Department Chair
Elena Dúzs
Associate Professor of Russian (1997).
Bosler Hall Room 204
duzs@dickinson.edu
(717) 245-1276
Department Faculty
Elena Dúzs
Associate Professor of Russian (1997).
Bosler Hall Room 204
(717) 245-1276 | duzs@dickinson.edu
M.A., Moscow State University, 1985; M.A., Ohio State University, 1988; Ph.D., 1996.

Her teaching interests include Russian and Hungarian languages and Russian literature and culture of all periods. Her scholarly interests focus on Mikhail Kuzmin, Russian symbolist poet, and the contemporary poet and artist Prygov.
Alyssa DeBlasio
(on leave of absence Fall 2014; on sabbatical Spring 2015)
Assistant Professor of Russian (2010).

deblasia@dickinson.edu
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 2006; Ph.D., 2010.

Her teaching and research interests fall primarily along the intersections of philosophy, Russian literature, and Russo-Soviet cinema. She is also interested in language learning through blogging and media, as well as practical translation skills for advanced language courses. Before coming to Dickinson, Prof. DeBlasio taught in the Department of Philosophy at the Higher School of Economics (Moscow, Russia). In 2014 she published a book titled The End of Russian Philosophy, which looks at the transition of the discipline of philosophy in Russia from the 1990s through the 2000s. Prof. DeBlasio also contributes to the Philosophy Department and the Film Studies Program.
Cassio de Oliveira
Visiting Assistant Professor of Russian (2014).
Bosler Hall Room 115
deolivec@dickinson.edu
B.A., Bard College, 2005; M.A., Yale University, 2008; M.Phil., 2011; Ph.D., 2014.

Alla Zaytseva
Visiting International Scholar in Russian
Bosler Hall Room 4M
zaytseva@dickinson.edu


Contributing Faculty
Karl D. Qualls
Professor of History (2000).
Denny Hall Room 201
(717) 245-1774 | quallsk@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Missouri at Columbia, 1993; Ph.D., Georgetown University, 1998.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 2003-04.

His teaching interests include Russian and German history, comparative revolutions (political, social, and cultural), dictators, urban history, and more. His book "From Ruins to Reconstruction: Urban Identity in Soviet Sevastopol after World War II" (Cornell, 2009) challenges notions of totalitarianism, investigates the creation of historical myths, and outlines the role of monuments and urban space in identity formation in a city torn between Ukraine and Russia. He is currently working on a new book about children who fled the Spanish Civil War and were raised in the Soviet Union.
Adjunct Faculty
Andrey Kukhtenkov
Visiting International Adjunct Professor of German and Russian (2014).
Stern Center for Global Educ Room 002
kukhtena@dickinson.edu