Fall 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
This class will be flexibly designed in order to accommodate students working in different places and times. Each week, students will be expected to stream a series of short video lectures, and to complete several course readings, at a time that is convenient for them. Then, all students will be expected to participate in one synchronous discussion section held via Zoom on Thursday afternoon 3-4pm OR Friday morning 9-10am. Students can choose which section best fits their schedule on a week-to-week basis. Alternative methods of completing the course can also be arranged for students unavailable at these specific times. Course assignments will include regular quizzes on course video lectures and readings, a series of short papers, and a lengthy final essay. A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
  DIST
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01.Course content will be delivered via weekly asynchronous, recorded PowerPoint videos to which I will add my narration. We will have one live, synchronous Zoom class session each week during the scheduled class time to discuss readings and to help clarify points from the PowerPoint videos. The second scheduled weekly class time will be for one-on-one Zoom consultations. You should complete each weeks assigned readings (~50 pages per week) and view the weeks PowerPoint videos (~1 hour per week) prior to each live meeting. Other details about course requirements will be provided during the first week of the semester. Note: I will record the live sessions for those who occasionally miss them and for others to review. However, if time zone issues or other considerations mean you will generally not be able to participate live, you should consider another course that works better in your schedule. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
0900:TR   DIST
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02.Lectures will be posted asynchronously, as well as some other online activities; we will meet on zoom as a large group during the regular course time An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:MR   DIST
POSC 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-03.Asynchronous presentations of content, chunked for digestibility, will be delivered via Moodle. Discussion sessions will meet twice weekly in smaller groups. I will divide the scheduled class time (TF 130P - 245P) among three groups. Students and I will meet via Zoom (video optional for students), for around 20 minutes, then the next group will switch in. Sessions will be recorded so students can review their own group discussion as well as others, ensuring equity. Students abroad or who are for any other reason unable to participate in synchronous sessions can review the recordings of those group discussions and then schedule one-on-one conversations with me. Assessment will be a combination of weekly low-stakes quizzes, participation points for contributions to synchronous and asynchronous (forum) discussions, and essay-based exams. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:TF   DIST
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01.Class will be taught synchronously via zoom and will feature a combination of lecture, discussion, and team exercises. Student online attendance is required, although absences for legitimate reasons will be excused. Participation in discussions and team exercises is factored into the final grade. If, for any reason, students are generally unable to join remotely during the scheduled time period, they should consider taking a different class, one that fits their schedule and time zone. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
0900:TR   DIST
POSC 180-02 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-02.Asynchronous presentations of content will be delivered via Moodle. Discussion sessions will meet synchronously in smaller groups during regular class time. Sessions will be recorded so students can review their own group discussion as well as others, ensuring equity. Students abroad or who are for any other reason unable to participate in synchronous sessions can review the recordings of those group discussions and also schedule one-on-one conversations with me. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
1130:MWF   DIST
POSC 204-01 Competing Political Ideologies
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
This class surveys the major ideologies that compete for political support in Western societies, such as liberalism, conservatism, and socialism, as well as radical alternatives (anarchism and fascism), and new perspectives such as feminism and ecologism/environmentalism. We will also examine the nature of ideology, and whether it is possible to develop a neutral, non-ideological perspective on politics. Prerequisite: 180, or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   DIST
POSC 220-01 Constitutional Law I
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
Class will be taught synchronously via zoom and will feature a combination of lecture, discussion, and team exercises. Student online attendance is required, although absences for legitimate reasons will be excused. Participation in discussions and team exercises is factored into the final grade. If, for any reason, students are generally unable to join remotely during the scheduled time period, they should consider taking a different class, one that fits their schedule and time zone. An analysis of constitutional adjudication in the areas of separation of powers, federalism, and economic rights. Special emphasis is placed upon the idea of a written constitution and the role that judges play in our constitutional system. Topics include Watergate, war powers, and legislative veto. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   DIST
POSC 234-01 Gender and Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 234-01 and WGSS 302-01.This course will be taught in a mostly synchronous manner during its scheduled times (Mondays/Thursdays, 1:30-2:45 pm). Enrolled students can expect to have a discussion-based course, supplemented by short asynchronous lectures, discussion boards, and writings. During our synchronous class meetings, students can also expect to work at crucial times in small groups and contribute to peer-to-peer activities. Please note that I would be happy to work with students who have concerns about attending class during the appointed meeting times. This course analyzes how legal theorists have drawn upon notions of gender, sex, and sexuality in order to understand and critique the American legal system and its norms. It considers questions like: How might a feminist perspective on the law illuminate instances of systematized inequality or legalized discrimination? Can queer theorists engage with the law in order to alter it, or does the very act of engagement hinder the possibility of future socio-legal change? How can the law better represent women of color, working women, queer women, stay-at-home mothers, transgender or non-binary individuals, women seeking surrogate or abortion services, and more, without reinforcing traditional understandings of what it means to be a woman? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis. Prerequisites: One POSC, LAWP or WGSS course or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 234 and WGSS 302.
1330:MR   DIST
POSC 239-01 Research Methods
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
This course will be taught with both synchronous and asynchronous meetings. I will work with students unable (for time zone or other reasons) to meet synchronously. If students have any additional questions, they should feel free to contact me. Helps the student answer (in the affirmative) the question, "Is political science a science?" Students will learn how to generate and test hypotheses through creating and executing research designs. Survey research, experimentation, content analysis, participant observation, and other methodologies will be studied. Although no prior knowledge of statistics is necessary, Math 121 is helpful. This class is especially recommended for prospective graduate students in the social sciences.
1030:TR   DIST
POSC 247-01 The American Presidency
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
This class will be flexibly designed in order to accommodate students working in different places and times. Each week, students will be expected to stream a series of short video lectures, and to complete several course readings, at a time that is convenient for them. Then, all students will be expected to participate in one synchronous discussion section held via Zoom on Thursday afternoon 4-5pm OR Friday morning 10-11am. Students can choose which section best fits their schedule on a week-to-week basis. Alternative methods of completing the course can also be arranged for students unavailable at these specific times. Course assignments will include regular quizzes on course video lectures and readings, a series of short papers, and a lengthy final essay. An in-depth analysis of the nature and significance of "the Man" and "the Office," including constitutional development, presidential roles and customs, the recruitment process, the executive branch, and the politics of the presidency. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
  DIST
POSC 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 248-01.This course will be taught in a mostly synchronous manner during its scheduled times (Tuesdays/Thursdays, 10:30-11:45 am). Enrolled students can expect to have a discussion-based course, supplemented by short asynchronous lectures, discussion boards, and writings. During our synchronous class meetings, students can also expect to work at crucial times in small groups and contribute to peer-to-peer activities. Please note that I would be happy to work with students who have concerns about attending class during the appointed meeting times. A study of the structure, processes, and institutional role of the American judiciary. Topics may include: the adversarial system, criminal and civil procedure, implementation of court decisions, judicial decision-making, legal development, and legal reasoning. Special attention is given to the federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 248.
1030:TR   DIST
POSC 258-01 Human Rights
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Lectures will be posted asynchronously, some group activities will take place online (e.g. quizzes,discussion boards, and short writing assignments), the class will meet all together on Thursday during the regular course meeting time The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights embodies a global consensus on the fundamental importance of human rights as a political value. But the idea and its practical applications have provoked intense controversy around the world on issues such as freedom of expression, capital punishment and torture, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, social and economic justice, and cultural and minority rights. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   DIST
POSC 270-01 European Union
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 270-01.Content will be delivered asynchronously but students should reserve the regular Friday class meeting time for synchronous discussion of reading and writing they complete asynchronously. Students who are unable to participate in the Friday discussions can be accommodated by doing additional written work. The European Union (EU) remains a work-in-progress, and this course will help students to contextualize the EU's development since the mid-1950s, understand the way that it currently functions, and think about how it is likely to evolve in the future. Substantively, the course covers the theory and history of European integration; the EU's unusual (and evolving) institutional structure and political processes; the major policy areas of the EU; and the power dynamics between the EU and it member states. This course is cross-listed as INST 270.
1330:F   DIST
POSC 273-01 International Political Economy
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 273-01.Course content will be delivered via weekly asynchronous, recorded PowerPoint videos to which I will add my narration. We will have one live, synchronous Zoom class session each week during the scheduled class time to discuss readings and to help clarify points from the PowerPoint videos. The second scheduled weekly class time will be for one-on-one Zoom consultations. You should complete each weeks assigned readings (~75 pages per week) and view the weeks PowerPoint videos (~1 hour per week) prior to each live meeting. Other details about course requirements will be provided during the first week of the semester. Note: I will record the live sessions for those who occasionally miss them and for others to review. However, if time zone issues or other considerations mean you will generally not be able to participate live, you should consider another course that works better in your schedule. This course examines the politics of global economic relations. Specific topics discussed include: trade and protectionism, international monetary relations, foreign direct investment, global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and World Trade Organization (WTO), regional economic integration (e.g. the European Union [EU] and North American Free Trade Agreement [NAFTA], economic development, and the economic emergence of China and India. The larger issue serving as the backdrop to all of this is economic globalization -- its significance, sources, and consequences. Prerequisite: 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 273.
1330:MR   DIST
POSC 277-01 International Politics of the Middle East
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 277-01 and MEST 266-01.Most content will be delivered via asynchronous/recorded presentations posted to Moodle. Synchronous class meetings via Zoom will focus on discussion and explanation and will be recorded. Assessment will be based on an essay-based midterm, a final research paper, student blogs, and a few quizzes, including at least one map quiz, as well as active participation. This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as MEST 266 and INST 277.
