This course examines U.S. poetry of the first four decades of the twentieth century, focusing on how authors experimented with new forms and techniques of verse writing to engage with changing social and political conditions. Authors studied may include T. S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Langston Hughes, Marianne Moore, and Muriel Rukeyser.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
EASTC 314
ENGL 341-01 The Start of the Anthropocene? Environment and Sustainability in Enlightenment France
Instructor: Hanna Roman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-01.Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Toulouse. Scientists today often attribute the beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the Anthropocene, to changes in culture, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What were the intellectual and philosophical ideas behind these changes, and how did they contribute to modern-day conceptions of the natural environment and the human role within it? What did questions of sustainability and climate change look like in the eighteenth century? This seminar will address these sustainability-themed questions through the lens of the literature of Enlightenment France, which imagined new ways of perceiving and altering nature. It will engage with the Enlightenment movement as both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction of both natural and human environments. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful to our contemporary understandings of sustainability and which have become harmful to the future of our species and planet. Readings include works of fiction, philosophy, natural history, and science fiction by famous Enlightenment authors such as Diderot, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Voltaire, as well as by less well-known, but equally important, voices such as Bernadin de Saint-Pierre, Mme de Graffigny, and Quesnay. Field trips to the Dickinson Farm, to natural areas around Carlisle, to rare books collections, and an optional GIS portion of the class focusing on foodways in Toulouse, France, are also part of the course. Readings, assignments, and discussions for this class are in English. As a FLIC course, students with the ability to read advanced French as well as French majors can complete readings and assignments in French. If you are a FFS major, you must enroll in the FLIC/FR section of the class (not the English section).
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 104
ENGL 351-01 Dante's Divine Comedy
Instructor: James McMenamin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ITAL 322-01. This topics course is on Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy. Although a special focus will be placed on the Inferno, which will be read in its entirety, various cantos from Purgatorio and Paradiso will also be studied. Aiding the students along their journey through Hell and beyond will be critical readings that consider the historical, social, cultural and literary context of the period. The poem will be read in English translation. Italian Studies majors, Italian minors and INBM majors using this course to satisfy major/minor requirements will attend a discussion group in Italian and will write their papers in Italian. Upon successful completion of the work in Italian, students will receive a FLIC: Italian notation on their transcript. Prerequisites: 231 if taken as Italian FLIC; none, if taking the English only portion.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 314
ENGL 404-01 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
EASTC 303
ENGL 404-02 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
EASTC 303