Department Chair
Mariana Past
Associate Professor of Spanish (2006).
Bosler Hall Room 10M
pastm@dickinson.edu
(717) 245-1833
Department Faculty
Alberto J. Rodríguez
Professor of Spanish (1990).
Bosler Hall Room 220
(717) 245-1278 | rodrigua@dickinson.edu
B.A., Clark University, 1974; M.A., 1976; Ph.D., Brown University, 1987.

His scholarship has focused on the Spanish novel of the Golden Age, particularly Cervantes. The subject of his research is the study of narrative discourse in Don Quixote. Besides his work on Cervantes, he has published on other authors of the Spanish Golden Age, and also on Cuban literature.
Mark C. Aldrich
Associate Professor of Spanish (1991).
Bosler Hall Room 123
(717) 245-1288 | aldrich@dickinson.edu
B.A., Hamilton College, 1981; M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1991.

He is particularly interested in 20th century Spanish poetry, although his publications include both Peninsular and Spanish American subjects. He has also published literary translations. Current scholarship is focused on poetry translation and the work of Rafael Pérez Estrada.
Abraham Quintanar
Associate Professor of Spanish (2001).
Bosler Hall Room 205
(717) 245-1884 | quintana@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Scranton, 1993; M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1995, Ph.D., 2002.

Jorge R. Sagastume
(on sabbatical Spring 2015)
Associate Professor of Spanish (2003).
Bosler Hall Room 126
sagastuj@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Utah, 1997; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1998; Ph.D., 2002.

Jorge's main area of research is the intersection of literature and philosophy, in particular philosophy of language. He is the author of Responsabilidad ética en la lectura del texto teatral, a book focusing on the semiotics of theatre, and five annotated volumes of poetry in translation with scholarly studies as well as numerous essays on Spanish American authors. He has recently published on Borges and Cantor's hypothesis of the continuum (Bulletin of Hispanic Studies), on Borges and language and identity (Aisthesis), and on Federico Andahazi and epistemological systems (Anales de Literatura Hispanoamericana). Jorge is currently the Director of the Dickinson Semester/Year Málaga Program, 2012-14.
Elise Bartosik-Vélez
(on sabbatical Spring 2015)
Associate Professor of Spanish (2003).
Bosler Hall Room 320
(717) 245-1844 | bartosie@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of California at San Diego, 1987; Masters in Pacific International Affairs, University of California at San Diego, 1990; M.A., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1997; Ph.D., 2003.

Professor Bartosik-Vélez received her Ph.D. in comparative literature from the University of Illinois. She teaches Latin American literature, and focuses in particular on the colonial period and the nineteenth century. Her research interests include: Christopher Columbus, the colonial and independence era in both Latin America and the United States, comparative colonizations and nationalisms, the intersections between history and literature, and the cultural encounter between the Americas and Europe.
Eva Maria Copeland
Associate Professor of Spanish; Director of the Dickinson Semester/Year in Malaga Program, 2014-16 (2005).
Bosler Hall Room 122
(717) 254-8152 | copelane@dickinson.edu
B.A., Colgate University, 1994; M.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1999; Ph.D., 2004.

Her teaching and research interests include 18th- and 19th-century literature, gender and sexuality studies and cultural studies. She is currently working on a book which explores constructions of masculinity and the intersections of gender, nation, and sexuality in the 19th-century Spanish realist novel.
Mariana Past
Associate Professor of Spanish (2006).
Bosler Hall Room 10M
(717) 245-1833 | pastm@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Texas at Austin, 1994; M.A., Duke University, 2002; Ph.D., 2006.

Twentieth-century Spanish and Francophone Caribbean literature is her area of concentration, and her current projects focus on Haitian-Dominican relations and representations of the Haitian Revolution in both literary and historical texts written in Spanish, French, and Haitian Creole. Her interests also include questions of migration/exile in Caribbean literature and influence vs. imitation in Latin American literature.
Margaret G. Frohlich
Assistant Professor of Spanish (2007).
Bosler Hall Room 5M
(717) 245-1155 | frohlicm@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Colorado-Denver, 2001; Ph.D., Stony Brook University, 2006.

