Faculty Profile

Wendy Moffat

Professor of English (1984), Department Chair

Contact Information

moffat@dickinson.edu

East College Room 408
717.245.1499
http://users.dickinson.edu/~moffat/

Bio

Her teaching interests include modernism, literature and sexuality, biography, and literary theory. Her biography, A Great Unrecorded History: A New Life of E. M. Forster, received the Biographer’s Club Prize in 2010 and was runner-up for the PEN Biography Prize in 2011.

Education

  • B.A., Yale University, 1977
  • M.A., 1979
  • M.Phil., 1981, Ph.D., 1986

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

ENGL 101 19th C Brit Lit & Society
We will study British society in the Romantic and Victorian eras through literature, historical accounts, and visual materials, including paintings and film. Substantial volume of reading; two papers and a final exam.

WRPG 211 Writing About the Great War
Cross-listed with ENGL 212-01. The War to End All Wars, the First World War, The First Modern War, the Post-colonial War: we will read and write about the experience and meaning of this refracted modern moment of violence from the temporal perspective of its participants, and looking back from our vantage point a century later. We'll use the archives at the Military History Institute in Carlisle for some of our research and writing. Four essays of different kinds, drafting, and editing.

ENGL 212 Writing About the Great War
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-01. The War to End All Wars, the First World War, The First Modern War, the Post-colonial War: we will read and write about the experience and meaning of this refracted modern moment of violence from the temporal perspective of its participants, and looking back from our vantage point a century later. We'll use the archives at the Military History Institute in Carlisle for some of our research and writing. Four essays of different kinds, drafting, and editing.

ENGL 364 James Joyce's Ulysses
Now you can tell your grandchildren that you have read, finished, and (partially) understood the Great Modern Novel almost every serious reader has picked up and attempted. The text of Ulysses (1922) is the linchpin for intertextual explorations; we will read Ulysses slowly, throughout the whole term. In addition, we will read around the novel, considering alternative contexts for understanding this complex, yet wonderful work. Other readings will include versions of Joyce's autobiography (A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Stephen Hero), biography (Richard Ellman and Edna O'Brien on Joyce and Brenda Maddox on Nora Barnacle, Joyce's lover and wife), Joyce's fiction (The Dubliners), the mythic context (The Odyssey, The Bible, Celtic myth), and Irish social history. A presentation, annotated bibliography, short research paper, and final exam.

ENGL 403 The Great War Imagined
Even at the time was being fought, the First World War (1914-1918) was represented as a "gap in history," a cataclysmic shift in European consciousness as well as a corporal event. We will foreground two principal ways of knowing the war in our interdisciplinary inquiry. One focus will be on the experience of living in a security state, the feeling of neverending war, the gaps in consciousness among men and women, combatants and civilians on the "home front." A second will be on visual representations-especially painting, film, the little magazines, and monuments. We will read memoir (Brittain, Wyndham Lewis), poetry (Sassoon, Owen, Rosenberg) , war policy documents, trial transcripts (Pemberton Billing), fiction ( Woolf, Barker) and film (Tavernier, MacKinnon). Oral reports, short argument papers, research project. No final exam.