Fall 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
0900:TR   DENNY 212
POSC 120-02 American Government
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
0830:MWF   DENNY 211
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1030:MWF   DENNY 203
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:TF   DENNY 304
POSC 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:MR   DENNY 203
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Harold Pohlman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
1500:TR   DENNY 21
POSC 202-01 Recent Political Thought
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 280-01. This class aims to show the breadth and vitality of the field of political theory today. It does this by deepening and broadening the account of the discipline offered in POSC 180, discussing the most important recent accounts of justice, freedom, and equality, and adding consideration of democracy, rights, power, culture, community, and cosmopolitanism. We will also explore issues of exploitation and exclusion relating to gender, class, race, and human interaction with the natural environment, and consider how recent theorists have tried to challenge these practices. The class also explores the contours of political theory as an academic field of study, considering the disciplinary contributions of fields such as philosophy, political science, international relations, legal studies, and history, and major ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, anarchism, and feminism. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 280. Prerequisite: 180 or PHIL 180, or permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
POSC 204-01 Competing Political Ideologies
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
This class surveys the major ideologies that compete for political support in Western societies, such as liberalism, conservatism, and socialism, as well as radical alternatives (anarchism and fascism), and new perspectives such as feminism and ecologism/environmentalism. We will also examine the nature of ideology, and whether it is possible to develop a neutral, non-ideological perspective on politics. Prerequisite: 180, or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   DENNY 212
POSC 220-01 Constitutional Law I
Instructor: Harold Pohlman
Course Description:
An analysis of constitutional adjudication in the areas of separation of powers, federalism, and economic rights. Special emphasis is placed upon the idea of a written constitution and the role that judges play in our constitutional system. Topics include Watergate, war powers, and legislative veto. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   DENNY 104
POSC 239-01 Research Methods
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Helps the student answer (in the affirmative) the question, "Is political science a science?" Students will learn how to generate and test hypotheses through creating and executing research designs. Survey research, experimentation, content analysis, participant observation, and other methodologies will be studied. Although no prior knowledge of statistics is necessary, Math 120 and/or Math 121 are helpful. This class is especially recommended for prospective graduate students in the social sciences.
1330:TF   DENNY 104
POSC 247-01 The American Presidency
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
An in-depth analysis of the nature and significance of "the Man" and "the Office," including constitutional development, presidential roles and customs, the recruitment process, the executive branch, and the politics of the presidency. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
POSC 252-01 African Government & Politics
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04. An introduction to the politics of contemporary, sub-Saharan Africa. After analyzing the historical and socio-economic context of African politics, the course examines a number of contrasting political systems in depth. The final section of the course discusses the current problems of South Africa from an international perspective. Prerequisite: one course in political science.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
POSC 264-01 Politics, Society & Culture in Israel
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 264-01 and MEST 264-01. This course provides an overview of the major political, social, and cultural forces that have shaped, and continue to shape, modern Israel. It covers the origins of the Zionist movement, political leadership, foreign relations, parties, the electoral system and the Israeli-Palestinian and Israeli-Arab conflict more broadly. In society, it focuses on the major cleavages in Israeli society, civil society, consumerism, as well as the impact of the Holocaust and the role of the Israel Defense Forces. The cultural component centers largely on poetry, short stories and changes in popular music. The course is intended to add nuance and depth to the often one-dimensional portrayal of Israel in the media and provide students with the analytical tools to better understand events in the Middle East. This course is cross-listed as MEST 264 and JDST 264.
1330:TR   DENNY 21
POSC 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 271.
0900:TR   DENNY 211
POSC 277-01 International Politics of the Middle East
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 277-01 and MEST 266-01. This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as MEST 266 and INST 277.
