Fall 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 101-01 Disorderly Women
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01.The class will be offered synchronous and I will also hold office hours as such. I will place various instructional/informational videos further explaining writing assignments and other assignments on Moodle. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a disorderly woman and what acts are considered disorderly and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American womens narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Betty Friedan, Audre Lorde, Grace Lee Boggs, and Gloria Anzaldua, while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyonc. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of disorderly women have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.
1330:MR   DIST
AMST 101-02 The Native American Intellectual Traditions
Instructor: Darren Lone Fight
Course Description:
Courses will be offered with weekly synchronous small-group discussions/projects and asynchronous content and readings provided through the LMS. The intellectual traditions of Native people are varied, long, and storied. Indigenous peoples in North America have been writing in English and translating cultural traditions, values, and cosmologies for centuries. This course will survey those intellectual traditions by starting with Samson Occoms writings in the mid-18th century and vectoring those traditions though the contemporary moment, charting how the intellectual traditions of Native artists and thinkers continue to inform and influence contemporary Indigenous intellectual production.
1030:MWF   DIST
AMST 101-03 Cyberpunk Media and Culture
Instructor: Stacey Suver
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-03.In his 1986 Preface to Mirrorshades, Bruce Sterling writes, Cyberpunk has little patience with borders. This course studies the ways in which the cyberpunk movement of the 1980s and 1990s transcended borders, including politics, culture, race, gender, sexual orientation, and the separation between technology and the human body. We will draw connections between Anonymous (the hackers collective), superheroes, Coca-Cola commercials, sunglasses, childrens cartoons, and the music of David Bowie. Types of texts include novels and short stories, graphic novels, film, television programs, pop music, and critical theory. It should be fun.
1500:MR   DIST
AMST 200-01 History of American Feminism
Instructor: Amy Farrell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 220-01 and HIST 211-03.We will meet on Zoom every Monday from 1:30-2:45. We will meet periodically on Thursdays (dates in syllabus) from 1:30-2:45 on Zoom. This course will emphasize such topics as the 19th century women's movement, the suffrage movement, radical and liberal feminism, and African-American feminism. We will pay particular attention to the diversity of women's experiences in the United States and to women's multiple and often conflicting responses to patriarchy and other forms of oppression.
1330:MR   DIST
AMST 201-01 Introduction to American Studies
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
This course will be taught mostly remote with 10% face to face. Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of United States and hemispheric cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.
1030:TR   DIST
AMST 202-01 Workshop in Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Cotten Seiler
Course Description:
This intensive writing workshop focuses on theoretical approaches to the interpretation of social and cultural materials. The course provides an early exposure to theories and methods that will be returned to in upper level departmental courses. Intended to develop independent skills in analysis of primary texts and documents.
0900:TR   DIST
AMST 303-01 Imagining American Futures
Instructor: Darren Lone Fight
Course Description:
Courses will be offered with weekly synchronous small-group discussions/projects and asynchronous content and readings provided through the LMS. This course takes a look at Americas vision of the future in the 20th and 21st centuries. Rather than looking to history to understand the past, well examine historical imaginaries that posit a future: What did America in the 1920s think the world would be like today? In the 1960s? The 1990s? How does going back to the future help us organize our own sense of the present, past, and future of our contemporary moment?
0930:MWF   DIST
AMST 401-01 Research and Methods in American Studies
Instructor: Amy Farrell
Course Description:
We will meet on Wednesdays on Zoom from 1:30-4:30. This integrative seminar focuses on the theory and methods of cultural analysis and interdisciplinary study. Students examine the origins, history, and current state of American studies, discuss relevant questions, and, in research projects, apply techniques of interdisciplinary study to a topic of their choosing. Prerequisite: 303, Senior American studies major, or permission of the instructor.
1330:W   DIST