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Faculty Profile

Nicoletta Marini Maio

(she/her/hers)Professor of Italian and Film Studies (2007)

Contact Information

marinin@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 219
717.245.1592
http://blogs.dickinson.edu/marinin/

Bio

Professor Marini-Maio completed her Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in Italian cinema. She is the Editor of the international open-access peer reviewed journal gender/sexuality/italy. Her main fields of research are film studies, Italian cinema, and theater, particularly the intersections between politics, gender, cultural representations, popular culture, the narrative mode, and collective memory. She recently published a book on Silvio Berlusconi in cinema. Her monograph on the representation of left-wing terrorism in Italian film and theatre is near to completion. In addition, she is currently doing research on the "decamerotici," a series of movies inspired by Boccaccio's Decameron produced in Italy in the 1970s, and on "Le Winx," an international comic strip and video series for young girls created in Italy. She has published articles on Italian cinema and theatre, Italian teaching pedagogy, and technology-enhanced language learning. In this areas, she has also co-edited the scholarly volumes "Set the Stage! Teaching Italian through Theater" (Yale University Press, 2009) and "Dramatic Interactions" (Cambridge Scholars, 2011). At Dickinson, she is sharing with her students her passion for film and theater.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.A., University of Perugia, Italy, 1986
  • M.A., University of Rome, 1998
  • M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 2001
  • Ph.D., 2006

2021-2022 Academic Year

Spring 2022

ITAL 231 Read/Writ Contemp Ital Culture
Designed to increase student's awareness of various rhetorical conventions and command of written Italian through analysis and imitation of model texts of a literary and non-literary nature. Two and a half hours classroom and one hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 201 or the equivalent.

FMST 310 Demystifying Mafia Universe
Cross-listed with ITAL 323-01. Mafia is synonymous with organized crime, violence, underworld trafficking, and black market trade. It is identified as a secret organization that operates as a shadow state within a nation. However, due to popular stories and fictional narratives, the term Mafia has become so encrusted with legend and myth that it is difficult to establish its true nature and scope. What does Mafia really mean? How is it related to Southern Italian folklore? How have Italian and American cultural representations of the Mafia converged, diverged, evolved, and/or persisted over the course of the past century? How have the cultural conditions of their production and reception shifted as Italians have ceased to occupy the privileged category of “the immigrant” in the popular American imagination, and as Italy has transitioned from a country of emigration to one of immigration? How has the Mafia evolved from a local organization to a global network in the 21st century, and how has cinema registered this shift? What are the unique origins and challenges of the Italian anti-Mafia resistance? Through an analysis of literary texts and films, this course explores representations of the Mafia in Italian and American film from the 1930s to today. In addition to raising key questions about cultural representation and power (stereotypes; immigration and national identity; racial, gender, and class difference), the course will introduce students to critical analysis of film genres and techniques.

ITAL 323 Demystifying Mafia Universe
Cross-listed with FMST 310-01. Mafia is synonymous with organized crime, violence, underworld trafficking, and black market trade. It is identified as a secret organization that operates as a shadow state within a nation. However, due to popular stories and fictional narratives, the term Mafia has become so encrusted with legend and myth that it is difficult to establish its true nature and scope. What does Mafia really mean? How is it related to Southern Italian folklore? How have Italian and American cultural representations of the Mafia converged, diverged, evolved, and/or persisted over the course of the past century? How have the cultural conditions of their production and reception shifted as Italians have ceased to occupy the privileged category of “the immigrant” in the popular American imagination, and as Italy has transitioned from a country of emigration to one of immigration? How has the Mafia evolved from a local organization to a global network in the 21st century, and how has cinema registered this shift? What are the unique origins and challenges of the Italian anti-Mafia resistance? Through an analysis of literary texts and films, this course explores representations of the Mafia in Italian and American film from the 1930s to today. In addition to raising key questions about cultural representation and power (stereotypes; immigration and national identity; racial, gender, and class difference), the course will introduce students to critical analysis of film genres and techniques.

ITAL 550 Independent Research