Fall 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 101-01 Elementary Portuguese
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
An intensive study of the fundamentals of Portuguese grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Composition and literary and cultural readings.
0930:MTWRF   BOSLER 214
PORT 201-01 Intermediate Portuguese
Instructor: Shawn Stein
Course Description:
Review of Portuguese syntax. Introduction to conversation and composition through selected cultural and literary readings. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
0930:MTWRF   BOSLER 307
PORT 380-01 Cultures of Soccer (Futebol/FĂștbol) in Latin America
Instructor: Shawn Stein
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01 and SPAN 380-01. With billions of fans, soccer (Brazilian futebol, Spanish American ftbol or European football) is the world's most popular sport. In order to gain a greater understanding of the phenomenon that takes place in stadiums, fields, and homes across the planet, this course examines cultural production (literature, film and art) of soccer from Latin America and scholarship on sport and society, with a focus on fair play and the impact that both the beautiful and ugly elements of the game have on individual and collective identities (nation/region, sex/gender, ethnicity, class and religion). This course will be taught in English with FLIC option for PORT or SPAN credit.
1330:TF   BOSLER 313
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 101-01 Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Erin Diaz
Course Description:
This course is designed for students who have never taken Spanish previously. The course focuses on all four language skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with an emphasis on vocabulary development and listening comprehension development. Prerequisite: No prior study of Spanish and permission of department.
0830:MTWRF   BOSLER 319
SPAN 101-02 Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
Course Description:
This course is designed for students who have never taken Spanish previously. The course focuses on all four language skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with an emphasis on vocabulary development and listening comprehension development. Prerequisite: No prior study of Spanish and permission of department.
0930:MTWRF   BOSLER 319
SPAN 101-03 Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
Course Description:
This course is designed for students who have never taken Spanish previously. The course focuses on all four language skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with an emphasis on vocabulary development and listening comprehension development. Prerequisite: No prior study of Spanish and permission of department.
1030:MTWRF   BOSLER 308
SPAN 102-01 Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Juan Benito-Ruano
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 101. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on speaking. Prerequisite: 101. Upon completion, students go to 201.
0830:MTWRF   BOSLER 313
SPAN 102-02 Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Karin Davidovich
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 101. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on speaking. Prerequisite: 101. Upon completion, students go to 201.
0930:MTWRF   BOSLER 309
SPAN 102-03 Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Karin Davidovich
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 101. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on speaking. Prerequisite: 101. Upon completion, students go to 201.
1030:MTWRF   BOSLER 309
SPAN 102-04 Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 101. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on speaking. Prerequisite: 101. Upon completion, students go to 201.
1030:MTWRF   LIBRY E. ASIAN
SPAN 102-05 Elementary Spanish
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 101. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on speaking. Prerequisite: 101. Upon completion, students go to 201.
0930:MTWRF   LIBRY E. ASIAN
SPAN 201-01 Intermediate Spanish
Instructor: Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 102. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on writing and speaking. Prerequisite: 102 or placement by department. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
0830:MTWRF   BOSLER 314
SPAN 201-02 Intermediate Spanish
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 102. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on writing and speaking. Prerequisite: 102 or placement by department. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
0930:MTWRF   BOSLER 313
SPAN 201-03 Intermediate Spanish
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 102. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on writing and speaking. Prerequisite: 102 or placement by department. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
1030:MTWRF   BOSLER 313
SPAN 201-04 Intermediate Spanish
Instructor: Tina Antonicelli
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 102. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on writing and speaking. Prerequisite: 102 or placement by department. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
1030:MTWRF   BOSLER 315
SPAN 201-05 Intermediate Spanish
Instructor: Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 102. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on writing and speaking. Prerequisite: 102 or placement by department. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
0930:MTWRF   BOSLER 314
SPAN 201-06 Intermediate Spanish
Instructor: Juan Benito-Ruano
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 102. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on writing and speaking. Prerequisite: 102 or placement by department. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
1030:MTWRF   BOSLER 310
SPAN 201-07 Intermediate Spanish
Instructor: Tina Antonicelli
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish 102. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on writing and speaking. Prerequisite: 102 or placement by department. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
1330:MTWRF   BOSLER 213
SPAN 202-01 Advanced Grammar
Instructor: Mark Aldrich
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' formal knowledge of Spanish by reviewing and studying the more challenging grammatical structures. The course will also work on development of skills in reading, oral expression, and vocabulary development. The purpose of the course is to equip students with the formal grammatical background necessary to be successful in courses on Hispanic literatures, linguistics and cultures. Prerequisite: 201, 120, or the equivalent.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 07
SPAN 202-02 Advanced Grammar
Instructor: Eva Copeland
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' formal knowledge of Spanish by reviewing and studying the more challenging grammatical structures. The course will also work on development of skills in reading, oral expression, and vocabulary development. The purpose of the course is to equip students with the formal grammatical background necessary to be successful in courses on Hispanic literatures, linguistics and cultures. Prerequisite: 201, 120, or the equivalent.
1030:MWF   BOSLER 319
SPAN 202-03 Advanced Grammar
Instructor: Eva Copeland
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' formal knowledge of Spanish by reviewing and studying the more challenging grammatical structures. The course will also work on development of skills in reading, oral expression, and vocabulary development. The purpose of the course is to equip students with the formal grammatical background necessary to be successful in courses on Hispanic literatures, linguistics and cultures. Prerequisite: 201, 120, or the equivalent.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 321
SPAN 202-04 Advanced Grammar
Instructor: Eva Copeland
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' formal knowledge of Spanish by reviewing and studying the more challenging grammatical structures. The course will also work on development of skills in reading, oral expression, and vocabulary development. The purpose of the course is to equip students with the formal grammatical background necessary to be successful in courses on Hispanic literatures, linguistics and cultures. Prerequisite: 201, 120, or the equivalent.
0930:MWF   BOSLER 306
SPAN 231-01 Fiesta: Rituals and Celebrations in Hispanic Cultures
Instructor: Mark Aldrich
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. In this course students will learn about some of the major festivals and rituals that are central to Hispanic cultures. We will study different kinds of fiestas in Spain and Latin America from multiple perspectives, and will strive to understand many of their multiple roles in terms of community, religion, entertainment, and even tourism. Part of our learning will develop from representations of fiestas in visual arts, literature, first person accounts, and popular media.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 213
SPAN 231-02 Fiesta: Rituals and Celebrations in Hispanic Cultures
Instructor: Mark Aldrich
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. In this course students will learn about some of the major festivals and rituals that are central to Hispanic cultures. We will study different kinds of fiestas in Spain and Latin America from multiple perspectives, and will strive to understand many of their multiple roles in terms of community, religion, entertainment, and even tourism. Part of our learning will develop from representations of fiestas in visual arts, literature, first person accounts, and popular media.
1230:MWF   BOSLER 213
SPAN 231-03 Crime Fiction in Hispanic Contexts
Instructor: Antonio Rivas Bonillo
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. The topic of this section of 231 is twentieth-century crime fiction. Throughout the semester students will read different examples of the genre from Hispanic works that will lead to the exploration of topics such as politics and power, history and identity. In addition to readings, students will be asked to watch films outside of class. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work.
0930:MWF   DENNY 112
SPAN 231-04 Framing the Marginal I/Eye
Instructor: Amaury Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-02 and FMST 210-03. How is the marginal I/Eye fashioned and embodied in its encounter with power and other individuals? In what ways does the I/Eye serve as an organizing principle around which tactics and strategies of resistance, revolt, and social justice are mobilized? In this course, we will explore the different ways individuals go about occupying that I/Eye, how they maintain and/or challenge it, and how they are compelled and/or inspired to present it to themselves and those around them. Our primary objects of study will be texts produced in Spain, Latin America, and the Caribbean, and the visual reproductions carried out by film directors from these regions as well as from the United States. On one hand, our conversations will center on the historical, cultural, political space marginal writers, artists, activists occupied and the I-texts they composed. On the other, our discussions will assess the cinematic eye each director crafted in their adaptation and appropriation of the marginal I. Throughout, we will address and unpack the ethical and aesthetic negotiations present in packaging these subject/visual positions.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305
SPAN 231-05 Contemporary Satire in Latin America
Instructor: Shawn Stein
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-03. The objective of this course is to analyze the use of the satiric mode through contemporary cultural production (short stories, films, comics, songs, essays) from different countries in Latin America. Students will acquire appropriate technical and analytical vocabulary to begin reading, writing and discussing elements of the satiric mode (for example, irony, parody and the grotesque) and understanding the satiric tradition in Latin America. We will explore the ways in which historical, social and political topics (democracy, equality, liberty, justice, censorship, prejudice, taboos, stereotypes and identity) inform different cultural productions with satiric impulses.
1500:TF   BOSLER 313
SPAN 239-01 Spanish for the Health Professions
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
Course Description:
This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: 202 or above, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as LALC 239. This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: 202 or above, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as LALC 239.
1230:MWF   BOSLER 313
SPAN 305-01 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Karin Davidovich
Course Description:
This course introduces students to different methods of reading and analyzing cultural products of the Spanish-speaking world. Strong emphasis is placed on expanding and honing strategies for close reading and/or interpretation, a practice that requires paying careful attention to the formal features of cultural products as well as their thematic content and generic conventions. Students will develop the necessary methodological skills and vocabulary enabling them to produce writing for academic purposes, which includes conducting advanced research and incorporating secondary sources to strengthen students own written arguments. This course prepares students for upper-level Spanish courses by fostering their abilities to examine discourses, analyze arguments, and construct arguments of their own. Prerequisite: 231. This course introduces students to different methods of reading and analyzing cultural products of the Spanish-speaking world. Strong emphasis is placed on expanding and honing strategies for close reading and/or interpretation, a practice that requires paying careful attention to the formal features of cultural products as well as their thematic content and generic conventions. Students will develop the necessary methodological skills and vocabulary enabling them to produce writing for academic purposes, which includes conducting advanced research and incorporating secondary sources to strengthen students own written arguments. This course prepares students for upper-level Spanish courses by fostering their abilities to examine discourses, analyze arguments, and construct arguments of their own. Prerequisite: 231.
1330:TF   BOSLER 319
SPAN 305-02 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
This course introduces students to different methods of reading and analyzing cultural products of the Spanish-speaking world. Strong emphasis is placed on expanding and honing strategies for close reading and/or interpretation, a practice that requires paying careful attention to the formal features of cultural products as well as their thematic content and generic conventions. Students will develop the necessary methodological skills and vocabulary enabling them to produce writing for academic purposes, which includes conducting advanced research and incorporating secondary sources to strengthen students own written arguments. This course prepares students for upper-level Spanish courses by fostering their abilities to examine discourses, analyze arguments, and construct arguments of their own. Prerequisite: 231. This course introduces students to different methods of reading and analyzing cultural products of the Spanish-speaking world. Strong emphasis is placed on expanding and honing strategies for close reading and/or interpretation, a practice that requires paying careful attention to the formal features of cultural products as well as their thematic content and generic conventions. Students will develop the necessary methodological skills and vocabulary enabling them to produce writing for academic purposes, which includes conducting advanced research and incorporating secondary sources to strengthen students own written arguments. This course prepares students for upper-level Spanish courses by fostering their abilities to examine discourses, analyze arguments, and construct arguments of their own. Prerequisite: 231.
1330:MR   BOSLER 319
SPAN 380-01 Cultures of Soccer (Futebol/FĂștbol) in Latin America
Instructor: Shawn Stein
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01 and PORT 380-01. With billions of fans, soccer (Brazilian futebol, Spanish American ftbol or European football) is the world's most popular sport. In order to gain a greater understanding of the phenomenon that takes place in stadiums, fields, and homes across the planet, this course examines cultural production (literature, film and art) of soccer from Latin America and scholarship on sport and society, with a focus on fair play and the impact that both the beautiful and ugly elements of the game have on individual and collective identities (nation/region, sex/gender, ethnicity, class and religion). This course will be taught in English with FLIC option for PORT or SPAN credit.
1330:TF   BOSLER 313
SPAN 380-02 Translation as Art and Profession
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to the art of translation. Students will learn different theories and approaches to translation, and work on translating texts in disciplines such as law, science, technology, business and finance, the humanities, literature, and others. In the process, students will further appreciate how cultural awareness in both worlds, that of the source of the text and that of the target, shapes translation and how, in turn, this shapes our understanding of our own culture through other cultures (Spain and Latin America, the US, UK and other English-speaking countries). The class will emphasize translation from Spanish into English. Prerequisites: 305 and one additional 300-level course; or, 305 and permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   LIBRY E. ASIAN
SPAN 385-01 Self and the City: Latinx Literature, Film, Popular Culture
Instructor: Amaury Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 385-01. How have Latinx individuals and communities crafted their identities, how have they represented their differences? How have they made sense of their past, and what futures have they imagined? What terrains have they navigated, shaped, and/or redefined in understanding, creating, and narrating their diverse experiences, and how have these spaces aided and/or challenged their Latinx subjectivities? In this course, we will focus on the spatial politics of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, nationality, and language as we study, interrogate, and relate the identity and place accorded to and set by Latinxs individuals and communities. Throughout, we will turn to a variety of texts from the early modern to the contemporary, from the United States, the Caribbean, Latin America, and Spain: poetry, spoken word, short story, music, novel, performance art, essay, and film, in order to investigate the ways in which Latinxs have elaborated a sense of self and place. Cross-listed with LALC 385.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 07
SPAN 410-01 Building Meaningful Spaces from the 19th Century: A Case Study of Chile
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 390-01. For a period of over seven months in 2011, Chilean students dissatisfied with their countrys education system inherited from Augusto Pinochets dictatorship territorialized public spaces to express their discontent and to clamor for change. They not only participated in highly coordinated marches, flash mobs (to include Michael Jacksons Thriller), among other theatrical activities; they also occupied education and public buildings, and marked historical monuments of national importance with graffiti and props. Almost 170 years after the University of Chile's opening, the meaningful actions and writings offered in the contemporary context of the protests resignified the University's walls, the iconic monument of the institution's founding father (Andrs Bello) and, arguably, the Universitys inaugural address that he offered in 1843. This course examines the signification of a series of "spaces" (physical, ideological, etc.) rooted in the 19th century, to discuss their plausible signification for the building of the Chilean nation following independence and, many times, beyond. Several "spaces" to be studied may include: Philadelphia and Ecuador (in the work of Camilo Henrquez); Argentina, and Chile as a place of exile (Esteban Echeverra; Domingo Faustino Sarmiento); the Church of La Compaa (Bello, Sarmiento, Mercedes Marn de Solar, Jos Antonio Soffia, and the more contemporary work of Englishman, Canon Keith Evans); mines (Jotabeche, Baldomero Lillo, and materials from the 2010 Copiap mining accident); and other centers and peripheries in the context of the 19th century (Daniel Barros Grez and Jotabeche (Santiago and the provincias); and Alberto Blest Gana (Santiago and the provincias, again, the space of mining towns, France in Chile; and the contested territory of the mapuches).
1330:W   BOSLER 314
SPAN 500-01 Intersectionality in Contemporary Spanish Film
Instructor: Antonio Rivas Bonillo, Eva Copeland
Course Description:
 
SPAN 500-02 Spain & The Ideology of Conquest in the America
Instructor: Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
 
SPAN 500-03 Urban Planning & Cultural Change: Malaga in the 21st Century
Instructor: Mark Aldrich
Course Description: