Fall 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 123-01 Latinx Studies
Instructor: Jed Kuhn
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-01.Who are Latinxs? At nearly 20% of the population (and growing), Latinxs comprise the largest minority group in the United States. Despite this large number, however, U.S. popular discourse about Latinxs continues to be plagued by assumptions, stereotypes, and misunderstandings. For instance, not all Latinxs speak Spanish, not all Latinxs are immigrants, and not all Latinxs like or would even use the term Latinx. Through an interdisciplinary approach to Latinx histories, cultures, and politics, this course introduces students to the breadth and diversity of Latinx experiences in the United States as well as to Latinx Studies as a site of scholarly inquiry. While Latinx presence in the United States is a story of im/migration, it is also a story of overlapping histories of colonization, U.S. imperial expansion, and U.S. intervention into Latin America. Major topics in this course may include the politics of labeling; race, racialization, and ethnicity; borders and borderlands, including recent events at the U.S.-Mexico border; cultural change, assimilation, and resilience; gender and sexuality; and popular culture and representation. In addition to helping us better understand the experiences of Latinxs in the United States, this course asks how Latinx experiences and Latinx Studies can help us better understand America.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 311
LALC 239-01 Spanish for the Health Professions
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 239-01.Permission of Instructor Required. This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or above, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 239.
12:30 PM-01:20 PM, MWF
BOSLER 319
LALC 251-01 Latin American Government and Politics
Instructor: Craig Lang
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 251-01. An introduction to the politics of contemporary Latin America. Emphasis is placed upon the varied political institutional responses to socio-economic change in the Americas. Major countries to be analyzed include Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Cuba. Prerequisite: one course in political science or Latin American, Latinx and Caribbean Studies. This course is cross-listed as POSC 251.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 104
LALC 283-01 Latin American-U.S. Relations
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 283-01. A study of political, economic, and cultural relations between Latin America and the United States from the early 19th century to the present. The evolution of inter-American relations is analyzed in light of the interplay of Latin American, U.S., and extra-hemispheric interests. This course is cross-listed as HIST 283.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TR
EASTC 314
LALC 285-01 Natural Disasters and Tropical Paradises: Fictions of the Contemporary Caribbean
Instructor: Mariana Past
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-01, AFST 310-01 and ENGL 321-03.This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly natural disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
BOSLER 314
LALC 300-01 Artists Against the System
Instructor: Mark Aldrich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-02.There have always been rebel artists. In this course we will explore several cases (studying both texts and contexts) in the Spanish-speaking world of artists who through their work have fought censorship and other forms of oppression. We will study primarily works of literature, but will also consider examples of visual and performing art works that have received politicized receptions. Taught in Spanish.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
BOSLER 314
LALC 300-02 Foundational Colonial Latin American Narratives
Instructor: Andrea Lopez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-03.Explores some of the significant texts, history and culture of colonial Latin America.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 201
LALC 300-03 Ethics in Latin American Literature and Film
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 299-01. The goal of this course is to introduce students to techniques and/or approaches to read and interpret a variety of texts (literature, film, art, photography, music, etc.), while developing the necessary skills in the field to examine discourses, analyze arguments, and construct and defend arguments of their own, orally and in writing. Depending on the professor, this introduction to reading and analyzing different texts may focus on historical, social, cultural, political, methodological, and/or aesthetic contexts, through an interdisciplinary approach. Prerequisite: 231.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 314
LALC 390-01 Senior Research Seminar
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 401-01.Permission of instructor required.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
LIBRY E. ASIAN
LALC 490-01 Latin American, Latinx and Caribbean Studies Senior Research Seminar
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for 1.0 credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for .50 credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, M
DENNY 315
LALC 500-01 Gender and Health among Ecuadorians
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
Course Description:

LALC 500-02 Conflict and Memory in Latin American Cities
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:

LALC 500-03 Analyzing Radical Black Feminism in the Work of Carolina Maria de Jesus
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:

Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 310-01 Natural Disasters and Tropical Paradises: Fictions of the Contemporary Caribbean
Instructor: Mariana Past
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-01, LALC 285-01 and ENGL 321-03.This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly natural disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-01 Latinx Studies
Instructor: Jed Kuhn
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 123-01.Who are Latinxs? At nearly 20% of the population (and growing), Latinxs comprise the largest minority group in the United States. Despite this large number, however, U.S. popular discourse about Latinxs continues to be plagued by assumptions, stereotypes, and misunderstandings. For instance, not all Latinxs speak Spanish, not all Latinxs are immigrants, and not all Latinxs like or would even use the term Latinx. Through an interdisciplinary approach to Latinx histories, cultures, and politics, this course introduces students to the breadth and diversity of Latinx experiences in the United States as well as to Latinx Studies as a site of scholarly inquiry. While Latinx presence in the United States is a story of im/migration, it is also a story of overlapping histories of colonization, U.S. imperial expansion, and U.S. intervention into Latin America. Major topics in this course may include the politics of labeling; race, racialization, and ethnicity; borders and borderlands, including recent events at the U.S.-Mexico border; cultural change, assimilation, and resilience; gender and sexuality; and popular culture and representation. In addition to helping us better understand the experiences of Latinxs in the United States, this course asks how Latinx experiences and Latinx Studies can help us better understand America.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 311
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 321-03 Natural Disasters and Tropical Paradises: Fictions of the Contemporary Caribbean
Instructor: Mariana Past
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 285-01, AFST 310-01 and SPAN 380-01.This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly natural disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in FMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FMST 210-02 Framing the Marginalized I/Eye
Instructor: Amaury Leopoldo Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-02.In this course, we unpack autobiographical accounts composed by marginalized writers, artists, and activists from the Caribbean, Latin America, Spain, and the United States. At the same time, we examine a variety of visual adaptations of these marginalized figures. In comparing these representations, we ask the following. What are the ethical negotiations that portraying ones life or that of another require? What rhetorical and visual techniques do these individuals use to frame their narratives? What does this framing include and exclude, and what is the relation between this inside and outside? Lastly, what do these different versions of self and other reveal about the cultural, historical, and political moment of their creation? Throughout, we address these questions in our analysis of the pcaro (trickster), Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz, Frida Kahlo, Reinaldo Arenas, Rigoberta Mench, Madame Sat, Pedro Lemebel, and others. Taught in Spanish.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
BOSLER 214
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 283-01 Latin American-U.S. Relations
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 283-01. A study of political, economic, and cultural relations between Latin America and the United States from the early 19th century to the present. The evolution of inter-American relations is analyzed in light of the interplay of Latin American, U.S., and extra-hemispheric interests. This course is cross-listed as LALC 283.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TR
EASTC 314
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 251-01 Latin American Government and Politics
Instructor: Craig Lang
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 251-01. An introduction to the politics of contemporary Latin America. Emphasis is placed upon the varied political institutional responses to socio-economic change in the Americas. Major countries to be analyzed include Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Cuba. Prerequisite: one course in political science or Latin American, Latinx and Caribbean Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 251.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 104
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-02 Framing the Marginalized I/Eye
Instructor: Amaury Leopoldo Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 210-02.In this course, we unpack autobiographical accounts composed by marginalized writers, artists, and activists from the Caribbean, Latin America, Spain, and the United States. At the same time, we examine a variety of visual adaptations of these marginalized figures. In comparing these representations, we ask the following. What are the ethical negotiations that portraying ones life or that of another require? What rhetorical and visual techniques do these individuals use to frame their narratives? What does this framing include and exclude, and what is the relation between this inside and outside? Lastly, what do these different versions of self and other reveal about the cultural, historical, and political moment of their creation? Throughout, we address these questions in our analysis of the pcaro (trickster), Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz, Frida Kahlo, Reinaldo Arenas, Rigoberta Mench, Madame Sat, Pedro Lemebel, and others.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
BOSLER 214
SPAN 239-01 Spanish for the Health Professions
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC-239-01.Permission of Instructor Required. This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. Prerequisite: 202 or 205. This course is cross-listed as LALC 239.
12:30 PM-01:20 PM, MWF
BOSLER 319
SPAN 299-01 Ethics in Latin American Literature and Film
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-03.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 314
SPAN 380-01 Natural Disasters and Tropical Paradises: Fictions of the Contemporary Caribbean
Instructor: Mariana Past
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 285-01, AFST 310-01 and ENGL 321-03.This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly natural disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
BOSLER 314
SPAN 380-02 Artists Against the System
Instructor: Mark Aldrich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01.There have always been rebel artists. In this course we will explore several cases (studying both texts and contexts) in the Spanish-speaking world of artists who through their work have fought censorship and other forms of oppression. We will study primarily works of literature, but will also consider examples of visual and performing art works that have received politicized receptions. Taught in Spanish.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
BOSLER 314
SPAN 380-03 Foundational Colonial Latin American Narratives
Instructor: Andrea Lopez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-02.This course will examine major themes and ideas from a group of colonial texts that became the foundations of the Latin American literary tradition. Students will analyze the rhetorical strategies and negotiations with the colonial order of a diverse group of writers, including conquistadors, indigenous peoples, mixed-raced, and creoles. The analysis will focus on themes such as the development of the idea of America, the polemics about the faculties of indigenous populations, the process of mestizaje [miscegenation], and the acculturation and resistance of indigenous peoples in terms of languages, traditions, and beliefs. Furthermore, the course will include discussions on the continuity and evolution of these themes in later Latin American fiction. Readings will include Cristobal Colns diaries, and chronicles by Bartolom de las Casas, Felipe Guamn Poma de Ayala, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxchitl, and Carlos de Sigenza y Gngora, among others.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 201
SPAN 401-01 Senior Research Seminar
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 390-01.Permission of instructor required. Students will work on a semi-independent basis along with the professor on a focused research project. Students will choose a research project that investigates a particular aspect of Hispanic or Luso-Brazilian studies. Students will be required to submit regularly scheduled progress reports and will participate in discussions on research strategies, the writing process, and peer review of their writing. Students will be required to present their research at various stages. The culmination of this course will be a research paper that may serve as a launching pad for the Honors Thesis in the spring semester. Offered regularly in the fall and occasionally in spring semesters. Students may write their papers in Spanish or English, depending on their priorities and interests.Prerequisite: SPAN 299, two 300-level courses, and permission of the professor based on the professors advanced approval of the students topic. This course is cross-listed as LALC 390.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
LIBRY E. ASIAN