Faculty Profile

Antje Pfannkuchen

Assistant Professor of German (2009)

Contact Information

pfannkua@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 11M
717.254.8151

Bio

Antje Pfannkuchen is a researcher in German media studies and cultural history. Her work is concerned with relationships of media-technology, science, literature and art. She has published on German Enlightenment poet and scientist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg as well as on Ezra Pound's interests in 19th century German science. Her current book project investigates the conditions and correlations of Romanticism and the invention of photography. Courses she has been and will be teaching include German Media Studies, German Film, German Stories - classical and digital, the Culture of the two Germanies, German Romanticism, German-Jewish Culture and all levels of German language.

Education

  • M.A., FU Berlin, 2000
  • M.P.S., New York University, 2002
  • Ph.D., 2010

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

GRMN 201 Int German I:Contemp Grm Cltr
Using literary texts and media from contemporary German-speaking cultures, students focus on recognizing and practicing various registers of written and oral German while reviewing grammatical structures and expanding stylistic forms. For instance, the course will expose students to the differences between the language of a popular daily newspaper, a TV interview, a blog entry, or an essay by a German author. Students will have to use these forms appropriately in class in and their homework. Classes meet four days a week. Prerequisite: 102 or 103, or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.

GRMN 201 Int German I:Contemp Grm Cltr
Using literary texts and media from contemporary German-speaking cultures, students focus on recognizing and practicing various registers of written and oral German while reviewing grammatical structures and expanding stylistic forms. For instance, the course will expose students to the differences between the language of a popular daily newspaper, a TV interview, a blog entry, or an essay by a German author. Students will have to use these forms appropriately in class in and their homework. Classes meet four days a week. Prerequisite: 102 or 103, or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.

Spring 2016

GRMN 102 German in Everyday Life
This course is an introduction to the German language as spoken in daily life. It focuses on the acquisition of language skills, such as speaking, reading, writing, and listening and does so while also learning about aspects of every-day cultures in German-speaking countries. Classes are small and emphasize communication. After successfully completing German 101 and 102, students are expected to navigate everyday situations successfully such as shopping, making friends, reading German newspapers etc. and understand basic grammatical and syntactical structures. Classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

GRMN 400 Sen Sem: German-Jewish Culture
This seminar will introduce the multilayered history of German Jewish culture before, during, and after the Nazi years. The aim is to understand “how Jews became Germans” in the course of the 19th century, but also, to what extend the cultural tradition we know as “German” today, has been strongly influenced by Jewish intellectuals, writers and artists.