Fall 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 120-01 American Government
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
POSC 120-02 American Government
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.
0930:MWF   DENNY 313
POSC 150-01 Comparative Politics
Instructor: Santiago Anria
Course Description:
An introduction to comparative political analysis with applications to political systems, processes, and issues in countries of the Third World and in advanced industrial states alike. The purpose of the course is to learn to observe systematically, to analyze political phenomena, and to distinguish and evaluate the assumptions underlying alternative approaches to the study of politics.
0900:TR   DENNY 311
POSC 150-02 Comparative Politics
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
An introduction to comparative political analysis with applications to political systems, processes, and issues in countries of the Third World and in advanced industrial states alike. The purpose of the course is to learn to observe systematically, to analyze political phenomena, and to distinguish and evaluate the assumptions underlying alternative approaches to the study of politics.
1130:MWF   DENNY 313
POSC 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:MR   DENNY 203
POSC 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
0900:TR   DENNY 304
POSC 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as INST 170.
1330:TF   TOME 115
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
POSC 180-02 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-02. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
0900:TR   DENNY 313
POSC 208-01 Justice in World Politics
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 285-01. An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 285. Prerequisite: 170, 180 or PHIL 180, or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   DENNY 212
POSC 220-01 Constitutional Law I
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
An analysis of constitutional adjudication in the areas of separation of powers, federalism, and economic rights. Special emphasis is placed upon the idea of a written constitution and the role that judges play in our constitutional system. Topics include Watergate, war powers, and legislative veto. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
POSC 235-01 Race, Ethnicity and U.S. Politics
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
With a focus on the experiences and activities of African-Americans, Latinos/Hispanics, Asian-Americans and Indigenous peoples in U.S. politics, this course examines the social construction of race and ethnicity in America as a force in public opinion, political representation and political behavior. The course also focuses on a range of political science methods used to study the politics of race/ethnicity in the U.S. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   DENNY 304
POSC 239-01 Research Methods
Instructor: Sarah Niebler
Course Description:
Helps the student answer (in the affirmative) the question, "Is political science a science?" Students will learn how to generate and test hypotheses through creating and executing research designs. Survey research, experimentation, content analysis, participant observation, and other methodologies will be studied. Although no prior knowledge of statistics is necessary, Math 121 is helpful. This class is especially recommended for prospective graduate students in the social sciences.
1030:TR   DENNY 112
POSC 245-01 Political Parties and Interest Groups
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
A study of the functions, structures, and operations of American political parties and interest groups. Special attention is given to the techniques of running a campaign for office, to the role of the media in superseding American parties, and to the interactions of government with the two largest "interest groups": business and labor. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1330:TF   DENNY 304
POSC 247-01 The American Presidency
Instructor: David O'Connell
Course Description:
An in-depth analysis of the nature and significance of "the Man" and "the Office," including constitutional development, presidential roles and customs, the recruitment process, the executive branch, and the politics of the presidency. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   DENNY 304
POSC 255-01 Chinese Politics
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. An introduction to the contours of contemporary politics as shaped by traditional and revolutionary legacies, the institutions of state socialism, China's underdevelopment and struggles over power and policy.
1030:TR   DENNY 104
POSC 259-01 Law, Politics, and Society in Asia
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 259-01 and LAWP 259-01. This course examines the interaction between law, legal institutions and citizens in China, Japan, and India. Covering history and the contemporary scene, course focuses on how law works in practice and is understood and used by ordinary people in Asia. It covers areas such as marriage and divorce, the legal profession, lost property, civil rights, the environment, sexuality, mediation, land development and property, among others. Comparisons between the United States and Asia, as well as between Asian countries, will be emphasized. This course is cross-listed as EASN 259 and LAWP 259.
1500:MR   STERN 103
POSC 277-01 International Politics of the Middle East
Instructor: Ed Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 277-01 and MEST 266-01. This course examines key factors and events in the formation of the modern Middle East state system and evolving patterns of conflict and cooperation in the region. Students will apply a range of analytical approaches to issues such as the conflicts between Arabs and Israelis, Iraq's wars since 1980, and the changing place of the region in global politics and economics. This course is cross-listed as MEST 266 and INST 277.
1330:TF   DENNY 311
POSC 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: 170 or INST 170 or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INST 280.
1030:TR   DENNY 110
POSC 283-01 Intelligence and National Security
Instructor: Anthony Williams
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 283-01. This course provides a basic understanding of the history, organization, activities, limitations, and capabilities of the U.S. national intelligence community, and the role of intelligence in developing and executing U.S. national security policy. The course also examines the significance of intelligence for policymakers and planners, the legal issues surrounding intelligence practices; the relationship between Congress, the Judiciary, and the intelligence community; and the future of U.S. intelligence.Prerequisites: 120 & 170/INST 170. This course is cross-listed as INST 283.
