Fall 2015

Tuesday, September 15th
Kyle Liss '16
"Scattering from a Quantum Memory: An REU Experience in Mathematical Physics"

Quantum computers perform computations by transforming the state of a quantum memory through a sequence of operations. Previous studies have modeled these operations as being performed by scattering non-relativistic particles from the memory. Specifically, the time-dependent, linear Schrodinger equations has been used to quantify how such a particle-memory interaction may cause the quantum memory to deviate from a pure state, which is referred to as a "memory impurity". The difficulty in avoiding such memory impurities is one of the principle opponents in the realization of a quantum computer. In this talk, we extend previous results to a study of particle-memory scattering using the time-dependent, nonlinear Schrodinger equation by viewing the nonlinear contribution as a perturbation to the known linear solutions. We show that by using Green's functions, we can formulate the nonlinear solution as an integral equation that can in principle be used to obtain approximate analytical solutions. This work was done as part of an REU experience at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Noon
Tome 115
Pizza provided

Tuesday, September 29th
Dick Forrester, Associate Professor of Mathematics, Dickinson College and
Laura Kilko, Associate Director of the Career Center, Dickinson College
"Where Do I Go From Here?"

In this chat we discuss a wide variety of careers and opportunities for students majoring in mathematics and computer science. In addition, we will talk about graduate school options, internships, and REUs (Research Experience for Undergraduates). Specific information about our recent graduates will be provided.

Noon
Tome 115
Pizza provided

Monday, October 12th
Steven Strogatz, Cornell University
Priestley Lecture - "Synchronization in Nature"

Strogatz will discuss spectacular examples of synchronization in nature, from rhythmically flashing fireflies to crowds of pedestrians that inadvertently caused London's Millennium Bridge to wobble on its opening day.

Anita Tuvin Schlecter Auditorium (ATS)
7:00 p.m.
Reception to follow in ATS Lobby

Tuesday, October 13th
Steven Strogatz, Cornell University - Priestley recipient
"Small-World Networks in Science and Society"

Everyone is familiar with the small-world phenomenon: soon after meeting a stranger, we are often surprised to discover that we have a mutual friend, or that we are linked by a short chain of friends.  In this talk, I'll present evidence that the small-world phenomenon is more than a curiosity of social networks -- it is actually a general property of many networks found in nature and technology, ranging from nervous systems to the power grid and the Internet.  I'll also speculate about some of the broader implications of these findings (e.g., for the spread of infectious diseases), and will reveal the identity of the actor at the center of the Hollywood universe (it's not Kevin Bacon).


Noon
Althouse 106
Pizza provided

Tuesday, October 27th
Jeffrey Caton, President of Kepler Strategies, LLC in Carlisle
"The Three C's of Cyberspace: A Holistic View of Cybersecurity Issues

Abstract: Modern cyberspace presents its users with the dual-edged sword of opportunity and threat. This presentation will explore cyberspace through the "three C's" framework - connectivity, content, and cognition. It will examine related cybersecurity vulnerabilities that are accessible through hardware, software, and wetware vectors as well as possible methods to mitigate their effects. Finally, it will consider some of the resulting implications of attacks through cyberspace at the personal, societal, and international levels.

Speaker bio: His current work includes research on autonomous warfare and NATO cyberspace issues. Over the past 5 years, he has presented lectures on cyberspace and space topics in Sweden, the United Kingdom, Estonia, Kazakhstan, and the Czech Republic. From 2007 to 2012, Mr. Caton served on the U.S. Army War College faculty including as Associate Professor of Cyberspace Operations. He also served 28 years in the U.S. Air Force in such areas as engineering, space operations, joint planning, and foreign military sales.

Tome 115
Noon
Pizza provided

Tuesday, November 17th
Quang Minh Nguyen, Visiting Assistant Professor, Mathematics & Computer Science Department, Dickinson College
"Intersections: Projective Geometry from Art to Counting"

Greek (Euclidean) geometry is the geometry of line and circles. It makes fundamental use of the notion of distance, measured by and reported with the compass. Surprisingly, it is possible to have a geometry without a compass, without distance or angles.

In this presentation, we will discuss the history of projective geometry, spurred by Renaissance arts, but rooted in Greek geometry. We will follow the evolution of a theorem of Pappus into its projective generalizations. In the process, we will see  how projective space is the natural setting for problems about intersection and geometric counting.

Tome 115
Noon
Pizza provided

Tuesday, December 8th
Barry Tesman, Professor of Mathematics, Dickinson College
"Do You Want to Deal?"

The dealer seems to have the advantage in many popular card games. (Did you ever think about why you are not allowed to deal blackjack at the casinos in Las Vegas?) In this talk, he will describe a very simple (two-person) card game where the answer to the question, "Do you want to deal?," is not immediately apparent. The analysis of this game, which involves elementary aspects of combinatorics, probability, decision theory, infinite series, and game theory, provides some surprising results and interesting lessons concerning competitive strategies.

Stafford Lecture Room
Noon
Pizza provided