Faculty Profile

Wendy Moffat

Professor of English; John and Ann Conser Curley Chair in Global Education (1984)

Contact Information

moffat@dickinson.edu

East College Room 408
717.245.1499
http://users.dickinson.edu/~moffat/

Bio

Her teaching interests include modernism, literature and sexuality, biography, and literary theory. Her biography, A Great Unrecorded History: A New Life of E. M. Forster, received the Biographer’s Club Prize in 2010 and was runner-up for the PEN Biography Prize in 2011.

Education

  • B.A., Yale University, 1977
  • M.A., 1979
  • M.Phil., 1981, Ph.D., 1986

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

ENGL 101 Jane Austen in Her Time
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-05.We will read all the major novels of Jane Austen in the context of biography and social history. Not open to students who have taken English 399 of the same title.) May not be taken pass/fail.

WGSS 101 Jane Austen in Her Time
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-02.We will read all the major novels of Jane Austen in the context of biography and social history. Not open to students who have taken English 399 of the same title.) May not be taken pass/fail.

ENGL 220 Intro to Literary Studies
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.

Spring 2017

ENGL 101 19th C Brit Lit & Society
We will study British society in the Romantic and Victorian eras through literature, historical accounts, and visual materials, including paintings and film. Substantial volume of reading; two papers and a final exam.

WGSS 301 Forster's England
Cross-listed with ENGL 399-01.D.H. Lawrence called his friend, the British novelist E.M. Forster, the last Englishman. During his long life (1879-1970), Forster saw the world he lived in utterly transformed, from the growth of the Victorian suburbs to Indian independence, from women's suffrage to the surveillance state. We will discover this seminal period in British culture by reading all of Forster's published writing, from the social satire Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905), to the colonial classic A Passage to India (1924), from pungent political essays in Two Cheers for Democracy (1952), to his homosexual novel Maurice (published just after his death). Forster is an early theorist of how sexuality intersects with hierarchical structures of masculinity, imperialism, religion, and social class. His fiction and non-fiction are deeply political. His later life also unveils real contestations of the Foucauldian idea of a uniform formation of a "species" ["the homosexual"], especially as it is contested and practiced by and within social class. Readings will also include portions of my published biography of Forster.

ENGL 399 Forster's England
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-05.D.H. Lawrence called his friend, the British novelist E.M. Forster, the last Englishman. During his long life (1879-1970), Forster saw the world he lived in utterly transformed, from the growth of the Victorian suburbs to Indian independence, from women's suffrage to the surveillance state. We will discover this seminal period in British culture by reading all of Forster's published writing, from the social satire Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905), to the colonial classic A Passage to India (1924), from pungent political essays in Two Cheers for Democracy (1952), to his homosexual novel Maurice (published just after his death). Forster is an early theorist of how sexuality intersects with hierarchical structures of masculinity, imperialism, religion, and social class. His fiction and non-fiction are deeply political. His later life also unveils real contestations of the Foucauldian idea of a uniform formation of a "species" ["the homosexual"], especially as it is contested and practiced by and within social class. Readings will also include portions of my published biography of Forster.