She specializes in 20th century and contemporary narrative with a focus on the construction of national and sexual identities. Her book, Framing the Margin: Nationality and Sexuality across Borders, won the international competition for the Victoria Urbano Monograph Prize of the Asociación Internacional de Literatura y Cultura Femenina Hispánica.
Hector A. Reyes Zaga
Assistant Professor of Spanish (2009).
Bosler Hall Room 7M
(717) 245-1158 | reyeszah@dickinson.edu
Licenciatura en Derecho, Universidad Iberoamericana-Mexico, 1997; M.A., University of Minnesota, 2005; Ph.D., 2009.

Hector earned his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures from the University of Minnesota. He also received a degree in Law from Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City. His research interests include Mexican literature, Latino/a studies, law and literature, immigration studies, and human rights. His current projects focus on the representation of immigrants in literature produced on the Mexican border through the framework of human rights.
Erin McNulty
Assistant Professor of Spanish (2009).
Bosler Hall Room M09
(717) 245-1739 | mcnultye@dickinson.edu
B.A., Hillsdale College, 1990; M.A., Indiana University, 2005; Ph.D., 2011.

Carolina Castellanos
(on sabbatical 2014-15)
Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese (2010).

castellc@dickinson.edu
Literata, Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, 2000; M.A., University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2004; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 2007; Ph.D., 2010.

Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Assistant Professor of Spanish (2010).
Bosler Hall Room 121
(717) 245-1722 | delutisa@dickinson.edu
B.A., B.S., Ithaca College, 2001; M.A., University of Maryland-College Park, 2003; Ph.D., 2010.

Antonio Rivas
Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese (2014).
Bosler Hall Room 122
rivasa@dickinson.edu
B.A., Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 2001; Ph.D., Universite de Neudchatel, 208.

Asunción Arnedo-Aldrich
Visiting Instructor in Spanish (2010).
Bosler Hall Room 217
(717) 245-1874 | arnedoa@dickinson.edu
B.S., M.S., Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain), 1981; M.S., University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1991.

Jenni O. Sharkey
Visiting Instructor in Spanish (2010).
Bosler Hall Room 14M
(717) 245-1408 | sharkeyj@dickinson.edu
B.A., San Martin de Porres University, Peru, 1983; M.S., Western Maryland College, 2006.

Julie Lesman
Visiting Instructor in Spanish (2012).
Bosler Hall Room 2M
lesmanj@dickinson.edu
B.A., Colorado College, 1997; M.A., University of Texas-Austin, 2001.

Edvan P. Brito
Visiting Instructor in Spanish and Portuguese (2014).
Bosler Hall Room M12
britoe@dickinson.edu
B.A., Universidade de Sao Paulo, 2006; M.A., Howard University, 2010.

Contributing Faculty
Marcelo Borges
Professor of History (1997).
Denny Hall Room 111
(717) 245-1186 | borges@dickinson.edu
Licenciado en Historia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1988; Profesor en Historia, 1988; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1997.

He teaches Latin American, Iberian, and comparative history. His current research deals with transatlantic migration from Portugal to Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly to Argentina; and with migration, identity and community formation in the oil fields of Patagonia, Argentina.
J. Mark Ruhl
Glenn E. and Mary L. Todd Professor of Political Science (1975).
Denny Hall Room 207
(717) 245-1501 | ruhl@dickinson.edu
B.A., Dickinson College, 1970; M.A., Syracuse University, 1972; Ph.D., 1975.
Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1988-1989; Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 2012-13

He specializes in comparative politics. His research centers on the politics of democratization in contemporary Latin America with a special emphasis on civil-military relations.