1500:MR   DENNY 103
POSC 290-01 Social Movements in Latin America
Instructor: Santiago Anria
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-04. Social movements have long played an important role in Latin American politics. This course provides an overview of historical and contemporary social movements, exploring the conditions that facilitate (or inhibit) collective action, the construction of collective identities, the dynamics of social protest, and the political impact of social movements, including their connection with political parties. Readings will cover different theoretical perspectives, different historical periods, and a wide array of old and new social movements, including, among others, indigenous peoples movements, womens movements, and movements representing unemployed workers and the urban poor. Special attention will be given to the impact of democratization, market liberalization, and the regions Left turn on diverse types of social actors.
1330:TF   DENNY 211
POSC 290-02 Gender and Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-02 and WGSS 302-04. This course analyzes how legal theorists have drawn upon notions of gender, sex, and sexuality in order to understand and critique the American legal system and its norms. It considers questions like: How might a feminist perspective on the law illuminate instances of systematized inequality or legalized discrimination? Can queer theorists engage with the law in order to alter it, or does the very act of engagement hinder the possibility of future socio-legal change? How can the law better represent women of color, working women, queer women, stay-at-home mothers, transgender or non-binary individuals, women seeking surrogate or abortion services, and more, without reinforcing traditional understandings of what it means to be a woman? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis.
1330:MR   DENNY 311
POSC 290-03 Politics of Southeast Asia
Instructor: Rachel Jacobs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-01. This course is an overview of the politics of Southeast Asia. Contemporary Southeast Asia is a region of contrasts. It is home to some of the fastest growing economies of the world, hubs of global trade and finance, but also rising threats from non-state actors, ethnic violence, and democratic backsliding. This course will cover the development of the region over the 20th and 21st century from the colonial period to independence and to growing regional interdependence. It will address the political history of most countries in the region and key regional issues. The major themes covered in the course include: nationalism, mass atrocity, statelessness and migration, regional integration, trade, and human rights.
1330:MR   DENNY 104
POSC 290-04 Crime and Punishment
Instructor: Harry Pohlman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-01. This course will examine and critically evaluate the substantive principles that the criminal law uses to assess culpability. Central questions are: Why punish? Who should be punished? How much punishment is proportionate? The focus will be on homicide and therefore the morality and constitutionality of capital punishment will be a recurring issue in our discussions. Various defenses and justifications will be considered, such as self-defense, necessity, insanity, diminished capacity, and duress.
1330:TR   DENNY 110
POSC 290-05 The Politics of Parks
Instructor: David Strand
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-05.Whether located at the center of a city or in the midst of a wilderness, public parks comprise a uniquely modern public good, designed to meet competing and complementary needs for social recreation, open space, and the conservation of nature and preservation of biodiversity. Worldwide they host endangered animals like Bengal tigers and "urban animals" like pigeons, squirrels and household pets. They are home to cricket and softball leagues as well as history-changing protests and orations. We will examine public and national parks as public policy, objects of planning and design, expressions of political culture and social change, and opportunities to represent and rethink the relationship between humankind and the natural world.
0900:TR   STERN 103
POSC 290-06 Russian Foreign Policy
Instructor: Craig Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-02 and RUSS 260-02.The course examines the foreign policy of the Russian Federation with an emphasis on historical traditions, policy process and domestic context, contemporary international engagements, and future trends. Russia has a great power tradition and has become increasingly active and assertive as a global actor in recent years. We will examine the nexus of interests and ambition that drive Russian policy, with particular attention to its troubled relationship with the U.S. and enhanced ties with the Peoples Republic of China.
1330:MR   BOSLER 222
POSC 390-01 Controversies in Chinese-American Relations
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01. This seminar takes a close look at some of the most contentious political, legal, and ethical issues in Sino-American relations in the post-Mao period (1978-), ranging from Tibet, Taiwan, birth control, the South China Sea, crime, environmental protection, religious freedom, trade, and intellectual property rights. Drawing on translated primary and secondary sources, the course focuses on the historical, political, and cultural forces that have often driven a wedge between the United States and China, but which also provide opportunity for cooperation.
1330:W   ALTHSE 07
POSC 390-02 American Political Representation
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
This seminar will acquaint you with the significant concepts and research questions addressed in recent and classic studies of political representation. We will consider the different dimensions of representation (e.g., descriptive, substantive), biases and inequality in representation and how normative considerations shape expectations about representation in practice. Representation is a very broad topic of study and the course readings will cover several subfields in American politics. For example, we will examine research about the behavior of political actors, the operation of government at the state and national levels, the roles of political parties and organized interests in representation, and how individuals form ideas about and respond to government activity and policies.
1330:W   DENNY 204
POSC 500-01 Intersectional Marxist Thought
Instructor: Toby Reiner
Course Description: