Spring 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
1330:TF   DENNY 304
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 201
POSC 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
1500:TF   DENNY 103
POSC 205-01 American Political Thought
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Is there a distinctively American way of thinking about politics? How have American political thinkers drawn on and differentiated themselves from political theory in other parts of the world? This course seeks to answer these questions by considering some of the major thinkers in the USA from its foundation to the present day. We will consider both the dominant liberalism and conservativism of mainstream American thought and radical challenges to it, from abolitionists through socialists and feminists to anarchists, environmentalists, and pacifists, and topics such as civil disobedience, federalism, constitutional interpretation, and republicanism. Defining political thought broadly, the class includes detailed consideration of activist political movements at key moments in the nations history, including the New Left in the 1960s, the New Right in the 1970s, and the Occupy movement. We will ask such questions as, How did the USA maintain slavery so deep into the 19th century?, Why has there been no major socialist movement in the USA? and What are the sources of American exceptionalism? Students should find some of their fundamental preconceptions about American political ideas challenged and come away with a deeper understanding of the countrys political culture. Prerequisite: POSC/PHIL 180.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
POSC 221-01 Constitutional Law II
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
An exploration of American constitutional rights. Both historical developments and contemporary issues are addressed. Topics include racial and sexual equality, affirmative action, seditious speech, and school prayer. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   DENNY 112
POSC 232-01 Religion in American Politics
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 250-03. This class will provide students with an overview of the role of religion in American politics. Students will become more familiar with the dynamics of a complex and diverse United States through in-depth study of the political differences that define several major religious groups. The political intersections between religion, race, gender, sexual orientation and class will be explored, helping students to think critically about political power. Other topics will include important aspects of constitutional law as they pertain to religious rights, and the various ways in which religion influences public policy.
1130:MWF   DENNY 313
POSC 233-01 Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-05. Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.This course is cross-listed as WGSS 202. Prerequisite: 120 or AP credit equivalent.
1500:TF   DENNY 304
POSC 243-01 Mass Media and American Politics
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-04. Examines the causes, content, and consequences of political news, primarily focusing on television. It will explore the ways in which audience characteristics, organizational routines, and professional socialization influence the style and substance of the news. The content of news will be analyzed for: the three branches of government, war, foreign governments, crises, and presidential campaigns. The impact of the media on political behavior will also be discussed. Content analysis will be used by students to systematically analyze television network news. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   DENNY 304
POSC 246-01 The Legislative Process
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
An analysis of the legislative branch of government, especially Congress. Emphasis is placed upon the legislature as a social system, the decision-making process, the interrelationships with the political parties and interest groups, the executive and the judiciary. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
0930:MWF   DENNY 211
POSC 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 248-01. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 248.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
POSC 251-01 Latin American Government and Politics
Instructor: Santiago Anria
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 251-01. An introduction to the politics of contemporary Latin America. Emphasis is placed upon the varied political institutional responses to socio-economic change in the Americas. Major countries to be analyzed include Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Cuba. Prerequisite: one course in political science or Latin American, Latino and Caribbean Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 251.
1330:MR   DENNY 110
POSC 258-01 Human Rights
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights embodies a global consensus on the fundamental importance of human rights as a political value. But the idea and its practical applications have provoked intense controversy around the world on issues such as freedom of expression, capital punishment and torture, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, social and economic justice, and cultural and minority rights. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of the instructor.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
POSC 261-01 Authoritarianism & Change in the Middle East & North Africa
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 261-01. This course will examine the most important features of the different varieties of authoritarian regimes in the Middle East & North Africa (MENA) and seek to explain the different outcomes of popular uprisings against them and other pressures to reform. Participants will study the range of governing institutions and traditions among modern MENA regimes. Students will learn to analyze competing explanations for the persistence of authoritarianism in the regionfor example: explanations derived from culture; from abundant hydrocarbons resources; from colonialism; and from historical institutionsas well as the prospects for the spread of more democratic government in the region.This course is cross-listed as MEST 261.
1330:MR   DENNY 203
POSC 271-01 Ethics and International Security
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 271-01. A course in applied ethics that examines the role ethical considerations both do and should play in the pursuit of national and international security objectives. Among the specific topics to be examined are the decision to go to war, rules governing how wars are fought, the ethics of weapons of mass destruction, the ethics of terrorism, the torture debate, economic sanctions, and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 271.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
POSC 281-01 American National Security Policy
Instructor: Marybeth Ulrich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 281-01. Analysis of formulation and implementation of American national security policy within the context of American society and the international system. National security will not be considered simply in a military/strategic sense but as connoting the preservation of the core values of a society. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or 120 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 281.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
POSC 290-01 China's Foreign Relations
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-03. This course examines China's relationship to the major world powers, regions and international organizations. Beginning with a consideration of Chinese traditions of dealing with foreign countries, we will then examine the revolutionary legacy of Mao Zedong and the reorientation of foreign policy under Deng Xiaoping after 1978. The course will focus on the role of ideology, history, culture, interests, and leadership in China's foreign relations.
