Fall 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 123-01 Introduction to Latino Studies
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-04. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Latinas and Latinos have emerged as the largest minority group in the United States, and reached majority status in states like California. Consequently, to assess their place in the United States seems timely. This course examines some of the central themes that shape the diverse experiences of Latino populations in the U.S. At core the course will be guided by the contradiction between what unites Latinos/as in the U.S., such as a shared ethos of latinidad, and what divides them, such as differential access to realms of economic and political power. In this course we will investigate how Latinas/os influence and are, in turn, impacted by histories of imperialism, generational conflict, demographic change, social movements, stratified labor markets, gender/sexuality, mass culture, music, and the global shift to free markets. Students will engage in a critical examination of a wide selection of texts, ranging from anthropological and historical texts to poetry, film, and graphic novels, in an effort to place the experience of diverse Latino populations in the social, political, historical, and interdisciplinary perspectives.
1330:TF   DENNY 103
LALC 200-01 Writing About Literature, Art, and Film, and Current Affairs
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-02. The overarching goal of this course is to introduce students to important aspects of college-level academic work, in Spanish: critical thinking, effective writing, careful reading, and engaged discussion. In reading, writing, and discussion, we will focus on the concept of argument and the construction and communication of effective arguments, in Spanish, departing from Latin American literature, art and film, as well as current affairs, to develop the ability to recognize and critique the arguments of others and to formulate and defend their own arguments based on logical thinking and evidence. This particular course has been designed with some specific ideas in mind: through Latin American literature, film and art, we will address the following questions: Who am I? What can I know? and How shall I live?, emphasizing our place in this world and the civic responsibilities we have towards the society we share with others.
0900:TR   LIBRY E. ASIAN
LALC 200-02 Writing About Literature, Art, and Film, and Current Affairs
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-03. The overarching goal of this course is to introduce students to important aspects of college-level academic work, in Spanish: critical thinking, effective writing, careful reading, and engaged discussion. In reading, writing, and discussion, we will focus on the concept of argument and the construction and communication of effective arguments, in Spanish, departing from Latin American literature, art and film, as well as current affairs, to develop the ability to recognize and critique the arguments of others and to formulate and defend their own arguments based on logical thinking and evidence. This particular course has been designed with some specific ideas in mind: through Latin American literature, film and art, we will address the following questions: Who am I? What can I know? and How shall I live?, emphasizing our place in this world and the civic responsibilities we have towards the society we share with others.
1030:TR   LIBRY E. ASIAN
LALC 200-03 Framing the Marginal I/Eye
Instructor: Amaury Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 210-02 and SPAN 231-01. How is the marginal I/Eye fashioned and embodied in its encounter with power and other individuals? In what ways does the I/Eye serve as an organizing principle around which tactics and strategies of resistance, revolt, and social justice are mobilized? In this course, we will explore the different ways individuals go about occupying that I/Eye, how they maintain and/or challenge it, and how they are compelled and/or inspired to present it to themselves and those around them. Our primary objects of study will be texts produced in Spain, Latin America, and the Caribbean, and the visual reproductions carried out by film directors from these regions as well as from the United States. On one hand, our conversations will center on the historical, cultural, political space marginal writers, artists, activists occupied and the I-texts they composed. On the other, our discussions will assess the cinematic eye each director crafted in their adaptation and appropriation of the marginal I.
1500:MR   BOSLER 313
LALC 200-04 Social Movements in Latin America
Instructor: Santiago Anria
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-01. Social movements have long played an important role in Latin American politics. This course provides an overview of historical and contemporary social movements, exploring the conditions that facilitate (or inhibit) collective action, the construction of collective identities, the dynamics of social protest, and the political impact of social movements, including their connection with political parties. Readings will cover different theoretical perspectives, different historical periods, and a wide array of old and new social movements, including, among others, indigenous peoples movements, womens movements, and movements representing unemployed workers and the urban poor. Special attention will be given to the impact of democratization, market liberalization, and the regions Left turn on diverse types of social actors.
1330:TF   DENNY 211
LALC 200-06 Monsters and Other Worlds. Tales and Themes of the Supernatural through Women’s Narratives
Instructor: Antonio Rivas Bonillo
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-04 and WGSS 201-02.The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. This course will focus on stories, films, and other cultural artifacts that explore alternative representations of reality, with special emphasis on those created by women artists and on their challenge of the stereotyping of female characters and roles. During the semester, we will analyze works by Silvina Ocampo, Cristina Fernndez Cubas, Patricia Esteban Erls, Julio Cortzar, Remedios Varo, and Guillermo del Toro (among others). Students will learn about social, political, and cultural contexts necessary to illuminate themes and contexts related to the different course materials and to shape critical responses to works in the fantastic genre. Among other questions, the course will seek to understand how the different types of fantasy work, why writers explore horror and fear, and what lies behind the creation of monsters and supernatural entities. A special emphasis of the course will be the work of women authors. Traditionally overlooked, women writers, painters, and directors have contributed significantly to the development of the fantastic genre; one of the goals of this class, therefore, will be to explore and study these contributions. Among other issues, discussions, activities, and writing assignments will deal with the stereotyping female characters and their roles in fantastic fiction as well as how these conventional tropes have been challenged by women creators. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work.
1330:MR   BOSLER 214
LALC 200-07 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 305-01.
1330:TF   LIBRY ALDEN
LALC 200-08 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 305-02.
1330:MR   BOSLER 309
LALC 200-09 Portuguese Conversation and Composition
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PORT 231-01.
1330:MR   BOSLER 321
LALC 239-01 Spanish for the Health Professions
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 239-01. This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or above, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 239.
1230:MWF   BOSLER 319
LALC 385-01 Home, the Streets, Borders: Examining Tropes of Latino/a Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 310-01 and SPAN 385-01. This course examines the production and cultural meaning of Latino/a cinema. In particular, we will focus on how film represents space in relation to the spatial imaginary of Latino/a communities. As we study the reinforcement and subversion of stereotyping in cinema, we will reflect on how transcultural subjects negotiate space and border crossings. Students will further develop research skills; develop advanced awareness of how film may be used to represent, interpret, and influence experience; and put their voices in conversation with other scholars in their written assignments. In addition to reading critical and literary texts, students will be asked to view films outside of class. The course will be taught in English with a Spanish FLIC option.
1500:MR   BOSLER 314
LALC 390-01 Haití y el Caribe hispanohabla
Instructor: Mariana Past
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 410-01.This seminar explores cultural production (in Spanish) from Haiti and Spanish-speaking Caribbean countries with the goal of situating the worlds first black republic within the region, examining historical commonalities and considering divergent identity narratives (particular emphasis will be placed on twentieth-century works). How and why has Haitis revolutionary past been broadly deployed? How does narrative help shape national imaginaries, including categories of race, culture, and gender?
1330:W   BOSLER 314
LALC 490-01 Latin American, Latino and Caribbean Studies Senior Research Seminar
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.
1500:M   BOSLER 321
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-04 Introduction to Latino Studies
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 123-01. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Latinas and Latinos have emerged as the largest minority group in the United States, and reached majority status in states like California. Consequently, to assess their place in the United States seems timely. This course examines some of the central themes that shape the diverse experiences of Latino populations in the U.S. At core the course will be guided by the contradiction between what unites Latinos/as in the U.S., such as a shared ethos of latinidad, and what divides them, such as differential access to realms of economic and political power. In this course we will investigate how Latinas/os influence and are, in turn, impacted by histories of imperialism, generational conflict, demographic change, social movements, stratified labor markets, gender/sexuality, mass culture, music, and the global shift to free markets. Students will engage in a critical examination of a wide selection of texts, ranging from anthropological and historical texts to poetry, film, and graphic novels, in an effort to place the experience of diverse Latino populations in the social, political, historical, and interdisciplinary perspectives.
1330:TF   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in FMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FMST 210-02 Framing the Marginal I/Eye
Instructor: Amaury Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-03 and SPAN 231-01. How is the marginal I/Eye fashioned and embodied in its encounter with power and other individuals? In what ways does the I/Eye serve as an organizing principle around which tactics and strategies of resistance, revolt, and social justice are mobilized? In this course, we will explore the different ways individuals go about occupying that I/Eye, how they maintain and/or challenge it, and how they are compelled and/or inspired to present it to themselves and those around them. Our primary objects of study will be texts produced in Spain, Latin America, and the Caribbean, and the visual reproductions carried out by film directors from these regions as well as from the United States. On one hand, our conversations will center on the historical, cultural, political space marginal writers, artists, activists occupied and the I-texts they composed. On the other, our discussions will assess the cinematic eye each director crafted in their adaptation and appropriation of the marginal I.
1500:MR   BOSLER 313
FMST 310-01 Home, the Streets, Borders: Examining Tropes of Latino/a Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 385-01 and SPAN 385-01. This course examines the production and cultural meaning of Latino/a cinema. In particular, we will focus on how film represents space in relation to the spatial imaginary of Latino/a communities. As we study the reinforcement and subversion of stereotyping in cinema, we will reflect on how transcultural subjects negotiate space and border crossings. Students will further develop research skills; develop advanced awareness of how film may be used to represent, interpret, and influence experience; and put their voices in conversation with other scholars in their written assignments. In addition to reading critical and literary texts, students will be asked to view films outside of class. The course will be taught in English with a Spanish FLIC option.
1500:MR   BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 290-01 Social Movements in Latin America
Instructor: Santiago Anria
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-04. Social movements have long played an important role in Latin American politics. This course provides an overview of historical and contemporary social movements, exploring the conditions that facilitate (or inhibit) collective action, the construction of collective identities, the dynamics of social protest, and the political impact of social movements, including their connection with political parties. Readings will cover different theoretical perspectives, different historical periods, and a wide array of old and new social movements, including, among others, indigenous peoples movements, womens movements, and movements representing unemployed workers and the urban poor. Special attention will be given to the impact of democratization, market liberalization, and the regions Left turn on diverse types of social actors.
1330:TF   DENNY 211
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-01 Framing the Marginal I/Eye
Instructor: Amaury Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 220-03 and FMST 210-02. How is the marginal I/Eye fashioned and embodied in its encounter with power and other individuals? In what ways does the I/Eye serve as an organizing principle around which tactics and strategies of resistance, revolt, and social justice are mobilized? In this course, we will explore the different ways individuals go about occupying that I/Eye, how they maintain and/or challenge it, and how they are compelled and/or inspired to present it to themselves and those around them. Our primary objects of study will be texts produced in Spain, Latin America, and the Caribbean, and the visual reproductions carried out by film directors from these regions as well as from the United States. On one hand, our conversations will center on the historical, cultural, political space marginal writers, artists, activists occupied and the I-texts they composed. On the other, our discussions will assess the cinematic eye each director crafted in their adaptation and appropriation of the marginal I.
1500:MR   BOSLER 313
SPAN 231-02 Writing About Literature, Art, and Film, and Current Affairs
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-01. The overarching goal of this course is to introduce students to important aspects of college-level academic work, in Spanish: critical thinking, effective writing, careful reading, and engaged discussion. In reading, writing, and discussion, we will focus on the concept of argument and the construction and communication of effective arguments, in Spanish, departing from Latin American literature, art and film, as well as current affairs, to develop the ability to recognize and critique the arguments of others and to formulate and defend their own arguments based on logical thinking and evidence. This particular course has been designed with some specific ideas in mind: through Latin American literature, film and art, we will address the following questions: Who am I? What can I know? and How shall I live?, emphasizing our place in this world and the civic responsibilities we have towards the society we share with others.
0900:TR   LIBRY E. ASIAN
SPAN 231-03 Writing About Literature, Art, and Film, and Current Affairs
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC-200-02. The overarching goal of this course is to introduce students to important aspects of college-level academic work, in Spanish: critical thinking, effective writing, careful reading, and engaged discussion. In reading, writing, and discussion, we will focus on the concept of argument and the construction and communication of effective arguments, in Spanish, departing from Latin American literature, art and film, as well as current affairs, to develop the ability to recognize and critique the arguments of others and to formulate and defend their own arguments based on logical thinking and evidence. This particular course has been designed with some specific ideas in mind: through Latin American literature, film and art, we will address the following questions: Who am I? What can I know? and How shall I live?, emphasizing our place in this world and the civic responsibilities we have towards the society we share with others.
1030:TR   LIBRY E. ASIAN
SPAN 231-04 Monsters and Other Worlds. Tales and Themes of the Supernatural through Women’s Narratives
Instructor: Antonio Rivas Bonillo
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-06 and WGSS 201-02.The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. This course will focus on stories, films, and other cultural artifacts that explore alternative representations of reality. During the semester, we will analyze works by Silvina Ocampo, Cristina Fernndez Cubas, Patricia Esteban Erls, Julio Cortzar, Remedios Varo, and Guillermo del Toro (among others). Students will learn about social, political, and cultural contexts necessary to illuminate themes and contexts related to the different course materials and to shape critical responses to works in the fantastic genre. Among other questions, the course will seek to understand how the different types of fantasy work, why writers explore horror and fear, and what lies behind the creation of monsters and supernatural entities. A special emphasis of the course will be the work of women authors. Traditionally overlooked, women writers, painters, and directors have contributed significantly to the development of the fantastic genre; one of the goals of this class, therefore, will be to explore and study these contributions. Among other issues, discussions, activities, and writing assignments will deal with the stereotyping female characters and their roles in fantastic fiction as well as how these conventional tropes have been challenged by women creators. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work.
1330:MR   BOSLER 214
SPAN 385-01 Home, the Streets, Borders: Examining Tropes of Latino/a Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 310-01 and LALC 385-01. This course examines the production and cultural meaning of Latino/a cinema. In particular, we will focus on how film represents space in relation to the spatial imaginary of Latino/a communities. As we study the reinforcement and subversion of stereotyping in cinema, we will reflect on how transcultural subjects negotiate space and border crossings. Students will further develop research skills; develop advanced awareness of how film may be used to represent, interpret, and influence experience; and put their voices in conversation with other scholars in their written assignments. In addition to reading critical and literary texts, students will be asked to view films outside of class. The course will be taught in English with a Spanish FLIC option.
1500:MR   BOSLER 314
SPAN 410-01 Haití y el Caribe hispanohabla
Instructor: Mariana Past
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 390-01.This seminar explores cultural production (in Spanish) from Haiti and Spanish-speaking Caribbean countries with the goal of situating the worlds first black republic within the region, examining historical commonalities and considering divergent identity narratives (particular emphasis will be placed on twentieth-century works). How and why has Haitis revolutionary past been broadly deployed? How does narrative help shape national imaginaries, including categories of race, culture, and gender?
1330:W   BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in WGSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 201-02 Monsters and Other Worlds. Tales and Themes of the Supernatural through Women’s Narratives
Instructor: Antonio Rivas Bonillo
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-04 and LALC 200-06.The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. This course will focus on stories, films, and other cultural artifacts that explore alternative representations of reality, with special emphasis on those created by women artists and on their challenge of the stereotyping of female characters and roles. During the semester, we will analyze works by Silvina Ocampo, Cristina Fernndez Cubas, Patricia Esteban Erls, Julio Cortzar, Remedios Varo, and Guillermo del Toro (among others). Students will learn about social, political, and cultural contexts necessary to illuminate themes and contexts related to the different course materials and to shape critical responses to works in the fantastic genre. Among other questions, the course will seek to understand how the different types of fantasy work, why writers explore horror and fear, and what lies behind the creation of monsters and supernatural entities. A special emphasis of the course will be the work of women authors. Traditionally overlooked, women writers, painters, and directors have contributed significantly to the development of the fantastic genre; one of the goals of this class, therefore, will be to explore and study these contributions. Among other issues, discussions, activities, and writing assignments will deal with the stereotyping female characters and their roles in fantastic fiction as well as how these conventional tropes have been challenged by women creators. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work.
1330:MR   BOSLER 214