1500:MR   DIST
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01.Zoom instruction with class materials and reading online. Special sessions provided for students who cannot tune in at scheduled class times (in other countries, time zones, special circumstances, etc.) Thorough description of procedures will be sent directly to students with syllabus. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
1330:TF   DIST
POSC 290-01 Zionism: Ideology, Institutions, Cultures & Contestations
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 262-01 and MEST 262-01. This course aims to provide students with a multi-dimensional understanding of Zionism as a political ideology that found its expression in the creation of a state, the establishment of a particular set of economic and cultural institutions as well as in the creation of new conceptions of land, space, and group interaction. At once a future-oriented revolutionary ideology and revivalist movement based on the idea of returning to an ancient homeland, the significance of Zionism in 20th and 21st centuries cannot be understated. Zionism (or rather, Zionists), produced a state Israel whose foundation has roiled politics in the Middle East until today. This course will look at the particular historical circumstances that gave rise to Zionism in the late 19th century, Zionist institutions, political culture and dominant historical narratives. The course will conclude with a detailed examination of more contemporary critics of Zionism both from within Israel and outside of it.
1500:MR   DIST
POSC 290-02 Social Movements in Latin America
Instructor: Santiago Anria
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-01.Class will be taught synchronously via Zoom and will feature a combination of lecture, discussion, and group work. Social movements have long played an important role in Latin American politics. This course provides an overview of historical and contemporary social movements, exploring the conditions that facilitate (or inhibit) collective action, the construction of collective identities, the dynamics of social protest, and the political impact of social movements, including their connection with political parties. Readings will cover different theoretical perspectives, different historical periods, and a wide array of old and new social movements, including, among others, indigenous peoples movements, womens movements, and movements representing unemployed workers and the urban poor. Special attention will be given to the impact of democratization, market liberalization, and the regions Left turn on diverse types of social actors.
1330:TF   DIST
POSC 290-05 Black Politics: A Century of Black Radicalism
Instructor: Nadia Alahmed
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-03.Lectures, discussions and meetings with students will take place on zoom live. This course combines political theory and history to explore the evolution of Black political thought of the 20th and 21stcentury : from abolition movement to Black Lives Matter. It will discuss issues and problems faced by Black people with respect to global political systems, examine various avenues of political expression, and raise questions and new ideas pertaining to the exploration of Black politics. The course will begin with an introduction to various theoretical and philosophical foundations of race and move toward a survey of some of the major trends of global Black political thought. It will introduce a wide spectrum of political trends and movements, focusing on radical Black politics: Black nationalism, Black Marxism, Black Internationalism, Black Feminism and Queer Theory. The course will create a multidimensional and complex picture of the evolution of visions and meanings of Black liberation.
1500:TF   DIST
POSC 390-01 China's Economic Reform after 40 Years
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01. This seminar will explore the wide-ranging impact of China's post-Mao economic reforms. Its main goal is to significantly deepen students understanding of certain facets of the current Chinese scene and develop and hone analytical and writing skills. We will be covering politics (both high and low ), economic and social changes, protest, law and private and family life, among other topics.
1330:W   DIST
POSC 390-02 Campaigns and Elections
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
This class will be taught largely synchronously, but I will work with students unable (for time zone or other reasons) to meet synchronously. If students have any additional questions, they should feel free to contact me.The purpose of this seminar is to examine and analyze the role of the political campaign in the American political system. We will look at key aspects of campaigns candidates; money; polling; advertising; and media as we read current research on the state of campaigning in the United States. Since this seminar occurs during an election season, students should expect to actively engage with current events, relating course topics to what they are observing in the day-to-day campaigns of candidates currently competing for office. Political pundits and commentators generate a tremendous amount of analysis, commentary, and predictions about American elections; however, in this class we will move beyond these types of comments and attempt to understand how voters decide and how campaigns persuade.
1330:W   DIST
POSC 390-03 Identity Ethics and Multiculturalism
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 391-01.Although this class is listed as in-person, students can still expect to have portions of the class taught remotely or to meet in smaller groups to accommodate social distancing needs. For those who would still like to take this class, but feel uncomfortable attending in person, I am happy to work with them to take the course remotely.Questions of social identity dominate contemporary politics, from the American Presidential election of 2016 through the Brexit vote and debates about migration to issues of gender, sexual orientation, and sexual identity. But why does identity matter politically and ethically? This class surveys the main recent responses to these questions, including the role of group membership in the construction of individual identity, the meaning and possibility of equality in culturally diverse societies, intersectionality and the tensions between different aspects of identity and the problem of internal minorities (minorities within minorities, such as women and children in cultural minorities), the notions of internalized oppression and double consciousness, and the limits of toleration.
1330:W   DIST