Major

A major in Classical Studies consists of ten courses, in one of the following combinations: 

A. 6 courses in Latin above 102, including at least one at the 300-level, 2 courses in Greek at any level, and two other courses in classical civilization.
B. 6 courses in Greek above 102, including at least one at the 300-level, plus 2 courses in Latin, and two other courses in classical civilization. 
C. 8 courses in Latin above 102, including at least one at the 300-level, and two other courses in classical civilization. 
D. 8 courses in Greek above 102, including at least one at the 300-level, and two other courses in classical civilization. 

Minor

A minor in Classical Studies consists of six courses, in one of the following combinations: 

A. Five courses in Latin above 102, including one at the 300 level, and one other course in classical civilization.
B. Five courses in Greek above 102, and one other course in classical civilization.
C. Three courses in Latin or Greek above 102, and three other courses in classical civilization.

Independent study and independent research

Independent studies are available. Contact the department chairperson for details.

Honors

Honors may be granted in Classical Studies for a two-semester project that results in a well-researched, sophisticated, finely crafted thesis within the range of sixty to one hundred pages. Students are self-selected but acceptance as an Honors candidate is based on the judgment of the department faculty and their assessment of the student's academic ability and potential for successfully completing the project. They will work closely with one advisor but will receive guidance and resources from other members of the department. Only the best projects will be granted Honors, but any student who completes the project will receive credit for the two semesters of independent study. For a detailed project schedule, see the faculty in the Classical Studies department.

Opportunities for off-campus study

Many majors have taken advantage of the Intercollegiate Center in Rome and the College Year in Athens (instruction in English by American professors under the American system), Durham University, and Advanced Studies in England (ASE). Four-week summer immersion courses taught in ancient Greek or Roman lands are offered occasionally. Students may also participate in archaeological survey, excavation and museum research at Mycenae with Prof. Christofilis Maggidis.

Courses

The following courses are offered abroad:

211 Roman Vistas
A four-week course conducted in Italy (the Bay of Naples; Rome and its environs). The course is designed to integrate the study of ancient sites and artifacts with relevant readings from Latin literature.
Admission by permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.

212 Greek Vistas
A four-week course conducted in Greece and Crete. The course is designed to integrate study of ancient sites and artifacts with relevant readings from Greek authors.
Admission by permission of instructor.

301 Fieldwork in Classical Archaeology
Archaeological excavation and geoprospection survey for four to six weeks at the Citadel and the Lower Town of Mycenae in Greece (DEPAS Project). The dig provides training for students in the techniques and methods of field archaeology.
Admission by permission of the instructor; ARCH 201 recommended. May be repeated for credit. If taken as part of the archaeology major, the course satisfies either the Field Experience requirement or counts as an elective in the classical area emphasis. If taken more than once it both satisfies the Field Experience requirement and counts as an elective in the classical area emphasis.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 301.

 ​

Greek

101 Beginning Attic Greek
All the fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax as well as the acquisition of vocabulary. By the conclusion of the second semester students will be prepared to read classical authors in the original.

102 Beginning Attic Greek
All the fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax as well as the acquisition of vocabulary. By the conclusion of the second semester students will be prepared to read classical authors in the original.
Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent.

111 Introduction to Greek Prose
A review of syntax and selected readings from prose authors. Consideration is given to authors whose style and grammar best illustrate the characteristics of Attic Greek of the Classical period. Supplemental readings in English provide historical and cultural context for the author chosen.
Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent.

112 Introduction to Greek Poetry
Selected readings from Homer with emphasis on poetic style and composition. Supplementary readings in English help stimulate discussion of literary, historical, and cultural topics regarding epic poetry.
Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent.

 

222 Philosophical Writers
Readings in Greek Philosophy including authors such as the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, or others. Supplementary readings in English provide historical context and an introduction to certain issues in ancient philosophy.
Recommended: 112 or the equivalent.

233 Herodotus
Selected readings from The Persian Wars, supplemented with reading of the text in English. Attention is paid to the nature of history and historical writing.
Recommended: 112 or the equivalent. Offered every two years. This course fulfills the DIV I.b. distribution requirement.

234 Greek Tragedy
A play from the corpus of Aeschylus, Sophocles, or Euripides will be read. Readings in English focus discussion on the authors' poetic style, purpose, and the historical context within which the writing occurred.
Prerequisite: 112 or the equivalent. Offered every two years. This course fulfills the DIV I.b. distribution requirement.

331 Thucydides
Selected readings from The Peloponnesian Wars, supplemented with reading of the text in English. Particular attention is paid to issues of historiography and Thucydides' place among historians.
Prerequisite: one course at the 200-level or the equivalent. Offered every two years.


332 Greek Comedy
Play(s) from the corpus of Aristophanes will be read. Readings in English help stimulate discussion of structure, technique and political-historical context of Aristophanes' comedy.
Prerequisite: at least one course at the 200-level or the equivalent. Offered every two years.

394 Seminar
Readings and conferences on selected areas of Greek literature. Research skills are emphasized.
Prerequisite: at least one course at the 200-level. Offered occasionally.

 

Latin

101 First-Year Latin
All the fundamentals of Latin grammar and the study of vocabulary. This course prepares students to read classical authors in the original.

102 First-Year Latin
All the fundamentals of Latin grammar and the study of vocabulary. This course prepares students to read classical authors in the original.
Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent.

111 Intro to Roman Prose
Review of syntax and selected readings from prose authors, with study of literary technique and discussion of supplementary readings in English.
Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent.

112 Introduction to Roman Poetry
Selected readings from Catullus and Ovid, with focus on poetic technique, and discussion of supplementary readings in English.
Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent.

233 Roman Historians
Readings from Roman historians such as Sallust, Caesar and Livy, with study of Roman political values.
Prerequisite: 112 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the DIV I.b. distribution requirement.

234 Ovid
Selections from the Metamorphoses with study of the more important Greek and Roman myths and their modern reception.
Prerequisite: 112 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the DIV I.b. distribution requirement.

241 Early Christian Latin
Selections from Augustine's Confessions, Prudentius' Psychomachia, and/or the corpus of Claudian and Ausonius. Attention is paid to the intellectual and literary culture of the late 4th century AD. Offered every two years.
Prerequisite: 112 or the equivalent. Offered every two years.

242 Vergil, Aeneid
Selections from the epic, with emphasis on Vergil's literary aims and technique.
Prerequisite: 112 or the equivalent. Offered every third year.

243 Lucretius
Selections from the Epicurean philosopher's epic poem On the Nature of Things, with study of the philosophical and poetic background of the work, its reception in antiquity, and its relevance to modern concerns.
Prerequisite: 112 or the equivalent. Offered every third year. This course fulfills the WR graduation requirement.

331 Cicero
Letters and speeches, with stress on the political life of the age of Cicero.
Prerequisite: at least one course at the 200-level. Offered every third year.

343 Lyric and Elegy
Selections from Horace and elegists such as Propertius and Tibullus, with focus on their literary technique and tradition.
Prerequisite: at least one course at the 200-level. Offered every two years.

351 Tacitus
Readings in the Annals, with emphasis on Roman historiography, Tacitus as historian and historical source.
Prerequisite: at least one course at the 200-level. Offered every third year.

352 Roman Satire
Readings from the satires of Juvenal or Horace with study of Roman social life in the early Principate.
Prerequisite: at least one course at the 200-level.

393 Seminar
Readings and conferences on selected areas of Latin literature. Emphasis on research skills.
Prerequisite: at least one course at the 200-level. Offered occasionally.

394 Seminar
Readings and conferences on selected areas of Latin literature. Emphasis on research skills.
Prerequisite: at least one course at the 200-level. Offered occasionally.

