Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
0900:TR   DIST
POSC 120-02 American Government
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
0930:WF   DIST
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02.Synchronous. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:MR   DIST
POSC 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:TF   DIST
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01.Students can expect to receive both remote and safely distanced, in-person instruction. In order to accommodate a large number of students, most lectures and discussions will be held via Zoom, but those students who are on campus will be able to participate in small discussion-based groups to allow for in-person connection and learning. On-campus students can also expect in-person office hours. I am also happy to work with students who would prefer to take this course entirely remotely. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
1030:TR   DIST
POSC 208-01 Justice in World Politics
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 285-01. In-person office hours will be available and optional in-person discussion sections on the quad once spring arrives and it is warm enough to gather outside.An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 285. Prerequisite: 170, 180 or PHIL 180, or permission of the instructor. An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 285. Prerequisite: 170, 180 or PHIL 180, or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   DIST
POSC 221-01 Constitutional Law II
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
Taught synchronously online and attendance is required. An exploration of American constitutional rights. Both historical developments and contemporary issues are addressed. Topics include racial and sexual equality, affirmative action, seditious speech, and school prayer. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   DIST
POSC 244-01 Public Opinion
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Lectures will be remote with the full group, and then meet with students on campus in small groups. Examines the origins, nature, and impact of public opinion in the United States. The ways that the public's attitudes are shaped and used by interest groups, politicians, and the mass media will be discussed. Methods of measuring public opinion, with special attention to polling, will be studied. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 204
POSC 250-01 West European Government and Politics
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Italy. This course provides a general overview to West European politics and the different political configurations that exist in the major West European countries. The course outlines some of the common features of the region's ongoing political development (e.g. democratization, institutionalization of the welfare state and political integration within the European Union) as well as the differences among today's national systems of political organizations.
1330:TF   DIST
POSC 252-01 African Government & Politics
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05.Part of the Globally Integrated Semester in Cameroon. An introduction to the politics of contemporary Africa. After reviewing the large historical, international, and socio-economic patterns of African politics, the course examines in greater depth a sampling of national political systems and salient regional or continent-wide themes. Prerequisite: one course in political science.
1500:TF   STERN GREAT ROOM
POSC 277-01 International Politics of the Middle East
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 277-01 and MEST 266-01. This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as MEST 266 and INST 277.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 207
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 109
POSC 290-01 Authoritarianism
Instructor: Santiago Anria, Neil Diamant
Course Description:
At the end of the Cold War in 1991, it was not uncommon to hear, in one version or another, that liberal democracy and free market capitalism not only emerged victorious in the realm of competing political ideas, but also that the political world in the near and distant future would be full of states adopting these ideas. At that time, countries such as China, Iran, Iraq, Vietnam, North Korea were considered outliers, that, like dinosaurs, would soon go extinct. Much has changed since then. Around the world democracy is in decline, while authoritarianism, in one form or another, is both resilient where it currently exists and on the rise in places such as Poland, Hungary, and the United States. More than this, authoritarian countries believe that their political model is superior in achieving goals the public considers important, such as economic growth and the provision of public order. This course offers students a comprehensive survey of authoritarianism as a political theory and practice, in comparative perspective. Looking at cases ranging from China, Taiwan, the USSR, Iran, Saudi Arabia to Argentina, Chile, Brazil, and the United States, we will examine the origins of authoritarian regimes, their fundamental features, how they maintain support, how they work in practice, and how they collapse, among other topics. Does authoritarianism work better? If so, under what circumstances, and why? Why are some authoritarian regimes so durable whereas others are unstable and weak? Why some collapse, and how do their legacies influence the kinds of political regimes that emerge in the aftermath?
1030:TR   EASTC 411
POSC 290-02 Managing Death
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PMGT 290-01. This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the subjects of death, dying and end-of-life decision making. Issues related to law, ethics, politics, medicine, religion and culture will all be covered.
1330:T   DIST
POSC 290-03 The Politics of American Pop Culture
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
This class will explore the important interactions between pop culture and American politics. Over the course of the semester, we will explore topics such as the impact of hip hop music on political behavior, the partisan and informational consequences that come from watching comedy programs like Saturday Night Live and The Daily Show, government censorship of entertainment products, the politics of sports and fashion, and the impact that pop culture has had on the criminal justice system. This class will also feature a number of in-depth case studies, ranging from the political career of Arnold Schwarzenegger to the use of social media by the Howard Dean presidential campaign.
1330:MR   DIST
POSC 290-04 War and Justice
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 261-03.In-person office hours will be available and optional in-person discussion sections on the quad once spring arrives and it is warm enough to gather outside."Alls fair in love and war, goes the common saying, suggesting that standards of justice or morality are inapplicable to military conflict, which is a realm of survival in which anything goes. Others hold that no war can possibly be just, at least in the contemporary era in which weapons of mass destruction mean that wars wreak a human and environmental impact that cannot possibly be sustainable or legitimate. In this class, we consider both these approaches realism and pacifism, respectively and juxtapose them to the just-war tradition, which holds that defensive and limited wars may be justified so long as they follow certain moral guidelines such as proportionality and non-combatant immunity. We will consider when it might be just to go to war, how just wars must be waged, and what if anything justice after war consists in. We will consider military conflicts from across the globe, including the World Wars, Vietnam, Rwanda, Cambodia, the former Yugoslavia, and more, and from ancient Greece through the Middle Ages to the present day. We will consider topics such as humanitarian intervention and the protection of human rights during war, the moral status and responsibility of ordinary combatants, war crimes tribunals, genocide and ethnic cleansing, civil war, emerging technologies of war, and the possibility of moving towards a world in which war is no longer necessary.
