Skip To Content Skip To Menu Skip To Footer
Coronavirus Update

Dickinson has made the decision to move classes online for the rest of the semester. The campus is not open to visitors until further notice.

Additional Information.


Faculty Profile

Eric Vazquez

Assistant Professor of American Studies (2015)

Contact Information

vazquez@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 19
717.254.8334
http://www.ericvazquezphd.com

Bio

Eric Vázquez specializes on U.S. Latinx and Transnational American studies. His research interests include U.S. relations with Central America, warfare and culture, undocumented immigration, social solidarities, and cultures of capitalism. His courses focus on the comparative cultures, aesthetics, and politics of marginalized communities.

Education

  • B.A., Kenyon College, 2003
  • Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 2015

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

AMST 200 The Literature of Money
Cross-listed with ENGL 222-02. The 2007 crisis is thought to have laid to rest widespread assumptions about the ceaseless abundance of financial markets. This faith, it has been argued, is built on fantasies of infinitely compounding abstractions that wager on hypothetical futures and turbulent risk. Fantasies, futures, and abstractions also describe the cultural function of literary texts. This course will examine not only how American literature represents practices like speculation and efforts to monetize risk, but also investigate literature and finance's common practice of producing fictions through an analysis of narrative: novels, film, and other forms of storytelling. Class will begin by examining 19th century novels about land and commodity speculation, but the majority of class will be devoted to literature composed in or about the 1980s and 90s, when financial capitalism is thought to have hit its apex. Fulfills AMST Representation or AMST Structures and Institutions. Cannot fulfill both.

AMST 201 Intro to American Studies
Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of United States and hemispheric cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.

ENGL 222 The Literature of Money
Cross-listed with AMST 200-01. The 2007 crisis is thought to have laid to rest widespread assumptions about the ceaseless abundance of financial markets. This faith, it has been argued, is built on fantasies of infinitely compounding abstractions that wager on hypothetical futures and turbulent risk. Fantasies, futures, and abstractions also describe the cultural function of literary texts. This course will examine not only how American literature represents practices like speculation and efforts to monetize risk, but also investigate literature and finance's common practice of producing fictions through an analysis of narrative: novels, film, and other forms of storytelling. Class will begin by examining 19th century novels about land and commodity speculation, but the majority of class will be devoted to literature composed in or about the 1980s and 90s, when financial capitalism is thought to have hit its apex. Fulfills AMST Representation or AMST Structures and Institutions. Cannot fulfill both.