Spring 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 104
POSC 120-02 American Government
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 304
POSC 150-01 Comparative Politics
Instructor: Craig Lang
Course Description:
An introduction to comparative political analysis with applications to political systems, processes, and issues worldwide. The purpose of the course is to learn to observe political life systematically, analyze a wide range of political phenomena, and distinguish and evaluate the assumptions underlying alternative approaches to the study of politics. The course may address topics such as democratization, authoritarian challenges to democratic systems, social inequality and underdevelopment, sustainability, political corruption, human rights, and political violence.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 313
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 104
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 104
POSC 204-01 Competing Political Ideologies
Instructor: John Harles
Course Description:
This class surveys the major ideologies that compete for political support in Western societies, such as liberalism, conservatism, and socialism, as well as radical alternatives (anarchism and fascism), and new perspectives such as feminism and ecologism/environmentalism. We will also examine the nature of ideology, and whether it is possible to develop a neutral, non-ideological perspective on politics. Prerequisite: 180, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 212
POSC 232-01 Religion in American Politics
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 232-01. This class will provide students with an overview of the role of religion in American politics. Students will become more familiar with the dynamics of a complex and diverse United States through in-depth study of the political differences that define several major religious groups. The political intersections between religion, race, gender, sexual orientation and class will be explored, helping students to think critically about political power. Other topics will include important aspects of constitutional law as they pertain to religious rights, and the various ways in which religion influences public policy. This course is cross-listed as RELG 232.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 313
POSC 243-01 Mass Media and American Politics
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-06. Examines the causes, content, and consequences of political news, primarily focusing on television. It will explore the ways in which audience characteristics, organizational routines, and professional socialization influence the style and substance of the news. The content of news will be analyzed for: the three branches of government, war, foreign governments, crises, and presidential campaigns. The impact of the media on political behavior will also be discussed. Content analysis will be used by students to systematically analyze television network news. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 203
POSC 258-01 Human Rights
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03. The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights embodies a global consensus on the fundamental importance of human rights as a political value. But the idea and its practical applications have provoked intense controversy around the world on issues such as freedom of expression, capital punishment and torture, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, social and economic justice, and cultural and minority rights. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of the instructor.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
ALTHSE 109
POSC 259-01 Law, Politics, and Society in Asia
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 259-01 and LAWP 259-01. This course examines the interaction between law, legal institutions and citizens in China, Japan, and India. Covering history and the contemporary scene, course focuses on how law works in practice and is understood and used by ordinary people in Asia. It covers areas such as marriage and divorce, the legal profession, lost property, civil rights, the environment, sexuality, mediation, land development and property, among others. Comparisons between the United States and Asia, as well as between Asian countries, will be emphasized. This course is cross-listed as EASN 259 and LAWP 259.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
STERN 103
POSC 273-01 International Political Economy
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 273-01. This course examines the politics of global economic relations. Specific topics discussed include: trade and protectionism, international monetary relations, foreign direct investment, global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and World Trade Organization (WTO), regional economic integration (e.g. the European Union [EU] and North American Free Trade Agreement [NAFTA], economic development, and the economic emergence of China and India. The larger issue serving as the backdrop to all of this is economic globalization -- its significance, sources, and consequences. Prerequisite: 170, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 273.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 103
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Andy Wolff
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 204
POSC 290-01 The Politics of American Pop Culture
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
Topics not normally studied in depth in the regular offerings are analyzed in these special topics courses. Recent offerings have included: Contemporary Political Ideologies, Mexican Politics, Political Thought of the Enlightenment, Politics in Fiction, Separation of Powers, The Bill of Rights, and Italian Politics. Prerequisite for 290 is dependent upon topic.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 203
POSC 290-02 The Politics of High-Speed Growth in Asia