1500:MR   STERN 103
POSC 290-02 The Politics of High-Speed Growth in Asia
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-06 and INST 290-02. The rise of Asia as an economic force since the late 19th century has been one of the most important developments in the history of the world. Beginning with Japan in the 1880s but later encompassing South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore in the 1950s and 1960s and then China in the late 1990s, the Asia-Pacific region has been a dynamo of economic growth: billions of people have been lifted out of poverty, Asian states have grown rich and more vocal on the world stage, millionaires have been minted and new middle classes have emerged. In this class we will explore the historical, political, economic and cultural factors that help explain this development. Among the questions we will focus are whether there is a distinctly Asian model of development that stands in contrast to Western patterns, the role of wars, authoritarianism, colonialism, and cultural factors such as Confucianism.
1030:TR   STERN 103
POSC 290-03 Asian Urban Ecology
Instructor: David Strand
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with ecological modernization, the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jakarta, Delhi, H Ch Minh City, Taipei, Varanasi, Manila and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.
0900:TR   STERN 103
POSC 290-04 The Politics of American Pop Culture
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
This class will explore the important interactions between pop culture and American politics. Over the course of the semester, we will explore topics such as the impact of hip hop music on political behavior, the partisan and informational consequences that come from watching comedy programs like Saturday Night Live and The Daily Show, government censorship of entertainment products, the politics of sports and fashion, and the impact that pop culture has had on the criminal justice system. This class will also feature a number of in-depth case studies, ranging from the political career of Arnold Schwarzenegger to the use of social media by the Howard Dean presidential campaign.
1500:MR   DENNY 313
POSC 290-05 The Media in War and Peace
Instructor: Jacob Jacob
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03.Media and Communications are integral to the ways and means through which contemporary battles are fought ranging from the symbolic acts of terrorism to state-sponsored malign influence operations, and full-scale warfare. This course provides students with a deeper awareness of the increasingly sophisticated means and forms through which international conflicts are `mediatized and how peace can be represented in contemporary society.
0900:TR   DENNY 211
POSC 390-01 Religion and Politics in the Middle East
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 490-01. This seminar will study interactions of state, society, and religion in the Middle East and North Africa from different perspectives, including media and public culture, institutions, and individual versus group rights. Participants will examine questions such as state regulation of religious activity, the experiences of religious minorities, and religiously-inspired political parties and organizations in several countries to include Iran, Turkey, Israel, and one or more Arab states. Each participant will write a substantial research paper, as well as contributing to weekly discussion in class and online
1330:T   ALTHSE 206
POSC 390-02 Global Political Thinking
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Did Gandhi have a political theory? Confucius? Mohammed? In this class, we will study the emerging field of Comparative Political Theory, exploring political thought outside the Western world, and considering how politics has been though about in East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa. We will also consider how this challenges our conceptions of political philosophy, constitutional law, and human rights, and indeed of politics itself.
1330:W   DENNY 204
POSC 390-03 National Security Law
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
This seminar will examine core issues of U.S. national security law, both from the perspective of domestic law (the U.S. Constitution and relevant statutes) and international law (relevant treaties and customary international law). A central theme of the course will be the degree to which policy-makers in the national security field should consider themselves bound by international law. The goal of the course is to expand student awareness of the difficult and complex legal issues that exist in this policy area. Topics that will be addressed include the right to wage war, targeted killing, covert action, interrogation, and military commissions.
1330:T   DENNY 204
POSC 390-04 Democracy and Disobedience
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 400-01. Do we have an obligation to obey the laws enacted by our government? If democracy is understood to be government by and for the people, what do we owe to the state and our peers? Are we morally obligated to obey laws that we consider unjust? And, if the laws are indeed deemed unjust, what kinds of disobedience to them are justified? By way of considering answers to these questions, this course will engage with a range of classic and contemporary texts from philosophers, legal actors, and practitioners of disobedience on such themes as obligation, justice, non-violent versus violent action, coercion, responsibility, authority, and liberty. We will consider foundational texts from thinkers like Plato, John Locke, and John Stuart Mill, and we will devote significant time to analyzing tangible moments of democratically-oriented disobedience, including: the American Revolution (which will feature the popular musical Hamilton, the Federalist papers, and the 19th century writings of Henry David Thoreau), the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s (which will draw from the speeches and writings of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and free speech leaders like Mario Savio), the Feminist Movement (which will incorporate writings from historical figures like Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony), and the present (which will examine the Supreme Courts recent decisions on hate speech, the rise of the Black Lives Matter Movement, and popular responses to Donald Trumps Executive Orders). Each of these moments will serve as test cases for thinking about expanding, altering, or otherwise rehabilitating the political and legal conditions of participatory and representative democracy. When and where appropriate, students can expect to observe or analyze the coverage of protests.
1330:W   DENNY 303
POSC 490-01 Senior Thesis
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Senior political science majors who are interested may apply to take this course during the spring semester of their senior year. The course involves writing a senior thesis based on a question of the students own choosing.Permission of instructor is required.
  DENNY 204