Classical Civilization

200 Special Topics in Classical Civilizations
This course undertakes topics, issues, and texts in Classical Civilization which are not otherwise offered in the Classical Studies Curriculum. The areas may include literary, historical, or philosophical topics from Bronze Age Greece to Christian Rome. Will meet either Division I or Division II distribution requirement depending upon topic.

 ​

Classical Literature and Mythology

100 Greek and Roman Mythology
A general introduction to the texts and narratives of the chief myths of Greece and Rome and their impact on Western civilizations with special reference to the fine arts: music, sculpture, painting, and literature.
This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement.

110 Intro to Greek Civilization
Reading and discussion of key literary and historical works of ancient Greece, including works by Homer, Thucydides, the Greek tragedians and comedians, with consideration of the Greek intellectual enlightenment, Athenian democracy and the Athenian empire in their historical and cultural contexts. The literature is read in English translation. This course will fulfill a literature requirement in the arts and humanities distribution requirement.
Offered every other year. This course fulfills the DIV I.b. distribution requirement.

120 Roman Private Life
Aspects of Roman History (c. 100 BC to AD 100), including family, role and power of women, sexuality, slavery and its variants, work, the environment and its pollution, medicine, reproduction and its management, religion, philosophies, magic, gladiatorial and animal shows, and chariot racing. Readings include modern historians and primary documents (in translation).
Offered every two years.

130 Women in Antiquity
This course examines the lives and roles of women in three periods of Greco-Roman antiquity: Classical Greece, Late Republic/ Early Empire Rome, and Early Christian Rome. Topics include the ancient construction of gender, sexuality, marriage, and the social and legal status of women. Literary and artistic remains provide the basis of writing and discussion which will be informed by current anthropological and feminist approaches.
Offered every two years.

140 Ancient Worlds on Film
An introduction to ancient Greek and Roman history and civilization (excluding mythology) through viewing popular films about this period and reading the historical and literary sources on which those films are based. Wherever possible we will read original primary documents.
This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement.

 

Classical Archaeology

221 Greek Art & Archaeology
A general introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from Prehistoric to Hellenistic times: Bronze Age civilizations (Cycladic, NE Aegean and Trojan, Minoan, Helladic/Mycenaean); Protogeometric, Geometric, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic Greece. A survey of architecture (temple, secular funerary), sculpture, vase-painting, monumental painting, metalwork, and minor arts of these periods, both on mainland Greece and in the Greek colonies (Asia Minor, Pontus, Syria, Phoenice, Egypt, S.I Italy and Sicily); comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments; styles and schools, regional trends, historical contextualization of ancient Greek art and brief consideration of socio-economic patterns, political organization, religion, and writing. Evaluation of the ancient Greek artistic legacy and contribution to civilization. Field trips to archaeological collections and Museums.
This course is cross-listed as ARCH 120. Offered every fall. This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement.

224 Roman Archaeology
A general introduction to the art and archaeology of the Roman world from the Late Republic to the 4th century AD. A survey of architecture (temple, public, domestic, palatial, funerary), monumental painting, sculpture, metalwork, and minor arts of these periods in Italy and the rest of the Roman world; particular emphasis on Rome, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Ostia, Greece/Asia Minor, and North Africa. Comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments; regional trends and foreign influences. Historical and cultural contextualization of Roman art and architecture with consideration of socio-economic patterns, political developments, religion, and writing.
This course is cross-listed as ARCH 130. Offered occasionally. This course fulfills the DIV I.c. distribution requirement.

 

Classical History

251 Greek History
A survey of the history of ancient Greece from 700 to 400 BC. Particular attention is devoted to the relationship of Sparta and Athens, the development of democracy and the cultural achievements of the fifth century BC.
Offered every other fall.

253 Roman History
A survey of the history of ancient Rome from 133 BC to AD 69. Particular attention is devoted to issues and men who brought about the fall of the Republic and the creation of the Empire of Rome.
Offered every other fall. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.