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01 and INST 290-02. The rise of Asia as an economic force since the late 19th century has been one of the most important developments in the history of the world. Beginning with Japan in the 1880s but later encompassing South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore in the 1950s and 1960s and then China in the late 1990s, the Asia-Pacific region has been a dynamo of economic growth: billions of people have been lifted out of poverty, Asian states have grown rich and more vocal on the world stage, millionaires have been minted and new middle classes have emerged. In this class we will explore the historical, political, economic and cultural factors that help explain this development. Among the questions we will focus are whether there is a distinctly Asian model of development that stands in contrast to Western patterns, the role of wars, authoritarianism, colonialism, and cultural factors such as Confucianism.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
STERN 103
POSC 290-03 Law and American Society
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-01.NOTE: Students who HAVE taken POSC 220 or 221 need permission of instructor to enroll. This course introduces students to the politics of law. In the first half of the course, students will acquire the historical and theoretical background necessary to think analytically about contemporary controversies in constitutional law. We will consider the relationship between law and violence in a democracy, the drafting of the US Constitution as well as the debates concerning its ratification, the arguments for and against the practice of judicial review, and the theories of constitutional interpretation. In the second half of the semester, students will put this knowledge into practice as we engage with several significant constitutional debates on matters like: equal protection, property ownership, sexual conduct, free speech, the separation of church and state, privacy, reproductive health, affirmative action, capital punishment, gun ownership, voting rights, and campaign finance. By the end of the semester, students will be better able to make sense of legal arguments, especially those rendered by the Supreme Court, and to interpret those arguments in relation to broader trends in American politics and culture.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 313
POSC 290-04 Capital Punishment
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-02 and PHIL 261-02.Permission of Instructor Required This course examines the historical and contemporary practices of capital punishment in the United States. Indeed, the United States is one of the few constitutional democracies that retains the punishment of death for criminal wrong-doing, despite the efforts made by some Supreme Court Justices to abolish the machinery of death in the American legal system and the pressure placed on federal and state governments by foreign nations to formally abolish its use. This course considers: Why does the state claim the authority to kill its citizens and how does it justify this authority? How has capital punishment in the United States changed over time, such that the modern promise of a painless death endeavors to legitimate its continuation? How do race, gender, class, religion, disability, and location impact who is subjected to the death penalty and for what crimes? What ethical arguments can be made for and against the use of capital punishment as a criminal sentence, from the perspectives of the condemned as well as the victim? Is it even possible to execute an individual in a manner that is just? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 313
POSC 290-06 Radical Politics and Thought of the Caribbean
Instructor: Nadia Alahmed
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02.This is an interdisciplinary seminar that will explore the contributions of Caribbean theorists, intellectuals, revolutionaries, and activists to the global discourse on Black Radicalism. Focusing on the 20th century, the course will discuss Caribbean articulations on Black liberation, Black Feminism, Black and Third World Marxism. It will forefront the impact Caribbean scholars made on major political and cultural movements of the 20th century such as the Harlem Renaissance, Negritude, Black Power, Third World Movement, and Hip Hop.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
ALTHSE 201
POSC 390-01 The Politics of International Migration
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
International migration is a touchstone issue of not only American politics, but of politics in states at all levels of development around the world. This seminar takes a global perspective, examining formal and informal policies that shape, and respond to, transnational migration and exploring the evolving interactions between policy-making, economic forces, cultural networks, and migratory flows.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
DENNY 110
POSC 390-02 Political Violence
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
This seminar is intended to improve critical thinking and analytical writing skills through the study of intra-state violence. The course will focus on the types of political violence, causes of intra-state conflict, and the reasons individuals participate in violence. The topics will focus primarily on civil war, ethnic conflict and genocide, terrorism, and revolution. The course will also emphasize the research process and the ethics (and ethical dilemmas) of conflict research. The discussions will be guided by three overarching questions: how do structural conditions shape the likelihood of political violence? What are the individual or social factors that contribute to an individuals decision to participate in violence? Why are certain strategies or types of violence used? These questions will be addressed through the readings, seminar discussions, and student research on a case of their choosing. By the end of the seminar, students should be able to ask informed questions and have the social science skills to answer those questions well. There is a heavy emphasis on writing in the course that is designed to improve students writing and research skills, as well as learning to give constructive feedback.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
EASTC 112
POSC 490-01 Senior Thesis
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required. Senior political science majors who are interested may apply to take this course during the spring semester of their senior year. The course involves writing a senior thesis based on a question of the students own choosing. Permission of instructor is required.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 315