Faculty Profile

Antje Pfannkuchen

Associate Professor of German (2009)

Contact Information

pfannkua@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 11M
717.254.8151

Bio

Antje Pfannkuchen is a researcher in German media studies and cultural history. Her work is concerned with connections between media-technology, science, literature and art. Most recently she co-edited "The Technological Introject," a volume engaging the ideas of Friedrich Kittler, mastermind of German media theory. She has also published on German Enlightenment poet and scientist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, on Romantic physicist Johann Wilhelm Ritter and on Ezra Pound's interests in 19th century German science. Her current book project investigates the correlations of Romanticism and the invention of photography. Courses she has taught include German Media Studies, German Film, German Stories - classical and digital, Goethe Forever!, The Two Germanies, German Romanticism, German-Jewish Culture and all levels of German language.

Education

  • M.A., FU Berlin, 2000
  • M.P.S., New York University, 2002
  • Ph.D., 2010

2018-2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018

GRMN 201 Int German I:Contemp Grm Cltr
What did the Brothers Grimm do besides collecting fairy tales? How do narratives inform national identity? Why do Germans return their empty bottles to the store? Students approach such questions, which touch on language, culture, economics, geography, history, and more, through a variety of media in this course. At the same time, students review grammatical structures, expand their knowledge of stylistic forms, and practice various registers of written and spoken German. German 201 aims to develop students’ skills to understand and reflect upon German-language culture at a basic intermediate level. Classes meet four days a week. Prerequisite: 102 or 103, or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.

GRMN 201 Int German I:Contemp Grm Cltr
What did the Brothers Grimm do besides collecting fairy tales? How do narratives inform national identity? Why do Germans return their empty bottles to the store? Students approach such questions, which touch on language, culture, economics, geography, history, and more, through a variety of media in this course. At the same time, students review grammatical structures, expand their knowledge of stylistic forms, and practice various registers of written and spoken German. German 201 aims to develop students’ skills to understand and reflect upon German-language culture at a basic intermediate level. Classes meet four days a week. Prerequisite: 102 or 103, or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.

GRMN 251 The German Political Landscape
This course introduces students to the structure of the German government, the main institutions, political parties and organizations and their historical context. The central focus is on how political Germany works today and what it took to get there since 1945. Public media institutions that are an important part of German civic interactions will be studied as well as possibilities for involvement of citizens and residents. Taught in German.

Spring 2019

GRMN 201 Int German I:Contemp Grm Cltr
What did the Brothers Grimm do besides collecting fairy tales? How do narratives inform national identity? Why do Germans return their empty bottles to the store? Students approach such questions, which touch on language, culture, economics, geography, history, and more, through a variety of media in this course. At the same time, students review grammatical structures, expand their knowledge of stylistic forms, and practice various registers of written and spoken German. German 201 aims to develop students’ skills to understand and reflect upon German-language culture at a basic intermediate level. Classes meet four days a week. Prerequisite: 102 or 103, or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.

FMST 320 German Media Cultures
Cross-listed with GRMN 400-01. This senior seminar surveys German media cultures of the 20th century with a special focus on the histories of film and radio but not excluding other forms of media. In recent years, Media Studies has been one of the fastest growing disciplines in German academia and this course is meant to provide a first impression of the topics discussed in the field. Theoretical texts will be combined with select case studies so students can gain an understanding of the historical background that has shaped German media today. In the second half of the semester each student in the class conducts an in-depth examination of one media example of their choice during which a wide array of writing practices will be performed and refined, from description, contextualization, analysis of form and content, etc. Taught in German.

GRMN 400 German Media Cultures
Cross-listed with FMST 320-04. This senior seminar surveys German media cultures of the 20th century with a special focus on the histories of film and radio but not excluding other forms of media. In recent years, Media Studies has been one of the fastest growing disciplines in German academia and this course is meant to provide a first impression of the topics discussed in the field. Theoretical texts will be combined with select case studies so students can gain an understanding of the historical background that has shaped German media today. In the second half of the semester each student in the class conducts an in-depth examination of one media example of their choice during which a wide array of writing practices will be performed and refined, from description, contextualization, analysis of form and content, etc. Taught in German.

GRMN 500 Independent Study

GRMN 500 Independent Study

GRMN 500 Independent Study