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Faculty Profile

Eric Vazquez

Assistant Professor of American Studies (2015)

Contact Information

vazquez@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 19
717.254.8334
http://www.ericvazquezphd.com

Bio

Eric Vázquez specializes on U.S. Latinx and Transnational American studies. His research interests include U.S. relations with Central America, warfare and culture, undocumented immigration, social solidarities, and cultures of capitalism. His courses focus on the comparative cultures, aesthetics, and politics of marginalized communities.

Education

  • B.A., Kenyon College, 2003
  • Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 2015

2019-2020 Academic Year

Fall 2019

AMST 101 War Narratives
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-06.Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been defined by a feeling of endlessness. In spite of the drawing down of troops from both nations, the war on terror would seem to hurtle on into the future. Considering the difficulty of public reckoning with a war whose conclusion may be unimaginable we will examine three wars characterized by overextension. In the Vietnam War, Central America's counterinsurgency wars, and the War on Terror, the American public shared an overextended experience of war either in terms of the duration of war and also as an effect of the commitment required to fight them. As a class, we will access the felt experiences of prolonged war through narrative—novels, films, testimonies, and other media forms. More specifically, we will look to works like Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket, Joe Rodriguez's The Oddsplayer, George Cosmatos Rambo: First Blood Part II, Horacio Castellanos-Moya's Senselessness, Tom Junod's "The Falling Man," and Roy Scranton's War Porn. Of these sources, we will ask, what does it mean to live with a war that has no limits or boundaries? How do storytellers manage the difficulty of capturing all-encompassing destruction, an enemy who is largely invisible, or experiences that do not match the national narrative about the war? How do the experiences non-normative sexuality and ethnic / racial disenfranchisement affect the mythology that surrounds American wars?

ENGL 101 War Narratives
Cross-listed with AMST 101-03.Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been defined by a feeling of endlessness. In spite of the drawing down of troops from both nations, the war on terror would seem to hurtle on into the future. Considering the difficulty of public reckoning with a war whose conclusion may be unimaginable we will examine three wars characterized by overextension. In the Vietnam War, Central America's counterinsurgency wars, and the War on Terror, the American public shared an overextended experience of war either in terms of the duration of war and also as an effect of the commitment required to fight them. As a class, we will access the felt experiences of prolonged war through narrative—novels, films, testimonies, and other media forms. More specifically, we will look to works like Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket, Joe Rodriguez's The Oddsplayer, George Cosmatos Rambo: First Blood Part II, Horacio Castellanos-Moya's Senselessness, Tom Junod's "The Falling Man," and Roy Scranton's War Porn. Of these sources, we will ask, what does it mean to live with a war that has no limits or boundaries? How do storytellers manage the difficulty of capturing all-encompassing destruction, an enemy who is largely invisible, or experiences that do not match the national narrative about the war? How do the experiences non-normative sexuality and ethnic / racial disenfranchisement affect the mythology that surrounds American wars?

LALC 123 Introduction to Latino Studies
Cross-listed with AMST 200-04. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Latinas and Latinos have emerged as the largest minority group in the United States, and reached majority status in states like California. Consequently, to assess their place in the United States seems timely. This course examines some of the central themes that shape the diverse experiences of Latino populations in the U.S. At core the course will be guided by the contradiction between what unites Latinos/as in the U.S., such as a shared ethos of latinidad, and what divides them, such as differential access to realms of economic and political power. In this course we will investigate how Latinas/os influence and are, in turn, impacted by histories of imperialism, generational conflict, demographic change, social movements, stratified labor markets, gender/sexuality, mass culture, music, and the global shift to free markets. Students will engage in a critical examination of a wide selection of texts, ranging from anthropological and historical texts to poetry, film, and graphic novels, in an effort to place the experience of diverse Latino populations in the social, political, historical, and interdisciplinary perspectives.

AMST 200 Introduction to Latino Studies
Cross-listed with LALC 123-01. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Latinas and Latinos have emerged as the largest minority group in the United States, and reached majority status in states like California. Consequently, to assess their place in the United States seems timely. This course examines some of the central themes that shape the diverse experiences of Latino populations in the U.S. At core the course will be guided by the contradiction between what unites Latinos/as in the U.S., such as a shared ethos of latinidad, and what divides them, such as differential access to realms of economic and political power. In this course we will investigate how Latinas/os influence and are, in turn, impacted by histories of imperialism, generational conflict, demographic change, social movements, stratified labor markets, gender/sexuality, mass culture, music, and the global shift to free markets. Students will engage in a critical examination of a wide selection of texts, ranging from anthropological and historical texts to poetry, film, and graphic novels, in an effort to place the experience of diverse Latino populations in the social, political, historical, and interdisciplinary perspectives.

AMST 202 Workshop in Cultural Analysis
Intensive workshop focused on theoretical approaches to the interpretation of social and cultural materials. The course provides an early exposure to theories and methods that will be returned to in greater depth in the senior year. Intended to develop independent skills in analysis of primary texts and documents.