Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 121-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 100 01.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 08
LALC 200-01 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-05 and HIST 215-01.Additional Time Slot: Optional Film Viewing Wednesday 4:30-7:00 pm in Bosler 208.This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
1500:TR   DENNY 112
LALC 200-03 Race, Ethnicity, and Hybridity
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06.This course examines the constructions, lived experiences and politics of race, ethnicity and hybridity. The course will explore the historical evolution of the concept of race, the ways in which race and ethnicity are overlapping classification categories that are embedded in relations of power, and the social, cultural and biological outcomes of extended contact and mixture. Whereas the majority of scholarship on race and ethnicity considers the dynamics of these social scientific categories and processes of formation through the lens of interactions between a dominant group (usually occupying the racial category of white) and a subordinated or minoritized group (usually racialized as black or brown), this course shifts the gaze to the politics of race and ethnicity between historically oppressed ethnic groupsthose of African ethnic origin and those of various Asian ethnicities. Using case studies mainly from the Caribbean, but also from the US and Africa, we will examine the anthropological, sociological, literary, musical and filmic documentation and analyses of Afro/Asian mixture and will explore how racial identities, interethnic relations, gender, sexuality, religious practices, politics, and festivity have been influenced by mixing and creolizing processes.
1330:W   ALTHSE 08
LALC 222-01 Contemporary Peoples of Latin America
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 222 01.
1130:MWF   DENNY 21
LALC 231-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 131-01.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
LALC 251-01 Latin American Government and Politics
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 251-01.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
LALC 300-01 The Anthropology of Music in the Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 310-01 and ANTH 345-01. Artists as individuals have had a tremendous impact on the lives of Caribbean people. Yet, in the Caribbean, the arts are as much a community enterprise as they are an individualistic endeavor. This course explores the contours of Caribbean society, thought and culture through artistic expression, in general, and music, in particular. Through the use of specific case studies drawn from the Anglophone, Hispanophone, Francophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean, we will interrogate salient themes in the academic literature of the region, such as agency, empowerment, self-affirmation, hegemony, resistance, and identity. We will seek to unravel how attention to musical production helps us to define the region and to understand the lives of the people who call it home. Through ethnographies and other critical readings, films and musical examples, we will look at how individuals and groups in the Caribbean have used artistic expression to write their own histories, preserve their spirituality, assert their unique identities, form alliances across groups (or polarize communities), resist oppressive regimes, build nations, and celebrate life.
1330:R   ALTHSE 109
LALC 300-03 Prostitution & Sexuality in Haitian Literature & Film
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and WGST 300-02.Taught in French. The objective of this class is to help develop students understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on womens agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences financially, emotionally and socially of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?
1330:T   BOSLER 319
LALC 350-01 Latino/Latina Literatures
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 350-01.
1500:MR   BOSLER 314
LALC 490-01 Latin American Interdisciplinary Research
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.
1330:M   WESTC 1
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 08
AFST 220-06 Race, Ethnicity, and Hybridity
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-03.This course examines the constructions, lived experiences and politics of race, ethnicity and hybridity. The course will explore the historical evolution of the concept of race, the ways in which race and ethnicity are overlapping classification categories that are embedded in relations of power, and the social, cultural and biological outcomes of extended contact and mixture. Whereas the majority of scholarship on race and ethnicity considers the dynamics of these social scientific categories and processes of formation through the lens of interactions between a dominant group (usually occupying the racial category of white) and a subordinated or minoritized group (usually racialized as black or brown), this course shifts the gaze to the politics of race and ethnicity between historically oppressed ethnic groupsthose of African ethnic origin and those of various Asian ethnicities. Using case studies mainly from the Caribbean, but also from the US and Africa, we will examine the anthropological, sociological, literary, musical and filmic documentation and analyses of Afro/Asian mixture and will explore how racial identities, interethnic relations, gender, sexuality, religious practices, politics, and festivity have been influenced by mixing and creolizing processes.
1330:W   ALTHSE 08
AFST 310-01 The Anthropology of Music in the Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 345-01 and LALC 300-01. Artists as individuals have had a tremendous impact on the lives of Caribbean people. Yet, in the Caribbean, the arts are as much a community enterprise as they are an individualistic endeavor. This course explores the contours of Caribbean society, thought and culture through artistic expression, in general, and music, in particular. Through the use of specific case studies drawn from the Anglophone, Hispanophone, Francophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean, we will interrogate salient themes in the academic literature of the region, such as agency, empowerment, self-affirmation, hegemony, resistance, and identity. We will seek to unravel how attention to musical production helps us to define the region and to understand the lives of the people who call it home. Through ethnographies and other critical readings, films and musical examples, we will look at how individuals and groups in the Caribbean have used artistic expression to write their own histories, preserve their spirituality, assert their unique identities, form alliances across groups (or polarize communities), resist oppressive regimes, build nations, and celebrate life.
1330:R   ALTHSE 109
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 222-01 Contemporary Peoples of Latin America
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 222 01.
1130:MWF   DENNY 21
ANTH 345-01 The Anthropology of Music in the Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 310-01 and LALC 300-01. Artists as individuals have had a tremendous impact on the lives of Caribbean people. Yet, in the Caribbean, the arts are as much a community enterprise as they are an individualistic endeavor. This course explores the contours of Caribbean society, thought and culture through artistic expression, in general, and music, in particular. Through the use of specific case studies drawn from the Anglophone, Hispanophone, Francophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean, we will interrogate salient themes in the academic literature of the region, such as agency, empowerment, self-affirmation, hegemony, resistance, and identity. We will seek to unravel how attention to musical production helps us to define the region and to understand the lives of the people who call it home. Through ethnographies and other critical readings, films and musical examples, we will look at how individuals and groups in the Caribbean have used artistic expression to write their own histories, preserve their spirituality, assert their unique identities, form alliances across groups (or polarize communities), resist oppressive regimes, build nations, and celebrate life.
1330:R   ALTHSE 109
Courses Offered in FLST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FLST 210-05 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-01 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Optional Film Viewing Wednesday 4:30-7:00 pm in Bosler 208.This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
1500:TR   DENNY 112
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 362-01 Prostitution & Sexuality in Haitian Literature & Film
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-03 and WGST 300-02. The objective of this class is to help develop students understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on womens agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences financially, emotionally and socially of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?
1330:T   BOSLER 319
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 131-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 231-01.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
HIST 215-01 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-05 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Optional Film Viewing Wednesday 4:30-7:00 pm in Bosler 208.This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
1500:TR   DENNY 112
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 251-01 Latin American Government and Politics
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 251-01.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 350-01 Latino/Latina Literatures
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 350-01.
1500:MR   BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in WGST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGST 300-02 Prostitution & Sexuality in Haitian Literature & Film
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and LALC 300-03. Taught in French. The objective of this class is to help develop students understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on womens agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences financially, emotionally and socially of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?
1330:T   BOSLER 319