1500:TF   DENNY 203
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Douglas Stuart
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
POSC 280-02 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Andrew Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-02. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
1330:MR   EASTC 301
POSC 281-01 American National Security Policy
Instructor: Andrew Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 281-01. Analysis of formulation and implementation of American national security policy within the context of American society and the international system. National security will not be considered simply in a military/strategic sense but as connoting the preservation of the core values of a society. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or 120 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 281.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
POSC 290-01 Comparative Law
Instructor: Douglas Edlin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-01. This course explores most of the major legal traditions of the world. We will begin by considering the concepts, functions and methods of comparative legal study. We will consider broad and specific distinctions between the common law and civil law traditions, with special emphasis on two common law systems (the United States and the United Kingdom) and two civil law systems (France and Germany). We then examine the EU legal system. We conclude by evaluating the historical and institutional development of legal cultures by considering the systems of Jewish, Islamic and Hindu law. Some of the questions we will try to answer are: Why did certain societies develop certain legal cultures? Are certain legal systems best suited to certain social arrangements? What is the relationship between religious law and municipal law? How do different legal traditions attempt to achieve the sometimes competing social, legal and governmental goals of order and justice? What role do constitutions and courts play in maintaining the rule of law?
1030:TR   DENNY 303
POSC 290-02 European Security
Instructor: Robert Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-02. What security issues do European countries face? How are European countries and the European Union responding to various threats? This course delves into the structure of European security, examines the security challenges confronted by Europe, and weighs the opportunities these challenges present for enhancing Europe's security and global leadership. Students will learn how European governments define security and formulate strategies to meet a host of security concerns. In particular, this course addresses the nature of NATO-EU relations, the development of an independent European security and defense policy, the status of European military forces and defense procurement, the performance of European peacekeeping operations in the Balkans (Bosnia and Kosovo), Africa (the Congo), and Afghanistan (ISAF), the assessment of potential threats emanating from Russia (energy security), and the European response to transnational terrorism.
1500:TF   DENNY 103
POSC 290-03 International Terrorism
Instructor: Anthony Williams
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03.This course provides a historic overview of international terrorism, its origins, evolution, characteristics, and the strategies of the participants. Starting with a clear definition of terrorism, the course will examine various historic case studies in an effort to identify common characteristics of terrorist activity, terrorist motivations, the origins of today's terrorist movements, and a general typology of terrorism. Studies will focus on specific "types" of terrorist activity as those types manifest themselves in the world today. The catastrophic events of September 11, 2001 and their impact on the national security of the United States will be the subject of several lessons. Finally, this course will examine the current strategies in the international struggle against terrorism, and their implications and challenges.
1500:MR   DENNY 103
POSC 290-04 The Personal is Political: Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Instructor: Kathleen Marchetti
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-02. Overview to field of gender and politics. Examines role women play in U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. Course also discusses theories of the role(s) gender plays in various aspects of politics.
1230:MWF   DENNY 104
POSC 290-05 Interest Groups
Instructor: Kathleen Marchetti
Course Description:
Course explores the formation and maintenance of organizations; how organizations achieve their policy goals; the effect of interest groups in the policy making process; the nature of interest group influence; and representation via organizations.
1500:MW   DENNY 211
POSC 290-06 Advocacy Organizations, Social Movements, and the Politics of Identity
Instructor: Kathleen Marchetti
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-03. Advocacy organizations/social movements as agents of political change in American politics. Course discusses organizations/movements that represent racial/ethnic minorities, women, religious conservatives, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender people, and low-income people.
1500:TF   DENNY 110
POSC 390-01 Campaigns and Elections
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
The purpose of this seminar is to examine and analyze the role of the political campaign in the American political system. We will look at key aspects of campaigns candidates; money; polling; advertising; and media as we read current research on the state of campaigning in the United States. Since this seminar occurs during an election season, students should expect to actively engage with current events, relating course topics to what they are observing in the day-to-day campaigns of candidates currently competing for office. Political pundits and commentators generate a tremendous amount of analysis, commentary, and predictions about American elections; however, in this class we will move beyond these types of comments and attempt to understand how voters decide and how campaigns persuade.
1330:M   DENNY 21
POSC 390-02 Interpreting the Chinese Cultural Revolution
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 310-01.This seminar examines the varying approaches and methodologies scholars have adopted in studying the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in China (1966-1976), one of the most important political events in modern Chinese history. While the course does cover some history, its approach is mainly analytical to formulate effective research results. How can we know if a certain methodology is appropriate? How have primary and secondary sources been used to understand this complex event? The goal is to teach students about what happened during the Cultural Revolution and how scholars have studied it.
1330:W   STERN 12