1330:TF   DIST
POSC 290-05 Capital Punishment
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-01 and PHIL 261-04.Students can expect to receive a mix of remote instruction via Zoom and safely distanced, in-person instruction while on campus (in the form of small group tutorials, office hours, and moderately-sized classroom discussions). I am happy to work with students who would prefer to take this course entirely remotely. This course examines the historical and contemporary practices of capital punishment in the United States. Indeed, the United States is one of the few constitutional democracies that retains the punishment of death for criminal wrong-doing, despite the efforts made by some Supreme Court Justices to abolish the machinery of death in the American legal system and the pressure placed on federal and state governments by foreign nations to formally abolish its use. This course considers: Why does the state claim the authority to kill its citizens and how does it justify this authority? How has capital punishment in the United States changed over time, such that the modern promise of a painless death endeavors to legitimate its continuation? How do race, gender, class, religion, disability, and location impact who is subjected to the death penalty and for what crimes? What ethical arguments can be made for and against the use of capital punishment as a criminal sentence, from the perspectives of the condemned as well as the victim? Is it even possible to execute an individual in a manner that is just? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis.
1330:MR   DENNY 311
POSC 290-06 Global Security
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03. The course offers an introduction to Security Studies as an academic field and a practical foundation for professional engagement with security affairs. The search for security is basic to all social and political interaction, but security itself is a contested concept that can be applied in different ways to individuals, states, and the global system. Traditionally, the formal study of International Security has focused on the nation-state, including territorial defense, the role of military assets in pursuit of national interests, and the struggle for power. These concerns remain vital, but in the 21st century the security challenge has broadened to include new kinds of issues and approaches. These include the alternative discourse of Human Security as well as transnational challenges such as criminal trafficking, terrorism, environmental disintegration, pandemic disease, etc. Our course will look closely at both traditional and new security challenges. We will confront the problem of global security conceptually, develop a comprehensive portrait of global security challenges, and explore ways and means available to address them.
1030:TR   STERN GREAT ROOM
POSC 290-07 The Media in War and Peace
Instructor: Jacob Jacob
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-05 and FMST 220-06. Media and Communications are integral to the ways and means through which contemporary battles are fought ranging from the symbolic acts of terrorism to state-sponsored malign influence operations, and full-scale warfare. This course provides students with a deeper awareness of the increasingly sophisticated means and forms through which international conflicts are `mediatized and how peace can be represented in contemporary society.
1330:MR   DIST
POSC 290-08 Introduction to Political Communication
Instructor: Jacob Jacob
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03 and FMST 220-05. This course introduces students to the basic concepts of political communication. It draws on recent global political occurrences, including Brexit, rise in populist, nationalist and extremist movements, Russian malign influence operations, and the 2016 election of president Donald Trump, to explore how mainstream and social media as well as an increasingly globalized public sphere, influence the political process.
0900:TR   DIST
POSC 390-01 American Political Development
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
When seniors return to campus after spring break, this class will conclude the second half of the semester by meeting each week in person. However, any seniors who elect not to return to campus wills till be able to finish the course remotely.Since the early 1980s, political science has witnessed an explosion of research on the subject of American political development (APD). APD is more than just political history. APD has common methodologies and a number of central topics, most prominently the state, liberalism, the trajectories of public policy, and analyses of the importance of timing and sequencing. This course will provide students with a critical introduction to the APD body of research. In order to do so the class will be organized around a guiding theme- the influence of ideas and emotions in American political history. The first half of the class will focus on the role of ideas in APD. Units will cover populism, conservatism and religion, among other topics. The second half of the class will concentrate on the role of emotions. Units will be structured around topics like disappointment, racism, fear and political passion. Not appropriate for first-year students.
1330:W   DENNY 21
POSC 390-02 National Security Law
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
Taught synchronously online and attendance is required.This seminar will examine core issues of U.S. national security law, both from the perspective of domestic law (the U.S. Constitution and relevant statutes) and international law (relevant treaties and customary international law). A central theme of the course will be the degree to which policy-makers in the national security field should consider themselves bound by international law. The goal of the course is to expand student awareness of the difficult and complex legal issues that exist in this policy area. Topics that will be addressed include the right to wage war, targeted killing, covert action, interrogation, and military commissions.
1330:T   DIST
POSC 390-03 Public Opinion
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
A seminar in selected topics in Political Science. Recent offerings have included: Political Leadership, Crime and Punishment, Democratization, Presidential Elections, Revolutions and Political Thought, Constitutional Politics, International Regimes, Russian Leadership Politics, Central American Politics, and Comparative Political Modernization. Not appropriate for first-year students.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 204
POSC 390-04 Justice in World Politics
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
A seminar in selected topics in Political Science. Recent offerings have included: Political Leadership, Crime and Punishment, Democratization, Presidential Elections, Revolutions and Political Thought, Constitutional Politics, International Regimes, Russian Leadership Politics, Central American Politics, and Comparative Political Modernization. Not appropriate for first-year students.
1500:TF   DIST
POSC 390-05 International Politics of the Middle East
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
A seminar in selected topics in Political Science. Recent offerings have included: Political Leadership, Crime and Punishment, Democratization, Presidential Elections, Revolutions and Political Thought, Constitutional Politics, International Regimes, Russian Leadership Politics, Central American Politics, and Comparative Political Modernization. Not appropriate for first-year students.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 207
POSC 490-01 Senior Thesis
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required. Senior political science majors who are interested may apply to take this course during the spring semester of their senior year. The course involves writing a senior thesis based on a question of the students own choosing. Permission of instructor is required.
1330:F   DENNY 212
POSC 500-01 Analysis of Methods of Jurisprudence on Constitutional Questions through Federal 2nd Amendment Cases
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
 
POSC 500-02 Anarchist Political Theory
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
 
POSC 500-03 Political Responses to Public Health Crises
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description: