Faculty Profile

Scott Boback

Associate Professor of Biology (2007)

Contact Information

bobacks@dickinson.edu

Rector North Room 1303
717.245.1799
http://users.dickinson.edu/~bobacks/

Bio

Broadly, I am an animal ecologist with a focus in herpetology (non-avian reptiles and amphibians). I teach courses in ecology, evolution, vertebrate natural history, and physiology. My students and I investigate a variety of organisms in both lab and field settings. Recent projects have included the muscular performance of snakes during constriction, the population ecology of painted turtles, and the evolutionary development of snake jaws.

Education

  • B.A., Ripon College, 1991
  • M.A., University of Northern Colorado, 1995
  • Ph.D., Auburn University, 2005

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

BIOL 120 Life at the Extremes w/Lab
The Weddell Seal holds its breath for 40 minutes while routinely diving to a depth of 1,500 feet in -1.6°C water and Bar Headed Geese migrate at thousands of feet above the summit of Mt. Everest. How do these animals accomplish these seemingly amazing tasks? Questions of survival and more will be addressed in this study of comparative physiology. We will seek explanations of these phenomena by first evaluating the physical nature of these hostile environments and then exploring the mechanisms of survival. We will also investigate our own physiology and human limits of performance. Lecture will be enhanced by laboratory experiences in experimental physiology and vertebrate dissection. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.

BIOL 120 Life at the Extremes w/Lab
The Weddell Seal holds its breath for 40 minutes while routinely diving to a depth of 1,500 feet in -1.6°C water and Bar Headed Geese migrate at thousands of feet above the summit of Mt. Everest. How do these animals accomplish these seemingly amazing tasks? Questions of survival and more will be addressed in this study of comparative physiology. We will seek explanations of these phenomena by first evaluating the physical nature of these hostile environments and then exploring the mechanisms of survival. We will also investigate our own physiology and human limits of performance. Lecture will be enhanced by laboratory experiences in experimental physiology and vertebrate dissection. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.

BIOL 314 Ecology w/Lab
Study of the interactions of organisms with each other, and with their environment, at the level of the individual, the population, the community, and the ecosystem. Lectures and readings consider both the theory of ecology and data from empirical research in the classic and current literature. Laboratory and field studies explore how ecologists perform quantitative tests of hypotheses about complex systems in nature. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129 or ENST 131, 132 (or 130). This course is cross-listed as ENST 314.

BIOL 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch

BIOL 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch

Spring 2015

BIOL 332 Natural History of Vertebrates
Cross-listed with ENST 332-01.

ENST 332 Natural History of Vertebrates
Cross-listed with BIOL 332-01.

BIOL 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch

BIOL 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch