Embracing the Perfectly Imperfect

Sarthak Karki '14

Sarthak Karki '14 is an environmental-studies major and aspiring writer-photographer with a desire to help protect the world's natural resources. Photo courtesy of Sarthak Karki.

Sarthak Karki ’14

Nepal native Sarthak Karki ’14 is an aspiring writer and photographer with a philosophical bent and a desire to help preserve natural resources. He’s also an avid hiker, a musician and an environmental-studies major at Dickinson, and as he prepares to graduate in May, he’s setting sights on a career that combines his creativity, his interest in world travel and his love of the great outdoors.

Major

Environmental studies.

Clubs and organizations:

Dickinson jazz ensemble, soccer club, Waidner-Spahr Library (student worker). 

Favorite books:

Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts and The Alchemist by Paulo Coehlo.

Favorite movie:

Waking Life.

Favorite Dickinson learning experience:

Studying [wildlife management] in Kenya and Tanzania. It was an incredible experience to take part in cultures that were completely foreign to me.

As a kid, I wanted to be …

… an astronaut, like many kids.

If I could have dinner with anyone, living or dead, it would be …

… Bruce Lee.

On deciding to attend Dickinson:

Initially, my decision to join Dickinson was mainly driven by the financial aid that I received. That decision has been more than justified, based on the experiences I’ve had here, and on all I have learned from my classes and from the people I have met.

Post-Dickinson plans:

I want to be an accomplished travel/nature photographer and filmmaker and, hopefully, create work [that furthers environmental] conservation.

Most important thing I’ve learned so far:

It’s important to do what you want to do, not what other people want you to do.

Biggest influence:

My dad. He taught me to be modest and to respect others.

On taking care of others:

In ninth grade I raised a homeless, abandoned kitten, even though I already had a dog at home and did not like cats. My parents were cool enough to let me bring the kitten home.

In a perfect world …

… everyone would accept and appreciate the world’s imperfections.

Learn more:

Published Apr. 11, 2014