Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 111-02 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Sohani Fatehin
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 204
ECON 111-03 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Sohani Fatehin
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 204
ECON 112-01 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 112-02 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 112-03 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 112-04 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 112-05 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1500:TF   DENNY 317
ECON 214-02 Sports Economics
Instructor: Thomas Woodbury
Course Description:
Economic analysis of professional and amateur sports teams, leagues, and institutions. Topics include antitrust issues, public funding of sports venues, labor relations, referee/umpire bias, player drafts, athlete compensation, wagering markets, competitive balance, cheating, and the general application of economic principles to sport settings and events. Prerequisite: ECON 111.
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 110
ECON 214-03 Introduction to Economics of Food Security in South Africa
Instructor: Maxwell Mudhara
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FDST 250-02. This course will introduce the concept of food security, investigating what food security means, who is vulnerable, and how it is measured. We will examine food security from a national, regional, and household/individual level and discuss its connections to gender, agriculture, and climate change. Students will learn about the policies, strategies, programs, and projects currently in place to handle food access, availability, utilization, and stability and will suggest and evaluate possible solutions to food insecurity. Prerequisite: ECON 111.
1030:MWF   DENNY 203
ECON 214-04 Sports Economics
Instructor: Thomas Woodbury
Course Description:
Economic analysis of professional and amateur sports teams, leagues, and institutions. Topics include antitrust issues, public funding of sports venues, labor relations, referee/umpire bias, player drafts, athlete compensation, wagering markets, competitive balance, cheating, and the general application of economic principles to sport settings and events. Prerequisite: ECON 111.
0930:MWF   STERN 103
ECON 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Nicola Tynan
Course Description:
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111. A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 228-01 Economic Analysis of Policy
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor. This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.
1330:W   ALTHSE 109
ECON 268-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Instructor: Emily Marshall
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Neoclassical theories of economic behavior in the aggregate. Models will be used as a framework for analyzing the determination of the level of national output and for explaining fluctuations in employment, the price level, interest rates, productivity, and the rate of economic growth. Policy proposals will be appraised. Prerequisite: 111 and 112; MATH 170.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 204
ECON 278-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
Instructor: Vlad Tarko
Course Description:
Neoclassical theory of relative prices of commodities and productive services under perfect and imperfect competition. The role of prices in the allocation and distribution of resources and commodities. Economic behavior of individual economic units like consumers, firms, and resource owners. Prerequisite: 111 and MATH 170.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 109
ECON 288-01 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Mesude Kongar
Course Description:
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 207
ECON 314-01 The Chilean Experiment: Economic Advice, Monetarism, and Economic Liberalization
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
This course will explore the Allende years and Pinochet years in Chile. We primarily focus on the policy reforms that were adopted following the military coup in 1973. We also pay much attention to the policy errors which culminated in the collapse of the Chilean economy in the early 1980s. The course will especially focus on the merits of alternative exchange rate regimes. Similarly, we investigate the role that foreign advisers played in persuading key actors (e.g., Pinochet) to adopt policy reform.
1330:TF   DENNY 317
ECON 314-02 Applied Empirical Data Analysis
Instructor: Stephen Erfle
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 300-03. This course provides students with the opportunity to undertake their own empirical investigation on topics of their choice. Students are welcome to use the information that I have gathered but they are also encouraged to obtain and analyze data of their choosing, subject to professor approval. Students have access to start of year and end of year physical activity and stature measures for more than 10,000 middle school students, two thirds of whom had daily PE, as well as school district level data for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This course will analyze the date obtained from this program. Students will learn how to use SPSS and Arc-GIS throughout the course of the semester. The class culminates in presenting your own findings in a poster presentation that is open to the public.
1230:W   ALTHSE 204
ECON 314-03 Advanced Topics in Economic Theory
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
This course will cover advanced topics selected from microeconomics and macroeconomics. Examples are expected to be drawn from various literatures including: game theory, international trade, evolutionary game theory, behavioral economics, efficiency wage/contested exchange, neoclassical theory and others.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 371-01 British and European Economic History
Instructor: Nicola Tynan
Course Description:
Rapid economic development took off in Britain during the eighteenth century. What were the causes and consequences of this first Industrial Revolution? Why did it take place in Britain and not France or another European country? Technological change, along with rapid population growth and migration, resulted in uneven distributional outcomes within and between countries. This course will cover important questions in British and European economic history. Readings will focus on improvements in living standards and efforts made to address unequal outcomes with an emphasis on the impact of industrial development and institutional change. Rapid economic development took off in Britain during the eighteenth century. What were the causes and consequences of this first Industrial Revolution? Why did it take place in Britain and not France or other European country? Technological change, along with rapid population growth and migration, resulted in uneven distributional outcomes within and between countries. This course will cover important questions in British and European economic history. Readings will focus on improvements in living standards and efforts made to address unequal outcomes with an emphasis on the impact of industrial development and institutional change. This course may be taught as a Writing in the Discipline or standard elective. Quantitative Economics majors may elect to write an empirical research paper. Prerequisites: 268 and 278. Recommended: 288.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 07
ECON 398-01 Advanced Econometrics
Instructor: Emily Marshall
Course Description:
This course covers some advanced topics in applied econometrics. Students will apply multiple regression analysis to both cross-sectional and longitudinal (panel) data to familiarize students with a variety of advanced econometric techniques including instrumental variable analysis, differences-in-differences methods, limited dependent variable models, and dynamic panel analysis. Students will conduct individual empirical research projects using Stata, or other statistical analysis software widely used in economics, to enable students to understand and apply the conventions of empirical research in economics. We will cover elements of technical writing, reviewing existing literature, data collection and organization, and file management for complete transparency and reproducibility. Prerequisites: 268 or 278, and 298. This course covers some advanced topics in applied econometrics. Students will apply multiple regression analysis to both cross-sectional and longitudinal (panel) data to familiarize students with a variety of advanced econometric techniques including instrumental variable analysis, differences-in-differences methods, limited dependent variable models, and dynamic panel analysis. Students will conduct individual empirical research projects using Stata, or other statistical analysis software widely used in economics, to enable students to understand and apply the conventions of empirical research in economics. We will cover elements of technical writing, reviewing existing literature, data collection and organization, and file management for complete transparency and reproducibility. Prerequisites: 268 or 278, and 298.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 204
ECON 496-01 Wage and Employment Determination in U.S. Labor Market
Instructor: Sohani Fatehin
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. This branch of economics known as labor economics is to enable you to use economic analysis and reasoning to understand the labor market outcomes in the US. In particular, the purpose of the course is to apply the analytical tools from intermediate microeconomic theory to analyze how society develops, allocates, and rewards human resources, and to study a wide range of labor-related issues. This goal can be achieved through careful reading, class lecture and discussion, the use of critical thinking, study, and writing. The course will expose you to important theoretical and applied topics in such areas as labor demand and supply, human capital (education and training), technological change, globalization, wage differentials, job mobility and migration, discrimination, earnings inequality, unemployment, labor unions, and public policy.
1330:W   ALTHSE 07
ECON 496-02 Political Economy of Health
Instructor: Mesude Kongar
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is as low as 49 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to nutrition, care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? In this course, students will examine the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. The emphasis throughout the course will be on how socioeconomic inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality and other social categories affect health and well-being outcomes.
1330:W   ALTHSE 206
ECON 496-03 Applied Statistical Methods and Comparative Institutions
Instructor: Vlad Tarko
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Social, economic and political reality is characterized by complex interactions between a large number of possible factors such as institutions, policies, organizations, cultural norms, history, and geography. Moreover, we usually have access only to limited and non-randomized data, making statistical analysis difficult. But we now have a variety of empirical and statistical methods for trying to deal with such challenges, allowing us to discover institutional patterns, and drawing plausible inferences about what determines various outcomes. This course presents such methods emphasizing their complementarity each method is useful under different contexts and for different purposes, and together they can provide a more or less coherent composite image. The course covers the following methods: (1) basic linear and non-linear econometrics, (2) factor and principal component analysis, (3) qualitative and fuzzy-set comparative method, (4) k-means pattern analysis and hierarchical clustering. The course is focused on giving you a practical skill set, teaching you how to use these methods in full awareness of their limitations and complementaries.
1330:T   ALTHSE 07
ECON 496-04 Economic Demography and Sustainable Development
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Demography is the study of the determinants and consequences of population change. It is concerned with effectively everything that influences or can be influenced by population size, population growth or decline, population processes, population spatial distribution, population structure, and population characteristics. As we go from the historical pattern of high birth and death rates to the increasingly common pattern of low birth and death rates, we pass through the demographic transition. This is actually a whole set of transitions relating to changes in health and mortality, fertility, migration, age structure, urbanization, and family and household structure. Each of these separate, but interrelated, changes have serious consequences for the way societies and economies work and the natural environment they are built upon. Thus, the objectives of this course are threefold: (1) to develop knowledge of the underlying demographic theories explaining these transitions; (2) to use this knowledge to understand the interrelationships between these transitions; and (3) to determine the implications of these transitions for sustainable development, that is, for social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Some questions we will consider include (but are not limited to): Why are so many adults living alone? Why are women having fewer babies? What impact do sub-replacement birth rates have on economies and societies? What role do the rights of women have in demographic transitions? Why are adults waiting so long to get married or not getting married at all? What happens when the population ages? Why are more and more people choosing to live in cities? Is this expected growth of cities sustainable? Often for familiarity and simplicity we will use data and readings focused on the United States, but since these transitions have evolved in ways that vary from one part of the world to another, this course will often have a necessarily international focus. Naturally, given the expansive subject matter, this course will require much from you it is reading and writing intensive.
1330:T   STERN 103
ECON 500-01 Independent Study
Instructor: Emily Marshall
Course Description:
 
ECON 500-02 Macroeconomic Volatility and Asset Prices
Instructor: Emily Marshall
Course Description:
 
ECON 550-01 The Effect of Hukon Reform on Relative Urbanization Rates in China: An Empirical Investigation
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
 
ECON 550-02 Sports Economics in the Cycling Industry
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
 
ECON 550-03 Relationship Between Hypothetical Bias and WTP-WTA Gap in Contingent Valuation
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
 
ECON 560-02 Natural Disasters and Household Debt: Evidence from US Counties
Instructor: Emily Marshall
Course Description:
 
ECON 560-03 Natural Disasters and Household Debt: Evidence from US Counties
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description: