Fall 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 111-01 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Xiaozhou Ding
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 201
ECON 111-02 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 317
ECON 111-03 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 317
ECON 111-04 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 201
ECON 111-05 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 201
ECON 111-06 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Nicky Tynan
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 204
ECON 111-07 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Nicky Tynan
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 204
ECON 112-02 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
ECON 112-03 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
ECON 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 110
ECON 222-02 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 110
ECON 226-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 200-01. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200. The course introduces economic theory that builds on ideas from introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. It uses that theory as a framework for examining developments in the changing global system. Developments include the revolution in information technology; the dynamics of human population growth; the implications of climate change; challenges to human security; and emerging patterns of organizational interdependence and collaboration. Those developments provide the context for business managers and for government officials responsible for shaping strategies and implementing policies. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 200.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
ALTHSE 207
ECON 228-01 Economic Analysis of Policy
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 109
ECON 228-02 Economic Analysis of Policy
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 109
ECON 240-01 International Development
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 240-01 and INBM 300-09. This course examines the challenges and strategies of economic development, with a detailed focus on how households behave. The goal is to provide an understanding of what life for poor households in developing countries is like, what can be done about it, and an idea of how valuable insights can be gained using standard economic tools and thinking. In addition to learning about theoretical models and real-life examples, we will spend significant time understanding recent research on development problems. Issues examined include: poverty measures, health issues such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and undernutrition, economic growth, agriculture, land use, technology adoption, foreign aid, credits, child labor, child education, migration, and measures of inequality. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112. This course is cross-listed as INST 240.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
ALTHSE 207
ECON 268-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Instructor: Paul Ko
Course Description:
Neoclassical theories of economic behavior in the aggregate. Models will be used as a framework for analyzing the determination of the level of national output and for explaining fluctuations in employment, the price level, interest rates, productivity, and the rate of economic growth. Policy proposals will be appraised. Prerequisite: 111 and 112; MATH 170.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 207
ECON 268-02 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Instructor: Paul Ko
Course Description:
Neoclassical theories of economic behavior in the aggregate. Models will be used as a framework for analyzing the determination of the level of national output and for explaining fluctuations in employment, the price level, interest rates, productivity, and the rate of economic growth. Policy proposals will be appraised. Prerequisite: 111 and 112; MATH 170.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 207
ECON 278-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
Instructor: Xiaozhou Ding
Course Description:
Neoclassical theory of relative prices of commodities and productive services under perfect and imperfect competition. The role of prices in the allocation and distribution of resources and commodities. Economic behavior of individual economic units like consumers, firms, and resource owners. Prerequisite: 111 and MATH 170.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 201
ECON 288-01 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 207
ECON 298-01 Econometrics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to econometrics in which the tools of economic theory, mathematics, and statistical inference are applied to the analysis of economic data. Students will develop foundational knowledge of applied statistics and econometrics through exploration of empirical techniques relevant to quantitative economics including probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, modeling, simple and multiple linear regression analysis, and time series analysis. In addition, this course will cover basic extensions of a multiple linear regression model such as dummy variables and interaction terms. Students will use Stata, or other statistical analysis software widely used in economics, to understand and apply empirical work.Prerequisite: 111, 112, MATH 170, and MATH 121 (or INBM 220 or MATH 225)
12:30 PM-01:20 PM, MWF
STERN 11
ECON 314-01 Political Economy of Neoliberalism: Past, Present, Future
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
This course explores the political economy of neoliberalism. We will examine neoliberal thinkers and ideas from the past, the present, and examine the debates about the neoliberalism of the future. Topics we will explore in detail include: The debate over economic planning, the debate over the welfare state and a universal basic income, the controversy over neoliberal involvement in Pinochets Chile, and the work by the critics of neoliberalism. The course is reading intensive. Works we will read include the original transcripts of the discussions and debates that took place at the initial meeting of the Mont Pelerin Society in 1947; the literature relating to the debate over F. A. Hayeks Road to Serfdom; Milton Friedmans Capitalism and Freedom Buchanan and Tullocks Calculus of Consent; and the work of contemporary critics of neoliberal doctrine (e.g., Nancy MacLean).
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 317
ECON 314-02 Trade, Globalization, and Open-Economy Macroeconomics
Instructor: Paul Ko
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-02.This course analyzes the causes and consequences of international trade in the United States and global economy. In this course, we will ask questions such as: Why do nations trade and what do they trade? How beneficial or costly is trade to our lives? How is trade recorded in history and how did it reshape the world? We will also touch upon contemporary theories of international trade and how economists build international trade models. We will further explore and analyze trade policies and contemporary trade disputes, tariffs and protectionism, effects of economic integration, effects of trade on economic growth and inequality, and the rise of multinational firms. Concepts and methodologies from diverse areas, including macroeconomics, microeconomics, and political science will be relevant. This course puts emphasis on quantitative (theoretical and empirical) skills to understand various international trade and macroeconomic models and to analyze different types of macroeconomic and trade data.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 110
ECON 351-01 Gender and Development
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 351-01 and WGSS 302-01. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as INST 351& WGSS 302.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 206
ECON 500-01 International Development: Research on Developing Countries
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:

ECON 500-02 Economics of Energy Systems
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:

ECON 500-03 Trade Shocks and the Gender Gap in Education
Instructor: Xiaozhou Ding
Course Description:

ECON 550-01 Impact of Trade Shocks
Instructor: Xiaozhou Ding
Course Description:

ECON 550-02 Economics Honors Thesis
Instructor: Xiaozhou Ding
Course Description:

ECON 560-04 The Impact of Covid-induced Inflation on Burkina Faso
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description: