Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 101-01 #StayWoke: Activism in U.S. Popular Culture
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
What is activism? Can activism take place in the realm of popular culture or does popular culture merely reflect activism happening in U.S. culture? This course will explore these questions and more as we look at examples of protest movements in modern American history. Theoretical concepts and historical context will be examined at the outset of the course. The major focus, however, will be on selected protest movements from the 1960s to present day and their relationships with popular culture. Selected movements include, but are not limited to, the Civil Rights Movement, the Anti-War Movement, Environmental Movement, Disability Rights Movement, and more.
0830:MWF   DENNY 212
AMST 101-02 Fighting the Power: Social Protest in Popular Music
Instructor: Stacey Suver
Course Description:
Following a politically charged Grammy Awards ceremony in January 2018, US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley publicly argued for a separation between politics and music. Dont ruin great music with trash, she tweeted. This course studies whether popular music and politics have ever been or can ever be separate and investigates how social change/protest informs popular music and vice versa. We will interrogate differences between protest music, political music, and socially conscious music. And we will seek to identify what about a song makes it political. Is protest limited to lyrical content only or can genres, instruments, or modes of production be political? Themes covered in this course include civil rights, womens rights, LGBT rights, class issues, environmental issues, and the anti-war and Black Lives Matter movements. Genres of music covered include folk, rock, hip-hop, jazz, blues, R&B, country, heavy metal, punk, disco, funk, top 40, and dance.
1500:MR   DENNY 303
AMST 101-03 Fighting the Power: Social Protest in Popular Music
Instructor: Stacey Suver
Course Description:
Following a politically charged Grammy Awards ceremony in January 2018, US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley publicly argued for a separation between politics and music. Dont ruin great music with trash, she tweeted. This course studies whether popular music and politics have ever been or can ever be separate and investigates how social change/protest informs popular music and vice versa. We will interrogate differences between protest music, political music, and socially conscious music. And we will seek to identify what about a song makes it political. Is protest limited to lyrical content only or can genres, instruments, or modes of production be political? Themes covered in this course include civil rights, womens rights, LGBT rights, class issues, environmental issues, and the anti-war and Black Lives Matter movements. Genres of music covered include folk, rock, hip-hop, jazz, blues, R&B, country, heavy metal, punk, disco, funk, top 40, and dance.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
AMST 200-01 Native American History
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-03. This course will survey the histories of Native American and Indigenous nations and peoples in the contiguous United States, Alaska and Hawaii, between roughly 1830 to present. Topics range from the impact that U.S. settler colonialism and westward expansion had on the demography, economy, and society of various Indian nations; resistance to and assimilation of U.S. culture by Indigenous peoples, to the growing involvement of the US government in the lives of Native America, Alaska Native and Native Hawaian nations and peoples in the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Until recent decades, Native histories have been told from non-Native perspectives, with Native peoples being pushed to the margins of U.S. history, as insignificant, vanishing primitives or victims of Euro-western imperialism. This course will push Native and Indigenous peoples to the center stage, as active participants in historical events unfolding around them and within their nations and communities.
0930:MWF   DENNY 304
AMST 200-02 Queerness in Blackness
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06 and WGSS 202-03. This course is an interdisciplinary survey of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ), and same gender loving (SGL) culture and politics. We will first review some key concepts in Black feminism since these theorists and activists have made uninvited interventions in Black (cultural) politics, which paved the way for Black critical cultural theory and methodology. We will then survey key texts and concepts of major nodes of Black LGBTQ social formation and intellectual production, exploring concepts such as intersectionality, normativity, respectability, and articulation, to name a few. Lastly, the course will facilitate the critical, close readings of various scholarly and popular texts, including writings, films, and visual art.
1030:MWF   DENNY 103
AMST 200-03 Introduction to Latino Studies
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 123-01. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Latinas and Latinos have emerged as the largest minority group in the United States, and reached majority status in states like California. Consequently, to assess their place in the United States seems timely. This course examines some of the central themes that shape the diverse experiences of Latino populations in the U.S. At core the course will be guided by the contradiction between what unites Latinos/as in the U.S., such as a shared ethos of latinidad, and what divides them, such as differential access to realms of economic and political power. In this course we will investigate how Latinas/os influence and are, in turn, impacted by histories of imperialism, generational conflict, demographic change, social movements, stratified labor markets, gender/sexuality, mass culture, music, and the global shift to free markets. Students will engage in a critical examination of a wide selection of texts, ranging from anthropological and historical texts to poetry, film, and graphic novels, in an effort to place the experience of diverse Latino populations in the social, political, historical, and interdisciplinary perspectives.
1330:MR   DENNY 311
AMST 200-04 Police Violence and Mass Incarceration
Instructor: Beenash Jafri
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-03. In recent years, the Black Lives Matter movement has drawn global attention to police violence and mass incarceration in the United States, all the while highlighting intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality. This course examines the social, historical, economic and political contexts for mass incarceration and police violence. Assigned readings tackle historical and theoretical bases for understanding the criminal justice system in the US. Drawing from black feminist, queer, transnational and Indigenous studies frameworks, we will question the foundations of the criminal justice system and its constructions of crime, justice and safety. Towards the end of the course, we will examine the alternative constructions of justice articulated by movements for prison abolition, transformative justice and community accountability.
1230:MWF   DENNY 304
AMST 201-01 Introduction to American Studies
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency. Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.
1130:MWF   DENNY 103
AMST 202-01 Workshop in Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
Intensive workshop focused on theoretical approaches to the interpretation of social and cultural materials. The course provides an early exposure to theories and methods that will be returned to in greater depth in the senior year. Intended to develop independent skills in analysis of primary texts and documents.
1030:TR   DENNY 112
AMST 303-01 Undocumented in America
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 301-01. "Undocumented immigrants," Luis Alberto Urrea writes, "have no way to tell you what they have experienced . . . They are, by the very nature of their experience, invisible." In actuality, the undocumented aren't invisible, so much as "hidden in plain sight," they are exempted of legal membership, deprived of political rights, and confined to spaces outside of recognition or public concern. How do producers of culture try to capture lives and experiences that are silenced and invisible to the broader public? This interdisciplinary course will try to engage directly with both the history of legal and economic parameters that designate one as undocumented and how narratives, artistic representations, and media that endeavor to portray and symbolize these particular immigrants. This class will pay particular attention to how legal, political, and economic designations of immigrant's "illegal" or "undocumented" status depend on and sustain U.S. discourse about race and ethnicity.
0900:TR   DENNY 303
AMST 402-01 Writing in American Studies
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
Students research and write a substantial research project, normally drawing on their work in 401. Prerequisite: 303, 401.
1330:W   DENNY 104
AMST 500-01 Native American Children: Colonial Oppression and Indigenous Resurgence
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
 
AMST 500-02 Rewriting "Pocahontas" To Serve U.S. Settler Colonial Goals
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description: