Fall 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
0830:MWF   DENNY 110
POSC 120-02 American Government
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
POSC 150-01 Comparative Politics
Instructor: David Strand
Course Description:
An introduction to comparative political analysis with applications to political systems, processes, and issues in countries of the Third World and in advanced industrial states alike. The purpose of the course is to learn to observe systematically, to analyze political phenomena, and to distinguish and evaluate the assumptions underlying alternative approaches to the study of politics.
1330:MR   STERN 103
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01.
1030:MWF   DENNY 311
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Edward Webb, Robert Musgrave
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02.
0930:MWF   DENNY 110
POSC 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Robert Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-03.
1330:R   DENNY 317
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.
1030:MWF   DENNY 103
POSC 220-01 Constitutional Law I
Instructor: Harold Pohlman
Course Description:
An analysis of constitutional adjudication in the areas of separation of powers, federalism, and economic rights. Special emphasis is placed upon the idea of a written constitution and the role that judges play in our constitutional system. Topics include Watergate, war powers, and legislative veto. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
0930:MWF   DENNY 204
POSC 239-01 Research Methods
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Helps the student answer (in the affirmative) the question, "Is political science a science?" Students will learn how to generate and test hypotheses through creating and executing research designs. Survey research, experimentation, content analysis, participant observation, and other methodologies will be studied. Although no prior knowledge of statistics is necessary, Math 120 and/or Math 121 are helpful. This class is especially recommended for prospective graduate students in the social sciences.
1500:MW   STERN 11
POSC 247-01 The American Presidency
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
An in-depth analysis of the nature and significance of "the Man" and "the Office," including constitutional development, presidential roles and customs, the recruitment process, the executive branch, and the politics of the presidency. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   DENNY 211
POSC 252-01 African Government & Politics
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
POSC 277-01 International Politics of the Middle East
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 277-01 and MEST 266-01.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 110
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Douglas Stuart
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 110
POSC 290-01 Zionism: Ideology, Institutions, Cultures & Contestations
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 262-01 and MEST 262-01. This course aims to provide students with a multi-dimensional understanding of Zionism as a political ideology that found its expression in the creation of a state, the establishment of a particular set of economic and cultural institutions as well as in the creation of new conceptions of land, space, and group interaction. At once a future-oriented revolutionary ideology and revivalist movement based on the idea of returning to an ancient homeland, the significance of Zionism in 20th and 21st centuries cannot be understated. Zionism (or rather, Zionists), produced a state Israel whose foundation has roiled politics in the Middle East until today. This course will look at the particular historical circumstances that gave rise to Zionism in the late 19th century, Zionist institutions, political culture and dominant historical narratives. The course will conclude with a detailed examination of more contemporary critics of Zionism both from within Israel and outside of it.
1330:MR   DENNY 104
POSC 290-02 International Terrorism
Instructor: Anthony Williams
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-02. This course will cover the global war on terrorism, its origins, its characteristics, and the ends, ways and means of the participants. We will begin by seeking to arrive at a working definition of terrorism. We will examine various historic case studies in an effort to identify common characteristics of terrorist activity, terrorist motivations, the origins of today's terrorist movements, and a general typology of terrorism. We will focus on specific "types" of terrorist activity as those types manifest themselves in the global war on terrorism. We will address the catastrophic events of September 11, 2001 and their impact on the national security of the United States. Finally, we will examine the current strategy of the United States in the global war on terrorism, and its implications and challenges.
1500:MR   DENNY 103
POSC 290-03 The Politics of Parks
Instructor: David Strand
Course Description:
Whether located at the center of a city or in the midst of a wilderness, public parks comprise a uniquely modern public good, designed to meet competing and complementary needs for social recreation, open space, and the conservation of nature and preservation of biodiversity. Worldwide they host endangered animals like Bengal tigers and "urban animals" like pigeons, squirrels and household pets. They are home to cricket and softball leagues as well as history-changing protests and orations. We will examine public and national parks as public policy, objects of planning and design, expressions of political culture and social change, and opportunities to represent and rethink the relationship between humankind and the natural world.
1030:TR   DENNY 104
POSC 290-06 Media & National Security: How Reporting Can Change Policy, and Sometimes, History
Instructor: Douglas Stuart, Kimberly Dozier
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-05. Journalists deliver the first draft of history, informing the public, policymakers, the business world and beyond. They drive public opinion, politics, policy and business at home and abroad. Their reports can help fuel debate, trigger diplomatic conflict or pressure competing sides into talking peace. But when you read "a U.S. official said," do you know the rules governing how that information was given out? Do you understand how a single news report can trigger a change in policy on Capitol Hill, or the firing of a top official at the White House, or the shifting in strategy and tactics of a multiyear, multibillion-dollar war? Explore case studies from Vietnam to Kosovo, Iraq to Afghanistan, WikiLeaks to the NSA's Edward Snowden, and meet some of those delivering the news.
0900:TR   DENNY 303
POSC 290-07 Energy & Global Politics
Instructor: Edward Webb, Robert Musgrave
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-07. Does oil cause war? Do energy-producing countries develop differently than energy-consuming ones? Will the advent of alternative energy sources make global politics and economics more stable? In this course, we look at the past, present, and future of the global energy market and its effects on global politics--and vice versa. Our goal is to understand the theories that political scientists and students of international relations have developed to answer these questions and to help you prepare for coming transformations in the way the world works.
1500:MW   DENNY 203
POSC 390-01 Campaigns and Elections
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
The purpose of this seminar is to examine and analyze the role of the political campaign in the American political system. We will look at key aspects of campaigns candidates; money; polling; advertising; and media as we read current research on the state of campaigning in the United States. Since this seminar occurs during an election season, students should expect to actively engage with current events, relating course topics to what they are observing in the day-to-day campaigns of the midterm elections. Political pundits and commentators generate a tremendous amount of analysis, commentary, and predictions about American elections; however, in this class we will move beyond these types of comments and attempt to understand how voters decide and how campaigns persuade.
1330:T   WESTC 1
POSC 390-02 Global Political Thinking
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Did Gandhi have a political theory? Confucius? Mohammed? In this class, we will study the emerging field of Comparative Political Theory, exploring political thought outside the Western world, and considering how politics has been though about in East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa. We will also consider how this challenges our conceptions of political philosophy, constitutional law, and human rights, and indeed of politics itself.
1330:W   DENNY 15
POSC 390-03 Consequences of China's Economic Reforms
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01. This seminar will explore the wide-ranging impact of China's post-Mao economic reforms. Its main goal is to significantly deepen students understanding of certain facets of the current Chinese scene and develop and hone analytical and writing skills. We will be covering politics (both high and low ), economic and social changes, protest, law and private and family life, among other topics.
1330:W   STERN 12